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  • 1.
    Vinogradova, Olena
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Palm, Veronica
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, MARIS (Maritime Archaeological Research Institute).
    Rönnby, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, MARIS (Maritime Archaeological Research Institute). Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Archaeology.
    Dahl, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Almgren, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jon
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Anne Birgitte
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Christine
    Lund University, Sweden; St Andrews University, UK.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    3000 Years of past regional and local land-use and land-cover change in the southeastern Swedish coastal area: Early human-induced increases in landscape openness as a potential nutrient source to the Baltic Sea coastal waters2024In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 56-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reconstructions of past land use and related land-cover changes at local and regional scales are needed to evaluate the potential long-term impacts of land use on the coastal waters of the Baltic Sea. In this purpose, we selected the Gamleby area at the Swedish Baltic Sea coast for a case study. We use a new, high resolution pollen record from a small lake (Lillsjön) located 3.6 km NNW of the bay Gamlebyviken and detailed analysis of the available archeological data to reconstruct local land-use changes over the last 3000 years. To estimate land-cover change at local (2–3 km radius area) and regional (50 km radius area) scales we use four additional, published pollen records from two small and two large lakes (25–70 km S of Lillsjön) and the Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm, a pollen-vegetation modeling scheme. Results show that regional and local (small lakes Lillsjön and Hyttegöl) land-cover changes are comparable over the last 1500 years (Late Iron Age to present), and that landscape openness was much larger locally than regionally (difference of 20–40% cover over the last 500 years). The periods of largest potential impacts on the Gamlebyviken Bay from regional and local land use are 200–950 CE (Late Iron Age) and 1450 CE to present, and of lowest potential impacts 950–1450 CE. The question on whether the large landscape openness 1150–50 BCE and significant afforestation 50 BCE–200 CE reconstructed for Lillsjön’s area are characteristic of the Gamlebyviken region will require additional pollen records in the catchment area. 

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  • 2.
    Dahl, Martin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Gullström, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Bernabeu, I.
    Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CEAB‐CSIC), Spain.
    Serrano, O.
    Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CEAB‐CSIC),Spain, Edith Cowan University, Australia.
    Leiva-Dueñas, C.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Linderholm, H. W.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Asplund, M. E.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björk, M.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ou, T.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, J. R.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Bergman, S.
    UiT—The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Braun, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Eklöf, A.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ežerinskis, Z.
    Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Lithuania.
    Garbaras, A.
    Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Lithuania.
    Hällberg, P.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Löfgren, E.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kylander, M. E.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Masqué, P.
    Edith Cowan University, Australia, PrincipalityofMonaco,Monaco.
    Šapolaitė, J.
    Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Lithuania.
    Smittenberg, R.
    Stockholm University, Sweden, Principality of Monaco, Monaco.
    Mateo, M. A.
    Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CEAB‐CSIC), Spain, Edith Cowan University, Australia.
    A 2,000-Year Record of Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.): Colonization Shows Substantial Gains in Blue Carbon Storage and Nutrient Retention2024In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224, Vol. 38, no 3, article id e2023GB008039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessing historical environmental conditions linked to habitat colonization is important for understanding long-term resilience and improving conservation and restoration efforts. Such information is lacking for the seagrass Zostera marina, an important foundation species across cold-temperate coastal areas of the Northern Hemisphere. Here, we reconstructed environmental conditions during the last 14,000 years from sediment cores in two eelgrass (Z. marina) meadows along the Swedish west coast, with the main aims to identify the time frame of seagrass colonization and describe subsequent biogeochemical changes following establishment. Based on vegetation proxies (lipid biomarkers), eelgrass colonization occurred about 2,000 years ago after geomorphological changes that resulted in a shallow, sheltered environment favoring seagrass growth. Seagrass establishment led to up to 20- and 24-fold increases in sedimentary carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates, respectively. This demonstrates the capacity of seagrasses as efficient ecosystem engineers and their role in global change mitigation and adaptation through CO2 removal, and nutrient and sediment retention. By combining regional climate projections and landscape models, we assessed potential climate change effects on seagrass growth, productivity and distribution until 2100. These predictions showed that seagrass meadows are mostly at risk from increased sedimentation and hydrodynamic changes, while the impact from sea level rise alone might be of less importance in the studied area. This study showcases the positive feedback between seagrass colonization and environmental conditions, which holds promise for successful conservation and restoration efforts aimed at supporting climate change mitigation and adaptation, and the provision of several other crucial ecosystem services. © 2024. The Authors.

  • 3.
    Katrantsiotis, Christos
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Dahl, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Palm, Veronica
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, MARIS (Maritime Archaeological Research Institute). Västerviks Museum, Sweden.
    Rönnby, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Archaeology. Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, MARIS (Maritime Archaeological Research Institute).
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Holocene relative sea level changes in the Vastervik-Gamlebyviken region on the southeast coast of Sweden, southern Baltic Sea2023In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 206-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We reconstruct the Holocene shore displacement of the Vastervik-Gamlebyviken area on the southeast coast of Sweden, characterised by a maritime cultural landscape and archaeological significance since the Mesolithic. Sediment cores were retrieved from four lake basins that have been raised above sea level due to the postglacial land uplift and eustatic sea level changes after the melting of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet. The cores were radiocarbon dated and analysed for loss on ignition and diatoms. The isolation thresholds of the basins were determined using LiDAR data. The results provide evidence for the initiation of the first Littorina Sea transgression in this area at 8.5 thousand calibrated years before present (cal. ka BP). A relative sea level rise by similar to 7 m a.s.l. is recorded between 8.0 and 7.5 cal. ka BP with a highstand at similar to 22 m a.s.l. between 7.5 and 6.2 cal. ka BP. These phases coincide with the second and third Littorina Sea transgressions, respectively, in the Blekinge area, southern Sweden and are consistent with the final deglaciation of North America. After 6.2 cal. ka BP, the relative sea level dropped below 22 m a.s.l., and remained at similar to 20 m a.s.l. until 4.6 cal. ka BP coinciding with the fourth Littorina Sea transgression in Blekinge. From 4.6 to 4.2 cal. ka BP, the shore displacement shows a regression rate of 10 mm a(-1) followed by a slowdown with a mean value of 4.6 mm a(-1) until 1.6 cal. ka BP, when the relative sea level dropped below 3.3 m a.s.l. The Middle to Late Holocene highstand and other periods of minor sea level transgressions and/or higher salinity between 6.2 and 1.7 cal. ka BP are attributed to a combination of warmer climate and higher inflow of saline waters in the southern Baltic Sea due to stronger westerlies, caused by variations in the North Atlantic atmospheric patterns.

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  • 4.
    Moberg, Christina
    et al.
    EASAC; KTH, Sverige.
    Wolrath Söderberg, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric.
    Sandberg, Linn
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Lindblad, Inger
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Sjöholm, Cecilia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Aesthetics.
    Gullström, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lalander, Rickard
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Vallström, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Porseryd, Tove
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Grahn, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Smith, Nicholas
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Philosophy.
    Lehtilä, Kari
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Cederberg, Carl
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Svärd, Veronica
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Bornemark, Jonna
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Bergkvist, Anna-Mia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Gunnarson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Persson, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Jacobsson, Ellen
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Spånberger Weitz, Ylva
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Diderichsen, Öjvind
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Teacher Education and Aesthetic Learning Processes.
    Gilek, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Garrison, Julie
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Pröckl, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Janzén, Therese
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Dobers, Peter
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Dinnétz, Patrik
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Westerberg, Charles
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Elmersjö, Magdalena
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Bisander, Thea
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Oreskovic, Nikolina
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Fröhlig, Florence
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Stedt, Kristoffer
    Göteborgs universitet, Sverige.
    De unga gör helt rätt när de stämmer staten: 1 620 forskare och lärare i forskarvärlden: Vi ställer oss bakom Auroras klimatkrav2022In: Aftonbladet, no 2022-12-07, p. 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi, 1 620 forskare samt lärare vid universitet och högskolor, är eniga med de unga bakom Auroramålet: De drabbas och riskerar att drabbas allvarligt av klimatkrisen under sin livstid. De klimatåtgärder vi vidtar i närtid avgör deras framtid. Sverige måste ta ansvar och göra sin rättvisa andel av det globala klimatarbetet. 

    I strid med Parisavtalet ökar utsläppen av växthusgaser i en takt som gör att 1,5-gradersmålet kan överskridas om några år. De globala effekterna blir allt mer synliga med ständiga temperaturrekord, smältande isar, havshöjning och extremväder som torka, förödande bränder och skyfall med enorma översvämningar, som i Pakistan nyligen. Försörjningen av befolkningen utsätts för allvarliga hot i många länder.

    Minskningen av den biologiska mångfalden är extrem. Klimatkrisen är enligt WHO det största hotet mot människors hälsa i hela världen och barn utgör en särskilt sårbar grupp. Med Sveriges nordliga läge sker uppvärmningen här dubbelt så fort som det globala genomsnittet. Det förskjuter utbredningsområden för växtlighet och sjukdomsbärande insekter och ökar förekomsten av extremväder såsom värmeböljor, skogsbränder och översvämningar samt av många olika sorters infektioner och allergier. När extremväder ökar, ökar även stressen och risken för mental ohälsa. Värmeböljor ökar risken för sjukdom och död hos sårbara grupper som äldre, små barn och personer med kroniska sjukdomar. De negativa effekterna på hälsan kommer att öka i takt med klimatkrisen och barn riskerar att drabbas av ackumulerade negativa hälsoeffekter under hela sina liv. Redan i dag är mer än hälften av unga mellan 12 och 18 år i Sverige ganska eller mycket oroliga för klimat och miljö. Detta är förståeligt när våra beslutsfattare inte gör vad som krävs.

