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  • 301.
    Rinne, Jenni
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Searching for Authentic Living Through Native Faith: The Maausk Movement in Estonia2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The broad aim of this thesis is twofold: firstly, I contextualise the Maausk movement and its practitioners’ understandings in relation to history and the surrounding society; secondly, I analyse the affective and embodied experiences of being a Maausk practitioner from a phenomenological perspective.

    The thesis focuses on the formation and practice of Maausk, which is perceived to be deeply tied to the society and history where it exists. Relatedly, this study examines how Maausk identity formation and practices have been influenced by the Soviet legacy, romantic nationalism and Estonia’s current economic and political situation.

    In order to analyse the Maausk experiences and narratives, this study draws from various phenomenologically oriented theories of affect, embodiment and emotion, as well as cultural theories of place, identity, tradition and authenticity. I have used economic anthropology and globalisation theories as well as historical studies of Estonia’s Soviet past to contextualise the Maausk movement. Further, to place Maausk in the European religious landscape, this study refers to native faith and Neo-pagan studies.

    Through sensory ethnography, this study draws on the affective and emotional aspects of the research material to analyse how the complexity of emotional experiences of being a Maausk practitioner produces Maausk meanings and values. The study also examines the role and function of the body and emotions during the process of embodying the Maausk practices, both techniques and meanings of the practices.

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    Searching for authentic living through native faith: The Maausk movement in Estonia
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  • 302.
    Rodin, Johnny
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political science.
    Do it yourself urbanism2010In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, E-ISSN 2001-7308, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 18-18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 303.
    Rodin, Johnny
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Political science.
    Kärlek, familj, mammor, barn och hot mot nationen: Den ryska populationsdiskursen2010In: Inblick Östeuropa, ISSN 1404-014X, no 1/2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 304.
    Rodin, Johnny
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Rethinking Russian Federalism: Federal Policies and Intergovernmental Relations From Yeltsin to Putin2008 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 305.
    Rodin, Johnny
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political science.
    Rethinking Russian Federalism: The Politics of Intergovernmental Relations and Federal Reforms at the Turn of the Millenium2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Russia federalism and the design of federal institutions have been greatly debated topics ever since the beginning of the 1990s. When the newly elected Russian president Vladimir Putin introduced a number of federal reforms in May 2000 it represented the culmination of a debate on federalism that had been triggered by the political and economic crisis of 1998. In many ways these reforms entailed a different perspective on federalism, or in the terminology of this thesis a new “federal paradigm”, from the one that had dominated most of the Yeltsin era. At the same time the relations between federal and regional authorities, often referred to as intergovernmental relations, appeared to become less confrontational and fragmented than before. This work examines this latest stage in the Russian state-building process.

    In particular two elements are scrutinized. The first is the shift of federal paradigms that the federal reforms reflected. Combining organisation theory and historical institutionalism it is argued that the origins of federal paradigm shifts often can be traced to the federal system itself. In Russia the failure of the federal system manifested through the political and economic crisis of 1998 changed many governmental actors’ views on federalism. However, it was not until Putin became president that the new federal paradigm could consolidate.

    The second element concerns the connections between the new federal paradigm and the mode of intergovernmental relations. This work presents the argument that the way in which federalism is interpreted and conceptualised by governmental actors is important for the variation of intergovernmental relations across and within federal systems. Deriving from federal theory and some comparisons with other federal systems it is concluded that the federal paradigm that Putin represented in his first presidential term was on the whole more conducive for coordinate intergovernmental relations, at least in the short term.

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  • 306.
    Rodin, Johnny
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Russian Archipelago2004In: Contemporary Change in Russia: In From the Margins? / [ed] Rindzeviciute, Egle, Huddinge: Baltic & East European Graduate School, Södertörns högskola , 2004, p. 95-109Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 307.
    Rodin, Johnny
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Political science.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Vendil-Pallin, Carolina
    Ryssland – att brottas med en stormaktsidentitet2009In: Det nya Östeuropa: stat och nation i förändring / [ed] Fredrika Björklund och Johnny Rodin, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, p. 49-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 308.
    Roos, Lena
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, The Study of Religions.
    Zorya, Kateryna
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, The Study of Religions. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Religionen i krigets skugga: Solidaritet och förstörelse2023Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 309.
    Rönnby, Johan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology. Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Maritime Archaeological Research Institute.
    Törnqvist, Oscar
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Maritime Archaeological Research Institute.
    Forskningsinstitutet MARIS och Baltic Maritime Archaeological PhD research Network2010In: Marinarkeologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 3, p. 4-7Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 310.
    Saar, Maarja
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Reflexivity beyond lifestyle migration: highly skilled Estonian migrantsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 311.
    Saar, Maarja
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The answers you seek will never be found at home: Reflexivity, biographical narratives and lifestyle migration among highly-skilled Estonians2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on issues around reflexivity and highly skilled migration. Reflexivity has been an underused concept in migration studies and incurporating it has been long overdue. By reflexivity this thesis understands the capacity of an actor to evaluate his or her position in relation to social structures, to take action in managing those structures and, finally, to critically revise both the position and action taken.

    There are multiple reasons as to why incorporating reflexivity is a useful endeavor to migration studies. On one hand, using reflexive types in order to understand different migration motivations offers an alternative to otherwise mainly class based explanations behind migration objectives. Migration research has long relied on the idea that migration motivations can be coupled with societal and class background. Similarly, return migration has been described almost unanimously as a result of a homing desire. Both positions, as claimed in this thesis, are oversimplifications. On the other hand, I argue that, reflexivity helps to analyze the importance of class or even society on migration in 21th century. This is why I suggest to analyze all three in concurrence – migration, reflexivity and class.

    In the following pages I analyze how reflexivity can be operationalized for studying migration. So far, reflexivity has been either used as background concept – mobility studies or for explaining particular kind of migration – lifestyle migration. I argue, that with careful operationalization reflexivity could be useful tool for explaining wide-variety of migrations – family, labour, lifestyle etc. Three articles in this thesis focus on providing such operationalizations, analyzing the relationship between migration motivations and reflexivity. Finally, the first article in this thesis analyzes the background of my particular group of migrants – Estonian highly skilled migrants and positions them in relation to other groups in Estonian society. Moreover, the article also underlines that self-development and lifestyle, if you will, is an important motivation for Eastern European migrants as well.

