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  • 1.
    Hale, S. E.
    et al.
    Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI), Norway.
    Tann, L. V. D.
    Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI), Norway.
    Rebelo, A. J.
    Agricultural Research Council, South Africa; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Esler, K. J.
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    de Lima, A. P. M.
    International Institute for Sustainability, Brazil; Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, A. F.
    International Institute for Sustainability, Brazil; Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Latawiec, A. E.
    International Institute for Sustainability, Brazil; Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Opole University of Technology, Poland; University of East Anglia, UK.
    Ramírez-Agudelo, N. A.
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain.
    Roca Bosch, E.
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain.
    Suleiman, L.
    KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Singh, Nandita
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Miljövetenskap.
    Oen, A. M. P.
    Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI), Norway.
    Evaluating Nature-Based Solutions for Water Management in Peri-Urban Areas2023Ingår i: Water, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 15, nr 5, artikel-id 893Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The term nature-based solutions (NBS) has gained traction in recent years and has been applied in many settings. There are few comprehensive assessment frameworks available that can guide NBS planning and implementation while at the same time capturing the short- and long-term impacts and benefits of the NBS. Here a recently presented framework, which builds on the theory of change and was developed to assess NBS at different phases of the project cycle, was applied to seven diverse case studies. The case studies addressed water quality and quantity issues in peri-urban areas across the global north and south. Framework indicators covering the sustainability dimensions (environmental, social and economic) were assessed at three stages of the framework: context, process and results. The work sought to investigate the following research objectives: (1) Can this framework be robust and yet flexible enough to be applied across a diverse selection of NBS projects that are at different phases of the project cycle and address different kinds of water challenges within varied ecological, social and economic contexts? (2) Is it possible to draw generalisations from a comparative analysis of the application of the framework to the case studies? Results showed that the framework was able to be applied to the case studies; however, their diversity showed that NBS projects designed in one context, for a specific purpose in a specific location, can not necessarily be transferred easily to another location. There were several process-based indicators that were universally significant for the case studies, including expertise, skills and knowledge of the involved actors, roles and responsibilities of involved actors and political support. The result-based indicators were case study-specific when environmental indicators were case study-specific, and important social indicators were environmental identity and recreational values. Overall, the use of the framework benefits the recognition of the implementation’s advances, such as the change in context, the processes in place and the results obtained.

  • 2.
    Morais de Lima, Ana Paula
    et al.
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Rodrigues, Aline F.
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.;Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio de Janeiro, Rio Conservat & Sustainabil Sci Ctr, Dept Geog & Environm, R Marques de Sao Vicente 225, BR-22451000 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Latawiec, Agnieszka Ewa
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.;Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio de Janeiro, Rio Conservat & Sustainabil Sci Ctr, Dept Geog & Environm, R Marques de Sao Vicente 225, BR-22451000 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.;Agr Univ Krakow, Fac Prod & Power Engn, Dept Prod Engn Logist & Appl Comp Sci, Ul Balicka 116b, PL-30149 Krakow, Poland.;Opole Univ Technol, Fac Mech Engn, Mikolajczyka 5, PL-45271 Opole, Poland..
    Dib, Viviane
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Gomes, Fernanda D.
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Maioli, Veronica
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Pena, Ingrid
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Tubenchlak, Fernanda
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Rebelo, Alanna J.
    Agr Res Council, Inst Soil Climate & Water, Nat Resources & Engn, POB 8783, ZA-0001 Pretoria, South Africa.;Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Conservat Ecol & Entomol, Private Bag X1, ZA-7602 Matieland, South Africa..
    Esler, Karen J.
    Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Conservat Ecol & Entomol, Private Bag X1, ZA-7602 Matieland, South Africa..
    Oen, Amy M. P.
    Norwegian Geotech Inst NGI, POB 3930, N-0806 Oslo, Norway..
    Andrea Ramirez-Agudelo, Nancy
    Univ Politecn Cataluna, Inst Sustainabil Sci & Technol, Barcelona 08034, Spain..
    Roca Bosch, Elisabeth
    Univ Politecn Cataluna, Inst Sustainabil Sci & Technol, Barcelona 08034, Spain..
    Singh, Nandita
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Miljövetenskap.
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, Royal Inst Technol, Dept Urban Planning & Environm, Sch Architecture & Built Environm, S-11428 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hale, Sarah E.
    Norwegian Geotech Inst NGI, POB 3930, N-0806 Oslo, Norway..
    Framework for Planning and Evaluation of Nature-Based Solutions for Water in Peri-Urban Areas2022Ingår i: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, nr 13, artikel-id 7952Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent efforts to achieve social, economic, and environmental goals related to sustainability emphasize the importance of nature-based solutions (NBS), as grey infrastructure alone is insufficient to address current challenges. The majority of frameworks proposed in the literature fail to address the full potential of NBS, neglecting long-term results, unintended consequences, co-benefits, and their contribution to achieving global environmental agreements, such as the Agenda 2030, especially for water management in a peri-urban context. Here we present an innovative framework that can be applied to both NBS project planning and evaluation for several water-based challenges, giving practitioners and researchers a tool not only to evaluate ongoing projects but also to guide new ones. The framework considers three main stages of a NBS project: (1) context assessment, (2) NBS implementation and adaptation process, and (3) NBS results. This tool has the potential to be used to evaluate whether NBS projects are aligned with sustainability dimensions through a set of adaptable sustainability indicators. The framework can also highlight how the NBS targets are related to the sustainable development goals (SGD) and contribute to catalyzing the 2030 Agenda. The framework is an important tool for water management and other NBS types.

