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  • 1.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kalmus, Veronika
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Figueiras, Rita
    Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Portugal.
    Björklund, Erik
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Social Media Surveillance and Authoritarianism: Final Report2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the attitudes of online media users to the vast collection of personal data held by commercial platform companies? Do previous experiences of state surveillance have an impact on these attitudes? Do they differ for those brought up in the surveillance regime of Estonia during the Soviet Union era, or who experienced the surveillance apparatus in Portugal under authoritarian dictatorship? Do Swedish media users without authoritarian surveillance experiences differ in their attitudes to commercial surveillance? 

    These questions are discussed in this final report from the project Social Media Surveillance and Authoritarianism (Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, 2020–2023), a three-country comparative study (Estonia, Portugal, Sweden). The project aimed to analyse the role of past experiences of state surveillance on attitudes to dataveillance, that is, the commercial surveillance stemming from online media that is at the heart of data capitalism. 

    The report accounts for the aims, objectives, theoretical and methodological points of departure and and presents empirical examples of the results. 

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    Social Media Surveillance and Authoritarianism
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  • 2.
    Figueiras, Rita
    et al.
    Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Portugal.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kalmus, Veronika
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Toward a Datafied Mindset: Conceptualizing Digital Dynamics and Analogue Resilience2024In: Social Media + Society, E-ISSN 2056-3051, Vol. 10, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the ways in which what we call the analogue and the datafied mindsets perceive the functioning of the datafied world. Based on a qualitative interview study of two generations of media users in Estonia, Portugal, and Sweden, we present and analyze underlying patterns in participants’ media attitudes and related practices. We show that belonging to a media generation does not always produce a homogeneous mindset or a uniform attitude toward media technologies. These mindsets, being ideal-typical constructs, are not bound to individuals: the same person can display features of the analogue and the datafied mindset in relation to different parts of the datafied world. One mindset does not replace the other but rather adds another layer to the social action of the individuals. The mindsets are multi-dimensional and molded by contrasting understandings, indicating that the tenacious structures of the analogue world linger on in the datafied social space. 

  • 3.
    Kalmus, Veronika
    et al.
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Figueiras, Rita
    Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Portugal.
    Who is afraid of dataveillance?: Attitudes toward online surveillance in a cross-cultural and generational perspective2022In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares surveillance-related experiences and attitudes of two generations of media users in countries with different historical surveillance regimes (Estonia, Portugal, and Sweden) and analyzes the predictors of the attitudes toward contemporary surveillance. A large-scale online survey (N = 3221) reveals that attitudes toward online state and corporate surveillance are interrelated; the two attitudinal components are, however, generation-specific, having different predictors. Tolerance toward state surveillance is more characteristic of the older group, being predicted by trustful and obedient attitudes toward state authorities and institutions. Tolerance toward corporate dataveillance is more characteristic of the younger group, being predicted by active and self-confident media use. While the socio-historical context molds the intergenerational gaps in surveillance-related experiences and attitudes, individual-level experiences of state surveillance do not predict tolerance toward either type of contemporary surveillance, suggesting that global techno-cultural developments are probably more powerful factors than past experiences in forming generation-specific attitudes.

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