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    The answers you seek will never be found at home: Reflexivity, biographical narratives and lifestyle migration among highly-skilled Estonians
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  • 312.
    Saar, Maarja
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Using reflexivity to explain variations in migration among highly-skilled2019In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 688-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Migration literature has traditionally distinguished between different motivations of migration, such as labour, family and newly also lifestyle migration, never fully exploring the background of these motivations. This article suggests that these different motivations may be explained by different modes of reflexivity as distinguished by Margaret Archer. Linking modes of reflexivity with migration motivations addresses two problems in current migration literature. First, it provides for practical application of reflexivity in explaining migration motivations, which has been missing so far. Second, the article advocates using psycho-social approach as opposed to more commonly adapted ethnical or class based explanations in understanding migration behavior, hence avoiding the potential trap of falling into the trap of methodological nationalism or classism. Through the interview with highly-skilled Estonian migrants it is shown that the reasons of migration among highly skilled are versatile and cannot be explained solely by their class background.

  • 313.
    Sandén, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Digital School Administration (DSA): productive, destructive or irrelevant?2020In: Contemporary Issues in European Educational Leadership / [ed] Roman Dorczak; Robin Precey, Krakow: Jagiellonian University Press, 2020, p. 37-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents accounts regarding Digital School Administration (DSA) from Polish and Swedish principals and analyse them from a conceptual and a contextual perspective. The accounts were categorized in productive, destructive or irrelevant representations of impact on schools, and first analysed using concepts from a Human Service Organization (HSO) perspective; professional capital, entrepreneurial role and decoupling. From this first analysis, a counter-intuitive rather than straightforward pattern between the principals’ native view and the conceptual view is made visible. The second round of analysis was based on the context of the principals, comparing features of the Polish and Swedish school systems, and relating these features to the results of previous analysis. The article concludes that school system marketization and whether principals teach themselves are key factors for if DSA works productive, destructive or irrelevant for schools.

  • 314.
    Sandén, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Närbyråkrater och digitaliseringar: Hur lärares arbete formas av tidsstrukturer2021Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation contributes to street-level and public administration research by showing how digitalisations bring temporal structures for street-level bureaucrats, and what consequences that has. It analyses what digitalisation(s) means, and what consequences it has in public sector street-level work. ‘Digitalisation’ is seen as a solution that aims to resolve various problems in the Swedish public administration. This is especially prominent in the Swedish school system, which therefore serves as the empirical context of the study. Despite the hope for digitalisation to solve problems, the term is unspecific in general public policy, the Swedish school context and in public administration research. To address that uncertainty, this dissertation lets teachers define what digitalisation means. From using this approach, four dimensions has emerged: social media use; Learning Management Systems (LMS, tools for administration, documentation and communication); digital teaching practices (one-on-one, learning programs, remote teaching and digital teaching materials) and digitalisation as management tools at organisational and political level. The empirical analysis shows how these different types of digitalisations impact teachers work in various respects. In street-level research on digitalisation, it is acknowledged that digitalisation shape work in various ways. However, few studies deal with digitalisations’ temporal aspects. Time is generally regarded as a fixed and objective phenomenon in the stream of research that address temporality in street-level work. It is remarkable how little attention temporal aspects have received, despite calls within the broader paradigm of public administration research to consider time to a greater extent. A theory of social acceleration is used to analyse digitalisations from a temporal perspective. A benefit from using such a perspective is that the subjective experience of time is acknowledged. The theoretical analysis shows how digitalisations bring both accelerating and decelerating mechanisms that are connected with processes of alienation and coping for street-level bureaucrats. The border between alienation and coping is however quite blurred and together with an intertwined web of temporal structures, this creates a dissociated situation for street-level bureaucrats.

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    Närbyråkrater och digitaliseringar: Hur lärares arbete formas av tidsstrukturer
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  • 315.
    Seits, Irina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Aesthetics. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Architectures of Life-Building in the Twentieth Century: Russia, Germany, Sweden2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The modernist concept of life-building as an architectural method for improving the conditions of everyday life originated in Europe during the 1920s. This book explores three modes of functionalism by way of a comparative analysis of both the theoretical discourses and architectural practices associated with functionalism in Russia, Germany, and Sweden. These three countries made significant contributions to the application of functionalism within mass housing construction, the overarching purpose of which was to transform the traditional home into a rational living space.

    This study provides both close readings of foundational modernist texts as well as an empirical study of the avant-garde heritage in Russia, Germany, and Sweden. As a special case study, a visual analysis of IKEA catalogues is presented, the purpose of which is to provide an illustrated history of modernist aesthetics within mass-produced living spaces, from the era of functionalism up to the present day.

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    Architectures of Life-Building in the Twentieth Century: Russia, Germany, Sweden
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  • 316.
    Seits, Irina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Aesthetics. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Invisible avant-garde and absent revolution: Walter Benjamin's new optics for moscow urban space of the 1920s2018In: Actual Problems of Theory and History of Art, ISSN 2312-2129, p. 575-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Walter Benjamin spent the fall and winter of 1926-1927 in Moscow. His experience and observations were recorded in “Moscow Diary” and essay “Moscow” (1927). In the present paper, the author refers to the latter text, in which Benjamin reflected on the space of Soviet capital that was undergoing severe transition. Without even mentioning Avant-garde architecture that was being constructed in his presence and that was transforming the living space of the new state on all levels, Benjamin left deep analyses of Moscow's post-revolutionary urban constitution, revealed its nature, and predicted its future. Benjamin came to Moscow to observe the Revolution in action, but could not find it. Instead, he saw Constructivism as already dismissed. While recording those huge transformations that he witnessed during his stay, Benjamin had not described them either in terms of new functionalist architecture, or through the reflection on demolition of Empire's architectural symbols. He turned to other features and spatial dimensions that were not directly related to any particular architecture, such as mobility, rhythm, aura and through which he fully revealed reformation of Moscow space that was initiated by functionalists and supported by the new regime. The “Moscow” essay along with another text that I refer to, “Experience and Poverty” (1933), enable for deeper analyses of Avant-garde aesthetics, of its origin, development and end, which is the major objective of the present article. 