  • 3.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Miljövetenskap.
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nature-Based Solutions for Sustainable Water management in the Peri-Urban: Towards a better understanding of opportunities and constraints in Stockholm County, Sweden2021Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature-based solutions (NBS) are increasingly reckoned as viable solutions to address water related societal challenges and as a sustainable strategic approach to manage water in terms of quality, quantity and flow. NATWIP, an EU-Cooperation Water-JPI Project, within which this abstract is produced, aims to contribute to closing the water cycle gap by exploring these questions in the peri-urban context, being transitional zones in the process of increasing urbanization. An assessment framework has been developed in NATWIP as a tool to analyze the contextual factors and driving forces, governance processes and the sustainability criteria of NBS projects in the peri-urban context of 6 countries in Europe and outside. 

    This presentation will focus on the findings from two case studies conducted in Stockholm County, Sweden that apply varied types of NBS interventions at different scales and to deal with different water challenges. The first case explores NBS application at decentralized scale as a means for improving wastewater treatment and management in Stockholm Archipelago and its environmental impact on the Baltic Sea, where many of the summerhouses lie outside the municipal network. The second case addresses various water pressures including climate change impacts and flooding at the sub-urban scale with the aim of planning an urban district that integrate spatially ambitious NBS in the form of blue-green structures for multifunctional urban spaces and improving ecosystem services.    

    The findings of the case studies will be presented to draw parallels and contrasts regarding their contexts, and the processes and socioeconomic and environmental benefits concerning NBS and to conclude on general lessons regarding opportunities and constraints for sustainable up-taking of NBS measures. 

  • 4.
    Singh, D. K.
    et al.
    Tsinghua University, Beijing, PR China.
    Xu, M.
    Tsinghua University, Beijing, PR China.
    Singh, Nandita
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Miljövetenskap.
    Lei, F.
    Tsinghua University, Beijing, PR China.
    Perspectives on emerging pressures and their integrated impact on large river systems: An insight from the Yellow River basin2021Ingår i: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 298, artikel-id 113423Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Yellow River, with a developmental and historical significance to China, is now facing several emerging pressures, which are degrading the river status and creating challenges for high-quality development in the basin. Numerous studies on such emerging pressures, present scattered outcomes, and trigger uncertainties and deficient assumptions on the river's problems. This review integrated such scattered information and investigated the emerging pressures, their drivers and integrated impacts at the basin level. The study intended to prioritize those pressures needing expeditious consideration, and carried a discussion on the alternative pathways to the solution. To determine the critical emerging pressures, a literature review was conducted and experts' opinion was sought. The outcome further led to a comprehensive review, data collection, and analysis of three groups of emerging pressures. The review recognized ‘Water Stress’ in the lower reach, primarily caused by an abated flow, as the most distressing emerging pressure inflicting social, ecological, and economic consequences. Such decline in flow was mostly induced by a recent increase in ‘Anthropogenic activities’, such as intensive water withdrawal for irrigation (≥27 BCM), and construction of check dams in the Loess Plateau region (trapping~5 BCM water). The increasing ‘Pollution’ in the river, besides threatening public health and ecology, also contributed to the water stress by rendering certain stretches of the river biologically dead and unsuitable for any use. The ‘Climate Change’, with its key negative effect on precipitation in the middle sub-basin, overall contributed small (8–11 %) to the observed reduction in river flow. With increasing challenges for the adopted engineering solutions tackling the water stress, the study suggested the use of a demand management approach, employing adaptive policy measures, as an alternative or supplementary solution to the current approach. In addition, the study highlights that regular reviewing and reforming the key decisions based on evidence and updated information, and taking a participatory approach, may offer a sustainable pathway to the environment as well as socio-economic goals.