    Den juridiska och moraliska grunden för arbetet mot klimatförändringarna är att varje land måste göra sin rättvisa andel av det globala klimatarbetet. Centralt i det internationella klimatramverket är att rika länder med höga historiska utsläpp, däribland Sverige, måste gå före resten av världen. Dessa länder måste också bidra till att finansiera klimatomställningen i länderna i det Globala Syd, som är minst ansvariga för klimatkrisen men drabbas hårdast. Denna rättviseprincip är tydlig i Parisavtalet och var en het diskussionsfråga under COP27 i Sharm el-Sheikh, men lyser med sin frånvaro i det svenska klimatarbetet. 

    Sverige har satt mål för att minska sina utsläpp. Men de är helt otillräckliga: minskningstakten är för låg och målen tillåter samtidigt att åtgärder skjuts på framtiden. Dessutom exkluderas merparten av Sveriges utsläpp från de svenska nationella utsläppsmålen; bland annat utelämnas utsläpp som svensk konsumtion orsakar utanför Sveriges gränser, utsläpp från utrikes transporter och utsläpp från markanvändning och skogsbruk, exempelvis utsläpp från förbränning av biobränslen eller utsläpp från dikade våtmarker (Prop. 2016/17:146 s.25-28).

    Sverige saknar dessutom ett eget mål för att öka upptaget av växthusgaser genom utökat skydd och restaurering av ekosystem, något som krävs för att begränsa de värsta konsekvenserna av klimatkrisen (IPCC s.32). Trots dessa låga ambitioner misslyckas Sverige med att nå sina utsläppsmål, konstaterar både Klimatpolitiska rådet och Naturvårdsverket. En klimatpolitik i linje med Parisavtalet kräver både att alla typer av växthusgasutsläpp minskar samtidigt som – inte i stället för – upptaget av växthusgaser maximeras: i dag misslyckas Sverige på bägge fronter.

    Slutsatsen är tydlig. Sverige vidtar inte de åtgärder som krävs för att skydda barns och ungdomars rättigheter enligt Europakonventionen till skydd för de mänskliga rättigheterna. Detta medför allvarliga risker för liv och hälsa för unga generationer, människor i andra länder och särskilt utsatta grupper. Detta kan inte fortsätta. Därför ställer vi oss bakom Auroras krav att Sverige börjar göra sin rättvisa andel och omedelbart sätter igång ett omfattande och långtgående klimatarbete som vilar på vetenskaplig grund och sätter rättvisa i centrum.

  • 5.
    Gerhardt, Karin
    et al.
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Sverige.
    Wolrath Söderberg, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric.
    Lindblad, Inger
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Diderichsen, Öjvind
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Teacher Education and Aesthetic Learning Processes.
    Gullström, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Dahlin, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric.
    Köping Olsson, Ann-Sofie
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Lehtilä, Kari
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Rasoal, Chato
    Södertörn University, School of Police Studies.
    Dobers, Peter
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Johansson, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Berndt, Kurt D.
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Mathematics Education.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Kjellqvist, Tomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lalander, Rickard
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Vallström, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Alvarsson-Hjort, Jesper
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Sjöholm, Cecilia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Aesthetics.
    Lönngren, Ann-Sofie
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Comparative Literature.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Färjsjö, Eva
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Mathematics Education.
    Porseryd, Tove
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Sio, Miriam
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Teacher Education and Aesthetic Learning Processes.
    Yazdanpanah, Soheyla
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Pihl Skoog, Emma
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Archive Studies.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Gallardo Fernández, Gloria L.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Wadstein MacLeod, Katarina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Garrison, Julie
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Svärd, Veronica
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Hajighasemi, Ali
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Spånberger Weitz, Ylva
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Elmersjö, Magdalena
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Persson, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Borevi, Karin
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Löfgren, Isabel
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ghose, Sheila
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Bornemark, Jonna
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Podolian, Olena
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Grahn, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Faber, Hugo
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Cederberg, Carl
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Gradén, Mattias
    Högskolan Dalarna, Sverige.
    Nog nu, politiker – ta klimatkrisen på allvar2022In: Aftonbladet, no 2022-08-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Sanyal, Anushree
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Larsson, Josefine
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    van Wirdum, Falkje
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Moros, Matthias
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, Rostock, Germany.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Not dead yet: Diatom resting spores can survive in nature for several millennia2022In: American Journal of Botany, ISSN 0002-9122, E-ISSN 1537-2197, p. 67-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PREMISE: Understanding the adaptive capacities of species over long timescales lies in examining the revived recent and millennia old resting spores buried in sediments. We show for the first time the revival, viability and germination rate of resting spores of the diatom Chaetoceros deposited in sub-seafloor sediments from three ages (recent: 0-80 years; ancient: ~1250 (Medieval Climate Anomaly) and ~6600 (Holocene Thermal Maximum) calendar year before present.

    METHODS: Recent and ancient Chaetoceros spores were revived to examine their viability and germination rate. Light and scanning electron microscopy and Sanger sequencing was done to identify the species.

    KEY RESULTS: We show that ~6600 cal. year BP old Chaetoceros resting spores are still viable and the vegetative reproduction in recent and ancient resting spores vary. The time taken to germinate is three hours to 2-3 days in both recent and ancient spores, but the germination rate of the spores decreased with increasing age. The germination rate of the recent spores was ~41% while that of the ancient spores were ~31% and ~12% for the ~1250 and ~6600 cal. year BP old resting spores. Based on the morphology of the germinated vegetative cells we identified the species as Chaetoceros muelleri var. subsalsum. Sanger sequences of nuclear and chloroplast markers identified the species as Chaetoceros muelleri.

    CONCLUSIONS: We identify a unique model system, Chaetoceros muelleri var. subsalsum and show that recent and ancient resting spores of the species buried in sediments in the Baltic Sea can be revived and used for long-term evolutionary studies.

  • 7.
    Warnock, Jonathan
    et al.
    Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, United States.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Juggins, Steve
    Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
    Lewis, Jonathan
    Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Ryves, David B.
    Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Weckström, Kaarina
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    A high‐resolution diatom‐based Middle and Late Holocene environmental history of the Little Belt region, Baltic Sea2020In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large‐scale shifts in the salinity of the Baltic Sea over the Holocene are well understood and have been comprehensively documented using sedimentary proxy records. More recent work has focused on understanding how past salinity fluctuations have affected other ecological parameters (e.g. primary productivity, nutrient content) of the Baltic basin, and salinity changes over key events and over short time scales are still not well understood. The International Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 347 cored the Baltic basin in order to collect basin‐wide environmental records through a glacial–interglacial cycle. Site M0059 is located in the Little Belt between the Baltic Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. A composite splice section from Site M0059 was analysed at a decadal resolution to study changes in salinity, nutrient conditions and other surface water column parameters based on changes in diatom assemblages and on quantitative diatom‐based salinity inferences. A mesotrophic slightly brackish assemblage is seen in the lowermost analysed depths, corresponding to 7800–7500 cal. a BP. An increase in salinity and nutrient content of the water column leads into a meso‐eutrophic brackish phase. The observed salinity increase is rapid, lasting from 7500 to 7150 cal. a BP. Subsequently, the Little Belt becomes oligotrophic and is dominated by tychopelagic diatoms from c. 7100 to c. 3900 cal. a BP. This interval contains some of the highest salinities observed followed by diatom assemblages similar to those of the Northern Atlantic Ocean, composed primarily of cosmopolitan open ocean marine diatoms. A return to tychopelagic productivity is seen from 3850 to 980 cal. a BP. Anthropogenic eutrophication is detected in the last 300 years of the record, which intensifies in the uppermost sediments. These results represent the first decadally resolved record in the region and provide new insight into the transition to a brackish basin and subsequent ecological development.

  • 8.
    Bathmann, Ulrich
    et al.
    Leibniz-Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde, Germany.
    Schubert, Hendrik
    University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Tuomi, Laura
    Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Radziejewska, Teresa
    University of Szczecin, Szczecin, Poland.
    Kulinski, Karol
    Institute of Oceanology of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Sopot, Poland.
    Chubarenko, Irina
    Shirshov Institute of Oceanology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
    Editorial: Living Along Gradients: Past, Present, Future2020In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 6, article id 801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea is a geologically and evolutionarily young part of the coastal ocean that experienced, in its past, several severe environmental changes. In its present state, the Baltic Sea is characterized by both horizontal and vertical gradients of environmental conditions. As a huge estuary, it shows a west to east/south to north surface salinity gradient from 24 in Kattegat to nearly freshwater in the Bothnian Bay. The vertical salinity and oxygen gradients result in stratification which causes hypoxic and sulfidic anoxic conditions in deep basins. These gradient systems are impacted by natural and anthropogenic changes due to physico-chemical driving forces, varying over time and space. Gradient environments produce an imprint on both the structure and function of the biological systems and influence biogeochemical cycling. Besides, coastal seas in general and the Baltic Sea in particular, experience constant and direct influence from land with consequences to matter and energy cycles, biogeochemical interactions, energy fluxes, and sediment dynamics. “Living along gradients: past, present, future” in the Baltic are today’s very important aspects that rise questions like which of the effects we are detecting occur naturally, and which are driven by human activities. Deciphering past environmental changes and their causes provide keys to understand and simulate possible future scenarios, all of which should rise societal awareness and implementation of appropriate marine and coastal policies. Present-day knowledge on the dynamics of gradient systems, on the processes that affect the coastal sea environment, the results of interaction between coastal seas and society, the detection or reconstruction of past and present changes on time scales from inter-annual to millennial, and future change models are summarized here, with the idea to stimulate scientific exchange on most complex questions, addressing them from different perspectives.