  • 317.
    Seits, Irina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Aesthetics. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Mickey Mouse - the perfect tenant of an early Soviet city2017In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, E-ISSN 2001-7308, Vol. X, no 3, p. 53-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article provides a closer reading of Walter Benjamin’s essays Experience and Poverty and Moscow, by juxtaposing the records of his visit to Russia in 1926–1927 with the author’s reflections on the nature of the transformations in the urban space of an early Soviet city. By using the dystopian image of Mickey Mouse as the desired inhabitant of modernity introduced by Benjamin in Experience and Poverty, Seits gives the allegorical and comparative interpretation to the substantial changes in the living space of Moscow that were witnessed by Walter Benjamin.

  • 318.
    Semenenko, Aleksei
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Hamlet the Sign: Russian Translations of Hamlet and Literary Canon Formation2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work is an attempt to answer one simple question: What is Hamlet? Based on the material of Hamlet translations into Russian, the dissertation scrutinizes the problems of literary canon formation, translation and textuality proceeding in two parallel directions: the historical analysis of canon formation in translation and the conceptualization of Hamlet’s textuality. The methodological framework is defined in the context of Jurij Lotman’s semiotics of culture, which is invaluable for an understanding of the mechanisms of literary evolution, the theory of translation and literary canon formation.

    The study examines the history of Hamlet in Russia from 1748 until the present with special attention to analysis of the canonical translations, theater productions of the Shakespearean classic and the phenomenon of Hamletism. The case study of the 1964 film by Grigorij Kozincev focuses on the problem of the cinematographic canon of Hamlet. Further, the work scrutinizes various types of representation of Hamlet in such semiotic systems as the theater, the cinema, and the pictorial arts, and also examines how Hamlet functions as a specific type of sign.

    The final section returns to the question of canon formation and textuality. The results of the research show that 1) the literary canon appears to be closely associated with the concepts of genre and myth, 2) in order to become canonical it is imperative for a literary text to function on the level of microcanon and to be represented in modes other than the written.

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  • 319.
    Semenenko, Aleksei
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Ėstonskij period Sergeja Dovlatova: ot ‘podeščniny’ do mifotvorčestva2008In: Scando-Slavica, ISSN 0080-6765, E-ISSN 1600-082X, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 32-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aleksei Semenenko: Sergej Dovlatov’s Estonian Period: From “Hackwork” to Myth-Making

    Sergej Dovlatov as journalist is known to the readers as a character in hisbooks, specifically Kompromiss (1981) which is dedicated to his “Estonianperiod.” From 1972 to 1975, Dovlatov had been working as a regular reporterin the Soviet Estonian newspapers in Tallinn – Molodež Ėstonii and SovetskajaĖstonija. However, his actual articles have not been analyzed until now. Thefirst part of this paper is dedicated to the description of Dovlatov’s articlesthat have been published in these newspapers.The second part analyzes the structure of Kompromiss and elucidates themethod of Dovlatov, who constructed his book as a sort of “disclosure of thejournalistic hackwork.” The comparative analysis is used to describe themechanisms of myth-making and the creation of a special type of narrative inDovlatov’s book (“storytelling”). The paper shows how Dovlatov exploits thegenre of anekdot to reveal the phenomena of Soviet reality through grotesqueand ironic discourse.Finally, the paper attempts to elucidate two central strategies in Dovlatov’soeuvre: biography-making by means of literature and mythologization of reality.

  • 320.
    Sherfey, Paul
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Cultivating responsible citizenship: Collective gardens at the periphery of neoliberal urban norms2024Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing human population is concentrating in urban environments across the globe, leading to urban expansion and densification. Consequently, political debates and social movements concerned with urban planning and land use have increased in relevance. Conflicts over urban space arise where people problematise and challenge dominant land-use rationalities, so it follows that one way of critically analysing dominant rationales of urban land use is to examine them in relation to collective action that challenges these norms.

    One example of counternormative practice are collective gardens, a subset of community gardens characterised by collective management and publicly-oriented programming. Because their use of urban land and collective social organisation appear inconsistent with the privatisation and free-market economy of neoliberal capitalism, studying collective gardens has implications for understanding these places as products of political forms of sensemaking, expressing grievances and demands that respond to the dominant political-economic context of contemporary urban life.

    Based on this understanding, this study explores discourses about the political significance of collective gardens as places where alternative norms of urban life are developed. What senses of place can be understood to be nurtured in relation to collective gardens, how does this manifest, and what is conveyed about citizenship and urban life in neoliberal capitalist contexts? These questions are investigated through a political discourse framework, supplemented by discursive theories of aesthetics, narratives, and sensemaking to learn about the meanings attributed to collective gardens as constituted within wider social contexts.

    The aesthetics of collective gardens are explored through multi-sited research at gardens across Germany and Sweden to analyse how urban space is materially reimagined. The study then turns to case studies in both nations to explore narratives – first to understand how local history sets up problems that are solved by the establishment of each garden, then to analyse how they are portrayed in discourses about urban development and social life. The study examines how the social critiques being fostered in these places convey a particular ethos of democratic citizenship, as well as how complex relationships to responsibility create situations where collectives resist neoliberal capitalist rationalities while also contributing to their objectives.

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  • 321.
    Sherfey, Paul
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Odla tillsammans: Att rädda världen och skapa ett ’bi-tydelsefullt’ vi2020In: Budkavlen: tidskrift för etnologi och folkloristik, ISSN 2736-8246, Vol. 99, p. 144-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collective gardens – in which individuals work collectively to cultivate and care for a common gardening area – have become a growing phenom­enon in recent years. At these sites, the cultivation of community is often as important as the cultivation of organic, local produce. However, obser­vation and digital research carried out in the context of a transnational study of such gardens demonstrates that this community is not limited to human participants, but instead also includes other animal species at these sites. The article investigates the relationships cultivated with one such group – insects. How might we understand the interest shown by gardeners in building hotels and cafés, sowing meadows and arranging festivals for insects? Do participants only see insects for their use­value, or is there something more occurring in the relationship they cultivate, and how it is represented and discussed?

    Beginning with a discussion of the built environment of the studied col­lective gardens, the article analyses how certain design choices are spe­cifically oriented towards the use and benefit of insects – especially bees. Progressing from physical space to digital space, the empirical discussion then investigates this interest in bees and their welfare further through several paradigmatic examples. In so doing, discourses communicated in manifestos, social media and news interviews are analysed. This is done in order to explore the worldviews from which individuals and groups un­derstand the importance of bees, as well as the backgrounds that influence their actions and the fantasies for the future that provide a focal point to­wards which to orient their efforts. Finally, I contrast the discourses about bees with the lack of similar discourse about another group of insects which are readily observable at many sites – wasps. I discuss how differing cultural heritages related to each affect how they are valued and reflect on the possibilities available to us as humans to see ourselves and our future as being dependent on one species, while being comparably indifferent to the presence and important contributions of the other.

