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  • 1.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Larsson, Anders Olof
    Kristiania University College, Norway.
    Masso, Anu
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Automating public administration: Citizens’ attitudes towards automated decision-making across Estonia, Sweden, and Germany2024In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 314-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although algorithms are increasingly used for enabling the automation of tasks in public administration of welfare states, the citizens’ knowledge of, experiences with and attitudes towards automated decision-making (ADM) in public administration are still less known. This article strives to reveal the perspectives of citizens who are increasingly exposed to ADM systems, relying on a comparative analysis of a representative survey conducted in Estonia, Germany, and Sweden. The findings show that there are important differences between the three countries when it comes to awareness, trust, and perceived suitability of ADM in public administration, which map onto historical differences in welfare provisions or so-called welfare regimes.

  • 2.
    Masso, Anu
    et al.
    Ragnar Nurkse Department of Innovation and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Kasapoglu, Tayfun
    Ragnar Nurkse Department of Innovation and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Galis, Vasilis
    Research Group Technologies in Practice, IT University of Copenhagen, Kobenhavn, Denmark.
    Citizens’ perspectives on platformisation of police work: a scenario and story-based exploration in Estonia and Sweden2024In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The integration of automated decision-making systems has transformed police work and our understanding of security and surveillance. Despite a growing theoretical literature on shifts in policing due to widespread analytical platform adoption, the public's understanding and perception of these changes are largely unexplored. This study aims to bridge this gap by empirically examining citizens’ perspectives on the new dynamics of police work in two societies with varying levels of experience with automation in the public sector: Estonia and Sweden. By combining data from a representative, scenario-based quantitative survey conducted among the general population (n = 2500) and qualitative storytelling techniques implemented in classroom settings with students (n = 23) who take classes with a focus on critical data studies, this research seeks to investigate people’s imaginaries, concerns, and expectations regarding predictive policing. The findings shed light on the observation that, in the era of data, the police are not solely perceived as an institution ensuring security or as a source of citizen apprehension related to surveillance. Rather, the transformations in police work are understood as ‘distant technologies’, wherein individuals, be they, citizens, or police officers, are increasingly removed from the direct application of these technologies. This article uncovers that when citizens possess low levels of trust in the police, the implementation of automation can further exacerbate the disconnect between citizens and the state. Furthermore, this research proposes an innovative approach to studying automated systems by combining scenario-based and storytelling methods, thereby making a valuable contribution to methodologies employed in the study of data.

  • 3.
    Åker, Patrik
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kaun, AnneSödertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Engaging Media: Fan Communities and Shock Advertisements2024Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume contains adaptions of two excellent master theses that were written and defended within the international master’s programme media, communication, and cultural analysis at Södertörn University in 2023. Running since 2009, the programme has more than 100 alumni who are employed in the media, academic and education. In 2020, the programme coordinator together with the programme council and the department council, chose to distinguish the best theses in a printed volume. This is the fourth volume in the series. 

    The contributions in this volume cover two very different topics: how social media and content streaming sites are used to shape relationships between K-pop superstars BTS and their fan base in Sweden and how vegans/vegetarians respectively meat eaters react to the use of shock advertisements by the organization for animal advocacy, PETA. Although stretching across two such different topics, the chapters share an interest in zooming in on how media can be understood in relation to engagement and emotions.

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  • 4.
    Zakharova, Irina
    et al.
    Leibniz University Hannover, Germany.
    Jarke, Juliane
    University of Graz, Austria.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Tensions in digital welfare states: Three perspectives on care and control2024In: Journal of Sociology, ISSN 1440-7833, E-ISSN 1741-2978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proponents of digital transformation in welfare provision argue that digital technologies can take over tedious tasks and free resources to provide better care for those in need. Digital technologies, however, are often developed in line with a logic of control and dispositions around surveillance and efficiency which challenge careful engagements. In this conceptual article, we explore emerging tensions in digital welfare arrangements and propose an analytical framework to illuminate interrelations between care and control in values, infrastructures, and work related to the provision of welfare services. Illustrating the application of this framework with three empirical vignettes, we discuss how digital welfare technologies shape relations between state care and control. Considering theories of care in relation to the digital welfare state, we give a nuanced perspective on the contingencies of the digital transformation and add to the literature concerned with social justice by attending to everyday lived experiences in-between control and care.

  • 5.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Messenger is the Medium: Newspaper carriers, union struggles, and newspaper development in Sweden during the 20th century2024In: Media History, ISSN 1368-8804, E-ISSN 1469-9729, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 31-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore the history of Swedish newspaper carriers through the lens of the union struggles within the Swedish Transport Workers’ Union. This focus allows us to make visible the influence of a profession that has largely been overlooked in media history. Mobilizing around working conditions, the workers put pressure on the newspapers in terms of the size and weight of the papers with consequences for the editorial work. There was also a strong stance against commercial advertising and additional supplements that had consequences for the financial situation of newspapers. Hence, through their union struggles newspaper carriers directly influenced the outlook of newspapers in Sweden in the post-war era. In extension, we consider newspaper carriers as soft media infrastructures that had a crucial role and influence on the formation of the Swedish public.

