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  • 1.
    Eklund, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Informat & Media, Uppsala, Sweden..
    von Essen, Emma
    Stockholm Univ, Swedish Inst Social Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jonsson, Fatima
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Game Design, Campus Gotland, Visby, Sweden..
    Beyond a Dichotomous Understanding of Online Anonymity: Bridging the Macro and Micro Level2022In: Sociological Research Online, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 486-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anonymity on the Internet is a contentious issue; by some seen as an important freedom to be protected, while others argue for increased identification to protect groups at risk of exploitation. The debate reflects a dichotomous view of online anonymity; you are, or you are not anonymous. However, anonymity is a complex process played out on different levels and defined by various actors. While empirical studies show this, theoretical synthesis is lacking. This essay provides perspective on anonymity online by comparing two critical cases, online auctions and online gaming, we corroborate results from a 4-year interdisciplinary project with researchers from sociology, economics, and computer and system sciences. We argue that one should talk about anonymities in plural form, as online anonymity is not a state but a relational process. We put forth a conceptual model, which unpacks online anonymity as interdependent macro structures - legal, commercial, and technological - and micro/meso facets - factual, social group, and physical - to be used in future research.

  • 2.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Bal, Zelal
    Uppsala universitet, Sverige.
    Digitala utmaningar med onlineundervisning: social närvaro på distans2022In: Digitala didaktiska dilemman / [ed] Sofia Lundmark; Janne Kontio, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2022, p. 141-164Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Hansson, Karin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Activism as a pedagogical resource2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this text, the promises of activism as pedagogical resource in higher education are discussed. What are the pedagogical promises of activism in higher education? How can we as teachers create a space for activism when designing courses and in our teaching practices? Based on our experience as teachers, scholars, and activists in higher education, we propose that activism could be used as a pedagogical resource that cater for students’ engagement in the “real” world matters. It could be grounded in a pedagogy of hope, community, and collectivism. Activism in higher education is an act of resistance to dominant forces of capitalism, consumption, patriarchy, hyper-individualism and postcolonialism that historically have and still influence higher education. Used as a pedagogical resource it allows us to recognize students as well as ourselves as teachers and scholars as political subjects.

  • 4.
    Rosén, Anton
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Lundmark, Sofia
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology. Stockholms Universitet.
    Håkansson, Jesper
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Control and reward in online dating practices: a study of users’ experiences of Tinder2017In: The 18th annual meeting of the Association of Internet Researchers (AoIR 2017): Networked Publics, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a study of users experiences and practices of meeting potential new partners online through the use of the mobile dating service Tinder. The aim of the study is to explore how users experience design features and functionalities for online dating practices. By exploring the use of functionalities and features in the location-based mobile application Tinder, we offer a broad understanding of the relationship between designed functionalities and dating practices that users experience through these features. The empirical material presented in the paper is drawn from a study based on a mixed method approach, combining an initial observational study, an online survey, with focus group interviews. Four specific designed functions are highlighted in our empirical data: the connection with Facebook, the profile cards of users, the swipe-centered mutual match function, and geographical proximity. These functions contribute to the specific user experiences of control and reward. Our findings indicate that online dating practices are formed by an inseparable interplay of design functionalities, users attitudes and the use of specific mobile applications that taken together contributes to the overall online dating experiences.

  • 5.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology. Stockholm University.
    Lundmark, Sofia
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology. Uppsala University.
    An interaction approach for norm-critical design analysis of interface design2014In: CaTaC’14: Culture, Technology, Communication: Celebration, Transformation, New Directions [online proceening], 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we argue for the need of a methodological framework for analysing the design of websites from a norm-critical perspective. Identifying some issues and challenges in previous studies on norms and values in interface design we suggest an approach for analysing norms in websites and user interfaces based on sociological and cultural perspectives on design. Approaching norms in interface design we understand design in terms of resources for interaction, involving four aspects of interaction: cultural representations, technology, interactivity, and context.

  • 6.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Hanging out in the game café: Contextualising co-located computer game play practices and experiences2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What social practices are people involved when staying in a game café? What kind of social setting is the game café? What are the attitudes towards playing computer games at home and in public among parents? What are the media representations of co-located game playing in public? What are the sensory experiences of playing co-located game play in public? This dissertation gives a descriptive and analytical account of the contexts and meanings of playing co-located computer games in public settings such as game cafés and LAN parties. The overall aim with the dissertation is to describe and investigate the social and cultural meanings and contexts of playing computer games in a game café. The research questions have been investigated in four empirical studies.