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    Odla tillsammans
  • 322.
    Sherfey, Paul
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Urban And Rural Transformation2019In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, E-ISSN 2001-7308, Vol. XII, no 1, p. 54-56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 323.
    Shutzberg, Mani
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Literal Tricks of the Trade: The Possibilities and Contradictions of Swedish Physicians’ Everyday Resistance in the Sickness Certification Process2020In: Journal of Resistance Studies, ISSN 2001-9947, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 8-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the ways Swedish General practitioners (GPs) informally deal with the stricter standards of sickness certification and the implications of understanding these ways in terms of ‘resistance.’ In recent decades, procedural and bureaucratic changes within the Swedish sickness benefit system have curtailed physicians’ clinical discretion with regards to the sickness benefit approval for patients. By both formal and informal means, the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (SSIA) has consolidated its power over the decision-making process. Despite widespread dissatisfaction among physicians with the current system, acts of open defiance do not seem to occur. However, as shown in a recent qualitative study, Swedish General practitioners have developed informal ‘techniques’ (ranging from simple exaggerations in the certificates to complex constructions of apparent objectivity) for intentionally circumventing the stricter sickness certification standards. Taking that study as a point of departure, this article will consider the use of techniques as a form of everyday resistance. Three dimensions of ambiguity arise which require further attention, namely: (1) the multiple motives and shifting target of resistance; (2) the complex blend of power and powerlessness which defines the situation of GPs and their resistance, and (3) the fundamental ambiguity of the resistant act of issuing sickness certificates tactically, as a particular mix of compliance and resistance.

  • 324.
    Shutzberg, Mani
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Tricks of the Medical Trade: Cunning in the Age of Bureaucratic Austerity2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Being a “good” doctor nowadays involves more than having virtues and capacities conducive to the content of encounters between physicians and patients. Physicians can and must be able to act on the surrounding conditions of the doctor-patient encounter, in order to keep external interests at bay. Hence, the patient-related virtues, such as compassion, prudence, temperance and the like might not constitute sufficient cause for “good” doctoring. Resistance against the invasion of external interests requires another set of capacities. In this compilation thesis, one such capacity is explored: cunning. While certainly not part of the repertoire of skills in relation to the patient, cunning intelligence is an indispensable “virtue” of good doctoring insofar as doctors must cleverly navigate institutions that block off paths toward the ultimate ends of healthcare. The role of cunning is examined through a particular case, namely, the struggle over social insurance, especially sickness benefits (“sjukpenning”), and the complex relationship between physician, patient and the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (“Försäkringskassan”). In these times of increased austerity, physicians have honed skills, retaining thereby good medical practice, and by extension also maintaining the integrity of the patient-related virtues of medicine. In the empirical material, techniques were identified, particularly with respect to the way in which the sickness certificate is written to ensure approval by the SSIA. Based on these findings, the ambiguities, contradictions and possibilities inherent in the cunning resistance of physicians are analyzed and problematized. Despite its many issues, what doctors do when issuing sickness certificates in this particular way, is certainly motivated and carried out by more than mere ignorance. Cunning intelligence is not merely a defective form of prudence (phronesis), nor is it simply an instance of instrumental reason (techne), but rather an ability that occupies a distinct place among the intellectual abilities generally ascribed to professionals. Finally, I explore if the use of these capacities indicates a change in the doctor-patient relationship. I argue that both doctor and patient are conditioned by an equality in powerlessness—the hallmark of “the age of bureaucratic parsimony”, which can be appropriately described in terms of solidarity between comrades.

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  • 325.
    Sjödin Lindenskoug, Susanna
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, History.
    Manlighetens bortre gräns: tidelagsrättegångar i Livland åren 1685-17092011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There were many ways of bordering manliness during the historical period covered by my research. Borders have been metaphorically understood as those invisible, often non-enunciated limits that have safeguarded manliness. There were borders separating masculinity from femininity and from childishnes, but there is also a more distant border, separating masculinity from the bestial. The term un-manliness is a useful concept for this analysis, for it can be used to illuminate the different ways in which masculinity has been interrogated. The concept can also be used in comparative analyses of how tolerance towards men deviating from ideas of ideal masculinity has differed according to situation and culture. It has been my ambition to elucidate the particular attitudes, values, customs, knowledge and requirements that influenced the view of masculinity at both individual and the group level. The clearest-cut aspects of manliness and un-manliness expressed in court proceedings were those having to do with sexuality, relations within the household, and the subordinate and dominant masculinities displayed by different court-room actors. The latter, in turn, reflected contemporary social structures, including the social gap that divided the Livonian peasantry’s serfs or former serfs from the ruling Baltic-German elite. Records from the court proceedings have shown the subordinate masculinity of the defendants, subordinate not only to that of the officers of the court but to that of the witnesses. This subordination was an inevitable consequence of the nature of the accusations, regardless of whether they were deemed well-founded or false.  The defendants were placed in a situation where they were forced constantly to be on the alert, ready to defend themselves and show their best sides. As a result, they would often give extremely clear expression to their views of proper masculinity. Such actors stressed, consciously or unconsciously, certain manly traits and behaviour patterns that characterised themselves and others. Their arguments provide insights into what they thought of each other and how they conceived a man should generally be, behave and act in different situations. By the same token, they clearly showed what kinds of behaviours were considered undesirable or outright unmanly. The positioning of the borders of manliness was linked both to time and to space. Deviations have helped different societies set the borders for what they considered acceptable behaviour. There was a clear cultural and geographical border between Sweden as such, and the Swedish province Livonia. This emerges clearly when one compares Livonian results with earlier studies on bestiality in Sweden. This shows that the view of manliness and the tolerance towards certain kinds of behaviour changed as one moved East.