  • 9.
    Andrén, Elinor
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    van Wirdum, Falkje
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Norbäck Ivarsson, Lena
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Moros, Matthias
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, Rostock, Germany.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Medieval versus recent environmental conditions in the Baltic Proper, what was different a thousand years ago?2020In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 555, article id 109878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sediment record from the western Gotland Basin, northwestern Baltic Proper, covering the last 1200 years, was investigated for past changes in climate and the environment using diatoms as a proxy. The aim is to compare the environmental conditions reconstructed during Medieval times with settings occurring the last century under influence of environmental stressors like eutrophication and climate change. The study core records more marine conditions in the western Gotland Basin surface waters during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; 950–1250C.E.), with a salinity of at least 8 psu compared to the present 6.5 psu. The higher salinity together with a strong summer-autumn stratification caused by warmer climate resulted in extensive long-lasting diatom blooms of Pseudosolenia calcar-avis, effectively enhancing the vertical export of organic carbon to the sediment and contributing to benthic hypoxia. Accordingly, our data support that a warm and dry climate induced the extensive hypoxic areas in the open Baltic Sea during the MCA. During the Little ice Age (LIA; 1400–1700C.E.), the study core records oxic bottom water conditions, decreasing salinity and less primary production. This was succeeded during the 20th century, about 1940, by environmental changes caused by human-induced eutrophication. Impact of climate change is visible in the diatom composition data starting about 1975C.E. and becoming more pronounced 2000C.E., visible as an increase of taxa that thrived in stratified waters during autumn blooms typically due to climate warming.

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  • 10.
    Norbäck Ivarsson, Lena
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Moros, Matthias
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, Rostock, Germany.
    Andersen, Thorbjörn Joest
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching. University of Gävle.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Baltic Sea Coastal Eutrophication in a Thousand Year Perspective2019In: Frontiers in Environmental Science, E-ISSN 2296-665X, Vol. 7, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sediment cores from three sites along the east-coast of Sweden, north-western Baltic Proper, have been studied with respect to lithologies, geochemistry and diatom assemblages to trace and date early human impact with emphasis on nutrient discharge. The three sites Bråviken, Himmerfjärden and Ådfjärden, have been impacted to various degree during the last millennia by multiple stressors like excessive nutrient discharge and hazardous substances, leading to coastal hypoxia, eutrophication and pollution. These stressors are mainly caused by drivers in the drainage area as increased human population, changed land use and point sources as industries and a sewage treatment plant. Even though their detailed history differs, the results show similar general patterns for all three sites. We find no evidence in our data from the coastal zone supporting the hypothesis that the extensive areal distribution of hypoxia in the open Baltic Sea during the Medieval Climate Anomaly was caused by human impact. Timing of the onset of man-made eutrophication, as identified from d15N and changes in diatom composition, differs between the three sites, reflecting the site specific geography and local environmental histories of these areas. The onset of eutrophication dates to 1800 CE in Bråviken and Himmerfjärden areas, and to 1900 CE in the less urban area of Ådfjärden. We conclude that the recorded environmental changes during the last centuries are unique in a thousand year perspective.

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  • 11.
    van Wirdum, Falkje
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Wienholz, D.
    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Kotthoff, U.
    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Moros, M.
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, Rostock, Germany.
    Fanget, A. -S
    University of Perpignan, Perpignan, France.
    Seidenkrantz, M. -S
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Middle to late holocene variations in salinity and primary productivity in the central Baltic Sea: A multiproxy study from the landsort deep2019In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 6, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic forcing has led to an increased extent of hypoxic bottom areas in the Baltic Sea during recent decades. The Baltic Sea ecosystem is naturally prone to the development of hypoxic conditions due to its geographical, hydrographical, geological, and climate features. Besides the current spreading of hypoxia, the Baltic Sea has experienced two extensive periods of hypoxic conditions during the Holocene, caused by changing climate conditions during the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM; 8–4.8 cal ka BP) and the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; 1–0.7 cal ka BP). We studied the variations in surface and bottom water salinity and primary productivity and their relative importance for the development and termination of hypoxia by using microfossil and geochemical data from a sediment core retrieved from the Landsort Deep during IODP Expedition 347 (Site M0063). Our findings demonstrate that increased salinity was of major importance for the development of hypoxic conditions during the HTM. In contrast, we could not clearly relate the termination of this hypoxic period to salinity changes. The reconstructed high primary productivity associated with the hypoxic period during the MCA is not accompanied by considerable increases in salinity. Our proxies for salinity show a decreasing trend before, during and after the MCA. Therefore, we suggest that this period of hypoxia is primarily driven by increasing temperatures due to the warmer climate. These results highlight the importance of natural climate driven changes in salinity and primary productivity for the development of hypoxia during a warming climate.

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  • 12.
    Ning, W.
    et al.
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Nielsen, A.B.
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden; Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystems Science, Lund University, Sweden.
    Norbäck Ivarsson, Lena
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Jilber, T.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands; Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Åkesson, C.M.
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden; Department of Biological Science, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, USA.
    Slomp, C.P.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Broström, A.
    The Archaeologists, Swedish National Historical Museums, Lund, Sweden.
    Filipsson, H.L.
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Anthropogenic and climatic impacts on a coastal environment in the Baltic Sea over the last 1000 years2018In: Anthropocene, E-ISSN 2213-3054, Vol. 21, p. 66-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coastal environments have experienced large ecological changes as a result of human activities over the last 100−200 years. To understand the severity and potential consequences of such changes, paleoenvironmental records provide important contextual information. The Baltic Sea coastal zone is naturally a vulnerable system and subject to significant human-induced impacts. To put the recent environmental degradation in the Baltic coastal zone into a long-term perspective, and to assess the natural and anthropogenic drivers of environmental change, we present sedimentary records covering the last 1000 years obtained from a coastal inlet (Gåsfjärden) and a nearby lake (Lake Storsjön) in Sweden. We investigate the links between a pollen-based land cover reconstruction from Lake Storsjön and paleoenvironmental variables from Gåsfjärden itself, including diatom assemblages,organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) contents, stable C and N isotopic ratios, and biogenic silica contents. The Lake Storsjön record shows that regional land use was characterized by small-scale agricultural activity between 900 and 1400 CE, which slightly intensified between 1400 and 1800 CE. Substantial expansion of cropland was observed between 1800 and 1950 CE, before afforestation between 1950 and 2010 CE. From the Gåsfjärden record, prior to 1800 CE, relatively minor changes in the diatom and geochemical proxies were found. The onset of cultural eutrophication in Gåsfjärden can be traced to the 1800s and intensified land use is identified as the main driver. Anthropogenic activities in the 20th century have caused unprecedented ecosystem changes in the coastal inlet, as reflected in the diatom composition and geochemical proxies.

  • 13.
    Warnock, J.P.
    et al.
    University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, PA, USA.
    Bauersachs, T.
    Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany.
    Kotthoff, U.
    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Brandt, H.-T.
    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Holocene environmental history of the Ångermanälven Estuary, northern Baltic Sea2018In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 593-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea has experienced a complex geological history, with notable swings in salinity driven by changes to its connection with the Atlantic and glacio-isostatic rebound. Sediments obtained during International Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 347 allow the study of the effects of these changes on the ecology of the Baltic in high resolution through the Holocene in areas where continuous records had not always been available. Sites M0061 and M0062, drilled in the Ångermanälven Estuary (northern Baltic Sea), contain records of Holocene-aged sediments and microfossils. Here we present detailed records of palaeoecological and palaeoenvironmental changes to the Ångermanälven Estuary inferred from diatom, palynomorph and organic-geochemical data. Based on diatom assemblages, the record is divided into four zones that comprise the Ancylus Lake, Littorina Sea, Post-Littorina Sea and Recent Baltic Sea stages. The Ancylus Lake phase is initially characterized as oligotrophic, with the majority of primary productivity in the upper water column. This transition to a eutrophic state continues into the Initial Littorina Sea stage. The Initial Littorina Sea stage contains the most marine phase recorded here, as well as low surface water temperatures. These conditions end before the Littorina Sea stage, which is marked by a return to oligotrophic conditions and warmer waters of the Holocene Thermal Maximum. Glacio-isostatic rebound leads to a shallowing of the water column, allowing for increased benthic primary productivity and stratification of the water column. The Medieval Climate Anomaly is also identified within Post-Littorina Sea sediments. Modern Baltic sediments and evidence of human-induced eutrophication are seen. Human influence upon the Baltic Sea begins c. 1700 cal. a BP and becomes more intense c. 215 cal. a BP.

