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  • 1.
    Bassin, Mark
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History of Ideas. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Lev Gumilev and the European New Right2015In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 840-865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The striking affinities that have developed between radical-conservative movements in Western Europe and Russia since the end of the Cold War have been widely noted. This essay considers these affinities through the example of the Soviet historian and geographer Lev Nikolaevich Gumilev (1912–1992). It argues that Gumilev and the European New Right developed perspectives that were highly comparable, founded on similar principles, and articulated through similar images and allusions. Yet despite the powerful resonances in terms of basic concepts and theoretical orientation, there were nonetheless deep differences in terms of the conclusions regarding the practical implications for their respective societies that Gumilev and the Europeans deduced from these principles.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Boundaries and Belonging Among Settled Minorities and Refugees in Bulgaria2023In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 1123-1142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of settled minorities for facilitating refugee belonging is seldom discussed in research on refugee integration. Drawing on scholarship on belonging, boundary-making, and bordering, this study investigates how boundaries are drawn between settled minorities and refugees in Bulgaria. Based on interviews with integration workers and organizations of settled minorities in a state with the largest historically present Muslim minority in the EU, an Arabic-speaking diaspora settled decades ago, and with minimal state involvement in refugee integration, the study shows how spatial, linguistic, and religious boundaries separate settled minorities from newly arrived refugees. Arabic-speaking diasporas are nevertheless witnessed to overcome the boundaries through geographical proximity, a shared language, and shared countries of origin, whereby they have functioned as facilitators of refugee belonging and inclusion. Furthermore, Muslim institutions led by Bulgarian Turks have functioned as spaces for refugee belonging. The study finds that settled minority communities have, despite multiple boundaries and some assimilatory discourses, contributed to refugee belonging in ways that in part has compensated for the state absence. The study calls for further research investigating the role of settled minorities in inclusionary processes in society.

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  • 3.
    Fittante, Daniel
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Institutional Activism and Ethnic Intermediation in Post-Communist Romania2022In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 554-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing studies on legal approaches to ethnic minority representation often highlight different systems’strengths and weaknesses. While this scholarship provides important insights into the growing body ofliterature on minority representation, the topic remains largely under-theorized. Because systems of ethnicminority representation clarify the organizations and philosophies of diverse states, more theoreticalanalyses can enrich the descriptive literature. Building on the existing scholarship, this article assessesRomania’s particular version of proportional representation regarding designated national minorities. Itapplies two theoretical models: (1) institutional activism and (2) ethnic intermediation. The former clarifiesthe establishment of Romania’s post-communist constitutional provisions regarding minority organizations, and the latter explains how small yet influential minority populations make claims to and reallocateresources from the Romanian state. Through a unique, understudied case study – the Armenian communityof Romania – this article attempts to broaden ethnic minority representation scholarship by refining thetheoretical frameworks of institutional activism and ethnic intermediation.

  • 4.
    Kalinina, Ekaterina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Becoming patriots in Russia: biopolitics, fashion, and nostalgia2017In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 8-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article seeks to explore the common ground between biopolitics, fashion, patriotism and nostalgia. Taking off from the Foucauldian notion of biopolitics as a control apparatus exerted over a population, I provide an insight into the modern construction of the Russian nation, where personal and collective sacrifice, traditional femininity and masculinity, orthodox religion, and the Great Patriotic War become the basis for patriotism. On carefully chosen case studies, I will show how the state directly and indirectly regulates people’s lives by producing narratives, which are translated (in some cases designers act as mouthpieces for the state demographic or military politics) into fashionable discourses and, with a core of time, create specific gender norms–women are seen as fertile mothers giving birth to new soldiers, while men are shown as fighters and defenders of their nation. In the constructed discourses, conservative ideals become a ground for the creation of an idea of a nation as one biological body, where brothers and sisters are united together. In these fashionable narratives, people’s bodies become a battlefield of domestic politics. Fashion produces a narrative of a healthy nation to ensure the healthy work- and military force.

  • 5.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Babi Yar and the Nazi Genocide of Roma: Memory Narratives and Memory Practices in Ukraine2022In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 450-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thousands of Roma were killed in Ukraine by the Nazis and auxiliary police on the spot. There are more than 50,000 Roma in today's Ukraine, represented by second and third generation decendants of the genocide survivors. The discussion on Roma identity cannot be isolated from the memory of the genocide, which makes the struggle over the past a reflexive landmark that mobilizes the Roma movement. About twenty Roma genocide memorials have been erected in Ukraine during last decade, and in 2016 the national memorial of the Roma genocide was opened in Babi Yar. However, scholars do not have a clear picture of memory narratives and memory practices of the Roma genocide in Ukraine. A comprehensive analysis of the contemporary situation is not possible without an examination of the history and memory of the Roma genocide before 1991.

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  • 6.
    Lastouski, Aliaksei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Zakharov, Nikolay
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Sacred Language in the Borderlands: Discussions on the Language of Belarusian Catholicism2024In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 446-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers in detail the choosing of a language for the liturgy and sermons in Roman Catholic parishes in Belarus. The choice of the Belarusian language is part of a deliberate nation-building policy by the Catholic Church. Moreover, a whole network of local peculiarities, historical stereotypes, and political attitudes is concealed beneath the unified cover of a preference for the use of the Belarusian language. Based on interviews with clergy and religious activists, the article shows that the Roman Catholic Church repeatedly works out compromise solutions that allow it to adapt to the pressures of the state and believers going through a process of contradictory and conflicting nation-building.

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  • 7.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Historians as Activists: History Writing in Times of War. The Case of Ukraine in 2014–20182021In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 691-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article elucidates the role of historians in times of war and the peculiarities of popular history narratives written by historians who became activists. The article focuses on historians who call themselves “Likbez. Historical Front.” This cohort gave rise to a new professional species—activist historians—who are different from so called memorians or propagandists, who work in service of authorities. Likbez historians tried to use their power to influence and promote their activist agenda not only in the realm of memory and history but also in reformation of state institutions. I argue that for Likbez historians, securitization of the past is the main strategy employed for producing historical knowledge. Historians’ work is a part of postcolonizing process observed in Ukrainian society since the Maidan protests. As the analysis shows, popular history narratives written with an open activist agenda are a result of many compromises made by scholars in the intersection of several factors: professional ambitions, political and civic aims, social and political context, popular expectations, and market environment. In line with the increased attention to agency in memory studies, this article demonstrates that historians have a much more nuanced relation to power than straightforward opposition or co-option.

1 - 7 of 7
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  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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