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  • 326.
    Sjödin, Susanna
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Manlighet kontra bestialitet2006In: Blad till Bladh: en vänbok till Christine våren 2006 / [ed] Einarssin Monica, Sandberg Robert, Stadin Kekke, Wottle Martin, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, , 2006, p. 167-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 327.
    Sommer, Christian
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Processes and factors governing benthic community dynamics—environmental change in the Baltic Sea2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As drivers of biogeochemical cycles and nutrient recycling, such as carbon turnover, the microbial community is essential in sustaining functioning ecosystems. Together with the metazoan community, the microbial community constitute the majority of all life in the benthos. Environmental change in biotic and abiotic factors may influence the dynamics of these communities, for example through a sorting or driving effect on the community structure through assembly processes. Environmental change, e.g. change in dissolved oxygen concentration, salinity and temperature, can directly or indirectly affect community composition. How, in what way, and to what extent, benthic bacterial and meiofaunal community composition in the eutrophied, brackish benthic environments, in the Baltic Sea sub-basin the Baltic Proper, respond to environmental change is understudied, both at local and seascape scale. This thesis aimed to study and understand the effects of environmental variation on the diversity and biogeographic patterns of Baltic Sea sediment bacterial and meiofaunal communities. A further aim was to understand the links between the different community levels by studying the interaction between meiofaunal- and macrofaunal communities in relation to environmental variation. Community diversity was analysed along a latitudinal transect of national environmental monitoring stations in the Baltic Proper using a framework of metapopulation and metacommunity theory. The analyses were based on environmental genomics, with high-throughput sequencing, bioinformatics

    and statistics. The total community genome was analysed using phylogenetic marker gene fragments as a proxy for taxonomic diversity, to investigate diversity, community structure and dynamics. Salinity and oxygen were found to be the main abiotic environmental drivers of benthic community composition and alpha- and beta-diversity patterns. Furthermore, macrofauna-meiofauna interactions were significantly more complex in higher salinity environments. Results also showed that both enhanced environmental gradients and dispersal following a major inflow of saline and oxygenated water from the Atlantic Ocean, influenced the composition of sediment bacterial communities at the seascape scale of the Baltic Sea, as shown by a reduced beta-diversity and increased alpha-diversity, and the development of a significant distance-decay of community similarity. This study also identified strong metapopulation dynamics of the benthic sediment bacterial communities with many satellite and a few core taxa. The outcomes from this study contribute to the understanding of how environmental variation and environmental change relate to changes in Baltic Sea benthic community diversity and composition, and important factors and processes governing community dynamics.

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    Processes and factors governing benthic community dynamics—environmental change in the Baltic Sea
  • 328.
    Sommer, Christian
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Hu, Yue
    3Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Molecular, 11 Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Solna.
    Nascimento, Francisco
    Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University.
    Gunnarsson, Jonas
    Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University.
    Dinnétz, Patrik
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Sjöling, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Reduced large-scale beta-diversity and changes in metapopulation patterns of sediment bacterial communities following a major inflow into the Baltic Sea2019In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea is heavily affected by eutrophication caused by nutrient overload, climate, and infrequency in major inflow events, resulting in widespread areas of oxygen depleted waters and sediments. A Major Baltic Inflow event (MBI) brings saline and oxygenated Atlantic Ocean water into the Baltic Sea, as occurred in 2014. Using a theoretical framework based on metapopulation and metacommunity theory we predicted a transition of the sediment bacterial community after the MBI, from a more heterogeneous community pattern driven by local colonisation-extinction dynamics towards a more pronounced environmental gradient but with reduced beta-diversities. Community diversity patterns before and after the MBI were investigated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of samples from 42 Baltic Sea environmental monitoring stations. Results showed strong metapopulation dynamics with many satellite and few core taxa. NMDS-ordination showed distinct geographical clustering. After the MBI, alpha-diversity increased, beta-diversity decreased and a significant distance-decay relationship developed. Changes in community composition correlated significantly with changes in oxygen and salinity from 2010 to 2015. Our results indicate strong metapopulation and metacommunity structuring of sediment bacterial diversity and composition in the Baltic Sea and how movements of large-scale water bodies affect bacterial communities through changes in large-scale environmental gradients and dispersal patterns.

  • 329.
    Stagnell, Alexander
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Hovets sofister: Diplomati, retorik och representationens problem2020In: Rhetorica Scandinavica, ISSN 1397-0534, E-ISSN 2002-7974, Vol. 24, no 81, p. 48-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rhetoric and diplomacy shares something we might call the problem of representation, arising out of the difficulties to ever accurately represent something. In the article, this joint problem is approached through an investigation into its different solutions, taking us from Plato’s and Aristotle’s critique ofthe sophists, through Demosthenes’ and Aeschines’ joint effort to create peace between Athens and Philip II of Macedon, to Rousseau, Kant, and contemporary scholars studying diplomatic rhetoric. In Kant’s idea of perpetual peace and Perelman’s conceptof a universal audience, we eventually find what we might call modernity’s answer to this ancient problem, the acceptance of what in Hegelian parlance could be called the bad infinity of diplomatic and rhetorical communication. Finally, and by contrast, Lacan’s use of the diplomat as an illustration of the limits of representation is discussed and the possibility of avoiding the endless dialectic of trial and error is developed.

  • 330.
    Stagnell, Alexander
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Uppsala universitet.
    Klassikerintroduktion: Cassin2016In: Rhetorica Scandinavica, ISSN 1397-0534, E-ISSN 2002-7974, no 71/72, p. 9-16Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 331.
    Stagnell, Alexander
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Uppsala universitet.
    Retorikens spöken2015In: Förledd och förtjust: andra generationens retorikvetare tar ordet, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2015, p. 73-85Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 332.
    Stagnell, Alexander
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric. Uppsala Universitet.
    Ska vi lära folk att tala?: Eller; om logologins förutsättningar2016In: Rhetorica Scandinavica, ISSN 1397-0534, E-ISSN 2002-7974, no 74, p. 55-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This text aims at investigating the possible effects that Cassin’s rereading of the battle between the philosophers and the sophist might have on the contemporary understanding of the connection between rhetoric and the political. Through her critique of Plato and Aristotle the conflict between Philosophy and Sophistics is perceived as one regarding being (ontology/logology) rather than, as traditionally, one of knowledge (epistemology/doxology). Finally, a possible foundation for a logological understanding of the political is sketched with the help of concepts from Lacanian psychoanalysis.

