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  • 1.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Gender, memory, and peace: struggles between homogenization and fragmentation2023In: Memory Fragmentation from Below and Beyond the State / [ed] Anne Bazin, Emmanuelle Hébert; Valérie Rosoux; Eric Sangar, Abingdon: Routledge, 2023Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter investigates gender as a central organizing principle in memory work and demonstrates how gender functions as a powerful narrative trope for the constitution of the post-war state. Gendered memory tropes of women as either sexualized bodies or grieving mothers are analyzed and it is argued that by paying attention to how women's experiences are memorialized as part of homogenizing national narratives, we can understand more deeply what roles for women are deemed acceptable, encouraged, or discouraged. The chapter demonstrates that the concept of vertical fragmentation is a useful analytical lens when rethinking memory politics as a site for gendered constitutions of power and helps to identify how gendered memory politics is increasingly (re)negotiated and challenged through contestations below and beyond the nation-state. Civil society activism as well as the arts are two realms that may contribute to a productive fragmentation of monolithic memory and the chapter argues that such contestations of homogenizing, gendered memory tropes open up for gender-just peace.

  • 2.
    Björkdahl, Annika
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Places of Pain and Spaces of Silence: Re-Visiting a Bosnian Rape Camp2023In: Geopolitics, ISSN 1465-0045, E-ISSN 1557-3028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between gender, silence, place and space is theorised in this article through an analysis of the former rape camp Vilina Vlas in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Combining a spatial perspective with narrative analysis, we dissect spatial practices and narrative silences that shape and reshape a particular place defined by gendered violence. We suggest that ‘places of pain’ and ‘spaces of silence’ are co-constituted through a lack of acknowledgement and spatial erasures, as well as the making and breaking of silences. Our investigation discloses how places of gendered violence are hidden, transformed and forgotten and how women exposing them are silenced and rejected, yet still continue to resist and speak out. The article sheds light on the long-term consequences of gendered violence in war and contributes to the growing research agenda on gendered geographies of violence. 

  • 3.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    The missing and the mass graves2023In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, E-ISSN 2001-7308, no 4, p. 42-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nearly three decades after the end of the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, thousands of people are missing and mass graves are regularly found. Relatives still search for knowledge about their loved ones in the midst of secrets, rumors and ethnonationalist denial. As the country struggles to come to terms with this dark legacy of the war, art has emerged as a space for recognition of the lingering presence of absence of the missing.

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  • 4.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    The politics of reconciliation and memory2023In: Handbook on the Politics of Memory / [ed] Maria Mälksoo, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2023, p. 191-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After war and mass atrocity, memories of violence, injustice and fear are part of the structure of peace and inscribed in individuals and collectives. How the past is articulated influences the construction of peace and the process of redefining and reworking antagonistic relationships. This chapter investigates the role of memory politics in reconciliation processes. Through illustrative examples from societies dealing with the legacies of collective trauma and violence, it calls into question some of the generalized, homogenizing imaginary of reconciliation and demonstrates that an analysis of the relationship between reconciliation and memory has to take into account practices of power and justice. Engagements with the past can both enable and disable reconciliation processes and reconciliation involves an intricate interplay between remembering and forgetting.

  • 5.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Challenging the 'Here''and 'There' of Peace and Conflict Research: Migrants' Encounters with Streams of Violence and Streams of Peace2022In: Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding, ISSN 1750-2977, E-ISSN 1750-2985, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 584-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article seeks to challenge Global North spatial imaginations of war as 'there' and peace as 'here'. It proposes this spatial rethinking against a background of migration being a defining feature of our time. Based on participant observation and an action research project, the article analyses embodied, emplaced encounters with violence and care that migrants experience in the Belgian capital Brussels. These encounters can be violent, but also productive of trust. The concepts of streams of violence and streams of peace are used to theorize these dynamics, thus reconfiguring understandings of where and when war and peace take place.

  • 6.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    The Stuff from the Siege: Transitional Justice and the Power of Everyday Objects in Museums2022In: International Journal of Transitional Justice, ISSN 1752-7716, E-ISSN 1752-7724, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 220-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the role of the affective power of everyday objects in commemorations of war and conflict. It seeks to understand the transformative power of the everyday as a memory node and investigates how and why everyday objects can become carriers of an inclusive rendering of the past. Through a phenomenologically grounded reading of two exhibitions on the 1992-1995 siege of the Bosnian capital Sarajevo, the article theoretically advances the idea that everyday objects that are transformed into artefacts in museums expand our moral, mnemonic imagination and therefore potentially contribute to peace. A systematic analysis of the affective power of everyday objects is developed through three key conceptual lenses - authenticity, intimacy and vulnerability. The study thus contributes to research on the postwar museum as a site for transitional justice and peacebuilding, and the role of material things as carriers of emotions and meaning in the context of postwar memorialization.

