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  • 1.
    Mangano, M. C.
    et al.
    Sicily Marine Ctr, Dept Integrated Marine Ecol, Stn Zool Anton Dohrn, Lungomare Cristoforo Colombo Complesso Roosevelt, I-90142 Palermo, Italy..
    Berlino, M.
    Univ Palermo, Lab Ecol, Earth & Marine Sci Dept, Viale Sci Ed 16, I-90128 Palermo, Italy.;Natl Inst Oceanog & Appl Geophys OGS, Via A Piccard 54, I-34151 Trieste, Italy..
    Corbari, L.
    Univ Palermo, Lab Ecol, Earth & Marine Sci Dept, Viale Sci Ed 16, I-90128 Palermo, Italy.;Univ Palermo, Dept Engn, Viale Sci,Ed 8, I-90128 Palermo, Italy..
    Milisenda, G.
    Sicily Marine Ctr, Dept Integrated Marine Ecol, Stn Zool Anton Dohrn, Lungomare Cristoforo Colombo Complesso Roosevelt, I-90142 Palermo, Italy..
    Lucchese, M.
    Univ Palermo, Lab Ecol, Earth & Marine Sci Dept, Viale Sci Ed 16, I-90128 Palermo, Italy.;Natl Inst Oceanog & Appl Geophys OGS, Via A Piccard 54, I-34151 Trieste, Italy..
    Terzo, S.
    Univ Palermo, Lab Ecol, Earth & Marine Sci Dept, Viale Sci Ed 16, I-90128 Palermo, Italy.;Univ Messina, Dept Chem Biol Pharmaceut & Environm Sci, Viale Fernando Stagno dAlcontres 3, Messina, Italy.;Dept Marine Biotechnol, Stn Zool Anton Dohrn, I-80121 Naples, Italy..
    Bosch-Belmar, M.
    Univ Palermo, Lab Ecol, Earth & Marine Sci Dept, Viale Sci Ed 16, I-90128 Palermo, Italy..
    Azaza, M. S.
    Natl Inst Marine Sci & Technol, Aquaculture Lab, Tunis 2025, Tunisia..
    Babarro, J. M. F.
    Inst Invest Marinas IIM CSIC, Eduardo Cabello 6, Vigo 36208, Spain..
    Bakiu, R.
    Agr Univ Tirana, Dept Aquaculture & Fisheries, Tirana, Albania..
    Broitman, B. R.
    Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Dept Ciencias, Villa Del Mar Chile, Chile.;Millenium Inst Coastal Socioecol SECOS, Concepcion, Chile..
    Buschmann, A. H.
    Univ Los Lagos, Ctr I Mar, Puerto Montt, Chile.;Univ Los Lagos, CeBiB, Puerto Montt, Chile..
    Christofoletti, R.
    Fed Univ Sao Paulo UNIFESP IMar, Inst Marine Sci, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Dong, Y.
    Ocean Univ China, Fisheries Coll, Key Lab Mariculture, Minist Educ, Qingdao 266003, Peoples R China..
    Glamuzina, B.
    Univ Dubrovnik, Dept Appl Ecol, Cira Carica 4, Dubrovnik 20000, Croatia..
    Luthman, Ola
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Makridis, P.
    Univ Patras, Dept Biol, Univ Campus, Rio Achaias 26504, Greece..
    Nogueira, A. J. A.
    Univ Aveiro, Dept Biol, Campus Santiago, P-3810193 Aveiro, Portugal.;Univ Aveiro, CESAM, Campus Santiago, P-3810193 Aveiro, Portugal..
    Palomo, M. G.
    Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Lab Marine Ecol, Nat Hist Museum Argentina, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina..
    Dineshram, R.
    CSIR, Biol Oceanog Div, Natl Inst Oceanog, Panaji 403004, Goa, India..
    Sanchez-Jerez, P.
    Univ Alicante, Dept Marine Sci & Appl Biol, ApC 99, Alicante, Spain..
    Sevgili, H.
    Isparta Univ Appl Sci, Egirdir Fac Fisheries, Fisheries Applicat & Res Ctr, Isparta, Turkey.;Isparta Univ Appl Sci, Egirdir Fac Fisheries, Dept Aquaculture, Isparta, Turkey..
    Troell, M.
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Kraftriket 2B, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Beijer Inst Ecol Econ, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    AbouelFadl, K. Y.