  • 333.
    Stagnell, Alexander
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric. Uppsala universitet.
    The Ambassador's Letter: On Diplomacy as Ideological State Apparatus2016Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 334.
    Stagnell, Alexander
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Uppsala universitet, Litteraturvetenskapliga institutionen.
    The Ambassador's Letter: On the Less Than Nothing of Diplomacy2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The principal aim of this dissertation is to answer the age-old question What is diplomacy? But this study approaches the question in what might, on first look, appear oblique. By employing Slavoj Žižek’s reworked notion of Ideologiekritik with respect to the history, science, and artistic explorations of diplomacy, this work begins by extracting three of its essential problems: the name, death, and representation. A presentation of the central concepts and theoretical perspectives at play in Žižek’s work is elaborated upon, focusing on his understanding of politics, ideology, and the core of the conceptual apparatus of Lacanian psychoanalysis.

    The overarching argument of the thesis is that diplomacy constitutes an Ideological State Apparatus, i.e. that it offers a symbolic link destined to, through ideology, repress the fundamental inconsistencies of the modern nation state, in order to secure its continuous functioning. Diplomacy is shown to constitute the name that points to the impossibility of the state to become One with itself, and the thesis aims to capture how this impossibility, and that which must be excluded from the state to keep the fantasy of fulness alive, always returns to haunt it. Empirically, this is explored by way of re-reading the history of the word diplomacy, whose modern birth coincided with the events of the French Revolution. The study seeks to retrace diplomacy through three distinct historical formations, which here are referred to as the archi-political, ultra-political, and post-political. Each of theses formations functions as a covering over of the fundamental impossibility of the state. Readings of Immanual Kant, Henry James, André Brink, Mads Brügger, and 20th century IR-theory and Diplomacy Studies are presented in order to elaborate the way in which these formations are constituted as ideological fantasies protecting the state and, for that matter, diplomacy from their abyssal ground.

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  • 335.
    Stalmokaitė, Ignė
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    New Tides in Shipping: Studying incumbent firms in maritime energy transitions2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Shipping is a cornerstone of global transportation responsible for moving large volumes of traded goods. At the same time, negative environmental impacts of shipping operations have attracted growing concerns. Although recognised as the most energy-efficient mode of transportation compared to air and land-based transport, maritime transportation contributes significantly to air-borne emissions, alongside other types of pollutants. Hence, it is apparent that alternatives to highly polluting conventional marine fuels, i.e., crude oil or diesel, have to be found in shipping, just as in other sectors. Responding to calls for a greater attention to actors’ roles in transitions, as well as for broader sectoral coverage of empirical work in the field of sustainability transition studies, this doctoral thesis explores the role of incumbents (established shipping firms) in the early stages of maritime energy transitions. 

    Focusing on incumbents is a relatively recent, yet rapidly evolving, stream of research in sustainability transitions studies, with increasing evidence showing heterogeneity and strategic variety in incumbent activities in various transition contexts. By drawing on a multi-level perspective from the socio-technical transition literature, the dynamic capabilities approach from the strategic management literature, and structuration theory, this thesis contributes new knowledge on “how” and “why” frontrunner incumbent shipping firms engage with maritime niche technologies and alternative energy solutions as well as what strategies they adopt to overcome increasing environmental sustainability pressures. These are the topics that have so far received scant attention in sustainability transitions studies. The thesis utilises a qualitative case study approach to study the selection of firms from passenger, vehicle carrier and container shipping business segments that are active in environmental work. 

    The findings of this thesis indicate that the roles of shipping firms in the early stage of maritime energy transitions are diverse and more complex than often accounted for in sustainability transitions literature. It is demonstrated that due to increased regulatory, social and competitive pressures, firms’ activities with regards to engagement in maritime niche technologies and alternative energy have shifted from reactive to a mix of strategies where a portfolio of solutions are pursued at the same time across and within individual firms. While adoption of incremental end-of-pipe technologies reinforces dependence on the fossil fuel energy system, a parallel engagement and experimentation with alternative energy solutions indicates that incumbent firms can also adopt a central role in niche development activities.

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  • 336.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    On Interpersonal Violence in Russia in the Present and the Past: A Sociological Study2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For much of the twentieth century researchers in the West knew little about the phenomenon of interpersonal violence in Russia as the Soviet authorities kept the vital and criminal justice statistics of violence secret. It was not until the Soviet Union was in its final death throes that these statistics were officially released for the first time in over fifty years. They showed that at least in terms of its level of lethal violence, Russia was one of the most violent countries in the industrialized world. Since that time, the sharp rise in violent mortality that has occurred in post-Soviet Russia during the transition period has attracted the attention of many researchers in both the East and West. The studies that have resulted have done much to enhance our understanding of violence in contemporary Russia. However, there are still many questions to be answered. For example, was Russia a violent country in much earlier periods of its history and are there particular social and/or cultural processes that have been important in explaining the occurrence of violence in Russia across time?

    To address these and other questions I have made use of the vital statistics data of homicide from tsarist and Soviet Russia, as well as individual-level survey data on violence from the contemporary period. By doing this it has been possible to show that there was a high level of lethal interpersonal violence in Russia throughout those periods of the twentieth century for which data exist and that Soviet Russia became comparatively more violent between the end of the tsarist and Soviet periods. Moreover, alcohol seems to have played an extremely important role in the occurrence of both lethal and non-lethal violence across time. In relation to this, I have focused on the particular drinking culture in Russia as a possible explanatory mechanism for the occurrence of violence, in conjunction with the Russian state’s dependence on the taxable revenue alcohol generated – which in both tsarist and Soviet Russia prevented any prolonged attempts to act against the deleterious effects of alcohol. The high level of violence in Russian society also highlights the problems that the Russian authorities had when trying to impose order on a geographically vast and ethnically diverse country. This might explain why even by the end of the Soviet period, rates of lethal violence were highest in those places (i.e. Siberia and rural Russia more generally) where the state’s presence is likely to have been at its weakest.

    The consequences of interpersonal violence have become a serious public health issue in contemporary Russia. The lesson that ‘might makes right’ seems to be learnt at an early age by some men who may subsequently model their behaviour on what they have witnessed in their childhood homes, with alcohol acting to facilitate the occurrence of violence in some instances. Any attempt to address the issue of violence in Russia must therefore focus on the specifics of the Russian drinking culture, as it is likely that if this can be changed, a reduction in levels of serious interpersonal injury can also be achieved. However, it may be the case, that it is not only changes in the drinking culture which are necessary, but also perhaps, the way in which violence is seen in Russian society traditionally, both by the state and its citizens – as a means of resolving both relatively minor and more intractable problems.