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  • 7.
    Al-Kahwati, Ashi
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Addressing Atrocity in Syria: New Challenges for Transitional Justice2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The war in Syria has been ongoing since 2011. What began as a protest against the regime has resulted in the deaths of 180,000 people, with many more wounded, more than 100,000 ‘disappeared’ and over 11 million displaced (Lederer 2019). As the conflict enters its tenth year, a peaceful solution to the violence looks as distant as ever. Nonetheless, in the midst of conflict, civil society and other actors are working hard to hold perpetrators accountable, and to ensure that victims are acknowledged and compensated for their suffering through reparations. The quest for truth and justice has not been put on hold.

    This report takes stock of these transitional justice efforts in the midst of conflict.

  • 8.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Articulating Presence of Absence: Everyday Memory and the Performance of Silence in Sarajevo2021In: Post-Conflict Memorialization: Missing Memorials, Absent Bodies / [ed] Olivette Otele; Luisa Gandolfo; Yoav Galai, Cham: Springer, 2021, 1, p. 15-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is interested in the tension between lived silences in the post-war everyday and public commemoration. The concept of ‘presence of absence’ is developed in order to capture the complex ways that the traumatic past is embedded in the present. Silence is understood as an articulation of this presence of absence and the chapter explores silence as a practice and performance in the everyday of post-war Sarajevo in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The chapter reflects upon how such everyday silent memory work can be represented through public commemoration. It looks to the importance of art as an alternative realm that does not necessarily strive for closure through speech, but rather embraces a state of suspension. Aesthetic representations of presence of absence may be, the chapter concludes, a powerful means to articulate everyday memory work of silence.

  • 9.
    Björkdahl, A.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Methodologies for feminist peace research2021In: Routledge Handbook of Feminist Peace Research / [ed] Tarja Väyrynen; Swati Parashar; Élise Féron; Catia Cecilia Confortini, London: Routledge, 2021, p. 40-49Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focusses on the question of “how” in research. It argues that critical methodologies are key to the development of theory in feminist peace research. The chapter discusses some central skills and sensitivities of the feminist peace researcher such as reflexivity, critical scrutiny, and attendance to power relations. It outlines three broad methodological approaches that are particularly influential as powerful vehicles for feminist peace research: first, the chapter discusses ethnography with a focus on the analytical framing of the everyday, the contextualisation of agency, and the close reading of embodiment and experiences. Second, it outlines methodologies that seek to unpack the construction of gendered discourses and representations. Third, it discusses the role of quantitative methodologies and provides some examples of how the work to identify patterns and causal relations can forward a feminist peace research agenda. Separate or combined, these approaches conduct critical epistemological and ontological work and advance theory on gender, peace, and conflict.

  • 10.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Minnespolitik: striden om det förflutna2021Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad är det som avgör hur samhället minns ett krig, ett terrorattentat eller andra traumatiska händelser? Dragkampen om vad som koms ihåg handlar om minnespolitik, det vill säga olika aktörers försök att tolka historien för sina egna syften och forma kollektiva minnen.

    Minnespolitik kan se ut på många olika sätt. Från gamla tiders statyer av kungar och andra makthavare till dagens ofta mer abstrakta monument till minne av förintelser eller folkmordet i Srebrenica. Det kan också vara ett verktyg för marginaliserade grupper som genom att välta historiska statyer gör uppror mot dagens orättvisor. Eller utformas på ett sätt som ger människor möjlighet att bearbeta trauman från en väpnad konflikt.