  • 5.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Miljövetenskap.
    Singh, Om Prakash
    Millennium Water Story, Kista, Sweden.
    Sustainable Arsenic Mitigation: Problems and Prospects in India2020Ingår i: Arsenic Water Resources Contamination: Challenges and Solutions / [ed] Dr. Ali Fares; Sushant K. Singh, Cham: Springer, 2020, s. 131-156Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater has emerged as a significant challenge for the human right to water in India because of over 80% dependence on groundwater for drinking, particularly in the rural areas. In order to mitigate the arsenic menace and provide safe drinking water to the masses, government and non-governmental agencies have initiated several interventions. These interventions can be categorized under one of the following approaches, namely, treatment of contaminated water; supply of groundwater with acceptable level of arsenic; surface water supply; and rainwater harvesting. While it is a reality that all populations estimated to be ‘at risk’ of arsenic exposure have not yet achieved ‘coverage’ under one or more of these approaches, there exist more pertinent issues. These can be summarized under the rubric of ‘sustainability’ of the interventions, primarily from environmental, social, cultural and economic perspectives. This chapter evaluates the different arsenic mitigation interventions in India from these different sustainability perspectives, and proposes that rainwater harvesting offers the most promising way forward for sustainable arsenic mitigation.

  • 6.
    Singh, D. K.
    et al.
    Tsinghua University, Beijing, P.R. China.
    Singh, Nandita
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Miljövetenskap.
    Drying Urban lakes: A consequence of climate change, urbanization or other anthropogenic causes? An insight from northern India2019Ingår i: Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management, ISSN 1320-5331, E-ISSN 1440-1770, Vol. 24, nr 2, s. 115-126Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban lakes in many places around the world are rapidly becoming vulnerable because of such factors as urbanization, climate change, anthropogenic pollutant inputs, etc. The influence of such forcing factors on lakes hydrology must be correctly recognized and addressed in order to protect them over the long term. Facing similar challenges, Sukhna Lake, an urban lake in northern India, has apparently dried up frequently in the recent past. Numerous hypotheses were subsequently proposed to isolate the possible factors affecting the lake and its water budget, including the potential impacts of land use changes, climate change, anthropogenic activities and other natural processes. Using meteorological data, lake-catchment information and a hydrologic model, these hypotheses were comprehensively analysed. Relevant data on rainfall, wind, temperature, lake inflows, groundwater, lake physical characteristics, catchment land uses, soil texture, etc., were gathered for the analysis. A temporal trend analysis of factors relevant to these hypotheses was undertaken to identify critical drivers of hydrological changes. A sensitivity analysis also was performed, using the lake water budget, to determine and prioritize the predominant factors affecting the lake, leading to the creation of an annual lake water budget for the period from 1971 to 2013, highlighting the lake inflows and outflows. The lake annual inflow (catchment run-off) was computed by adopting a rainfall–run-off model based on the SCS-curve number. Lacking any anthropogenic water withdrawals, the outflow was quantified by estimating the evaporation loss (using the FAO-based Penman–Monteith Equation). The results of the present study indicate that the process of siltation and the construction of check dams in the catchment, rather than urbanization and climate change, were the dominating reasons contributing to changes in the lake hydrology, and affecting the lake most in recent years. 