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  • 337.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Kislitsyna, Olga
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Timofeeva, Irina
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Attitudes Toward Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in Moscow2008In: Journal of family Violence, ISSN 0885-7482, E-ISSN 1573-2851, Vol. 23, p. 447-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines attitudes towards violenceagainst women among the populace in Moscow, Russiausing data drawn from the Moscow Health Survey.Information was obtained from 1,190 subjects (510 menand 680 women) about their perceptions of whetherviolence against women was a serious problem in contemporaryRussia, and under what circumstances they thoughtit was justifiable for a husband to hit his wife. Less thanhalf the respondents thought violence was a seriousproblem, while for a small number of interviewees therewere several scenarios where violence was regarded asbeing permissible against a wife. Being young, divorced orwidowed, having financial difficulties, and regularly consumingalcohol were associated with attitudes moresupportive of violence amongst men; having a loweducational level underpinned supportive attitudes amongboth men and women. Results are discussed in terms of the public reemergence of patriarchal attitudes in Russia in thepost-Soviet period.

  • 338.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Timofeeva, Irina
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Sparén, Pär
    Risk factors for intimate partner violence against women in St. Petersburg, Russia2008In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 483-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory study examines which risk factors are associated with intimate partner violence against women in St. Petersburg, Russia. Women attending two crisis centers and a birthing house constituted the study sample. The male partner's frequent alcohol consumption and seeing his father hit his mother in childhood were associated with an increased risk of violence, whereas living in a communal apartment reduced the risk of intimate partner violence. The importance of crisis centers in Russia is highlighted by the study, as the women who turn to them are likely to have experienced more severe forms of violence.

  • 339.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University College, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Announcing in multiplatform broadcasting: self-referentiality, buzz and eventfulness in a commercial music format2010In: Radio-Leituras, ISSN 2179-6033, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 131-153Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 340.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Ett eget rum: om unga backpackers resedagböcker på internet2007In: Locus, ISSN 1100-3197, no 1/2, p. 5-20Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur skall vi förstå passionen för det främmande? Vad innebär det när ungdomar i Sverige ägnar sig åt praktiker som afrikansk dans, intresserar sig för svart musik eller österländsk mysticism – eller när de som backpackers åker på långa resor till avlägsna platser för att uppleva det exotiska och autentiska? Artikelförfattaren Fredrik Stiernstedt har undersökt hur resedagböcker publicerade på internet blir berättelser om exotism och nostalgi.

  • 341.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Från radiofabrik till mediehus: medieförändring och medieproduktion på MTG-radio2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a study of how the Swedish media company MTG Radio has developed new strategies and production practices in relation to technological change, new competition and media convergence during the first decade of the 2000s. During this period the media landscape in general has been marked by digitization, the rise of new media platforms and competition from new media companies. The study engages in an ethnographical perspective on media production, but also takes its starting point in political-economic theories on media work (Banks 2007, Hesmondhalgh & Baker 2011, Ryan 1992) in order to raise questions about the relation between technological and organizational changes and relations of power in production. Empirically, the thesis builds on interviews with production staff as well as an analysis of production documents and content produced by MTG Radio.

    The analysis shows that digital production technologies contribute to anincreased automation and centralization of control over editorial decisions, and hence to “de-skilling” (Braverman 1974/1999, Örnebring 2010). On the other hand, strategies of multiplatform production and the organizational changes taking place contribute to an “upskilling” (Edgell 2012) and give DJs and presenters more autonomy and control within production. This strengthened autonomy involves their possibilities for reflexivity and critical self-evaluation, as well as their control over content and production. Finally, the thesis connects these results to the more overarching question of alienation, arguing that upskilling and increased autonomy do not automatically create better jobs within the media house, or necessarily represent emancipatory possibilities within media work, as has been argued in previous research and theory.

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  • 342.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University College, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies. Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Maximizing the power of entertainment: The audience commodity in contemporary radio2008In: Radio Journal: International Studies in Broadcast and Audio Media, ISSN 1476-4504, E-ISSN 2040-1388, Vol. 6, no 2/3, p. 113-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the reconfigurations of the control and monitoring of the audience that take place in concert with the digitalization that characterize contemporary radio broadcasting. Three technologies for the automation of audience research and consumer monitoring are analyzed: MediaScore, used for online media research (in this case music tests); the iSelector for customizing music streams online, and the Personal People Meter (PPM) for the production of ratings. Drawing on analysis from an ethnographic fieldwork at eight music radio stations the article concludes that the work of producing the audience commodity within the radio industry is changing. Research is increasingly becoming a way to bond with listeners, turning audience self-disclosure into a part of media consumption as such. At the same time, as shown in the article, the three technologies distributes the responsibility of the research process to the people researched upon, meanwhile facilitating a more generalized surveillance. The expanded surveillance through digital media seems also to have other objectives than the previous production of audience statistics. This could be characterized as a shift from using quantitative to using qualitative data, in producing the audience commodity.

  • 343.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Sustainability of Native Advertising: Organizational Perspectives on the Blurring of the Boundary Between Editorial and Commercial Content in Contemporary Media.2017In: What is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social and Economic Challenges of Journalism / [ed] Peter Berglez, Ulrika Olausson & Mart Ots, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 277-295Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 344.
    Svanelid, Oscar
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    AnthroPOPhagous: Political Uses of Pop Art in the Aftermath of the Brazilian Military Coup d'État of 19642017In: Art in Transfer in the Era of Pop: Curatorial Practices and Transnational Strategies / [ed] Annika Öhrner, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2017, p. 215-237Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    AnthroPOPhagous
  • 345.
    Svanelid, Oscar
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Att forma tillvaron: Konstruktivism som konstnärligt yrkesarbete hos Geraldo de Barros, Lygia Pape och Lygia Clark2021Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation examines artistic translations of constructivism by the Brazilian artists Geraldo de Barros (1923-1998), Lygia Pape (1927-2004) and Lygia Clark (1920-1988) using the theoretical perspectives of anthropophagy and biopolitics. Previous research has addressed artworks of Brazilian constructivism, a movement which over the last few decades has been canonised as part of a multiple, global modernism. The dissertation shifts the focus to the idea of art-as-labour, which had been central for Soviet constructivists in the 1920s, and the various ways in which this idea reappeared in the practices of these three Brazilian artists. The focal points are 1) de Barros’ work as an administrator and designer at the Catholic working cooperative Unilabor in São Paulo (1954-1964), 2) Pape’s teaching at the Santa Úrsula School of Architecture (1971-1985) during the Brazilian military dictatorship, and 3) Clark’s therapeutic method Estruturação do Self (1976-1988), which she practised at her home clinic and then endeavoured to integrate into the mental health care system in Rio de Janeiro. These examples of artistic labour are viewed as instances, as well as thresholds, of a historical process in which constructivists have sought to embed art within the biopolitical field. Furthermore, the dissertation demonstrates how de Barros, Pape and Clark infused multiple aspects of human existence into their work, such as sensibility, religious beliefs, object relations, socio-political concerns, extrasensory perception and interspecies communication. It is further suggested that when Brazilian artists translated constructivism, they added concerns that have deeply altered this artistic movement and its attempts to transfigure life. 