  • 11.
    Kappler, Stefanie
    et al.
    Durham University, UK.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Working with the cultural heritage of conflict for peacebuilding: Lessons learned from the Western Balkans2021Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Violent conflicts often leave a legacy of destroyed, ruptured or segregated political landscapes. Accordingly, engaging the cultural heritage that emerges from periods of violence is a key factor for the construction of durable and inclusive peace. Many of the great challenges faced by conflict-affected societies are reflected in the politics around cultural heritage as it can be instrumentalised for war and peace alike, making it imperative for local, national and international stakeholders to engage with cultural heritage as a component of peacebuilding processes.This discussion paper provides a deeper understanding of the role of cultural heritage in conflict-affected societies and, specifically, the Western Balkans. The paper examines how narratives and practices around cultural heritage can be developed to foster social cohesion and dialogue, and seeks to demonstrate how divisive uses of cultural heritage can be transformed in a way that is conducive to peace.Using examples from Bosnia-Herzegovina (BiH) and Kosovo, the paper maps and identifies key cultural heritage sites and spaces that reflect a variety of cultural heritage narratives and practices in relation to peace processes. Tangible heritage including museums, memorials, plaques and religious buildings are discussed alongside intangible heritage including art installations and monuments. In particular, the role of local actors as anchors in cultural heritage processes is discussed, and attention is given to the gendered and intersectional power dynamics (re)produced through cultural heritage. Further, cultural heritage pedagogiesare discussed as instruments to rectify divisive propaganda and build bridges between multiple narratives, including the recognition of multi-layered histories and memories. Digitisation processes, it is argued, can be part of such pedagogies, mitigating or ameliorating processes of exclusion. Further, the role of cultural heritage as an income-generating factor is considered, not only in terms of its political significance but also in terms of its role in addressing economic marginalisation. Further, the paper identifies and warns against potential gaps between external notions of reconciliation and local requests for justice. Finally, the paper demonstrates that by reading the material landscape of post-conflict societies through both the presence and absence of tangible cultural heritage, it is possible to gain a deeper understanding of local power dynamics.

    Based on this analysis, the paper draws out a number of key recommendations to the European Union’s engagement in the field of cultural heritage and peacebuilding:1) Any cultural heritage work should be anchored in the work that local heritage actors are already doing.2) Not all cultural heritage is equal. There is a need to consider which heritage has been historically privileged and why, as well as how these privileges translate into the present. 3) The frictions around cultural heritage can be successfully addressed through work with educational actors.4) Cultural heritage work should be considered as a potential income-generating factor in contexts of deprivation.5) Digital opportunities for heritage transformation should be considered.6) Cultural heritage interventions should not impose external notions of reconciliation but instead engage with the diversity of local requirements. 7) Cultural heritage work should be sensitive to the multiple layering of history.8) A spatial analysis of presences and absences in the post-conflict landscape should be conducted to understand processes of exclusion and inclusion.

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  • 12.
    Björkdahl, Annika
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Insitute of International Affairs.
    Gender and transitional justice2020In: An Introduction to Transitional Justice / [ed] Olivera Simić, Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2020, 2Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on three gendered justice gaps–the accountability, acknowledgement and reparations gaps–and unmask transitional justice as a site for the long-term construction of a gendered post-conflict order. It begins by defining and conceptualising the role of gender analysis in transitional justice, followed by a brief historical overview of the policy and practice accomplishments and shortcomings so far. The permanent International Criminal Court with a seat in The Hague has built upon the work of the two ad hoc tribunals. The treaty that established the court and governs it, the Rome Statute, refers to gender-based violence as a possible war crime. On a theoretical level a great number of questions remain unresolved and it is pertinent to problematise some of the assumptions and outcomes of research so far. Transitional justice practices aim to right wrongs in the past, institutionalise the rule of law and new juridical and normative frameworks, as well as prevent the recurrence of violence and future harms.  

  • 13.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Gendered silences in post-conflict societies: a typology2020In: Peacebuilding, ISSN 2164-7259, E-ISSN 2164-7267, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers new theoretical insights into the relationship between silence, gender and agency. Bridging feminist research and critical peace research, the article considers the gendered practices of making and breaking silence in the aftermath of war and armed conflict. A typology is proposed along the axes of (a) disabling and enabling silences, and (b) social remembering and forgetting. Drawing on a number of illustrative cases, the typology is used to identify and categorise modes and functions of gendered silence, and show how oxymoronic fluctuations between silence and speech play out in the everyday. Silence can be employed for subordination and erasure, but can also be a strategy for coping with a precarious everyday, a form of tacit communication of ambiguity as well as a claim-making strategy. Unpacking the gendered dimensions of silence reveals power dynamics with deep implications for societies transitioning from war.