    Aswan Univ, Fac Fish & Fisheries Technol, Aquat Ecol Dept, Tingar, Egypt..
    Azra, M. N.
    Univ Malaysia Terengganu, Inst Marine Biotechnol, Terengganu 21030, Malaysia..
    Britz, P.
    Rhodes Univ, Dept Ichthyol & Fisheries Sci, Grahamstown, South Africa..
    Carrington, E.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biol, 620 Univ Rd, Friday Harbor, WA 98250 USA.;Univ Washington, Friday Harbor Labs, 620 Univ Rd, Friday Harbor, WA 98250 USA..
    Celic, I
    Natl Inst Oceanog & Appl Geophys OGS, Via A Piccard 54, I-34151 Trieste, Italy..
    Choi, F.
    Northeastern Univ, Marine Sci Ctr, 430 Nahant Rd, Nahant, MA 01908 USA..
    Qin, C.
    Chinese Acad Fishery Sci, South China Sea Fisheries Res Inst, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Dionisio, M. A.
    Univ Lisbon, Fac Sci, MARE Marine & Environm Sci Ctr, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal..
    Dobroslavic, T.
    Univ Dubrovnik, Dept Appl Ecol, Cira Carica 4, Dubrovnik 20000, Croatia..
    Galli, P.
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Dept Earth & Environm Sci, Milan, Italy..
    Giannetto, D.
    Mugla Sikti Kocman Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Biol, TR-48000 Mugla, Turkey..
    Grabowski, J. H.
    Northeastern Univ, Marine Sci Ctr, 430 Nahant Rd, Nahant, MA 01908 USA..
    Helmuth, B.
    Northeastern Univ, Marine Sci Ctr, 430 Nahant Rd, Nahant, MA 01908 USA..
    Lebata-Ramos, M. J. H.
    Southeast Asian Fisheries Dev Ctr, Aquaculture Dept, Iloilo 5021, Philippines..
    Lim, P. T.
    Univ Malaysia, Inst Ocean & Earth Sci, Bachok Marine Res Stn, Bachok Kelantan 16310, Malaysia..
    Liu, Y.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Fac Biosci Fisheries & Econ, Tromso, Norway..
    Llorens, S. M.
    Univ Politecn Valencia, Dept Ciencia Anim, Valencia, Spain..
    Mirto, S.
    Natl Res Council IAS CNR, Inst Anthrop Impact & Sustainabil Marine Environm, Lungomare Cristoforo Colombo 4521, I-90142 Palermo, Italy..
    Pecarevic, M.
    Univ Dubrovnik, Dept Appl Ecol, Cira Carica 4, Dubrovnik 20000, Croatia..
    Pita, C.
    Int Inst Environm & Dev IIED, London, England.;Univ Aveiro, CESAM Ctr Environm & Marine Studies, Dept Environm & Planning, Aveiro, Portugal..
    Ragg, N.
    Cawthron Inst, Aquaculture Grp, Nelson, New Zealand..
    Ravagnan, E.
    NORCE Climate & Environm, Nygardsgaten 112, N-5008 Bergen, Norway..
    Saidi, D.
    Univ Hassiba Benbouali Chlef, Fac Nat Sci & Life, Dept Water & Environm, Ouled Fares Chlef, Algeria..
    Schultz, K.
    Northeastern Univ, Marine Sci Ctr, 430 Nahant Rd, Nahant, MA 01908 USA..
    Shaltout, M.
    Univ Alexandria, Fac Sci, Dept Oceanog, Alexandria, Egypt..
    Tan, S. H.
    Univ Sains Malaysia, Ctr Marine & Coastal Studies, George Town 11800, Malaysia..
    Thiyagarajan, V
    Univ Hong Kong, Swire Inst Marine Sci, Pokfulam Rd, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Univ Hong Kong, Sch Biol Sci, Pokfulam Rd, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Sara, G.
    Univ Palermo, Lab Ecol, Earth & Marine Sci Dept, Viale Sci Ed 16, I-90128 Palermo, Italy..