  • 6.
    Lomborg, S.
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Scott Hansen, S.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Automated decision-making: Toward a people-centred approach2023In: Sociology Compass, E-ISSN 1751-9020, Vol. 17, no 8, article id e13097Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, automated decision-making (ADM) has been increasingly introduced in for example, the public sector potentially ensuring efficiency and more just decision-making. The increasing use of ADM has been reflected by a growing interest by scholarly research. While initially mainly researchers within law and computer sciences engaged with ADM, there has also been a growing engagement by social science and humanities-oriented researchers. This article traces the emergence and evolution of ADM research beyond computer sciences and engineering with a specific focus on social sciences and humanities by identifying central concerns and methods while outlining a stable baseline for future research. Based on a systematic mapping of publications, we outline the contours of ADM as an area of research engaging with an emerging empirical phenomenon. Drawing on findings from the mapping, we discuss ways ahead for ADM research as part of the subfield of digital sociology and suggest that sociological media and communication studies have a crucial role to play in developing future research avenues. Drawing on advances made in audience research, we suggest a radically contextualized and people-centered approach to ADM. Such an approach would help to develop ADM and ground it alongside people's divergent capabilities and contextual arrangements. 

  • 7.
    Masso, Anu
    et al.
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    van Noordt, Colin
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Basic values in artificial intelligence: comparative factor analysis in Estonia, Germany, and Sweden2023In: AI & Society: The Journal of Human-Centred Systems and Machine Intelligence, ISSN 0951-5666, E-ISSN 1435-5655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing attention is paid to ethical issues and values when designing and deploying artificial intelligence (AI). However, we do not know how those values are embedded in artificial artefacts or how relevant they are to the population exposed to and interacting with AI applications. Based on literature engaging with ethical principles and moral values in AI, we designed an original survey instrument, including 15 value components, to estimate the importance of these values to people in the general population. The article is based on representative surveys conducted in Estonia, Germany, and Sweden (n = 4501), which have varying experiences with implementing AI. The factor analysis showed four underlying dimensions of values embedded in the design and use of AI: (1) protection of personal interests to ensure social benefit, (2) general monitoring to ensure universal solidarity, (3) ensuring social diversity and social sustainability, and (4) efficiency. We found that value types can be ordered along the two dimensions of resources and change. The comparison between countries revealed that some dimensions, like social diversity and sustainability evaluations, are more universally valued among individuals, countries, and domains. Based on our analysis, we suggest a need and a framework for developing basic values in AI.

  • 8.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Åker, PatrikSödertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Centering the Margins of Digital Culture: Data Centers in Sápmi, Climate Change Denial, and the New Space Race2023Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume contains adaptions of three excellent master theses that were written and defended within the international master’s programme Media, communication, and cultural analysis at Södertörn University in 2022. Running since 2009, the programme has more than 100 alumni who are employed in the media, academic and education. In 2020, the programme coordinator together with the programme council and the department council, chose to distinguish the best theses in a printed volume. This is the third volume in the series. 

    The contributions cover a broad range of topics: how the Sami community is implicated and affected by the data center industry that is increasingly being established in the Northern parts of Sweden, Finland and Norway directly impacting Sápmi; how the NIPCC (The Non-Governmental International Panel on Climate Change) can be understood as a cultural industry producing social meaning, not knowledge, in its dissemination of climate disinformation; how what has been coined the contemporary space race has very little to do with its precursor in the 1960s, today it stands for a particular vision for humanity envisioned by tech billionaires such as Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos. 

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  • 9.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Lomborg, Stine
    Copenhagen University, Denmark.
    Pentzold, Christian
    University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Sztandar-Sztanderska, Karolina
    Polish Academy of Science, Poland.
    Allhutter, Doris
    Austrian Academy of Science, Austria.
    Crosscurrents: Welfare2023In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 877-883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this crosscurrent contribution, we approach the notion of welfare through the lens of the data welfare state. We, further, suggest that datafied welfare can be fruitfully studied with the capabilities approach to better understand how ideas and values of data welfare intersect with and may allow for the ‘good’ life and human flourishing. The main aim is to highlight the deep-seated changes of the welfare state that emerge with the delegation of care and control tasks to algorithmic systems and the automation based on datafication practices. Welfare provision is undergoing major shifts that imply fundamentally rethinking the role of technology that supports and enhances welfare with the help of data.

  • 10.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Männiste, Maris
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Liminga, Agnes
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Mapping the automated decision-making landscape in Swedish and Estonian welfarestate2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report summarizes the findings from desk research in Sweden and Estonia mapping and documenting automated decision-making tools and support systems in use in the public sector of both countries. The report provides a general overview over governance and implementation principles as well as several shorter descriptions of specific case studies in both countries. The findings indicate that there are several ADM applications in use in both the Swedish and Estonian public sector that range from administrative backend automation to front end automation of communication channels including chatbots. The landscape is however fast changing partly because of the fast-evolving technology but also and especially due to the primarily pilot character of many ADM projects in both countries. The report ends by outlining methodological challenges and provides future directions for further research.

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  • 11.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Prison Media: Incarceration and the Infrastructures of Work and Technology2023Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How prisoners serve as media laborers, while the prison serves as a testing ground for new media technologies.

    Prisons are not typically known for cutting-edge media technologies. Yet from photography in the nineteenth century to AI-enhanced tracking cameras today, there is a long history of prisons being used as a testing ground for technologies that are later adopted by the general public. If we recognize the prison as a central site for the development of media technologies, how might that change our understanding of both media systems and carceral systems? Prison Media foregrounds the ways in which the prison is a model space for the control and transmission of information, a place where media is produced, and a medium in its own right.