  • 14.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs.
    Searching For Security2020In: Whose future is here?: Searching for hospitality in Brussels northern quarter / [ed] Action Research Collective for Hospitality, Metrolab Series , 2020, p. 107-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs.
    Book review: Marie E Berry, War, Women, and Power: From Violence to Mobilization in Rwanda and Bosnia-Herzegovina2019In: Media, War & Conflict, ISSN 1750-6352, E-ISSN 1750-6360, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 504-508Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    The Swedish Institute of International Affairs.
    Everyday agency and transformation: Place, body and story in the divided city2019In: Cooperation and Conflict, ISSN 0010-8367, E-ISSN 1460-3691, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 131-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do we identify and understand transformative agency in the quotidian that is not contained in formal, or even informal structures? This article investigates the ordinary agency of Palestinian inhabitants in the violent context of the divided city of Jerusalem. Through a close reading of three ethnographic moments I identify creative micropractices of negotiating the separation barrier that slices through the city. To conduct this analytical work I propose a conceptual grid of place, body and story through which the everyday can be grasped, accessed and understood. ‘Place’ encompasses the understanding that the everyday is always located and grounded in materiality; ‘body’ takes into account the embodied experience of subjects moving through this place; and ‘story’ refers to the narrative work conducted by human beings in order to make sense of our place in the world. I argue that people can engage in actions that function both as coping mechanisms (and may even support the upholding of status quo), and as moments of formulating and enacting agential projects with a more or less intentional transformative purpose. This insight is key to understanding the generative capacity of everyday agency and its importance for the macropolitics of peace and conflict.

  • 17.
    Björkdahl, Annika
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    WPS and Civil Society2019In: The Oxford Handbook of Women, Peace, and Security / [ed] Sara E. Davies; Jacqui True, New York: Oxford University Press, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Civil society is often understood as a normative vehicle for the promotion of human rights and democracy, as it plays a central role in ensuring gender equality and advocating for local ownership in the decision-making processes of states. Civil society agents and organizations have been instrumental in promoting and advancing the Women, Peace, and Security (WPS) agenda. In this chapter, we examine the experiences of Bosnian Civil Society Organizations (CSO) and their activities to advance a gender-just peace. Drawing on examples from the Bosnian case study, we argue that women civil society organizations are key actors, as they not only set the agenda when it comes to WPS, they also play a key role in ensuring that the WPS principles are institutionalized and operationalized in policy. Moreover, we observe that women CSOs are particularly successful in advocating for the needs of victims of conflict-related sexual-based violence.

  • 18.
    Björkdahl, Annika
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Feminist Ethnographic Research: Excavating Narratives of Wartime Rape2018In: Ethnographic Peace Research: Approaches and Tensions / [ed] Gearoid Millar, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 43-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter reflects upon our feminist approach to narrative ethnographic research and how we explore the production and circulation of gendered stories in post-war societies. The illustrative case is wartime rape in Bosnia-Herzegovina during the 1992–1995 war. For ethical reasons we rely on women survivors’ accounts of their experiences in order to study how they narratively construct their social worlds and their positions within them. We discuss the practice of “enquiry-as-bricolage” and how narratives produced at diverse sites and by various agents can be put in dialogue with each other—courtroom narratives produced at the ICTY, published life stories, narratives produced at the Women’s Court, interviews with “gatekeepers”, and narratives collected through “being-in-place”—and reflected upon from the positionality of “the vulnerable observer”.

  • 19.
    Björkdahl, Annika
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Feeling silences in a place of pain2017In: International feminist journal of politics, ISSN 1461-6742, E-ISSN 1468-4470, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 383-385Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Gender, narrative and affect: Top-down politics of commemoration in post-genocide Rwanda2017In: Memory Studies, ISSN 1750-6980, E-ISSN 1750-6999, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 131-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes an interest in gendered memory politics and addresses the dearth of research on gender and commemoration in relation to the genocide in Rwanda. It analyses elite-produced gendered narratives at key sites of commemoration and investigates their affective role in constituting the post-genocide Rwandan state. Through a methodological approach of ‘the situated gaze’, three central observations are made. First, women are mourned as a specific category of rape victims and mothers. Second, women’s experiences of sexual violence are at the same time censored and de-individualized. Third, no other experiences, beyond being a victim, are taken into account. The article finds that the top-down affective memory politics circumscribes the role women played during and after the genocide, and restricts their agency within the present state project of ‘national unity and reconciliation’.

