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  • 1.
    Fröhlich, Christian
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Anarchist movement in contemporary Russia2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Fröhlich, Christian
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Dog lovers and vegan liberators: Fractures and tensions within the Animal Rights Movement in Russia2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1990s Russia saw many social movements emerging due to developing spaces of social activism and a rising concern of citizens for their immediate surroundings. Although the Putin reign closed many opportunities, social activism in spaces which are not directly connected to political concerns survived and developed further. The example of the animal rights movement shows how its main concern for shelter and survival of homeless animals units a wide range of Russian citizens and mostly stays under the radar of state security organs. However, the access to information to world-wide developments supported the emergence of more radical forms of activism for universal rights of animals, such as animal liberation, property destruction and street protests. These currents were brought in by followers of vegan/vegetarian lifestyles and by anarchists, which propose oppositional positions and radical critiques on society as a whole.

    The paper gives an overview over the main concerns of the Russian animal rights movement and shows how demands and critiques differ according to ideological backgrounds and social positions of their agents. On the one hand, ideological cleavages among concerned citizens and activists cause also differences in organizational approaches to social activism, which makes cooperation and mutual support difficult. But on the other, the Russian movement for the rights of animals succeeds in supporting the diffusion of international lifestyle values and forms of social activism.

  • 3.
    Jämte, Jan
    et al.
    Örebro Universitet.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Why Did It Not Happen Here?: The Gradual Radicalization of the Anarchist Movement in Sweden 1980–902016In: A European Youth Revolt: European Perspectives on Youth Protest and Social Movements in the 1980s / [ed] Bart van der Steen and Knud Andresen, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 97-111Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines the development and role of the anarchist movement in Sweden during the 1980s. In relation to many other parts of Northern Europe – which had seen an upsurge in radical left-libertarian activism, squatting and urban unrest at the turn of the 1980s – such social movements and confrontations remained a marginal phenomenon in Sweden, at least until the end of the decade. However, by the late 1980s a new generation of younger activists, often with roots in the anarchist milieu, formed the basis for a radical squatter and autonomist movement, which proved very similar to the movements that had developed throughout Europe almost a decade earlier.

  • 4.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Anarchism in post-socialism: A case of Polish anarchists2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Anarchist movement in post-socialist context2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Anarchists in Poland – a new generation of the Left?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Od post-anarchizmu do pop-anarchizmu2016In: Studia z dziejów anarchizmu (2): w dwusetlecie urodzin Michaiła Bakunina / [ed] Radosława Skryckiego, Szczecin: Wydawnictwo Naukowe Uniwersytetu Szczecińskiego , 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Squatting in the East – Rozbrat in Poland2014In: The City Is Ours: Squatting and Autonomous Movements in Europe from the 1970s to the Present / [ed] van Hoogenhuijze, Leendert and Van Der Steen, Bart, Oakland CA: PM Press , 2014, p. 233-253Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squatters and autonomous movements have been in the forefront of radical politics in Europe for nearly a half-century—from struggles against urban renewal and gentrification, to large-scale peace and environmental campaigns, to spearheading the antiausterity protests sweeping the continent. Through the compilation of the local movement histories of eight different cities—including Amsterdam, Berlin, and other famous centers of autonomous insurgence along with underdocumented cities such as Poznan and Athens—The City Is Ours paints a broad and complex picture of Europe’s squatting and autonomous movements. Each chapter focuses on one city and provides a clear chronological narrative and analysis accompanied by photographs and illustrations. The chapters focus on the most important events and developments in the history of these movements. Furthermore, they identify the specificities of the local movements and deal with issues such as the relation between politics and subculture, generational shifts, the role of confrontation and violence, and changes in political tactics. 

  • 9.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Polanska, Dominika V.
    Uppsala University.
    Radical Urban Movements in Poland: the case of squatting2016In: Miscellanea Anthropologica et Sociologica, ISSN 2084-2937, E-ISSN 2354-0389, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 53-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radical social movements are more and more often the subject of academic inquiry, where their agenda, identity-building processes and repertoires of action are examined vis a vis the dominant discursive opportunity structures. The case study presented in this articleis the squatting movement in Poland. We interpret this movement, its actions and in particular alliance-building strategies, through the perspective of radical flanks of broader urban social movements environment.

  • 10.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Always against the state?: An analysis of Polish and Swedish radical left-libertarian activists’ interaction with institutionalized politics2015In: PArticipation and COnflict, ISSN 1972-7623, E-ISSN 2035-6609, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 845-875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radical left-libertarian movements are often regarded as primarily seeking ways to accom-plish social and political change outside the framework of institutionalized politics. Previous research, however, has paid little or no attention to the question of these activists’ actual interactions with institu-tionalized politics, nor has it addressed the ways these interactions could be understood in relation to their overall strategies and ideology. This article therefore explores whether, and to what extent, such interaction actually occurs and analyzes the meanings and motives radical left-libertarian activists – from anarchist, autonomist, and anarcho-syndicalist groups – attribute to various types of political actions, ranging from voting and lobbying to protests and direct action. We furthermore compare activists in Po-land and Sweden, in order to scrutinize whether cross-country differences in “political opportunities” affects the activists’ political strategies and ideas about how social and political change can best be ac-complished. Contrary to popular beliefs and many activists’ own self-declarations, our analysis shows that radical left-libertarian groups do in fact try to achieve political change by interacting with institution-alized politics. While radical left-libertarian activists do in most cases prefer “direct action”, this article explores how a more complex relationship to institutionalized politics allows them to accomplish real and immediate changes at the grassroots level.