    Examining the relationship between media and prison architecture, as surveillance and communication technologies are literally built into the facilities, this study also considers the ways in which prisoners themselves often do hard labor as media workers—labor that contributes in direct and indirect ways to the latest technologies developed and sold by multinational corporations like Amazon. There is a fine line between ankle monitors and Fitbits, and Prison Media helps us make sense of today's carceral society. 

  • 12.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Logsdon, Alexis
    Seuferling, Philipp
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Serving Machines and Heterotopias: Data Entry Work in Prisons and Refugee Camps in the US and Uganda2023In: Media Backends: Digital Infrastructures and Sociotechnical Relations / [ed] Lisa Parks; Julia Velkova; Sander de Ridder, Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2023, p. 144-161Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The End of Media?: From Mediatisation to Datafication2023In: Contemporary Challenges in Mediatisation Research / [ed] Katarzyna Kopecka-Piech; Göran Bolin, London: Routledge, 2023, 1, p. 161-174Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Liminga, Agnes
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Welfare service centers: Maintenance, repair, and care at the analog interfaces of the digital welfare state2023In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many public administrations advocate digital services that allow for the deployment of algorithmic automation and the use of artificial intelligence. This shift has been discussed as the expansion of the digital welfare state. However, numerous citizens remain excluded from digital services provided by the state. In this context, welfare service centers have emerged as important interfaces of the digital welfare state. These service centers undergird many of the operations of digitalization as a large-scale, societal infrastructure project. In this article, we elaborate the specific characteristics of welfare service centers in Sweden, relying theoretically on interface theory and broken world thinking. Methodologically, we rely on ethnographic methods including in-depth interviews and observations. The article ultimately argues that the digital welfare state continues to be based on material inequalities and exclusions.

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  • 15.
    Moberg, Christina
    et al.
    EASAC; KTH, Sverige.
    Wolrath Söderberg, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric.
    Sandberg, Linn
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Lindblad, Inger
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Sjöholm, Cecilia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Aesthetics.
    Gullström, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lalander, Rickard
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Vallström, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Porseryd, Tove
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Grahn, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Smith, Nicholas
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Philosophy.
    Lehtilä, Kari
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Cederberg, Carl
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Svärd, Veronica
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Bornemark, Jonna
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Bergkvist, Anna-Mia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Gunnarson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Persson, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Jacobsson, Ellen
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Spånberger Weitz, Ylva
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Diderichsen, Öjvind
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Teacher Education and Aesthetic Learning Processes.
    Gilek, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Garrison, Julie
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Pröckl, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Janzén, Therese
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Dobers, Peter
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Dinnétz, Patrik
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Westerberg, Charles
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Elmersjö, Magdalena
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Bisander, Thea
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Oreskovic, Nikolina
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Fröhlig, Florence
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Stedt, Kristoffer
    Göteborgs universitet, Sverige.
    De unga gör helt rätt när de stämmer staten: 1 620 forskare och lärare i forskarvärlden: Vi ställer oss bakom Auroras klimatkrav2022In: Aftonbladet, no 2022-12-07, p. 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi, 1 620 forskare samt lärare vid universitet och högskolor, är eniga med de unga bakom Auroramålet: De drabbas och riskerar att drabbas allvarligt av klimatkrisen under sin livstid. De klimatåtgärder vi vidtar i närtid avgör deras framtid. Sverige måste ta ansvar och göra sin rättvisa andel av det globala klimatarbetet. 

    I strid med Parisavtalet ökar utsläppen av växthusgaser i en takt som gör att 1,5-gradersmålet kan överskridas om några år. De globala effekterna blir allt mer synliga med ständiga temperaturrekord, smältande isar, havshöjning och extremväder som torka, förödande bränder och skyfall med enorma översvämningar, som i Pakistan nyligen. Försörjningen av befolkningen utsätts för allvarliga hot i många länder.

    Minskningen av den biologiska mångfalden är extrem. Klimatkrisen är enligt WHO det största hotet mot människors hälsa i hela världen och barn utgör en särskilt sårbar grupp. Med Sveriges nordliga läge sker uppvärmningen här dubbelt så fort som det globala genomsnittet. Det förskjuter utbredningsområden för växtlighet och sjukdomsbärande insekter och ökar förekomsten av extremväder såsom värmeböljor, skogsbränder och översvämningar samt av många olika sorters infektioner och allergier. När extremväder ökar, ökar även stressen och risken för mental ohälsa. Värmeböljor ökar risken för sjukdom och död hos sårbara grupper som äldre, små barn och personer med kroniska sjukdomar. De negativa effekterna på hälsan kommer att öka i takt med klimatkrisen och barn riskerar att drabbas av ackumulerade negativa hälsoeffekter under hela sina liv. Redan i dag är mer än hälften av unga mellan 12 och 18 år i Sverige ganska eller mycket oroliga för klimat och miljö. Detta är förståeligt när våra beslutsfattare inte gör vad som krävs.

    Den juridiska och moraliska grunden för arbetet mot klimatförändringarna är att varje land måste göra sin rättvisa andel av det globala klimatarbetet. Centralt i det internationella klimatramverket är att rika länder med höga historiska utsläpp, däribland Sverige, måste gå före resten av världen. Dessa länder måste också bidra till att finansiera klimatomställningen i länderna i det Globala Syd, som är minst ansvariga för klimatkrisen men drabbas hårdast. Denna rättviseprincip är tydlig i Parisavtalet och var en het diskussionsfråga under COP27 i Sharm el-Sheikh, men lyser med sin frånvaro i det svenska klimatarbetet. 