  • 7.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, Sweden.
    Socio-Cultural Norms, Human Rights and Access to Water and Sanitation2017Ingår i: The Human Right to Water: Theory, Practice and Prospects / [ed] Malcolm Langford; Anna F. S. Russell, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017, s. 603-623Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a natural resource indispensable for women, men and children to leadhealthy lives with dignity. Access to water has found recognition as a humanrights standard by being implied within various international treaties, declarationsand other instruments. In 2002, it was acknowledged as an inextricable aspect of Articles 11 and 12 of the International Covenant on Economic,Social and Cultural Rights. Access to adequate sanitation is likewise considered indispensable for leading a life with dignity. Subsequently, it has been treated as a right alongside water, potentially as a twinned right.

    Recognition of access to water and sanitation as a human right is often seenas important because it clarifies the role of States in improving access to basicservices or supply, sets standards that can be monitored and prioritises those currently without access, particularly the vulnerable and marginalised, in anon-discriminatory manner. Consequently, significant focus has remained onthe machinery and mechanisms for implementing the right. Perhaps animportant assumption is that, once action for implementing the right is undertaken, access to water and sanitation and hence realisation of the rightwill be progressively achieved. However, do actions taken to implement the right necessarily lead to its realisation? Can a duty bearer guarantee exercise of the right by rights holders solely because essential legal frameworks have beencreated and actions within their scope undertaken?

    Similar questions have been raised elsewhere. For instance, some have argued that a human rights-based approach brings a focus to community power relations, a factor that can otherwise impinge on effective access to resources by more marginalised groups. From an anthropological perspective, it has been argued that the practice of human rights takes place between different global and local understandings and meanings of humanness and rights. One sociology of law perspective contends that law, including international legal and political agreements, often obtains content only when first implemented. Therefore implementation should be investigated atthe local level.

    It has also been argued that the human right to water is not enjoyed automatically by rights holders solely because relevant policies and laws havebeen created, institutional frameworks laid down, or appropriate programmesand interventions implemented. It is important to consider the ‘context’ in which these actions unfold, which primarily deal with water resources management and water governance questions.

    Drawing upon such arguments, and looking at the realities on the groundin regard to the realisation of the right to water and sanitation in India, in particular, this chapter seeks to explore the processes lying at the interface between the community where rights holders lead their lives and the State that implements actions in accordance with the legal formulation of the right.

  • 8.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, Sweden.
    The Human Right to Water: From Concept to Reality2016Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The discourse on the human right to water presents deliberations on the concept, content and rationale for the right, with little attention to the practical question of translating the right into reality. This book aims to fill this void by focusing on ‘realization’ of the right by its holders, examining how effective the mechanisms are for ‘implementing’ the right in enabling its universal realization. In a quest to answer this question, the book draws a conceptual differentiation between ‘implementation’ and ‘realization’ of the right, arguing that unlike implementation - which is an objective process of creation - and implementation of measures such as legal frameworks, institutional structures or policy and action guidelines, realization of the right is a subjective process that extends much beyond. It takes shape within specific contextual settings which may include varied situations, yet remains neglected in the related academic and action forums. This book attempts to address this void by discussing some of the most significant contexts and the underlying problems and concerns that strongly influence realization of the human right to water. It contends that if the right is to be truly realized, these different contexts - which can be further classified as 'objective' and 'subjective' - must be understood, analysed and appropriately addressed before framing and implementing relevant action. The book further situates the human right to water discourse in a broader interdisciplinary perspective, expanding its scope beyond the narrower legal dimensions, linking it to the wider field of water resources management/governance. Through the novel ideas it proposes, the book makes an innovative and unique contribution in the field of human right to water which is of great scientific value.