     

  • 14.
    Weckström, Kaarina
    et al.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Chopenhagen, Denmark.
    Lewis, Jonathan P.
    Loughborough University, Leicestershire, UK.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Ellegaard, Marianne
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Rasmussen, Peter
    National Museum of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark .
    Telford, Richard
    Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway .
    Palaeoenvironmental History of the Baltic Sea: One of the Largest Brackish-Water Ecosystems in the World2017In: Applications of Paleoenvironmental Techniques in Estuarine Studies / [ed] Weckström, Kaarina; Saunders, Krystyna M.; Gell, Peter A.; Skilbeck, C. Gregory, Springer Netherlands, 2017, p. 615-662Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The past of the Baltic Sea has been intensively investigated using a wealth of techniques. By far the largest number of studies has focused on sea level and salinity changes, driven by global climate and isostatic crustal rebound after the Baltic Sea emerged underneath the Weichselian Ice Sheet ca. 15,000 cal. years BP. The post-glacial history of the Baltic has included both freshwater and brackish water stages depending on the connection of the Baltic Sea with the world’s oceans. As the Baltic is one of the most polluted sea areas in the world, many studies have also focused on both the long-term trends in nutrients and productivity and the relatively recent anthropogenic eutrophication. The long-term changes in the trophic state of the Baltic Sea have been found to be linked to changes in climate, which controls freshwater discharge from the catchment and weathering rates, as well as marine water inflow from the North Sea. The productivity of the Baltic Sea has followed major climate patterns: it was high during warm periods and lower during phases of deteriorating climate. Recent eutrophication of the Baltic Sea can mainly be explained by a marked increase in discharge of nutrients caused by a growing population and changes in the agricultural practice, although long-term climate variability also plays a part. Signs of recovery have recently been detected, however, the Baltic Sea is still far from its pre-industrial trophic state.

  • 15.
    Kotthoff, U.
    et al.
    University of Hamburg.
    Groeneveld, J.
    University of Bremen.
    Ash, J.L.
    UCLA.
    Fanget, A.-S.
    Aarhus University, Université de Perpignan.
    Krupinski, N.Q.
    Lund University.
    Peyron, O.
    University of Montpellier.
    Stepanova, A.
    Texas A&M University.
    Warnock, J.
    Indiana University of Pennsylvania.
    Van Helmond, N. A. G. M.
    Utrecht University.
    Passey, B.H.
    University of Michigan.
    Clausen, O.R.
    Aarhus University.
    Bennike, O.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Granoszewski, W.
    Polish Geological Institute-National Research Institute Krakow.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Filipsson, H.L.
    Lund University.
    Seidenkrantz, M.-S.
    Aarhus University.
    Slomp, C.P.
    Utrecht University.
    Bauersachs, T.
    Christian-Albrechts-Universität.
    Reconstructing Holocene temperature and salinity variations in the western Baltic Sea region: a multi-proxy comparison from the Little Belt (IODP Expedition 347, Site M0059)2017In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 14, p. 5607-5632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sediment records recovered from the Baltic Sea during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 347 provide a unique opportunity to study paleoenvironmental and climate change in central and northern Europe. Such studies contribute to a better understanding of how environmental parameters change in continental shelf seas and enclosed basins. Here we present a multi-proxy-based reconstruction of paleotemperature (both marine and terrestrial), paleosalinity, and paleoecosystem changes from the Little Belt (Site M0059) over the past  ∼  8000 years and evaluate the applicability of inorganic- and organic-based proxies in this particular setting. All salinity proxies (diatoms, aquatic palynomorphs, ostracods, diol index) show that lacustrine conditions occurred in the Little Belt until  ∼  7400 cal yr BP. A connection to the Kattegat at this time can thus be excluded, but a direct connection to the Baltic Proper may have existed. The transition to the brackish–marine conditions of the Littorina Sea stage (more saline and warmer) occurred within  ∼  200 years when the connection to the Kattegat became established after  ∼  7400 cal yr BP. The different salinity proxies used here generally show similar trends in relative changes in salinity, but often do not allow quantitative estimates of salinity. The reconstruction of water temperatures is associated with particularly large uncertainties and variations in absolute values by up to 8 °C for bottom waters and up to 16 °C for surface waters. Concerning the reconstruction of temperature using foraminiferal Mg  /  Ca ratios, contamination by authigenic coatings in the deeper intervals may have led to an overestimation of temperatures. Differences in results based on the lipid paleothermometers (long chain diol index and TEXL86) can partly be explained by the application of modern-day proxy calibrations to intervals that experienced significant changes in depositional settings: in the case of our study, the change from freshwater to marine conditions. Our study shows that particular caution has to be taken when applying and interpreting proxies in coastal environments and marginal seas, where water mass conditions can experience more rapid and larger changes than in open ocean settings. Approaches using a multitude of independent proxies may thus allow a more robust paleoenvironmental assessment.

  • 16.
    Andrén, Elinor
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Telford, Richard J.
    University of Bergen.
    Jonsson, Per
    Stockholm University.
    Reconstructing the history of eutrophication and quantifying total nitrogen reference conditions in Bothnian Sea coastal waters2017In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 198, p. 320-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reference total nitrogen (TN) concentrations for the Gårdsfjärden estuary in the central Bothnian Sea, which receives discharge from an industrial point-source, have been estimated from diatom assemblages using a transfer function. Sedimentological and diatom evidence imply a good ecological status before 1920 with an assemblage dominated by benthic taxa indicating excellent water transparency, high diatom species richness and less organic sedimentation resulting in homogeneous well oxygenated sediments. A change in the diatom assemblage starts between 1920 and 1935 when the species richness declines and the proportion of planktic taxa increases. Increased organic carbon sedimentation after 1920 led to hypoxic bottom waters, and the preservation of laminae in the sediments. The trend in the reconstructed TN-values agrees with the history of the discharge from the mill, reaching maximum impact during the high discharge between 1945 and 1990. The background condition for TN in Gårdsfjärden is 260-300 μg L-1, reconstructed until 1920.

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  • 17.
    Snoeijs-Leijonmalm, Pauline
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Why is the Baltic Sea so special to live in?2017In: Biological Oceanography of the Baltic Sea / [ed] Snoeijs-Leijonmalm, Pauline; Schubert, Hendrik; Radziejewska, Teresa, Dordrecht: Springer, 2017, p. 23-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "Why is the Baltic Sea so special to live in", is the main question the authors here give several arguments or answers for. Geographical position, geological development, hydrographical features, climate and physical drivers together create the Baltic Sea environment. The Baltic Sea water is brackish and characterized by pronounced salinity gradients, both in horizontal and vertical directions, because of the large volume of freshwater runoff from over 100 rivers, which mixes with the saline water from the Kattegat that enters the Baltic Sea via narrow shallow straits. Being a semi-enclosed continental sea with a large drainage area compared to its water volume , the Baltic Sea ecosystem is heavily impacted by the surrounding landmasses. The water residence time in the Baltic Sea is long (30–40 years), and therefore discharged nutrients and toxic compounds circulate within the sea for a long time, which contributes to its vulnerability to eutrophication and chemical contamination by hazardous substances. The Baltic Sea Area is geologically young and the Baltic Sea ecosystem is extremely young in an evolutionary perspective. Only few macroscopic species are fully adapted to its low-salinity environment. In an ecosystem-wide perspective, the large-scale Baltic Sea gradient is the principal ecological characteristic of the Baltic Sea.

  • 18.
    Lewis, J.P.
    et al.
    Loughborough University, Loughborough, England.
    Ryves, D.B.
    Loughborough University, Loughborough, England.
    Rasmussen, P.
    National Museum of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark / Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Olsen, J.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Knudsen, K.-L.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Andersen, S.H.
    Moesgård Museum, Højbjerg, Danmark.
    Weckström, K.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Clarke, A.L.
    APEM Aquatic Scientists Ltd, Stockport, UK.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Juggins, S.
    Newcastle University, Newcaslte, England.
    The shellfish enigma across the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in southern Scandinavia2016In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 151, p. 315-320, article id http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2016.09.004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The well-known and widespread replacement of oysters (abundant during the Mesolithic period) by cockles and mussels in many Danish Stone Age shell middens ca. 5900 cal yrs BP coincides with the transition to agriculture in southern Scandinavia. This human resource shift is commonly believed to reflect changing resource availability, driven by environmental and/or climatic change at the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition rather than cultural choice. While several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the “Mesolithic-Neolithic oyster decline”, an explanation based on a sudden freshening of the inner Danish waters has received most attention. Here, for the first time, we test and refute this long-standing hypothesis that declining salinity explains the marked reduction in oysters identified within numerous shell middens across coastal Denmark at the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition using quantitative and qualitative salinity inference from several, independent proxies (diatoms, molluscs and foraminifera) from multiple Danish fjord sites. Alternatively, we attribute the oyster decline to other environmental causes (particularly changing sedimentation), ultimately driven by external climatic forcing. Critical application of such high-quality environmental archives can reinvigorate archaeological debates and can aid in understanding and managing environmental change in increasingly impacted coastal regions.