    Sverige har satt mål för att minska sina utsläpp. Men de är helt otillräckliga: minskningstakten är för låg och målen tillåter samtidigt att åtgärder skjuts på framtiden. Dessutom exkluderas merparten av Sveriges utsläpp från de svenska nationella utsläppsmålen; bland annat utelämnas utsläpp som svensk konsumtion orsakar utanför Sveriges gränser, utsläpp från utrikes transporter och utsläpp från markanvändning och skogsbruk, exempelvis utsläpp från förbränning av biobränslen eller utsläpp från dikade våtmarker (Prop. 2016/17:146 s.25-28).

    Sverige saknar dessutom ett eget mål för att öka upptaget av växthusgaser genom utökat skydd och restaurering av ekosystem, något som krävs för att begränsa de värsta konsekvenserna av klimatkrisen (IPCC s.32). Trots dessa låga ambitioner misslyckas Sverige med att nå sina utsläppsmål, konstaterar både Klimatpolitiska rådet och Naturvårdsverket. En klimatpolitik i linje med Parisavtalet kräver både att alla typer av växthusgasutsläpp minskar samtidigt som – inte i stället för – upptaget av växthusgaser maximeras: i dag misslyckas Sverige på bägge fronter.

    Slutsatsen är tydlig. Sverige vidtar inte de åtgärder som krävs för att skydda barns och ungdomars rättigheter enligt Europakonventionen till skydd för de mänskliga rättigheterna. Detta medför allvarliga risker för liv och hälsa för unga generationer, människor i andra länder och särskilt utsatta grupper. Detta kan inte fortsätta. Därför ställer vi oss bakom Auroras krav att Sverige börjar göra sin rättvisa andel och omedelbart sätter igång ett omfattande och långtgående klimatarbete som vilar på vetenskaplig grund och sätter rättvisa i centrum.

  • 16.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Forsman, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Digital care work at public libraries: Making Digital First possible2022In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Claims of becoming the first, the best, and the most digitized are standard rather than outstanding in most public-facing digitalization agendas and strategy documents of countries in the Global North. These grand narratives of digitalization need translation through concrete practices by sometimes unexpected actors-in this case, librarians. This article develops the notion of digital care work based on 18 book-chapter-length essays by active librarians based at Swedish public libraries. It illustrates that librarians are central to the process of translating digitalization into reality; they have become ambassadors of digitalization not only by fostering digital skills and competences in workshops and official training sessions but also, we argue, through a specific form of digital work, namely, digital care work. This kind of gendered work, which is typically carried out alongside the official tasks and assignments of librarians, is of low prestige and often involves affective aspects, such as emotions of shame and uncertainty.

  • 17.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Gedächtnisgeschichte als Mediengeschichte: Technologien, Affordanzen und Zeitregime2022In: Handbuch kommunikationswissenschaftliche Erinnerungsforschung, Berlin: De Gruyter Open, 2022, p. 95-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Imagining Digital Futures: Music, Chess and Big Tech2022Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume contains adaptions of four noteworthy master theses written within the international master’s programme in Media, Communication, and Cultural Analysis at Södertörn University and defended in June 2021. Running since 2009, the programme has more than 100 alumni who are employed in the media, academia and education. In 2020, the programme coordinator, together with the programme and department councils, chose to distinguish the best theses in a printed volume. This second volume includes chapters by graduates in 2021, a challenging year by any measure. Nevertheless, the students showed dedication to their subjects and produced high quality essays. 

    The contributions cover a broad range of topics: how young, second-generation migrants negotiate belonging though music listening practices; how the classical game of chess is changing through novel forms of community engagement, including live streaming; the future narratives that Facebook and its affiliates have constructed, and finally, how the smart city is narrated as a place of future primitivism, focused on leisure and fun rather than work and duties.

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  • 19.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Imagining mundane automation: historical trajectories of meaning making around technological change2022In: Everyday Automation: Experiencing and Anticipating Emerging Technologies / [ed] Sara Pink; Martin Berg; Deborah Lupton; Minna Ruckenstein, London: Routledge, 2022, p. 23-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current wave of automation, spurred by developments in artifcial intelligence(AI), has been described as the second machine age (Brynjolfsson and McAfee,2014) and the fourth industrial revolution (Schwab, 2017). One important partof this new era of smart machines is large-scale automation, not only of industrialproduction but also, and more importantly, of our everyday lives. Smart devicesand the internet of things are supposed to make our lives, including our homes,smoother and more efcient. The historical descriptions of these tremendouschanges often depict a linear development from steam-powered industrialisationand mass production (which also includes the invention of the railway and masstransportation of the frst machine age) to large-scale digitalisation with the helpof computers that is often depicted as replacing cognitive power. As Brynjolfssonand McAfee argue, what steam power was for the industrial age, the computer isfor the second machine age.This chapter aims to critique histories of automation that draw a picture oftechnological development as a teleological movement from industrial automationto ‘smart’ machines, moving from the automation of manual tasks to automatingcognitive labour. Instead, we demonstrate that technological innovation isnever straightforward but characterised by failures and dead ends as well as specifcchoices that are anchored in the social and political contexts rather than a naturalevolution towards the ‘best’ technological solutions. Drawing on visualisations ofautomation in Swedish mainstream press since the 1950s, we focus on critical juncturesof automation – such moments where it becomes apparent that automationdevelops into a diferent direction than initially imagined. By drawing on thesematerials, we emphasise the importance of mundane ways of imagining technologicalchange as a way of meaning-making.