  • 9.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Singh, Om Prakash
    WaterZoom, Sweden.
    Climate change, water and gender: Impact and adaptation in North-Eastern Hills of India2015Ingår i: International Social Work, ISSN 0020-8728, E-ISSN 1461-7234, Vol. 58, nr 3, s. 375-384Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Water resources in India are projected to face severe climate-induced stress. In the North-Eastern Hill region, where lifestyles are closely connected to nature, this holds great implications for human development. While scientific knowledge regarding climate change and water is growing at global and regional scales, an equally diverse body of knowledge on the human dimensions of the same at local levels is weak. This article attempts to bridge this knowledge gap by presenting micro-level evidence on the gendered impact of increasing water stress and the innovative gendered local adaptive strategies in this region. It urges for the need to re-think on adaptation planning, basing it on local templates for greater sustainability. 

  • 10.
    Singh, Nandita
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Translating human right to water and sanitation into reality: a practical framework for analysis2013Ingår i: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 15, nr 6, s. 943-960Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The human right to water and sanitation has been most commonly approached from the perspective of legal machinery and mechanisms for its implementation. Perhaps an underlying assumption among human rights practitioners is that once action for implementing the right is undertaken, its realization will be achieved. Often ignored are factors and processes at the micro-level where action for implementing the right actually takes place. This paper aims to propose a practical framework for analyzing this context that influences the action undertaken for realizing the right. The framework derives from an empirical study in India and is based upon an understanding of the micro-level processes at the ‘interface’ where the duty-bearing agents implementing action come face-to-face with the right-holders in the community. Both are situated in their own local contexts – the ‘implementation’ and the ‘socio-cultural’ contexts respectively. The two contexts can in turn be understood as constituted of distinct ‘norm-triads’ and the interactions between these ultimately lead to ‘realization’ or ‘non-realization’ of the right. The paper further contends that in order to translate the human right to water and sanitation into reality, it is necessary to identify the gaps and contradictions between the two contexts and address these appropriately and adequately.

  • 11.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wickenberg, Per
    Department of Sociology of Law, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Åström, Karsten
    Department of Sociology of Law, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hydén, Håkan
    Department of Sociology of Law, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Accessing water through a rights-based approach: problems and prospects regarding children2011Ingår i: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 14, nr 2, s. 298-318Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The right to water has been recently recognized as a fundamental human right by the United Nations, thereby clarifying its status as ‘legally binding’, making it ‘justiciable’ and enforceable. This development has been heralded as a key that holds great potential to change the lives of the billions who still lack access to clean water. Many of those deprived of enjoyment of the right are children, who constitute up to a third of the population in the developing world. What is the value added of the rights-based approach for access to water, especially for children? Would recognition of the right to water as legally binding deliver real benefits to children in improving their access to water? Does it really offer anything new that can help them realize their right to water more effectively? These questions will be explored in this paper using empirical evidence from India, where water has been legally interpreted as a fundamental right, and as a welfare state, where there has been consistent effort on part of the state to improve children's access to water.

  • 12.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Singh, Om Prakash
    Anthropology of Water: Perspectives from Traditional Water Management Regime in Rural India2009Ingår i: Man in India, ISSN 0025-1569, Vol. 89, nr 1-2, s. 215-228Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Water a natural resource, is characterized by multitudes of traits which are distinctively processed by diversified thoughts and beliefs orienting the behaviour-patterns of the people. The present paper highlights the integrated inter-relation between water as a natural sources and human societies. Water works as an essence in human existence and at the sametime it in seen that this particular element of the environment has been specifically moulded by the social-cultural patterns of the people in such a way that it takes the principal role in governing the peoples sacred and secular mode of life-situation. In the perspective of this view-point an attempt has been made here to study the traditional water management system that are still prevalent in Indian villages. This study is engaged to explore the water management pattern in the background of socio-cultural and ritualistic traditions in the caste-oriented villages in Bihar and Madhya Pradesh. Day to day water use by the people and the associated values, norms and taboos open up such a unique dimension which can best be illustrated and analysed through the domain of anthropology of water.