    The dissertation shows that people are involved in various social practices and activities aimed at supporting and maintaining social relationships among friends and peers. The game café can be seen as a third place, as it used by players for recreation and an escape from the pressure of home and school, a place which feels like home, is familiar and welcoming. However the game café is a limited third place used by young men who likes to play online and network games. The dissertation also shows how the social environment provides for specific sensory experiences. These sensory experiences involve sitting together side by side slapping each other’s shoulders and legs, eating candies and drinking sodas, listening to music. The representations of co-located game playing in public reproduce traditional gender roles where professional gamers are represented by men and causal gamers are represented by women (and men) as well as construct youth as party lovers. The study also suggests that parents’ attitudes towards their children playing games in public draw on traditional values and ideas about children’s play and social relationships.

  • 7.
    Eklund, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Time to play: the rationalization of leisure time2012In: Proceedings of the 2012 iConference, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 145-151Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how rationalization logic and rationalization processes influence digital gaming by looking at how players value and manage the time they spend on games. The study is framed in a discussion of leisure time, critical theories of computation and rationalization theory. Qualitative interview data is used in an inductive and phenomenology inspired approach. The results show two frames of understanding of gaming. First, games are perceived as media products and playing as a waste of time. Secondly, digital gaming is a hobby, a social activity highly valued within the framework of a rational time economy. We conclude that even though we are seeing a rationalization of leisure time in gaming, that rationalization process must be understood in the context of individualization within the new network society. This means that players are involved in a 'rational individualization' process where their management of leisure time and gaming activities are part of an ongoing identity project.

  • 8.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Verhagen, Harko
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Senses Working Overtime: On Sensuous Experiences and Public Computer Game Play2011In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we will discuss players’ experience of computer games in terms of sight, sound, taste, smell, and touch. We discuss how senses shape and give meaning to players’ game play experiences in the game café and a mass LAN party. We also discuss how the social environments in which games are played impact on the experience of playing games. The data is drawn on a field study of public gameplay in a game café and a mass LAN party in Sweden. We conclude by highlighting that the social atmosphere is key to understanding public game play experiences.

  • 9.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Verhagen, Harko
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Sensing game play: Exploring game play in a game cafe and a Mass LAN party2011In: Computer Games (CGAMES), 2011, Piscataway, N.J.: IEEE Communications Society, 2011, p. 134-141Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we discuss the sensory experiences of playing computer games by exploring the sight, the sound, the taste, smell, and touch of games. We reflect on how senses and the social atmosphere gives meaning to players’ experiences of playing computer games in two co-located public settings, a game café and a mass LAN party. This discussion is related to a more general discussion concerning what it means to participate and play online and network games in a game café and a mass LAN party. The discussion is based on a field study in Sweden. We conclude by highlighting the different experiences of playing computer games and participating in those colocated game settings. In the game café playing computer games is a rather ordinary and mundane activity while playing games in the mass LAN party is to a large extent a sensational and extra ordinary event.

  • 10.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    A public place of their own: A field study of a game café as a third place2010In: Proceedings of DiGRA Nordic 2010: Experiencing Games: Games, Play, and Players, Tampere: Digra , 2010, p. -8Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the meaning and function of the game café as a ‘Third place’ for boys and young men who play games in a game café. As there has been relatively little focus on game cafés in Western Europe as compared to studies of game cafés in Asia this paper examines the meaning and function of a game café in Sweden. This is achieved through an ethnographic study of a game café in central Stockholm. The author argues that the game café functions as a public place of their own. This means that for this group the game café is an escape from the moral judgments and parental restrictions and control at home. It also provides young men with a local hang out to maintain, negotiate and establish relationships with friends, peers and like minded through gaming. This place is a rather restricted third place which fosters interaction within a homogenous community of people of the same gender and age group. Therefore the game café shares more similarities with a sport club than a traditional café.

  • 11.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Go out and Play: The construction of public game play in a Swedish contextIn: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how co-located computer game play in public is valued and constructed by mass media, parents, and staff in a Swedish context. The article argues that by viewing co-located game playing in public as a youth leisure activity, we can reach a fuller understanding of the norms and values surrounding computer game playing as a social phenomenon. Data was collected through interviews with parents and staff and by analyzing articles in Swedish newspapers. Findings show that newspaper reports on game cafés and LAN parties construct game playing as a sport or fun. These constructions reproduce gender stereotypes. Parents’ attitudes towards public game play are both positive and negative and constructed around themes such as problematic or non problematic game playing. Staff and parent discourses on game playing reflect a wider concern reading leisure and youth, such as activities young people should be engaged in at their leisure.

1 - 11 of 11
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