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    Att forma tillvaron: Konstruktivism som konstnärligt yrkesarbete hos Geraldo de Barros, Lygia Pape och Lygia Clark
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  • 346.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH.
    Alfredsson, Eva C.
    KTH.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH.
    Fuehrer, Paul
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    KTH / VTI.
    Malmaeus, Mikael
    IVL .
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH.
    Skånberg, Kristian
    KTH.
    Stigsson, Peter
    IVL.
    Aretun, Åsa
    IVL.
    Buhr, Katarina
    IVL.
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    KTH.
    Öhlund, Erika
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Scenarios for sustainable futures beyond GDP growth 20502019In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 111, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of continued economic growth is increasingly questioned and critically analysed on the basis of its potential negative sustainability impact. Along with the critique, visions and strategies for alternative systems need also be brought onto the agenda. The aim of this paper is to present the qualitative content of scenarios that explore sustainability strategies for Swedish society when economic growth is not seen as an end in itself, and instead the objective is other values/targets that society might wish to achieve. Multi-target backcasting scenarios are developed that illustrate future states in which four sustainability targets (climate, land use, participation, and resource security) are to be attained. The focus of these four scenarios is: 1) a Collaborative economy, 2) Local self-sufficiency, 3) Automation for quality of life, and 4) Circular economy in the welfare state. In the paper, we also present the process of the development of the scenarios, and feedback from stakeholders. Although the focus is on Sweden, the process and scenarios may also be relevant for other similar countries. The scenarios are discussed in terms of their relevance and their purpose, the fulfilment of the sustainability targets, and the multi-target approach.

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  • 347.
    Svenonius, Ola
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political science.
    Exploring Consumer Rights Regimes and Internet Consumption in Europe2010In: Surveillance, Privacy and the Globalization of Personal Information / [ed] E. Zureik et al., Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2010, p. 310-327Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 348.
    Svenonius, Ola
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Sensitising Urban Transport Security: Surveillance and Policing in Berlin, Stockholm, and Warsaw2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The city as a focal point of both domestic and international security policy is characteristic of the 21st century security landscape in Europe. Amidst the 'War on Terror' and the pan-European battle against organised crime, the city is the location where global processes are actually taking place. Urban security is the local policy response both to such global threats as terrorism and local ones, such as violent crime. Public transport systems in particular came under threat after the terrorist attacks in the United States in 2001, Madrid in 2004, and London in 2005. This doctoral thesis studies security policy in three public transport systems – Berlin, Stockholm, and Warsaw – from a comparative perspective focusing on the conditions that made new and very specific understandings of security possible.

    The study argues that urban transport security has undergone radical changes during the last ten years. While transport authorities and the police used to conceive security as related solely to crime rates, today the focus of security practices consists of passengers' perceptions. The study shows how this shift is paralleled by a new discourse of 'security as emotion', and how it came into being. It concentrates specifically on the central role that surveillance and private policing assumes as the security policy shifts objectives to the inner life of the passengers. Today, complex governance networks of both public and private actors manage security in the three cities. The analysis shows how passengers are constructed in the urban security policy as children, consumers, and citizens. These different 'roles' constitute the passenger in the eye of urban security governance characterised by technocracy, 'friendly security', and individual responsibility. The introduction of new governance models for public administration, the legacy of European communist regimes, and rising fear of crime are central conditions for this new, sensitised urban transport security.

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  • 349.
    Svensson, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Regulation of Rule-Following: Imitation and Soft Regulation in the European Union2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Present times are sometimes referred to as "the golden era of regulation", as more and more areas of social life are regulated. But regulation is not only increasing; it is also changing. New regulators are emerging, and they are issuing new kinds of rules. These new kinds of regulation are frequently not legally binding, and are therefore labelled soft regulation as opposed to hard law. It is not compulsory to follow soft rules but many actors - including sovereign states - still do, and the thesis asks the question why this is so. Why do even states, which are powerful regulators themselves, abide by soft regulation, and wherein lies the regulative power of soft rules?

    Through an in-depth study of the European Union's pre-accession instrument Twinning an answer to the question of the power of soft regulation has been arrived at. Treating Twinning as a critical case of soft regulation, and using theories of imitation to grasp the meaning and evolution of Twinning projects, makes it possible to define three regulative elements involved in soft regulation. These are the combinative, co-productive and constitutive elements of soft regulation, from which the thesis suggests that it derives its power.

    First of all, soft regulation combines different kinds of rules, the regulation of identity and the regulation of activity, and a variety of sources of legitimacy. Second, it depends on regulators and regulatees interacting to co-produce regulation. And third, as its main result, it constitutes the rule-followers as formal, rational, and modern organisations. Accordingly, soft regulation has rather impressive regulative capabilities, builds on complex, dynamic, and social interactions, and embodies as well as promotes some of Western society's most strongly institutionalised ideas. The thesis argues that it is through these characteristics that actors, including states, are compelled to follow soft rules.

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  • 350.
    Sá Cavalcante Schuback, Cecilia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Aesthetics. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Is There an Environmental Principle of Causality?2022In: Philosophies, ISSN 2409-9287, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay considers and reflects upon the principle of causality and its relation to the global environmental crisis. Parting from some of Immanuel Kant’s views on causality and freedom as well as from Heidegger’s reading of causality in Kant, it asks some questions about the role of human activity in the principle of causality, the relation between causality and freedom, and in what possible different way we could interpret causality and environment. The essay proposes that instead of trying to decide on the subject of who causes the environmental crisis, and on the subject capable to solve it, one must turn the intention of inquiry to the very principle of causality and consider the need to rethink this notion today. 

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