  • 13. Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    Wickenberg, Per
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Åström, Karsten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hydén, Håkan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Children's Right to Water as a Contested Domain: Gendered reflections from India2008Ingår i: Development: Journal of the Society for International Development, ISSN 1011-6370, E-ISSN 1461-7072, Vol. 51, nr 1, s. 102-107Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Nandita Singh and her colleagues look at children’s rightto water in India. They argue for the exercise of the right by childrenby analyzing the universal normative-legal framework and itsdifference to the local socio-culturally defined framework. Theysuggest that defining problems and designing actions only withinthe normative-legal framework can obscure understanding thecritical realities at the right-holders’ end. They suggest thatinterventions at various levels, such as through policy and targetedprogrammes, have at best provided an ‘enabling environment’,but the process of implementation of children’s rights at theright-holders’ end is to date an incomplete socio-cultural process.

  • 14.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, Sweden.
    Equitable Gender Participation in Local Water Governance: An Insight into Institutional Paradoxes2008Ingår i: Water resources management, ISSN 0920-4741, E-ISSN 1573-1650, Vol. 22, nr 7, s. 925-942Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of local stakeholders in governance of water resources is regarded as inalienable for ensuring efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability. To enhance gender balance in the water governance process, institutions are being designed and executed globally to elicit enhanced participation of women. This paper contends that in the context of local communities, the new institutional framework is divorced from the traditional social institutions that in turn operationalize their resource management systems. Based upon empirical evidence from rural Indian setting, the paper deciphers the paradoxes between the two sets of institutional paradigms and illustrates how these paradoxes at the ‘interface’ between the local community context and the development strategy lead to problems with effective women’s participation. On the basis of the findings, it argues that the institutional paradigm for achieving equitable gender participation in local water governance does not represent a truly ‘bottom-up’ approach. It further raises the concern that if the institutional paradigm for participation is contradictory to local institutions, then how can the objectives of participation founded thereupon be seen as achievable? The paper proposes the need to design participatory paradigms that are more realistically rooted in community-based institutional frameworks so as to enhance effectiveness of the endeavors.

  • 15. Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    Åström, Karsten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hydén, Håkan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wickenberg, Per
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gender And Water From A Human Rights Perspective: The Role Of Context In Translating International Norms Into Local Action2008Ingår i: Rural Society, ISSN 1037-1656, E-ISSN 2204-0536, Vol. 18, nr 3, s. 185-193Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    An important area in the discourse on gender and water is water supply where women are seen as the key actors and beneficiaries. A human rights approach to development has been adopted with access to safe water explicitly recognized as a basic human right. This right places a legal obligation upon governments to translate the international norms into practice. But does explicitly acknowledging the human right to water make a practical difference in women’s lives? Using an actor-oriented perspective, this paper analyzes how the international legal norms for realization of the right get reconstructed in local communities where women are the right holders. The empirical data for the analysis will be drawn from a first-hand qualitative study in rural India. The findings of the study show how the socio-cultural matrix provides the environment for implementing the right and determines its equitable and effective exercise by women.

  • 16.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, Sweden.
    Water resources Management in rural India: lessons from traditions for designing sustainable local action2008Ingår i: Journal of Resources, Energy and Development, ISSN 0975-7554, Vol. 5, nr 1, s. 11-26Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a common pool resource, indispensable for human life and development. Consequently, the need for organizing its use in an efficient,effective, and sustainable manner is now recognized as paramount for ensuring sustainable development. Towards this end, a paradigmatic shift has been globally adopted with emphasis on designing co-management regimes rooted in community participation, India being no exception. It can be contended that despite this approach the newly designed water management regimes are alien, top-down, and universalistic with little or no concern and connections with the localized traditional WRM (water resources management) structures. Perhaps these assume that local communities either lack any operational resource management system or that the ones in practice are irrational, narrowly pragmatic, or in the process of disappearance. This paper examines the reality behind such assumptions through a holistic study of water management traditions in rural India. It demonstrates that rooted in the cosmology of society, the traditional regime enables collective action for management of water as a CPR (common property resource). The system continues to be enduring and vibrant, full of meaning and relevance for the practitioners. Finally, it urges the need to understand and makes suggestions for applying the knowledge to designing new 'co-management' based water management strategies proposed within the contemporary water policy context by building these upon existing localized traditional templates.