  • 21.
    Björkdahl, Annika
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    A tale of three bridges: agency and agonism in peace building2016In: Third World Quarterly, ISSN 0143-6597, E-ISSN 1360-2241, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 321-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores agonistic processes of peace, which are situated within and constitutive of different spaces and places. Three contested cities, Sarajevo, Mostar and Visegrad in Bosnia-Herzegovina, provide us with local sites where peace and peace building in various forms 'take place' as people come together in collective action. Through a close reading of three symbolically and materially important bridges in the towns, we reveal meaning-making processes, as agentive subjects struggle around competing claims in the post-conflict everyday world. The collective, situated and fleeting agency that we explore through the Arendtian notion of 'space of appearance' invests space with meaning, belonging and identity. Thus, this article grapples with agonistic peace as it manifests itself in materiality and spatial practices. We use the social and material spaces of the city to locate agency and agonism in peace building as they relate to the conflict legacy in Mostar, Visegrad and Sarajevo in order to advance the critical peace research agenda.

  • 22.
    Björkdahl, Annika
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Gender and transitional justice2016In: An Introduction to Transitional Justice, Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2016, p. 69-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter provides a short overview and investigation of gender perspectives on transitional justice. It examines some of the gender implications of the 'transitional' theory of justice. The chapter explains conceptualising the role of gender analysis in transitional justice and what it means to add gender to transitional justice. It discusses key points of contention and the case study of Bosnia-Herzegovina; zoom in on gendered justice gaps connected to accountability, acknowledgement and reparation. The chapter explores gender as a relational concept that more broadly informs an understanding of power, exclusion and marginalisation. Transitional justice practices aim to right wrongs in the past, institutionalise the rule of law and new juridical and normative frameworks in the present, as well as prevent the recurrence of violence and future harm. The efforts to break the impunity for these crimes and unveil the extensive harm suffered by women paradoxically risks cementing conservative gender roles of women as victims and men as perpetrators.

  • 23.
    Björkdahl, A.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Gender: The missing piece in the peace puzzle2016In: The Palgrave Handbook of Disciplinary and Regional Approaches to Peace / [ed] Oliver Richmond; Sandra Pogodda; Jasmin Ramovic, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 181-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several scholars from various theoretical perspectives have proposed pieces of the peace puzzle. As scholars fit together the sometimes disparate pieces of this puzzle, the missing pieces become more visible, and gender is among them. While gender studies, feminist international relations (IR) scholars, and peace and conflict researchers informed by a gender perspective have contributed to this puzzle, epistemological, ontological and methodological barriers have often prevented this work from attracting a mainstream audience.

  • 24.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Challenges of Postconflict Coexistence: Narrating Truth and Justice in a Bosnian Town2015In: Political Psychology, ISSN 0162-895X, E-ISSN 1467-9221, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 231-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article sets out to deepen our understanding of how people make everyday strategies for living together after mass atrocities and what role transitional justice may play for these strategies. Based on a study in the small town of Foa in Bosnia-Herzegovina, the analysis unpacks the encounter between three clusters of narratives that make competing moral claims and offer different ways of ordering the past, present, and future: the institutional narrative formed globally at various institutions of transitional justice and here represented in the local by the International Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia (ICTY); the collective narratives of ethnonationalism constructed by entrepreneurs in politics and media and fed into daily discourses; and individual narratives in the margins that refuse collective categorizations. The article argues that the ICTY narrative, based on individual justice and factual truth, was, contrary to its aims, used to enforce exclusionist and collective claims. At the same time, less dominant narratives embraced the ICTY narrative, which suggests that the tribunal may potentially play a constructive role as an archive for the future.

  • 25.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Chiseche Salome Mibenge, Sex and International Tribunals: The Erasure of Gender from the War Narrative, University of Pennsylvania Press: Philadelphia, PA, 2013.2015In: Cooperation and Conflict, ISSN 0010-8367, E-ISSN 1460-3691, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 551-552Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Björkdahl, Annika
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Gendering agency in transitional justice2015In: Security Dialogue, ISSN 0967-0106, E-ISSN 1460-3640, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 165-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mainstream transitional justice and peacebuilding practices tend to re-entrench gendered hierarchies by ignoring women or circumscribing their presence to passive victims in need of protection. As a consequence we have limited knowledge about the multifaceted ways women do justice and build peace. To address this lacuna we conceptualize and unpack the meaning of gendered agency, by identifying its critical elements and by locating it in space and in time. The conceptual work that we undertake is underpinned by empirical mapping of the transitional justice spaces in post-conflict Bosnia-Herzegovina, where we point out instances of critical, creative, and transformative agency performed by women that challenge or negotiate patterns of gendered relations of domination. We collect women's oral narratives and explore new sets of questions to capture women's unique experiences in doing justice. Such research enables us to engage with the subjects of post-conflict peacebuilding and transitional justice processes directly and in their own spaces. This article thus renders women's agency visible and attempts to grasp its contributions and consequences for transformations from war to peace.