  • 19.
    Andrén, Thomas
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Jørgensen, Bo Barker
    Cotterill, Carol
    Green, Sophie
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Baltic Sea Basin Paleoenvironment: Expedition 347 of the mission-specific drilling platform  from and to Kiel, Germany Sites M0059–M0067  12 September–1 November 20132015Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Andrén, Elinor
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Klimaschewski, Andrea
    Queen's University Belfast, UK.
    Self, Angela E.
    The Natural History Museum, London, UK.
    St. Amour, Natalie
    University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
    Andreev, Andrei A.
    University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Bennett, Keith D.
    Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia / Uppsala University.
    Conley, Daniel J.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Edwards, Thomas W.D.
    University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
    Solovieva, Nadia
    Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia / University College London, UK.
    Hammarlund, Dan
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Holocene climate and environmental change in north-eastern Kamchatka (Russian Far East), inferred from a multi-proxy study of lake sediments2015In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 134, p. 41-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sediment record from a small lake in the north-eastern part of the Kamchatka Peninsula has been investigated in a multi-proxy study to gain knowledge of Holocene climatic and environmental change. Pollen, diatoms, chironomids and selected geochemical parameters were analysed and the sediment record was dated with radiocarbon. The study shows Holocene changes in the terrestrial vegetation as well as responses of the lake ecosystem to catchment maturity and multiple stressors, such as climate change and volcanic eruptions. Climate change is the major driving force resulting in the recorded environmental changes in the lake, although recurrent tephra deposition events also contributed. The sediment record has an age at the base of about 10,000 cal yrs BP, and during the first 400 years the climate was cold and the lake exhibited extensive ice-cover during winter and relatively low primary production. Soils in the catchment were poor with shrub alder and birches dominatingthe vegetation surrounding the lake. At about 9600–8900 cal yrs BP the climate was cold and moist, and strong seasonal wind stress resulted in reduced ice-cover and increased primary production. After ca. 8900 cal yrs BP the forest density increased around the lake, runoff decreased in a generally drier climate resulting in decreasedprimary production in the lake until ca. 7000 cal yrs BP. This generally dry climate was interrupted by a brief climatic perturbation, possibly attributed to the 8.2 ka event, indicating increasingly windy conditions with thick snow cover, reduced ice-cover and slightly elevated primary production in the lake. The diatom record shows maximum thermal stratification at ca. 6300–5800 cal yrs BP and indicates together with the geochemical proxies a dry and slightly warmer climate resulting in a high productive lake. The most remarkably change in the catchment vegetation occurred at ca. 4200 cal yrs BP in the form of a conspicuous increase in Siberian dwarf pine (Pinus pumila), indicating a shift to a cooler climate with a thicker and more long-lasting snow cover. Thisvegetational change was accompanied by marked shifts in the diatom and chironomid stratigraphies, which are also indicative of colder climate and more extensive ice-cover.

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  • 21.
    Klimaschewski, Andrea
    et al.
    School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1NN Northern Ireland, UK.
    Barnekow, Lena
    Quaternary Sciences, Department of Geology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 12, SE22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Bennett, Keith D.
    School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1NN Northern Ireland, UK.
    Andreev, Andrei A.
    Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, Zülpicher Str. 49a, D-50674 Cologne, Germany.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Bobrov, A.A.
    Faculty of Soil Science, Moscow State University, Vorobievy Gory, 119899 Moscow, Russia.
    Hammarlund, Dan
    Quaternary Sciences, Department of Geology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 12, SE22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Holocene environmental changes in southern Kamchatka, Far Eastern Russia, inferred from a pollen and testate amoebae peat succession record2015In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 134, no SI, p. 142-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High resolution palaeoenvironmental records in Far-Eastern Russia are rare, and the Kamchatka Peninsula is among the least studied areas of the region. This paper describes a record spanning the last ca. 11,000 yr, obtained from a bog in the southern part of Kamchatka. The radiocarbon dated core was analysed for pollen, testate amoebae, charcoal and loss-on-ignition (LOI).

    The vegetation during the early Holocene was dominated by grasses (Poaceae), birch (Betula) and heath (Ericaceae p. p.). Around 10,300 cal yr BP there was a substantial change in the vegetation cover to shrub alder (Alnus viridis s.l.) stands with sedges and ferns (Polypodiophyta) as well as herbs such as meadow rue (Thalictrum) in the understory. In the surroundings of Utka peatlands started to form. The variations in the vegetation cover were most probably caused by climatic changes. At the beginning of sediment accumulation, before 10,300 cal yr BP, the composition of the vegetation points to cooler summers and/or decreased annual precipitation. Around 10,300 cal yr BP, changes in vegetation occurred due to rising temperatures and/or changed water regimes. Increased abundancies of dry indicating testate amoebae after 9100 cal yr BP point to intermediate to dry soil conditions. Between 8600 and 7700 cal yr BP tree alder (Alnus incana) was widely spread at the site which probably indicates optimal environmental conditions. The tephra layer at 381–384.5 cm (ca. 8500 cal yr BP) produces a strong impact on the testate amoebae assemblages. At 7700 cal yr BP there was a sudden drop of A.incana in the local vegetation. From this time on, A.incana and also A.viridis decrease continuously whereas Betula gradually increases. The upper part of the sequence (after 6300 cal yr BP) shows higher abundancies of meadowsweet (Filipendula) and sweet gale (Myrica) pollen. After 6300 cal yr BP, changes in testate amoebae demonstrate variable soil moisture conditions at the site. Between 3700 and 1800 cal yr BP, wet conditions dominate as dry indicating testate amoebae decrease. After 1800 cal yr BP soil conditions become more variable again but this time with dry dominating testate amoebae.

    In contrast to surrounding regions, there is no evidence of trees such as spruce or larch growing in the surroundings of the site even though those trees are characteristic of many eastern Siberian sites. This difference might be because of the maritime influence of the Okhotsk Sea. Even dwarf pine (Pinus pumila), which is currently widely dispersed in northern Kamchatka, became part of the local vegetation only during the last 700 yr.

  • 22.
    Andrén, Thomas
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Jørgensen, Bo Barker
    Cotterill, Carol
    Green, Sophie
    IODP expedition 347: Baltic Sea basin paleoenvironment and biosphere2015In: Scientific Drilling, ISSN 1816-8957, E-ISSN 1816-3459, Vol. 20, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 347 cored sediments from different settings of the Baltic Sea covering the last glacial–interglacial cycle. The main aim was to study the geological development of the Baltic Sea in relation to the extreme climate variability of the region with changing ice cover and major shifts in temperature, salinity, and biological communities. Using the Greatship Manisha as a European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) mission-specific platform, we recovered 1.6 km of core from nine sites of which four were additionally cored for microbiology. The sites covered the gateway to the North Sea and Atlantic Ocean, several sub-basins in the southern Baltic Sea, a deep basin in the central Baltic Sea, and a river estuary in the north.

    The waxing and waning of the Scandinavian ice sheet has profoundly affected the Baltic Sea sediments. During theWeichselian, progressing glaciers reshaped the submarine landscape and displaced sedimentary deposits from earlier Quaternary time. As the glaciers retreated they left a complex pattern of till, sand, and lacustrine clay, which in the basins has since been covered by a thick deposit of Holocene, organic-rich clay. Due to the stratified water column of the brackish Baltic Sea and the recurrent and widespread anoxia, the deeper basins harbor laminated sediments that provide a unique opportunity for high-resolution chronological studies.

    The Baltic Sea is a eutrophic intra-continental sea that is strongly impacted by terrestrial runoff and nutrient fluxes. The Holocene deposits are recorded today to be up to 50m deep and geochemically affected by diagenetic alterations driven by organic matter degradation. Many of the cored sequences were highly supersaturated with respect to methane, which caused strong degassing upon core recovery. The depth distributions of conservative sea water ions still reflected the transition at the end of the last glaciation from fresh-water clays to Holocene brackish mud. High-resolution sampling and analyses of interstitial water chemistry revealed the intensive mineralization and zonation of the predominant biogeochemical processes. Quantification of microbial cells in the sediments yielded some of the highest cell densities yet recorded by scientific drilling.

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  • 23.
    Hammarlund, D.
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Klimaschewski, A.
    Queen's University, Belfast, UK.
    St. Amour, N. A.
    University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Self, A. E.
    The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, UK .
    Solovieva, N.
    University College London, UK / Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia .
    Andreev, A. A.
    Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia / University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany .
    Barnekow, L.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Edwards, T. W. D.
    University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada / University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada .
    Late Holocene expansion of Siberian dwarf pine (Pinus pumila) in Kamchatka in response to increased snow cover as inferred from lacustrine oxygen-isotope records2015In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 134, no SI, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Holocene records of cellulose-inferred lake-water δ18O were produced from two lake-sediment sequences obtained in central and northern Kamchatka, Russian Far East. The sediment records share similar fluctuations in δ18O during the interval of ca. 5000-800calyr BP that correspond (inversely) with changes in K+ content of the GISP2 ice-core record from Greenland, a proxy for the relative strength of the Siberian High, suggesting control by climate-related variability in δ18O of regional precipitation. The dramatic expansion of Siberian dwarf pine (Pinus pumila) in northern and central Kamchatka between ca. 5000 and 4000calyr BP, as inferred from pollen records from the same and neighbouring sites, appears to have occurred at a time of progressively declining δ18O of precipitation. This development is interpreted as reflecting a regional cooling trend accompanied by increasing winter snowfall related to gradual intensification of the Siberian High from ca. 5000 to ca. 3000calyr BP. A thicker and more long-lasting snow cover can be assumed to have favoured P. pumila by providing a competitive advantage over other boreal and subalpine tree and shrub species in the region during the later part of the Holocene. These results, which are the first of their kind from Kamchatka, provide novel insight into the Holocene vegetational and climatic development in easternmost Asia, as well as long-term atmospheric circulation dynamics in Beringia.