  • 17. Singh, Nandita
    Women-centric issues in water resources management in rural India2008Ingår i: Advances in Water Quality & Management / [ed] Sudhakar M. Rao;, Monto Mani; N. H. Ravindranath, Chennai: Research Publishing Services , 2008Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 18.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Koku, J.E.
    University of Ghana, Legon-Accra, Ghana.
    Balfors, Berit
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Resolving Water Conflicts in Mining Areas of Ghana Through Public Participation A Communication Perspective2007Ingår i: Journal of Creative Communications, ISSN 0973-2586, Vol. 2, nr 3, s. 361-382Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mining as a sector is vital to a country's economic growth but the impact of the activities on environment can be an important cause of concern. In Wassa West district of Ghana, mining as an industry has been promoted in the recent past, but with significant impact on environmental aspects, especially water, leading to conflicts between the local communities and the mining companies. The practical theory of ‘Trinity of Voice’ (TOV) has been proposed for understanding the community-related intricacies underlying multi-stakeholder decision-making processes and proposing a futuristic course of action for effective public participation in the same. This article attempts to understand the causes underlying the mining-related water conflicts in Ghana using the TOV theory. Using this theory, the article proposes a practical framework for enhanced effective participation of members from local host communities that in turn can enable resolving the existing conflicts and preventing the same in future.

  • 19.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Gender and water management: some policy reflections2006Ingår i: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 8, nr 2, s. 183-200Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of gender concern in water sector is paramount, being seen as the harbinger of greater efficiency and effectiveness as well as equity. Consequently, there has been a continuing trend of designing water management policies with emphasis ranging from promoting participation of women in management of water projects in particular to supporting “gender-balanced” development of the water sector in general. How effective have these policies been in addressing such basic concerns? What are the local water users' perceptions about effectiveness of the policies in addressing their realistic gendered needs and priorities? While “women” have received much attention, how well does the gender concern in the policies integrate “men”? Do “effectiveness” and “equity” as underlying policy goals reflect the water users' perceptions as well? The paper attempts to evaluate the existing policies within the context of local communities where these are operational and proposes “facilitation of gender role performance” as a suitable policy alternative.

  • 20.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, Sweden.
    Indigenous Water Management Systems: Interpreting Symbolic Dimensions in Common Property Resource Regimes2006Ingår i: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 19, nr 4, s. 357-366Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a natural resource subject to management in many small-scale societies as common property. A dominant approach to understanding the sustainability of such common property resource (CPR) management regimes is the rational action model, which assumes that their successful governance is achieved through collective action based on a rationally constructed set of working rules. By presenting a holistic study of indigenous water management system in small-scale community setting in India, this article argues that the relationship between water resources and society extends beyond a materialistic mundane relationship, to incorporate a “symbolic” orientation. It concludes that rooted in the cosmology of the society, the indigenous water management system represents a mechanism to reinforce the symbolic constructions and also to fulfill water-related needs that cut across material and nonmaterial realms. The outcomes of the article enhance the understanding of management of CPRs, adding an alternate perspective concerning beliefs and values associated with such resources.

  • 21. Singh, Nandita
    The Changing Role of Women in Water Management: Myths and Realities2006Ingår i: Wagadu: a Journal of Transnational Women's & Gender Studies, ISSN 2150-2226, E-ISSN 1545-6196, Vol. 3, s. 94-113Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Women and water are linked in several ways, an important pragmatic linkage being their role in water management. Several continuous efforts at positively transforming this role have been made during the last three decades, ranging from their improved role as domestic water managers to eliciting their greater participation in water management initiatives at community level. Studies tend to indicate that the anticipated ends of such exercises are universally achievable, in isolation of the prevailing social and cultural contexts where the women are placed. This paper seeks to unfold the realities underlying the universalistic claims regarding a transformed role for women in water management. Considering the importance of 'context' in the construction of gender ideologies and relations, through a micro-level study in the rural Indian context, this paper argues that the transformation of women's role in water management cannot be taken as a universal reality. The findings suggest that the existing role can be effectively modified only when interventions are built upon realistic, workable strategies that are meaningful and acceptable to the women and their communities.