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  • 11.
    Polanska, Dominika V.
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Uppsala universitet.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Poland: Local differences and the importence of cohesion2016In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, E-ISSN 2001-7308, Vol. IX, no 1-2, p. 46-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two Polish cities, Warsaw and Poznań, are studied in the article to examine how external structures are handled and used by squatters in these two settings. The aim is to analyze opportunity structures that condition the emergence and development of squatting and how squatters respond to and utilize these opportunities. Our ambition is to understand why squatting has developed differently in the two cities by emphasizing the duration and cohesion of the squatting scene as pivotal for the different trajectories of squatting. It is argued in the article that the durability of the squatting environment abates tendencies to open the squatting scene to external coalitions and establish more institutionalized forms of political struggle.

  • 12.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    The transformative power of cooperation between social movements: squatting and tenants’ movements in Poland2015In: City, ISSN 1360-4813, E-ISSN 1470-3629, Vol. 19, no 2-3, p. 274-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squatting, or the use of property without the legal permission, and tenants’ activism are under-researched areas, in particular in the post-socialist context. Poland has been pointed out as extraordinary on the map of squatting in post-socialist Europe and a considerable number of tenants’ organizations are active in the country. What is most interesting is that squatters’ and tenants’ activists are forming alliances, despite their obvious differences in their organizational models, social composition, along with the specific motives and goals of their activism. The objective of this article is to examine the relations between the tenants’ and squatting movements in Poland by studying two cities where both movements are established and closely cooperating. In particular we are interested in the transformative power of such cooperation and we assume that cooperation between social movements results in negotiations and transformations of the social movement actors involved. The empirical foundations for this article are 50 interviews, whereof 30 interviews conducted in Warsaw with squatters and tenants’ movement activists and 20 interviews conducted with activists in Poznań. Warsaw and Poznań are, moreover, two Polish cities where the squatting movement is most vibrant and where squatters and tenants have achieved some considerable successes in their activities. The article argues against previous studies emphasizing access to abundant resources and identity alignment as crucial for the mobilization of collective and collaborative action. Instead, it argues that the lack of resources might also be driving social movements towards cooperation, as a kind of compensation. Moreover, our cases demonstrate that ideology and identity alignment in social movements create stagnation with regard to openness towards new allies. We therefore argue that a high degree of identity alignment and ideological consistency might discourage the formation of new alliances.

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  • 13.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Jämte, Jan
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Umeå University.
    Why it didn´t happen here: The development of the Anarchist Movement in Sweden 1980-19902014In: On conference website, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 14.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Begreppet extremism - en kritisk introduktion2016In: ARKIV. Tidskrift för samhällsanalys, ISSN 2000-6225, E-ISSN 2000-6217, no 5, p. 15-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Termen ”extremism” har blivit vanligare inom både svensk offentlig debatt och myndighetsprosa. I sådana sammanhang är det dock sällan klart exakt vad som avses med denna term. Inte heller inom samhällsvetenskapen är begreppet extre­ mism oomstritt och inom olika forskningsfält används begreppet på olika sätt. Syftet med Adrienne Sörbom och Magnus Wennerhags artikel är att belysa extremismbegrep­ pets uppkomst och förändrade betydelse under moderniteten, samt att diskutera några av de problem som begreppet är behäftat med. Med hjälp av bland annat vetenskaps­ sociologen Thomas F. Gieryns begrepp ”gränsdragningsarbete” (boundary-work) visar Sörbom och Wennerhag hur begreppet extremism används i fältet mellan vetenskap, politik och samhällsdebatt. Författarnas huvudsakliga poäng är att begreppets utgångs­ punkt i en tydligt normativ föreställning om politiska avvikelser gör det mindre använd­ bart i vetenskapliga sammanhang, eftersom det enbart tar dessa avvikelser för givna och inte erbjuder några förklaringar om varför de uppkommer eller vilken roll de spelar i moderna samhällen. 

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  • 15.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Radical left movements in Europe: An introduction2017In: Radical Left Movements in Europe / [ed] Magnus Wennerhag; Christian Fröhlich; Grzegorz Piotrowski, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017, p. 1-21Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Fröhlich, ChristianHigher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia.Piotrowski, GrzegorzSödertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES). European Solidarity Centre, Gdansk, Poland.
    Radical left movements in Europe2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When the Iron Curtain lifted in 1989, it was seen by some as proof of the final demise of the ideas and aspirations of the radical left. Not many years passed, however, before the critique of capitalism and social inequalities were once again the main protest themes of social movements. This book provides an account of radical left movements in today’s Europe and how they are trying to accomplish social and political change.

    The book’s international group of leading experts provide detailed analysis on social movement organizations, activist groups, and networks that are rooted in the left-wing ideologies of anarchism, Marxism, socialism, and communism in both newly democratized post-communist and longstanding liberal-democratic polities. Through a range of case studies, the authors explore how radical left movements are influenced by their situated political and social contexts, and how contemporary radical left activism differs from both new and old social movements on one hand, and the activities of radical left parliamentary parties on the other. Ultimately, this volume investigates what it means to be ‘radical left’ in current day liberal-democratic and capi- talist societies after the fall of European state socialism.

    This is valuable reading for students and researchers interested in European politics, contemporary social movements and political sociology.

  • 17.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Challenging Consensus in Civil Society: Anarchist activists in Poland and in Sweden2013Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 17 of 17
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