  • 24.
    Solovieva, Nadia
    et al.
    University College London, UK / Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation.
    Klimaschewski, Andrea
    Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK.
    Self, Angela E.
    The Natural History Museum, London, UK.
    Jones, Vivienne
    University College London, UK.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andreev, Andrei A.
    Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation / University of Cologne, Köln, Germany.
    Hammarlund, Dan
    Lund University.
    Lepskaya, E.V.
    Kamchatka Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatski, Russian Federation.
    Nazarova, L.B.
    Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation.
    The Holocene environmental history of a small coastal lake on the north-eastern Kamchatka Peninsula2015In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 134, p. 55-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A radiocarbon and tephra-dated sediment core from Lifebuoy Lake, located on the north-east coast of Kamchatka Peninsula, was analysed for pollen, spores, diatoms, chironomids and tephra in order to uncover regional environmental history.

  • 25.
    Self, Angela E.
    et al.
    The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, UK.
    Klimaschewski, Andrea
    Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK.
    Solovieva, Nadia
    University College London, UK / Institute of Geology and Petroleum Technologies, Kazan, Russia.
    Jones, Vivienne
    University College London, UK.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andreev, Andrei A.
    Institute of Geology and Petroleum Technologies, Kazan, Russia / Universität zu Kӧln, Germany.
    Hammarlund, Dan
    Lund University.
    Brooks, Stephen J.
    The Natural History Museum, London, UK.
    The relative influences of climate and volcanic activity on Holocene lake development inferred from a mountain lake in central Kamchatka2015In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 134, no SI, p. 67-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sediment sequence was taken from a closed, high altitude lake (informal name Olive-backed Lake) in the central mountain range of Kamchatka, in the Russian Far East. The sequence was dated by radiocarbon and tephrochronology and used for multi-proxy analyses (chironomids, pollen, diatoms). Although the evolution of Beringian climate through the Holocene is primarily driven by global forcing mechanisms, regional controls, such as volcanic activity or vegetation dynamics, lead to a spatial heterogeneous response. This study aims to reconstruct past changes in the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and to separate the climate-driven response from a response to regional or localised environmental change. Radiocarbon dates from plant macrophytes gave a basal date of 7800 cal yr BP. Coring terminated in a tephra layer, so sedimentation at the lake started prior to this date, possibly in the early Holocene following local glacier retreat. Initially the catchment vegetation was dominated by Betula and Alnus woodland with a mosaic of open, wet, aquatic and semi-aquatic habitats. Between 7800 and 6000 cal yr BP the diatom-inferred lake water was pH 4.4 -5.3 and chironomid and diatom assemblages in the lake were initially dominated by a small number of acidophilic/acid tolerant taxa. The frequency of Pinus pumila (Siberian dwarf pine) pollen increased from 5000 cal yr BP and threshold analysis indicates that P. pumila arrived in the catchment between 4200 and 3000 cal yr BP. Its range expansion was probably mediated by strengthening of the Aleutian Low pressure system and increased winter snowfall. The diatom-inferred pH reconstructions show that after an initial period of low pH, pH gradually increased from 5500 cal yr BP to pH 5.8 at 1500 cal yr BP. This trend of increasing pH through the Holocene is unusual in lake records, but the initially low pH may have resulted directly or indirectly from intense regional volcanic activity during the mid-Holocene. The chironomid-inferred July temperature reconstruction suggests cool periods between 3200 – 2800 cal yr BP and 1100 – 700 cal yr BP and a warmer period between 2800 and 1100 cal yr BP. Chironomid and diatom DCA scores decline from ca. 6000 cal yr BP, indicating compositional changes in these aquatic assemblages. In comparison declines in pollen PCA scores are delayed, starting ca. 5100 cal yr BP. The results suggest that while catchment vegetation was responding primarily to climate change, the biota within the lake and lake water chemistry were responding to localised environmental conditions.

  • 26.
    Andrén, Thomas
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Zhang, Rui
    Xiamen University, China.
    Baltic Sea Basin Paleoenvironment: paleoenvironmental evolution of the Baltic Sea Basin through the last glacial cycle2014Report (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Andrén, Elinor
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Syrefria bottnar - orsakade av klimat, människa eller både och?2014In: Havsutsikt, ISSN 1104-0513, no 2, p. 12-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28. Mertens, Kenneth
    et al.
    Bringué, Manuel
    van Niewenhove, Nicolas
    Takano, Yoshihito
    Pospelova, Vera
    Rochon, Andre
    De Vernal, Anne
    Radi, Taoufik
    Dale, Barrie
    Patterson, R. Timothy
    Weckström, Kaarina
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Geography.
    Louwye, Stephen
    Matsouka, Kazumi
    Process length variation of the cyst of thedinoflagellate Protoceratium reticulatum in the NorthPacific and Baltic-Skagerrak region: calibration as anannual density proxy and first evidence ofpseudo-cryptic speciation2012In: Journal of Quaternary Science, ISSN 0267-8179, E-ISSN 1099-1417, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 734-744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process length variation of cysts of the dinoflagellate Protoceratium reticulatum (Claparede et Lachmann) Butschli in surface sediments from the North Pacific was investigated. The average process length showeda significant inverse relation to annual seawater density: t annual= -0.8674 x average process length +1029.3(R2=0.84), with a standard error of 0.78 kgm-3. A sediment trap study from Effingham Inlet in British Columbiarevealed the same relationship between average process length and local seawater density variations. In the Baltic–Skagerrak region, the average process length variation was related significantly to annual seawater density: t annual =3.5457 x average process length -993.28 (R2=0.86), with a standard error of 3.09 kgm3. These calibrations cannot be reconciled, which accentuates the regional character of the calibrations. This can be related to variations in molecular data (small subunit, long subunit and internal transcribed spacer sequences), whichshow the presence of several genotypes and the occurrence of pseudo-cryptic speciation within this species.

  • 29.
    Andrén, Thomas
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Geography.
    Björck, S
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Geography.
    Conley, D J
    Lambeck, K
    Zillén, L
    The development of the Baltic Sea basin during the last 130 000 years2011In: The Baltic Sea Basin / [ed] Jan Harff, Svante Björck, Peer Hoth, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 75-97Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30. Zillén, Lovisa
    et al.
    Conley, Daniel J.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Björck, Svante
    Past occurrences of hypoxia in the Baltic Sea and the role of climate variability, environmental change and human impact2008In: Earth-Science Reviews, ISSN 0012-8252, E-ISSN 1872-6828, Vol. 91, p. 77-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypoxic zone in the Baltic Sea has increased in area about four times since 1960 and widespread oxygen deficiency has severely reduced macro benthic communities below the halocline in the Baltic Proper and the Gulf of Finland, which in turn has affected food chain dynamics, fish habitats and fisheries in the entire Baltic Sea. The cause of increased hypoxia is believed to be enhanced eutrophication through increased anthropogenic input of nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus. However, the spatial variability of hypoxia on long time-scales is poorly known: and so are the driving mechanisms. We review the occurrence of hypoxia in modern time (last c. 50ᅵyears), modern historical time (AD 1950-1800) and during the more distant past (the last c. 10ᅵ000ᅵyears) and explore the role of climate variability, environmental change and human impact. We present a compilation of proxy records of hypoxia (laminated sediments) based on long sediment cores from the Baltic Sea. The cumulated results show that the deeper depressions of the Baltic Sea have experienced intermittent hypoxia during most of the Holocene and that regular laminations started to form c. 8500-7800ᅵcal. yr BP ago, in association with the formation of a permanent halocline at the transition between the Early Littorina Sea and the Littorina Sea s. str. Laminated sediments were deposited during three main periods (i.e. between c. 8000-4000, 2000-800ᅵcal. yr BP and subsequent to AD 1800) which overlap the Holocene Thermal Maximum (c. 9000-5000ᅵcal. yr BP), the Medieval Warm Period (c. AD 750-1200) and the modern historical period (AD 1800 to present) and coincide with intervals of high surface salinity (at least during the Littorina s. str.) and high total organic carbon content. This study implies that there may be a correlation between climate variability in the past and the state of the marine environment, where milder and dryer periods with less freshwater run-off correspond to increased salinities and higher accumulation of organic carbon resulting in amplified hypoxia and enlarged distribution of laminated sediments. We suggest that hydrology changes in the drainage area on long time-scales have, as well as the inflow of saltier North Sea waters, controlled the deep oxic conditions in the Baltic Sea and that such changes have followed the general Holocene climate development in Northwest Europe. Increased hypoxia during the Medieval Warm Period also correlates with large-scale changes in land use that occurred in much of the Baltic Sea watershed during the early-medieval expansion. We suggest that hypoxia during this period in the Baltic Sea was not only caused by climate, but increased human impact was most likely an additional trigger. Large areas of the Baltic Sea have experienced intermittent hypoxic from at least AD 1900 with laminated sediments present in the Gotland Basin in the Baltic Proper since then and up to present time. This period coincides with the industrial revolution in Northwestern Europe which started around AD 1850, when population grew, cutting of drainage ditches intensified, and agricultural and forest industry expanded extensively.