  • 27.
    Bjökdahl, Annika
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Translating UNSCR 1325 from the global to the national: protection, representation and participation in the National Action Plans of Bosnia-Herzegovina and Rwanda2015In: Conflict, Security and Development, ISSN 1467-8802, E-ISSN 1478-1174, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 311-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A decade and a half after the adoption of United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325, gendered peace gaps in post-conflict societies are still wide and deep. This raises pressing questions concerning how UNSCR 1325 and concomitant resolutions on women, peace and security (WPS) constitute women and gender, and how they as particular discursive configurations impact on post-conflict societies. In this article we zoom in on the role of National Action Plans (NAPs) for the implementation of 1325 in national contexts. We undertake a discursive analysis of Bosnia-Herzegovina's and Rwanda's NAPs in order to trace how the 1325 agenda of protection, representation and participation is translated into national contexts. We conclude that the NAPs to a large degree perpetuate the status quo and are not used as instruments for greater societal transformation that support women's authentic participation. The article ends with a reflection on how to imagine agency beyond the scripted protection, representation and participation that the NAPs (re) produce and we suggest a possible role for the latest WPS resolution UNSCR 2122 as a vehicle for transformation.

  • 28.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Strömbom, L.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Whose place?: emplaced narratives and the politics of belonging in East Jerusalem's contested neighbourhood of Silwan2015In: Space & Polity, ISSN 1356-2576, E-ISSN 1470-1235, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 191-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the relationship between politics of belonging, narratives and place. We do this through a case study of the contested neighbourhood of Silwan in East Jerusalem, partly appropriated by an archaeological excavation site. Three conflicting narratives that make claims to the place are identified. They are geographically anchored, (re)produced in and through the material form of the place, and symbolically retold through social and moral meaning-making activities. Such an emplaced reading makes it possible to understand how divergent narratives produce insecurity and violence when enacted in and through materially and geographically contested sites.

  • 29.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Efter kriget: den svåra vägen till försoning2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Tjugo år har gått sedan folkmordet i Rwanda och sedan Sydafrika höll sitt första demokratiska val efter apartheids fall men i båda länderna pågår ännu uppgörelserna med det förflutna. Ett försoningsarbete är långvarigt och har egentligen inget klart slut.

    Att hålla en debatt vid liv, som i Tyskland där nazitiden oförtröttligt diskuteras, är på många sätt en förutsättning för en fungerande demokrati. 

    Försoning handlar i grunden om att sätta ord på vad som hänt och om att skipa rättvisa, men det är lättare sagt än gjort. För att det ska lyckas krävs en kombination av många olika slags insatser som inbegriper enskilda människor såväl som regeringar, frivilligorganisationer och medier.

  • 30.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Film Review: We women warriors (Tejiendo Sabiduría)2014In: Peacebuilding, ISSN 2164-7259, E-ISSN 2164-7267, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 358-359Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Kammars Larsson, Disa
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Gender andTransition in Libya: Mapping women’s participation in post-conflict reconstruction2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    More than three years after the end of the Gaddafi regime, Libya is struggling to end a vicious circle of violence in order to take steps towards reconciliation and durable peace. This paper analyses the ongoing transitional period in Libya from a gender perspective. It maps the most pressing concerns of the post-conflict transition: women’s lack of security in both public and private spaces, the silence around conflict-related sexual violence in transitional justice processes, the struggles for political representation and gender-sensitive electoral processes, the challenges of including both men and women in reconciliation efforts, and the lack of sustained international engagement for gender justice in Libya. It is argued that women’s security concerns remain unaddressed, and that formal and informal structures interact to exclude women from decision-making and transitional justice processes. At the same time the  study shows that women in Libya take an active role in the political transformation and have  made some inroads into traditionally male domains of politics.