    The aquaculture supply chain in the time of covid-19 pandemic: Vulnerability, resilience, solutions and priorities at the global scale2022In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 127, p. 98-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 global pandemic has had severe, unpredictable and synchronous impacts on all levels of perishable food supply chains (PFSC), across multiple sectors and spatial scales. Aquaculture plays a vital and rapidly expanding role in food security, in some cases overtaking wild caught fisheries in the production of high quality animal protein in this PFSC. We performed a rapid global assessment to evaluate the effects of the COVID19 pandemic and related emerging control measures on the aquaculture supply chain. Socio-economic effects of the pandemic were analysed by surveying the perceptions of stakeholders, who were asked to describe potential supply-side disruption, vulnerabilities and resilience patterns along the production pipeline with four main supply chain components: a) hatchery, b) production/processing, c) distribution/logistics and d) market. We also assessed different farming strategies, comparing land-vs. sea-based systems; extensive vs. intensive methods; and with and without integrated multi-trophic aquaculture, IMTA. In addition to evaluating levels and sources of economic distress, interviewees were asked to identify mitigation solutions adopted at local / internal (i.e., farm site) scales, and to express their preference on national / external scale mitigation measures among a set of a priori options. Survey responses identified the potential causes of disruption, ripple effects, sources of food insecurity, and socio-economic conflicts. They also pointed to various levels of mitigation strategies. The collated evidence represents a first baseline useful to address future disaster-driven responses, to reinforce the resilience of the sector and to facilitate the design reconstruction plans and mitigation measures, such as financial aid strategies.

  • 2.
    Rodela, Romina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. WageningenUniversity and Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Bregt, Arnold K.
    University and Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Ligtenberg, Arend
    University and Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Pérez-Soba, Marta
    University and Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Verweij, Peter
    University and Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    The social side of spatial decision support systems: Investigating knowledge integration and learning2017In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 76, p. 177-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Spatial decision support systems (SDSS) represent a step forward in efforts to account for the spatial dimension in environmental decision-making. The aim of SDSS is to help policymakers and practitioners access, interpret and understand information from data, analyses and models, and guide them in identifying possible actions during a decision-making process. Researchers, however, report difficulties in up-take of SDSS by the intended users. Some suggest that this field would benefit from investigation of the social aspects involved in SDSS design, development, testing and use. Borrowing insights from the literature on science-policy interactions, we explore two key social processes: knowledge integration and learning. Using a sample of 36 scientific papers concerning SDSS in relation to environmental issues, we surveyed whether and how the selected papers reported on knowledge integration and learning. We found that while many of the papers mentioned communication and collaboration with prospective user groups or stakeholders, this was seldom underpinned by a coherent methodology for enabling knowledge integration and learning to surface. This appears to have hindered SDSS development and later adoption by intended users.

  • 3.
    Rodela, Romina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Reinecke, S.
    Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg, Germany.
    Bregt, A.
    Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg, Germany.
    Kilham, E.
    Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg, Germany.
    Lapeyre, R.
    Institut du développement durable et des relations internationales (IDDRI) - Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations, France.
    Challenges to and opportunities for biodiversity science-policy interfaces2015In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 54, p. 483-486Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Rodela, Romina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Wageningen University & Research, Netherlands.
    Tucker, Catherine May
    University of Florida, Gainesville, USA.
    Šmid-Hribar, Mateja
    Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Sigura, Maurizia
    University of Udine, Udine, Italy.
    Bogataj, Nevenka
    Slovenian Institute for Adult Education, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Urbanc, Mimi
    Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Gunya, Alexey
    Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
    Intersections of ecosystem services and common-pool resources literature: An interdisciplinary encounter2019In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 94, p. 72-81Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interdisciplinary research is understood to be the preferred way for scientific research to deepen understanding about environmental issues and challenges for sustainability. Two well-defined interdisciplinairy research fields, Ecosystems services (ES) and Common-pool resources (CPR), have taken different approaches that integrate the natural and social sciences to address environmental conundrums collaboratively. Several recent studies bring together insight from each, yet little is known about the breadth or directions, of the interdisciplinary conversation between the two fields of research. Moreover, the potential of this interaction to advance theory and practice relevant for sustainability is underexplored. The purpose of this study is to fill this gap by addressing three questions: 1) What are the motives for the interaction between CPR and ES fields?, 2) How are these two fields of research interacting?, and 3) How does the interaction of CPR and ES contribute to research on sustainability? We conducted a systematic map to identify, select, describe and analyse research of our interest. We mapped out motivations for researchers to bring together insights from these two lines of inquiry and examined how they are doing so.