  • 31.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University College, School of Life Sciences.
    Reflektioner från BERINGIA 2005: en svensk polarforskningsexpedition till Kamtjatka2008In: Ymer, ISSN 0044-0477, p. 113-151Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Andrén, Elinor
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Life Sciences.
    Clarke, Annemarie
    Telford, Richard
    Weckström, Kaarina
    Vilbaste, Sirje
    Aigars, Juris
    Conley, Daniel
    Johnsen, Torbjørn
    Juggins, Steve
    Korhola, Atte
    Defining Reference Conditions for Coastal Areas in the Baltic Sea2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of DEFINE is to provide a methodology to define reference conditions for nutrient concentrations in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea. This will aid the national authorities that surround the Baltic basin in implementing the EU's Water Framework Directive (WFD) by providing decision-makers with a methodology to assess reference conditions and the degree of past and present departure from this state, such that appropriate policy and management measures can be taken at national and European levels. DEFINE adopts a palaeoecological approach grounded on diatom-based transfer functions, which can then be applied to define background total nitrogen (TN) concentrations in estuaries and coastal areas over the entire Baltic Sea. All transfer functions and necessary supporting documentation will be publicly available as a coherent management tool and accessible via the MOLTEN/DEFINE web page (http://craticula.ncl.ac.uk/Molten/jsp/).

  • 33.
    Andrén, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Berglund, Björn E.
    Lund University.
    Yu, Shi-Yong
    University of Minnesota.
    New insights on the Yoldia Sea low stand in the Blekinge archipelago, southern Baltic Sea2007In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 129, no 4, p. 277-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One sediment core from the Jarnavik bay in Blekinge archipelago has been investigated for its content of pollen and diatoms and its chemical properties. Two levels were also dated by radiocarbon. Based on the results the sediment sequence analysed has been divided into three environmental units largely corresponding to the lithology of the sequence. A lowermost unit consisting of weakly varved and homogeneous clay was deposited during the end of the brackish phase of the Yoldia Sea at a moderate water depth. On top of this unit a gyttja-clay unit was deposited. The onset of the deposition of this unit has been dated to c. 11 100 cal. yrs. BP. An increasing organic production and increased terrestrial influence is recorded in the chemical data and a very shallow water depth is indicated in the pollen and diatom flora. These results point to conditions in a bay probably isolated from the Yoldia Sea. A local tentative shore displacement curve have been constructed and it is proposed that this unit represents the low stand at c. -18 m during the Yoldia Sea stage in this part of the Baltic Sea basin. The uppermost unit consists of homogeneous clay with a low content of organic carbon. An increasing water depth is indicated by the composition of both pollen and diatoms. The diatom flora also displays an increase in freshwater species. This environmental change was probably the result of a transgression in the beginning of the Ancylus Lake stage.

  • 34. Clarke, A. L.
    et al.
    Weckström, K.
    Conley, D. J.
    Anderson, N. J.
    Adser, F.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Jonge, V. N. de
    Ellegaard, M.
    Juggins, S.
    Kauppila, P.
    Korhola, A.
    Reuss, N.
    Telford, R. J.
    Vaalgamaa, S.
    Long-Term Trends in Eutrophication and Nutrients in the Coastal Zone2006In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 385-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used high-resolution paleoecological records of environmental change to study the rate and magnitude of eutrophication over the last century in two contrasting coastal ecosystems. A multiproxy approach using geochemical and biological indicators and diatom-based transfer functions provides a long-term perspective on changes in nutrient concentrations and the corresponding biological and sedimentary responses. In Roskilde Fjord, Denmark, total nitrogen (TN) increased 85% during the last century, with the most rapid increase occurring after the 1950s, corresponding to the postwar increase in N fertilizer use. In Laajalahti Bay, an urban embayment near Helsinki, Finland, total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) increased with growing wastewater inputs and decreased with the remedial actions taken to reduce these discharges. These changes are small relative to the order of magnitude increases in nutrient loading that have occurred in northwestern Europe, where the dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) load has increased more than threefold in certain areas.

  • 35.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University College, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science.
    Naturliga halter – vad är det?: Historiska arkiv ger referensvärden.2005In: Miljötillståndet i egentliga Östersjön: Rapport 2005, Stockholm: Stockholms marina forskningscentrum , 2005, p. 50-62Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Andrén, Thomas
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Nordberg, Kjell
    Omstedt, Anders
    Östersjön förändras ständigt2005In: Upsala nya tidning, ISSN 1104-0173, no 8/6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Yu, Shi-Yong
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Berglund, Björn E
    Lund University.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Uppsala University.
    Sandgren, Per
    Lund University.
    Mid-Holocene Baltic Sea transgression along the coast of Blekinge, SE Sweden ancient lagoons correlated with beach ridges2004In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 126, p. 257-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mid-Holocene Littorina transgression in southern Scandinavia is well documented. Multiple-stratigraphic sequences in ancient Littorina lagoons in the coastal area of Blekinge, SE Sweden reveal a maximum relative sea level of 7-8 m above present sea level between 8000-6000 cal. BP. Evidence for at least two transgression waves is found within this period. In this study these are documented in one modern lake and correlated with an ancient beach-lagoon stratigraphy. Furthermore, two younger transgressions are documented at one site, altogether establishing a firm transgression chronology for the time span 8000-4000 cal. BP (sea level 5-8 m a.s.l.) as a basis for understanding the dynamics of Baltic sea-level changes. Neolithic cultural layers are correlated to regression periods, indicating more favorable conditions for beach settlement between stormy transgression periods.

  • 38.
    Yu, Shi-Yong
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Uppsala University.
    Barnekow, Lena
    Lund University.
    Berglund, Björn E
    Lund University.
    Sandgren, Per
    Lund University.
    Holocene palaeoecology and shoreline displacement on the Biskopsmåla Peninsula, southeastern Sweden2003In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 32, p. 578-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-resolution palaeoecological proxies of pollen, macrofossils and diatoms from an isolation lake provide a long-term record of the Holocene landscape history and shoreline displacement on the Biskopsmala Peninsula in central Blekinge, SE Sweden. During the Preboreal/Boreal transition, the peninsula was sparsely vegetated by woodlands, along with lateglacial dwarf shrub/steppe communities. The lake basin was isolated from the shallow Yoldia Sea during this time. The regional climate improved from 10 700 cal. BP, evident as progressive expansion of Pinus -dominated mixed forest with deciduous trees. The lake basin was probably connected with the Ancylus Lake during the period 10 700-10 100 cal. BP. Subsequently the basin became isolated again, corresponding to the Early Littorina Sea phase. Replacement of freshwater diatoms by those with brackish-water affinity at 8100 cal. BP indicates the initial transgression of the Littorina Sea in this basin. But not until 7500 cal. BP were brackish conditions fully established. Peaks of brackish-marine diatoms and dinoflagellates during 7500-7000 cal. BP indicate increased saltwater inflow to the Baltic Sea in response to global meltwater pulse 3. However, interactive changes in seagrass and stonewort macrofossil concentrations suggest that three minor transgressions during 5900-5300, 5000-4700 and 4400-4000 cal. BP occurred locally, associated with centennial-scale variations in regional wind pattern or coastal storminess. By 3000 cal. BP, the lake basin was finally isolated from the Baltic, and thereafter the landscape on the peninsula became gradually more influenced by human activities.

  • 39. Andrén, Thomas
    et al.
    Lindeberg, Greger
    Andrén, Elinor
    Evidence of the final drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake and the brackish phase of the Yoldia Sea in glacial varves from the Baltic Sea2002In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 31, p. 226-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A clay-varve chronology based on 14 cross-correlated varve graphs from the Baltic Sea and a mean varve thickness curve has been constructed. This chronology is correlated with the Swedish Time Scale and covers the time span 11 530 to 10 250 varve years BP. Two cores have been analysed for grain size, chemistry, content of diatoms and changes in colour by digital colour analysis. The final drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake is dated to c. 10800 varve years BP and registered in the cores analysed as a decrease in the content of clay. This event can be correlated with atmospheric D 14 C content and might have resulted in an increase in these values recorded between 11565 and 11545 years BP. The results of the correlation between the varve chronology from the Baltic Sea, the Greenland GRIP ice core and the atmospheric D 14 C record indicate that c. 760 years are missing in the Swedish Time Scale in the part younger than c. 10 250 varve years BP. A change in colour from a brownish to grey varved glacial clay recorded c. 10 770 varve years BP is found to be the result of oxygen deficiency due to an increase in the rate of sedimentation in the early Preboreal. The first brackish influence is recorded c. 10 540 varve years BP in the northwestern Baltic Sea and some 90 years later in the eastern Gotland Basin.