  • 32.
    Björkdahl, A.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Gendered Justice Gaps in Bosnia-Herzegovina2014In: Human Rights Review, ISSN 1524-8879, E-ISSN 1874-6306, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 201-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A gendered reading of the liberal peacebuilding and transitional justice project in Bosnia-Herzegovina raises critical questions concerning the quality of the peace one hopes to achieve in transitional societies. By focusing on three-gendered justice gaps-the accountability, acknowledgement, and reparations gaps-this article examines structural constraints for women to engage in shaping and implementing transitional justice, and unmasks transitional justice as a site for the long-term construction of the gendered post-conflict order. Thus, the gendered dynamics of peacebuilding and transitional justice have produced a post-conflict order characterized by gendered peace and justice gaps. Yet, we conclude that women are doing justice within the Bosnian-Herzegovina transitional justice project, and that their presence and participation is complex, multilayered, and constrained yet critical.

  • 33.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Making peace, making memory: peacebuilding and politics of remembrance at memorials of mass atrocities2013In: Peacebuilding, ISSN 2164-7259, E-ISSN 2164-7267, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 334-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peacebuilding in post-conflict societies increasingly encompasses memorialisation and practices of remembrance. Memorials that commemorate incidents of mass atrocity have been claimed as spaces for intervention by outside actors, and international support has often been decisive for their creation. While external involvement is driven by a desire for solid statements about the violent past, it is increasingly recognised that memorials are on the contrary sites for the ongoing production of meaning in the present; sites used both for mourning and for making politics. This article interrogates the productive encounter between external actors' globalised template for remembering and desire, and local processes of remembrance. The argument is illustrated by cases studies of the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the Kigali Genocide Memorial Centre in Rwanda.

  • 34. Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    et al.
    Nyquist Brandt, Åsa
    Söderberg Jacobson, Agneta
    Equal power - lasting peace: obstacles for women's participation in peace processes2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Violence, corruption and unequal laws are some of the obstacles that keep women in conflict-torn regions from participating in peace processes on equal terms with men. Another big part of the problem is the international community prioritizing men in senior positions in peace operations, according to the new report Equal Power – Lasting Peace by the Swedish women and peace organization The Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation.

    The report Equal Power – Lasting Peace is based on field studies conducted in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Iraq, the DR Congo and Liberia. Although the countries and conflicts differ, the patterns are strikingly similar.

    In all the regions women and women’s organizations play important roles in resolving conflicts in local communities and in managing everyday life.

    But when it comes to formal decision fora the doors are closed for women. This is contrary to the statements of UN Security Council Resolution 1325, which emphasizes that, in order for reaching a sustainable peace, women must participate on the same terms as men in all parts of peace processes.

  • 35.
    Eastmond, M.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Silence as possibility in postwar everyday life2012In: International Journal of Transitional Justice, ISSN 1752-7716, E-ISSN 1752-7724, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 502-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silence is a form of communication as multifaceted as speech and as such conveys a broad range of contextually situated social meanings. Often silence is understood as a form of denial and inherently detrimental to processes of reconciliation, but it may help create a sense of ‘normality’ and facilitate encounters between former foes. This article enquires into the role and meanings of silence as tacit forms of communication in postwar social processes and everyday life among people of different ethnic groups in Bosnia and Herzegovina, particularly as used by the displaced and returnees. It argues that in these contentious settings, everyday social interaction employs silence in ways that empower by communicating respect and even trust, thus forming and sustaining relations important to viable local life. Silence can be used to affirm family continuity and protect close relationships. Silent claims may also ‘speak’ from a marginalized position in relation to hegemonic narratives and make moral claims. Silence may thus be understood as a pragmatic and at times successful strategy for coexistence even when reflecting continued division in the larger society.

  • 36.
    Mannergren Selimovic, Johanna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Perpetrators and victims: Local responses to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia2010In: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 0920-1297, E-ISSN 1558-5263, Vol. 57, p. 50-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article juxtaposes local understandings and narratives on justice and reconciliation in Bosnia and Herzegovina with those of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). By looking at notions of collective innocence/guilt, the development of victim identities, and the relativization of the suffering of the other, it explores the failure of the ICTY to offer a convincing model of transitional justice in Bosnia. Although the ICTY disciplines the boundary between victim and perpetrator through measures for shared truth and individual justice, local discourses resist or transform these representations, thus tending to entrench rather than transcend national divisions. The findings of this article challenge prevalent instrumentalist understandings of transitional justice and its role in facilitating reconciliation. The article focuses on the communities of Konjic and Srebrenica and the ICTY outreach conferences held in these towns in 2004 and 2005.

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