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  • 20.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Uppsala universitet, Sverige.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Medier, tillit och information2022Data set
    Abstract [en]

    The proposed urgent project has the purpose to collect thick, qualitative material on how citizens’ media trust evolves during the Corona pandemic. During the last two decades discussions of a crisis of trust have been emerging in democratic societies. Contemporary debates about fake news and disinformation have contributed further to the challenges of shrinking trust in especially the media. The Corona pandemic has made research into media trust even more important. In turbulent times, the amount and speed of misinformation, i.e. false information that is spread unknowingly, and disinformation, i.e. false information that is spread deliberately, accelerates. The proposed project will document the development of media trust in Sweden with the help of diaries and in-depth interviews. It is a unique opportunity to see media trust rapidly changing that will allow us to learn for future crises, but also help to re-conceptualize media trust more generally. The collected material will be made accessible for other research projects.

  • 21.
    Gerhardt, Karin
    et al.
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Sverige.
    Wolrath Söderberg, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric.
    Lindblad, Inger
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Diderichsen, Öjvind
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Teacher Education and Aesthetic Learning Processes.
    Gullström, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Dahlin, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric.
    Köping Olsson, Ann-Sofie
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Lehtilä, Kari
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Rasoal, Chato
    Södertörn University, School of Police Studies.
    Dobers, Peter
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Johansson, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Berndt, Kurt D.
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Mathematics Education.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Kjellqvist, Tomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lalander, Rickard
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Vallström, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Alvarsson-Hjort, Jesper
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Sjöholm, Cecilia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Aesthetics.
    Lönngren, Ann-Sofie
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Comparative Literature.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Färjsjö, Eva
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Mathematics Education.
    Porseryd, Tove
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Sio, Miriam
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Teacher Education and Aesthetic Learning Processes.
    Yazdanpanah, Soheyla
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Pihl Skoog, Emma
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Archive Studies.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Gallardo Fernández, Gloria L.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Wadstein MacLeod, Katarina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Garrison, Julie
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Svärd, Veronica
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Hajighasemi, Ali
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Spånberger Weitz, Ylva
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Elmersjö, Magdalena
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Persson, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Borevi, Karin
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Löfgren, Isabel
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ghose, Sheila
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Bornemark, Jonna
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Podolian, Olena
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Grahn, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Faber, Hugo
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Cederberg, Carl
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Gradén, Mattias
    Högskolan Dalarna, Sverige.
    Nog nu, politiker – ta klimatkrisen på allvar2022In: Aftonbladet, no 2022-08-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Suing the algorithm: the mundanization of automated decision-making in public services through litigation2022In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, p. 2046-2062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automated decision-making using algorithmic systems is increasingly being introduced in the public sector constituting one important pillar in the emergence of the digital welfare state. Promising more efficiency and fairer decisions in public services, repetitive tasks of processing applications and records are, for example, delegated to fairly simple rule-based algorithms. Taking this growing trend of delegating decisions to algorithmic systems in Sweden as a starting point, the article discusses two litigation cases about fully automated decision-making in the Swedish municipality of Trelleborg. Based on analyzing court rulings, exchanges with the Parliamentary Ombudsmen and in-depth interviews, the article shows how different, partly conflicting definitions of what automated decision-making in social services is and does, are negotiated between the municipality, a union for social workers and civil servants and journalists. Describing this negotiation process as mundanization, the article engages with the question how socio-technical imaginaries are established and stabilized.

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  • 23.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Prison Media Complex: Labour, Technology and Communication Infrastructures in the Prison System2022In: tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique, E-ISSN 1726-670X, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prisons are a recurring topic and backdrop in the popular culture of the Global North. They often serve as spectacular environments that seem far removed from most people’s everyday lives. This article develops the notion of the prison media complex and discusses material entanglements between prisons and private media industries via the production of media technologies, consumption of communication, and technology development in the prison sector. The article seeks to answer the question of how we can conceptualise the prison media complex (PMC) from a materialist perspective. Taking the Swedish context as a starting point, we analyse the economic and material connections that characterise the PMC in this national context. Drawing on archival data, participant observations at prison technology tradeshows and a prison sector conference, as well as freedom of information requests, we bring nuance to the picture of media and communication technologies, as technologies of freedom are also based on unfreedom and captivity.

  • 24.
    Pentzold, Christian
    et al.
    Universität Leipzig, Deutschland.
    Lohmeier, Christine
    Universität Salzburg, Österreich.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Was will, was kann, was soll eine kommunikationswissenschaftliche Erinnerungsforschung?2022In: Handbuch kommunikationswissenschaftliche Erinnerungsforschung, Berlin: De Gruyter Open, 2022, p. 1-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Velkova, Julia
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Algorithmic resistance: Media practices and the politics of repair2021In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 523-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article constitutes a critical intervention in the current, dramatic debate on the consequences of algorithms and automation for society. While most research has focused on negative outcomes, including ethical problems of machine bias and accountability, little has been said about the possibilities of users to resist algorithmic power. The article draws on Raymond Williams’ work on media as practice to advance a framework for studying algorithms with a focus on user agency. We illustrate this framework with the example of the media activist campaign World White Web by the Swedish artist and visual designer Johanna Burai. We suggest that user agency in relation to algorithms can emerge from alternative uses of platforms, in the aftermath of algorithmic logics, and give birth to complicit forms of resistance that work through ‘repair’ politics oriented towards correcting the work of algorithms. We conclude with a discussion of the ways in which the proposed framework helps us rethink debates on algorithmic power.