  • 40. Sohlenius, Gustav
    et al.
    Emeis, Kay C
    Andrén, Elinor
    Andrén, Thomas
    Kohly, Alexander
    Development of anoxia during the Holocene fresh-brackish water transition in the Baltic Sea2001In: Marine Geology, ISSN 0025-3227, E-ISSN 1872-6151, Vol. 177, p. 221-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most pronounced environmental changes during the Holocene Baltic Sea history was the transition from the freshwater Ancylus Lake to the brackish water Litorina Sea. The establishment of brackish conditions during this transition (the A/L) was caused by an interplay of sea level rise and subsidence of sills in the Danish Straits. The northward progression of salt water influence caused the gradual and transgressive development of a halocline which obstructed vertical water circulation in the deep depositional basins. It caused changes in surface water properties (mirrored by diatom flora and productivity levels), in redox conditions of bottom waters, in organic carbon preservation of sediments, and in nutrient cycling. In seven cores from the Arkona, Bornholm and Gotland Basins, the A/L transition was WC dated and studied in high-resolution samples for minor and major element composition. The earliest marine inflows were small and can only be detected by sedimentary properties in the southern Baltic. Further north the salinity increase was gradual and retarded; only when the connection through the Danish Straits was well established the entire Baltic proper became brackish with a stratified water column. This development took altogether 2000 C-14 yr (c. 9000-7000 BP). Diatom analyses indicate a fast increase in salinity c. 7000 C-14 yr BP, which coincides with a transgressive phase in the straits, In the Gotland Basin, deposition of laminated sediments and periodically euxinic conditions were established first at the deepest bottoms, and rose to shallower water depth as the basin was gradually filled with dense brackish water. The laminated sequences have high organic carbon contents, which is attributed to better preservation under anoxic conditions. Litorina sediments from the Arkona and Bornholm Basins are bioturbated even though conditions became more reducing also in these sediments during the A/L transition. The development of reducing conditions during the A/L transition probably caused Pre-mobilization from the sediments and a decrease in the rates of denitrification. Both factors increased primary productivity. A comparison between isochronous sediments from different basins shows that certain elements (Mo, Cu, V and Cd) are enriched sediments deposited during predominantly anoxic conditions.

  • 41.
    Andrén, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Did The Storegga tsunami affect the Baltic Sea?2001In: Baltica: an International Yearbook for Quaternary Geology and Palaeogeography, Coastal Morphology and Shore Processes, Marine Geology and Recent Tectonics of the Baltic Sea Area, ISSN 0067-3064, E-ISSN 1648-858X, Vol. 14, p. 115-123Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Andrén, Elinor
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Stockholm University.
    Kunzendorf, Helmar
    Risø National Laboratory.
    Holocene history of the Baltic Sea as a background for assessing records of human impact in the sediments of the Gotland Basin2000In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 10, p. 687-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sediment cores from the Gotland Basin were studied for their siliceous microfossil assemblages and organic carbon content to compare recent environmental changes in the Baltic Sea with its natural long-term history. Age models were constructed using Pb-210, Cs-137 and corrected and calibrated C-14 dates. The transgression that marks the onset of the Ancylus Lake stage is recorded in the sediments as a small increase in organic carbon coinciding with a peak in diatom abundance and increased diatom diversity. A minor occurrence of brackish-freshwater diatoms is recorded in the Ancylus Lake c. 9950-9750 cal. yr BP (c. 8900-8800 C-14 yr BP), correlating with the onset of the Initial Litorina Sea in the Bornholm Basin. A high-productivity event is recorded in the end of the Post-Litorina Sea and corresponds to the Mediaeval warm event. An alteration in the diatom assemblage contemporaneous with a decrease in organic carbon, interpreted as representing a deterioration in the climate, correlates with the start of the ‘Little Ice Age’ about 850-700 cal. yr BP. A change dated to ad 1950-1960 is probably an effect of increased nutrient availability in the open Baltic Sea. This effect of eutrophication was probably caused by increased discharge of nutrients deriving from fertilizers, as the responding diatom species partly indicate a cold climate rather than a warm one, as would have been expected if this had been only a response to the warmer climate documented during the last 100 years or so.

  • 43.
    Andrén, Elinor
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Stockholm University.
    Sohlenius, Gustav
    Swedish University of Agriculture.
    The Holocene history of the southwestern Baltic Sea as reflected in a sediment core from the Bornholm Basin2000In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 29, p. 233-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of changes in siliceous microfossil assemblages and chemical analyses in a well-dated offshore sediment core from the Bornholm Basin, southwestern Baltic Sea, is carried out with the objective of increasing knowledge of the Holocene history of the area. The core covers about 11 300 calendar years from the brackish phase of the Yoldia Sea stage to the present. The first weak marine influence in the Ancylus Lake stage is recorded about 10 100 cal. yr BP (c. 8900 C-14 BP), indicating a complex transition to the Litorina Sea with different phases of brackish-water inflow. The lithology, organic carbon content and C/N and C/S ratios indicate no major changes in the sedimentary environment during the Litorina-Post-Litorina Sea stages. A high productivity event recorded in the Post-Litorina Sea stage around 950 cal. yr BP correlates with the Medieval warm event. A biostratigraphical change indicating a colder climate is recorded in the sediment at about 800 cal. yr BP, which might mark the beginning of the Little Ice Age.

  • 44.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Stockholm University.
    Changes in the composition of the diatom flora during the last century indicate increased eutrophication of the oder estuary, south-western Baltic Sea1999In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 48, p. 665-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four short sediment cores from the Oder estuary, south-western Baltic Sea, were studied with respect to their siliceous microfossil and organic carbon content. The sediments were dated by Pb-210. The objective was to detect and date changes in the composition of the diatom flora and link these changes to increased human impact in the drainage area during recent centuries. Two of the cores showed an unperturbed sedimentary sequence representing a complete historical record. A change in the composition of the diatom assemblages attributable to anthropogenic factors was recorded. This was dated to about 1900 in the Oderhaff. The change consisted of an increase in species that thrive in eutrophic waters and those indicating increased salinity or the availability of inorganic nutrients.

  • 45. Andrén, Elinor
    et al.
    Shimmield, Graham
    Brand, Timothy
    Environmental changes of the last three centuries indicated by siliceous microfossil records from the southwestern Baltic Sea1999In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 9, p. 25-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four short sediment cores from the southwestern Baltic Sea were analysed with respect to their content of siliceous microfossils. The aim was to detect and date changes in the composition of the diatom flora and to link these changes to variations in the anthropogenic load of nutrients during the last century. The study shows that the most significant change in the diatom assemblages occurred 130-140 years ago. The change is recorded in the sediments as a shift from periphytic diatom taxa to a predominance of planktonic taxa. This indicates that the photic layer has decreased in depth, probably due to eutrophication of the Baltic Sea, which consequently began to affect the area investigated approximately AD 1850. To support the results of a changing ratio of periphytic to planktonic diatoms, diatom accumulation rates were calculated In general, the diatom accumulation rate data show a decrease in the periphytic accumulation rates and an increase in the planktonic accumulation rates towards the sediment surface. Some indications of a colder climate are recorded in the sediments approximately 230 years ago. These results are in accordance with the record of maximum extent of sea ice in the same area and are suggested to represent a late stage in the ‘Little Ice Age’.

  • 46.
    Risberg, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Sandgren, Per
    Lund University.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Stockholm University.
    Early Holocene shore displacement and evidence of irregular isostatic uplift northwest of Lake Vanern, western Sweden1996In: Journal of Paleolimnology, ISSN 0921-2728, E-ISSN 1573-0417, Vol. 15, p. 47-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 1920’s the Swedish geologist Lennart von Post found evidence of irregular early Holocene isostatic uplift in the region northwest of Lake Vanern in western Sweden. von Post based his conclusions on levellings of ancient shore lines. These were indirectly dated by pollen stratigraphical investigations in basins situated at approximately the same altitudes as the shore lines. To test von Post’s hypothesis, we have adopted a different methodological approach. The sediments in twelve small lake basins, within five minor areas in this region, have been investigated with respect to when they became isolated from ancient Lake Vanern. Initially all the lake thresholds were levelled. Altitudes range between 165 and 96 m above sea level. By combining the results of mineral magnetic and diatom stratigraphical analyses it has been possible to determine the level in the sediment when the basin became isolated. The C-14 age of this isolation level has been inferred from AMS dates based on the NaOH-soluble fraction of bulk sediment, partly with very low organic content. Altogether, 36 radiocarbon datings have been carried out, ranging from 10080 to 8800 C-14 years BP. Pollen analyses, and subsequent correspondence analysis (CA) of all pollen spectra, were carried out around the isolation level in each basin as a complement to the AMS datings. If the region had been subject to irregular isostatic uplift, lakes at the same altitude in the five areas should have been isolated at different times. The AMS determined isolation ages, ‘corrected’ according to CA of the pollen stratigraphy and compensated for the relatively higher rebound of the northerly situated sites support von Post’s conclusion, from the beginning of this century, that the region northwest of Lake Va;nern has been subjected to irregular isostatic uplift.

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