  • 5.
    Siebenhüner, B.
    et al.
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany.
    Rodela, Romina
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, The Netherlan.
    Ecker, F.
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Social learning research in ecological economics: A survey2016In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 55, p. 116-126Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social learning studies emerged as part of the ecological economics research agenda rather recently. Questions of how human societies and organisations learn and transition on the basis of environmental knowledge relate to the core ideas of ecological economics with its pluralistic understanding of human behaviour in contrast to the limited focus on incentive-driven behaviour. Our study analyses the emergence and thematic foci of social learning studies within ecological economics over the past 15 years. We selected and analysed 54 articles published after peer review in established journals adhering to the epistemological tradition of ecological economics. This study is guided by the interest in how social learning is conceptualised, how this research is positioned in terms of process dynamics, causal factors and outcomes of learning. Results show, that the number of related papers grew substantially in recent years. Also the role of formal or informal institutions has been found to be a strong causal factor for social learning and change processes vis-à-vis technological, economic or political factors. In addition, there is a growing awareness of social learning processes in various environmental policy fields such as biodiversity governance, water and land management, fisheries, and climate adaptation. We conclude that these insights can give new impulses to research on socio-ecological transition and to the related debate on societal change and transformation processes as core topics for ecological economics.

  • 6.
    Sokolova, Tatiana
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Co-producing ‘The Future(s) We Want’: How does political imagination translate into democratised knowledge-action models for sustainability transformations?2023In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 144, p. 162-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Democratic societies face the challenge of effecting sustainability transformations, allowing for variously imagined futures and underpinned by a diversity of practices of knowledge production and action. This article investigates how political imagination of sustainable futures informs the ways knowledge and action are understood and linked in sustainability and research policy, and what potential implications this has for democratic transformative change. Empirically, the article analyses the overarching sustainability and research policies in Sweden, focusing on the central documents produced by the government and public research financiers. The analysis shows parallels between the conceptualisations of sustainability and knowledge-action, characterised by linearity, instrumentalisation of knowledge and circumscription of power-sharing spaces for knowledge creation against the background of endorsement of collaborations between academia and society. Such conceptualisations, apart from sending mixed signals to sustainability researchers and practitioners, potentially enable knowledge and action processes driven by impact, competitiveness and atomisation, precluding the exercise of the intrinsic value of democratic knowledge and action practices necessary for reflexive governance of transformations towards sustainability.

  • 7.
    Udovyk, Oksana
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Gilek, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Coping with uncertainties in science-based advice informing environmental management of the Baltic Sea2013In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 29, p. 12-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managing uncertainty is a main challenge for sustainable management of complex socioecological systems, such as marine ecosystems. Today, a growing number of scientific publications address decision-making practices under conditions of high uncertainty. However, very few studies have analyzed how science treats uncertainty before it reaches decision-makers, especially for various marine environmental issues. This study aims to fill these research gaps by identifying the main theoretical approaches to science-based uncertainty management proposed in the scientific literature. Furthermore, by scrutinizing advisory documents, current approaches and methods to assess and treat uncertainty in science-based advice are analyzed and compared for five significant environmental issues in the Baltic Sea (eutrophication, fisheries, invasive species, chemical pollution, and oil spills). Specifically, the study analyzes the types of uncertainties acknowledged, how strategies and practices present and address uncertainties, and whether new theoretical proposals identified in the scientific literature affect existing practices. The study's results reveal that current scientific practices do not adequately address uncertainty in advice formulation. First, no common guideline is in use, resulting in significant differences among studied environmental issues and a common lack of structure, clarity, established terminology, and transparency in the assessment and treatment of uncertainty. Furthermore, new theoretical developments connected with uncertainty appraisal (such as theoretical typologies) and new tools and methods for handling uncertainty (such as precautionary and participatory approaches) are hardly utilized in practice in the management of the Baltic ecosystem. Consequently, although theoretical approaches for coping with uncertainty in complex socio-ecological systems are ample, the challenge for the future is to implement these approaches more effectively in assessment and management frameworks. The study discusses possible improvements to current practices in environmental management of large-scale socio-ecological systems such as the Baltic Sea and other regional seas, acknowledging that these measures will not reduce all existing uncertainty but rather contribute to a more comprehensive treatment of uncertainties.

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