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  • 26.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Challenging Digital Communication: Disconnections, toxicity and right-wing digital architecture2021Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2020, the programme coordinator, programme council and department council, Media, Communication and Cultural Analysis, chose to distinguish three theses in one volume. This volume presents adaptations of these works that were written and defended within the framework of the international master’s programme at Södertörn University. It is the first in a series and includes chapters by alumni who graduated in 2020.

    The contributions deal with discussions of how those in the creative industries manage day-to-day life in hyperconnected pandemic times, how toxic language is experienced and reproduced in gaming environments and what is specific to right-wing digital platforms. Each contribution challenges aspects of digital communication: work overload, toxic language, and behavior or extremist communities, and helps us develop a better understanding of contemporary digital culture from a critical perspective.

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  • 27.
    Trere, Emiliano
    et al.
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Digital Media Activism: A Situated, Historical, and Ecological Approach Beyond the Technological Sublime2021In: Digital Roots: Historicizing media and communication concepts of the digital age / [ed] Balbi, Gabriele; Ribeiro, Nelson; Schafer, Valerie; Schwarzenegger, Christian, Berlin: De Gruyter Oldenbourg , 2021, p. 193-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter engages with the notion of digital media activism. The starting point is that current studies often fall short in situating digital media activismwithin a longer historical trajectory and in the context of a complex media ecology, comprising both old and new media interactions. As a result, they frequently assume activism has been (and is) predominantly “digital”. Countering this assumption, this chapter argues for the importance of establishing both a historical perspective and a contextualized ecological lens of this concept, allowing for anuanced analysis of activist media practices beyond the technological sublime. In the first part, the chapter situates the notion of digital media activism within broader research on media activism and then disentangles its constitutive elements, i.e. “digital”, “media”, and “activism”. In the second part, the chapter brings together attempts to historicize and contextualize digital media activism. It shows that a historical perspective is able to capture the continuities and evolution in relation to a long history of technologically mediated activism. Then, it illustrates how media ecology perspectives can contextualise digital activism by (a) identifying the coexistence of multiple media practices and artefacts;(b) elucidating motivations and obstacles in the adoption and rejection of digitaltools; (c) shedding light on how citizens purposely disconnect from media tech-nologies as a form of resistance.

  • 28.
    Andreassen, Rikke
    et al.
    Department of Communication and Arts, Roskilde University, Denmark.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Nikunen, Kaarina
    Faculty of Information, Technology and Communication Sciences, Tampere University, Finland.
    Fostering the data welfare state: A Nordic perspective on datafication2021In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 207-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital tools facilitating everything from health to education have been introduced at a rapid pace to replace physical meetings and allow for social distancing measures as the Covid-19 pandemic has sped up the drive to large-scale digitalisation. This rapid digitalisation enhances the already ongoing process of datafication, namely turning ever-increasing aspects of our identities, practices, and societal structures into data. Through an analysis of empirical examples of datafication in three important areas of the welfare state – employment services, public service media, and the corrections sector – we draw attention to some of the inherent problems of datafication in the Nordic welfare states. The analysis throws critical light on automated decision-making processes and illustrates how the ideology of dataism has become increasingly entangled with welfare provision. We end the article with a call to develop specific measures and policies to enable the development of the data welfare state, with media and communication scholars playing a crucial role.

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  • 29.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Fängelser och medier: arbete, arkitektur och teknikutveckling2021In: Tidskrift för Kriminalvård, ISSN 0040-6821, no December 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Förhållandet mellan fängelser och medier utforskas i en ny bok av medieforskarna Anne Kaun och Fredrik Stiernstedt. I boken Prison Media – Work, Architecture and Technology Development används såväl historiska som nutida exempel för att analysera hur fängelser varit – och är – av central betydelse för utvecklingen av mediesystem och kommunikationsinfrastrukturer, men också hur fängelser i sig själva kan förstås som en slags medier. 

  • 30. Jakobsson, Peter
    et al.
    Kaun, AnneSödertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.Stiernstedt, FredrikSödertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Machine Intelligences2021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Peter Baldwin. Fighting the first wave. Why the Coronavirus wastackled so differently across the globe. Cambridge University Press, 20212021In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, E-ISSN 2002-066X, Vol. 58, no 1-2, p. 181-182Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Prison papers: Between alternative and mainstream2021In: Journal of Alternative and Community Media, ISSN 2634-4726, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 197-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages with the history of Swedish prison papers, situating them as alternative media within the broader media landscape shaped by the emergence and dismantling of the welfare state. The article not only aims to give a descriptive account of the history of Swedish prison papers but also builds and further develops theorizations of alternative media by constructing them not in opposition to established media but as in dialogue and exchange with them. As we show, prison papers have had repercussions for mainstream discourses beyond catering to niche audiences. Therefore, we suggest that alternative media should be understood as part of the broader media landscape rather than being situated outside of it. This also has implications for how we conceptualize newly emerging alternative media, also called alt-media, that are not progressive but populist and right-wing oriented, as well as supportive of conspiracy theories. 