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  • 22.
    Singh, Nandita
    Royal Instititue of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Women, Society and Water Technologies: Lessons for Bureaucracy2006Ingår i: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Vol. 10, nr 3, s. 341-360Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Water technologies are increasingly regarded as pivotal to the process of societal development. One arena of importance is the delivery of water to society through comprehensive water supply programs that aim at ensuring ‘safe’ water for all. The principal target group in these programs is women, whose development is believed to be promoted through improved water facilities offering them greater convenience, better health and enhanced socio-economic opportunities. These programs can be seen as having three essential aspects, namely technology, people and institutions. Of these, the responsibilities of designing technologies for supplying water, creating institutional frameworks for their execution and implementing the program at the people’s end for their benefit all lie with development bureaucracies. But the extent to which these bureaucracies can be sensitive to the socio-cultural contexts of the communities and the women for whom the program interventions are designed and implemented remains problematic. This article explores the gender dimensions of the socio-cultural context of water and how this may play a role in the adoption and management of improved water technologies. A perspective on the lessons for planning bureaucracies is offered to make the concerned technologies more efficient, effective and sustainable.

  • 23.
    Singh, Nandita
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Women’s Participation in Local Water Governance: Understanding Institutional Contradictions2006Ingår i: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 61-76Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of women in local water governance is currently envisaged as necessary for achieving sustainable management of water resources. Towards this end, institutions are being created in many developing countries enabling the participation of local people in the use and management of resources. How effective is the participation of women as makers and shapers within local water governance institutions—and how does their participation translate into benefits for their communities? How realistic is this participatory strategy in the traditional rural contexts of the developing world? Based on empirical evidence from rural India, where women do not constitute a homogenous group, this article seeks to explore how social and power differences among them thwart the beneficial effects of water governance in communities. The findings underscore the need to develop a holistic understanding of the institutional factors that differentiate among women and the implications of these on mechanisms of water governance put in place at the local level.

  • 24.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, Sweden.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, Sweden.
    Women and community water supply programmes: An analysis from a socio-cultural perspective2005Ingår i: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 213-223Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Community water supply programmes are seen as instrumental in achieving the goal of ‘safe’ water for all. Women, aprincipal target group of these programmes, are to be benefited with greater convenience, enhanced socio-cultural oppor-tunities and better health for themselves and their families, provided through improved water facilities. Water supplyprogrammes largely consist of three essential components, namely: technology, people and institutions. Although suchprogrammes are intended to benefit women members of local communities, scant attention is paid to the impacts of thesocio-cultural context of the community on these programmes. This article explores the influence of social and culturalintricacies on the implementation of community water supply programmes, and assesses their effectiveness. The articleoffers important lessons for the design and implementation of this type of programme. It concludes that the local socio-cultural context sets the stage for programme implementation, being a dynamic factor that determines actual access to watersources, more so than mere physical availability, which is often used as a criterion for programme performance. The articlestresses the urgent need to integrate socio-cultural factors as a fourth dimension in designing community water supplyprogrammes, and suggests practical measures for enhancing the effectiveness of such programmes.

  • 25. Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    Jacks, Gunnar
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    Women and Modern Domestic Water Supply Systems: Need for a Holistic Perspective2004Ingår i: Water resources management, ISSN 0920-4741, E-ISSN 1573-1650, Vol. 18, s. 237-248Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    As domestic water managers, the strategic need of women has been identified as havingaccess to domestic water sources that are convenient, reliable and located close to home. The needhas been addressed through installation of low cost improved water supply systems in different partsof the developing world. While the need of women as domestic water managers has been globallyarticulated and addressed, perhaps adequate attention has not been drawn to the fact that this roleis actually performed within the context of local communities where domestic water managementactivities are built upon the users’ perceived needs to be fulfilled through culturally appropriatemeans. How do cultural intricacies in local communities influence the water fetching behaviour ofwomen? What is the impact of such factors on the adoption and utilization of modern domestic watersupply systems? The paper explores the implications of local cultural realities for the effectiveness ofhandpump as a modern domestic water supply system arguing that the locally perceived water needsof women are holistic and fail to be adequately addressed through the new source. Consequently, ithas been admitted only as an ‘add on’ source, thereby hindering achievement of the basic objectiveof bringing women greater comfort, better health and socio-economic empowerment.

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