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  • 33.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Prison Tech: Imagining the Prison as Lagging Behind and as a Test Bed for Technology Advancement2021In: Communication, Culture & Critique, ISSN 1753-9129, E-ISSN 1753-9137, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 69-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the ways in which prisons are imagined as sites of technology development. By attending to expos that showcase prison technologies and constitute “live theatres of technology” (L. Cornfeld, 2018), we carve out ambivalent sociotechnical imaginaries of technological backwardness that are combined with the idea of radical technological innovation to reform the justice system. In doing so, we highlight the prison as one site of technology development and actors at technology trade shows catering to the prison and security sector as platforms for technological mediators that range from corporate prison tech companies to educators as well as representatives of the criminal justice system. The expos emerge as sites where technological development is negotiated through performative sociotechnical imaginaries of prison tech.

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  • 34.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ways of seeing digital disconnection: A negative sociology of digital culture2021In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1571-1583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this contribution, I do not engage in digital disconnection merely as an empirical phenomenon but as a way of seeing digital culture and as a heuristic. I do not ask whether or not digital disconnection is possible, is good or bad, or should be advocated or overcome. Instead, I adopt Eva Illouz's framework of a negative sociology of social bonds to explore what it would mean to study digital culture from the perspective of negative choice. The conceptual framework is illustrated with three empirical cases that show what it would mean to engage in a negative sociology of digital culture. The shift in perspective from positive bonds to the choice to disengage, not use, or exit certain fora makes visible how digital culture is not only increasingly characterized by polarization, but also how disconnection emerges as a civic virtue that puts the individual user's responsibility at the forefront.

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  • 35.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Att automatisera orättvisor: Tre kritiska perspektiv på algoritmer i samhället2020In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, no 64-65, p. 147-159Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Dencik, Lina
    Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Datafication and the Welfare State: An Introduction2020In: Global Perspectives, ISSN 2575-7350, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 12912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both vehemently protected and attacked in equal measure, the welfare state as an idea and as a policy agenda remains as relevant as ever. It refers not only to a program of social welfare and the provision of social services, but also to a model of the state and the economy. According to Offe (1984), the welfare state in advanced capitalist economies is a formula that consists of the explicit obligation of the state apparatus to provide assistance and support to those citizens who suffer from specific needs and risks characteristic of the market society, and it is based on a recognition of the formal role of labor unions in both collective bargaining and the formation of public policy. Although actively dismantled in recent decades as globalization and neoliberalism have taken hold of much of the modern world-system, its future continues to be fought over. It serves as a model for society that is seen to privilege a commitment to decommodification, universal access, and social solidarity as a way to overcome the most prominent contradictions of capitalism. A product of the twinned global crises of the Great Depression and the Second World War, the modern welfare state therefore encapsulates a moment of political and economic settlement, a mechanism of stabilization that arguably could emerge only out of such crises.

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  • 37.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Doing time, the smart way? Temporalities of the smart prison2020In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 1580-1599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article engages with the notion of the smart prison to develop an understanding of emerging temporalities of digital technologies. The prison context serves here as a magnifying glass that makes certain contradictions and paradoxes of the digital imperative visible. Starting with a brief discussion of smart technology discourses, the article explores the temporalities of real-timeness, prediction and pre-emption that are entangled with digital technologies. Analysing the Spartan RFID tracking tool, the use of algorithms in prison administration and a mobile phone application used in Swedish probation, the article identifies a desynchronization between the temporalities of the incarcerated individuals’ lived experience and the (imagined) temporalities of the smart prison. The findings point to developments that are relevant for the smart, digital society beyond the prison walls.

  • 38.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Hallbladet - fängelsetidningen som ibland tog sig över muren2020In: Lyssnade medierna på användarnas kritik?: Användarnas ombudsmän samt kampen om kommentarsfälten / [ed] Torbjörn von Krogh, Bromma: Svensk Mediehistorisk Förening , 2020, p. 155-176Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Hushållsarbete i landets datastugor: Digitalt omsorgsarbete och bibliotek som smörjmedel inom digitaliseringsprojektet2020In: Bankdosor, skam och sms-poesi: Essäer om bibliotekens arbete med digitalisering / [ed] Stina Bäckström, Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket , 2020, p. 41-47Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 40.
    Pentzold, Christian
    et al.
    Chemnitz University of Technology, Chemnitz, Germany.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Lohmeier, Christine
    University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.
    Imagining and instituting future media: Introduction to the special issue2020In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 705-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our fast-forward times, the special issue ‘Back to the Future: Telling and Taming Anticipatory Media Visions and Technologies’ examines the future-making capacity of networked services and digital data. Its contributions ask about the role media play in forecasting the future and their part in bringing it about. And they are interested in the expectations and anticipatory visions that accompany the formation and spread of new media. Along these lines, the eight articles in this special issue explore the future-making dimension of new media. As a whole, they provide an empirically grounded analysis of the ways media reconfigure the relations and distances among present, past, and future times. The contributions delineate imaginaries of futures related to digital media. Furthermore, they attend to interventions into the plans and efforts of making futures and they inquire about the creation of differently vast and (un)certain horizons of expectation. Together, the articles share the assumption that mediated futures are actively accomplished and enacted; they do not simply appear or wait for us to arrive in them.

  • 41.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Velkova, Julia
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Laaksonen, Salla-Maaria
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Delfanti, Alessandro
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Logsdon, Alexis
    University of Minnesota Libraries, USA.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Lehtiniemi, Tuukka
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ruckenstein, Minna
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    In the Shadows of the Digital Economy: The Ghost Work of Infrastructural Labor2020In: Selected Papers of Internet Research 2020, The Association of Internet Researchers , 2020, no 0Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What does digital piecework have in common with laboring in the warehouse of a large online shopping platform? How is data cleaning related to digitization work and AI training in prisons? This panel suggests bringing these diverse ways of laboring in the digital economies together by considering these practices as infrastructural labor that takes the shape of shadow work (Illich, 1981) and ghost labor (Gray & Suri, 2019). Work and labor in modern, capitalist society imply power, authority and possibility for resistance, and these dimensions are crucial for understanding why and how infrastructures are realized and how they work. Infrastructure labor is ambiguous. It is both visible and invisible depending on the specific tasks and their inherent power relations (Leigh Star & Strauss, 1999). It includes both manual and cognitive labor. It is geared towards innovation as well as repair, maintenance and servitude. The panel aims to paint the contours of infrastructural labor at the margins of digital economies pointing towards forms of alienation and resistance that have for long been part of labor relations, but that are renegotiated in the context of emerging technologies within digital economies that need human labor to be sustained and further innovated.

  • 42.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Jürgen Habermas: Borgerlig offentlighet (1962)2020In: Medievetenskapens idétraditioner / [ed] Bengtsson, Stina; Ericson, Staffan; Stiernstedt, Fredrik, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2020, p. 111-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Pentzold, ChristianZeMKI, Germany.Lohmeier, ChristineUniversity of Salzburg, Austria.
    Making Time for Digital Lives: Beyond Chronotopia2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is said that the ontology of data resists slowness and also that the digital revolution promised a levelling of the playing field. Both theories are examined in this timely collection of chapters looking at time in the digital world. Since data has assumed such a paramount place in the modern neoliberal world, contemporary concepts of time have undergone radical transformation. By critically assessing the emerging initiatives of slowing down in the digital age, this book investigates the role of the digital in ultimately reinforcing neo-liberal temporalities. It shows that both "speed-up" and "slow down" imperatives often function as a form of biopolitical social control necessary to contemporary global capitalism. Problematic paradoxes emerge where a successful slow down and digital detox ultimately are only successful if the individual returns to the world as a more productive, labouring neoliberal subject. Is there another way? The chapters in this collection, broken up into three parts, ask that question.

  • 44.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Lohmeier, Christine
    University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.
    Pentzold, Christian
    Chemnitz University of Technology, Chemnitz, Germany.
    Making time for digital lives: Sketching the field and history of resisting dominant temporal regimes2020In: Making Time for Digital Lives: Beyond Chronotopia / [ed] Anne Kaun, Christian Pentzold & Christine Lohmeier, London: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2020, 1, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Lohmeier, Christine
    et al.
    University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Pentzold, Christian
    Chemnitz University of Technology, Chemnitz, Germany.
    Making time in digital societies: Considering the interplay of media, data, and temporalities - An introduction to the special issue2020In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 1521-1527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The text reflects on conceptualizations of media and time, and it introduces the articles of the special issue on the “Mediatization of time.”

  • 46.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Prison media work: from manual labor to the work of being tracked2020In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 42, no 7-8, p. 1277-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incarcerated individuals have long contributed to crucial societal infrastructures. Frombeing leased work force building the railway in the United States to constructing canalsystems in Sweden, prisoners’ labor has been widespread as an important part ofvalue production. Part of the labor conducted by incarcerated people is related tothe production, repair, and maintenance of media devices and media infrastructuresconstituting what we call prison media work. In this article, we trace the changinglogics of prison media work historically since the inception of the modern prison at theturn of the 20th century. Based on archival material, interviews, and field observations,we outline a shift from physical manual labor toward the work of being tracked thatis constitutive of surveillance capitalism in- and outside of the prison. We argue thatprison media work holds an ambiguous position combining elements of exploitationand rehabilitation, but most importantly it is a dystopian magnifying glass of media workunder surveillance capitalism.

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  • 47.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Treré, Emiliano
    Cardiff University, Cardiff ,UK.
    Repression, resistance and lifestyle: charting (dis)connection and activism in times of accelerated capitalism2020In: Social Movement Studies, ISSN 1474-2837, E-ISSN 1474-2829, Vol. 19, no 5-6, p. 697-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying the nexus of media and social movements is a growing subfield in both media and social movement studies. Although there is an increasing number of studies that criticize the overemphasis of the importance of media technologies for social movements, questions of non-use, technology push-back and media refusal as explicit political practice have received comparatively little attention. The article charts a typology of digital disconnection as political practice and site of struggle bringing emerging literatures on disconnection, i.e. forms of media technology non-use to the field of social movement studies and studies of civic engagement. Based on a theoretical matrix combining questions of power, collectivity and temporality, we distinguish between digital disconnection as repression, digital disconnection as resistance and digital disconnection as performance and life-style politics. The article discusses the three types of digital disconnection using current examples of protest and social movements that engage with practices of disconnection.

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  • 48.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies. Uppsala universitet.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Research Note 3: Användning av spårningsappar på mobiltelefonen: Medier, information och tillit under pandemin2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 49.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies. Uppsala universitet.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Research Note 4: Tillit och följsamhet till råd och rekommendationer2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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    fulltext
  • 50.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Sueing the Algorithm: The Mundanization of Automated Decision-Making2020In: Anais de resumos Expandidos IV Seminário Internacional de Pesquisas em Militarização e Processos Sociais: Realizado entre Novembro de 2020 e Janeiro de 2021, UNISINOS, São Leopoldo, RS, Brasil, São Leopoldo: Instituto Humanitas Unisinos , 2020, Vol. 1Conference paper (Other academic)
123 1 - 50 of 122
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