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  • 1.
    Andersson, Ingela
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Stockholm University, Department of Physical Geography and Quarternary Geology.
    Jarsjö, Jerker
    Stockholm University, Department of Physical Geography and Quarternary Geology.
    Petersson, Mona
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography. Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Saving the Baltic Sea, the Inland Waters of Its Drainage Basin, or Both? Spatial Perspectives on Reducing P-Loads in Eastern Sweden2014In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 43, no 7, 914-925 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrient loads from inland sources to the Baltic Sea and adjacent inland waters need to be reduced in order to prevent eutrophication and meet requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) and the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP). We here investigate the spatial implications of using different possible criteria for reducing water-borne phosphorous (P) loads in the Northern Baltic Sea River Basin District (NBS-RBD) in Sweden. Results show that most catchments that have a high degree of internal eutrophication do not express high export of P from their outlets. Furthermore, due to lake retention, lake catchments with high P-loads per agricultural area (which is potentially of concern for the WFD) did not considerably contribute to the P-loading of the Baltic Sea. Spatially uniform water quality goals may, therefore, not be effective in NBS-RBD, emphasizing more generally the need for regional adaptation of WFD and BSAP-related goals.

  • 2.
    Asghar, Naveed
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology. Örebro universitet.
    Petersson, Mona
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology. Örebro univarsitet.
    Dinnétz, Patrik
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Local land-scape effects on population dynamics of Ixodes ricinus2016In: Geospatial Health, ISSN 1827-1987, Vol. 11, 283-289 p., 487Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Balogh, Péter
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Sleeping abroad but working at home: Cross border residential mobility between transnationalism and (re)bordering2013In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 95, no 2, 189-204 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-border residential mobility (CBRM) has so far largely been approached from a transnational perspective. However, recent developments in border studies and transnationalism give rise to certain doubts. While border studies have come to include mental borders next to physical borderlands, transnationalism today refers not just to cross-border movements but also to identities trans-cending the national. But border studies have shown that the increased crossing of borders is not necessarily coupled with their diminished significance. CBRM is a particularly interesting phenomenon as it entails the continuous crossing of a physical border, but the question is whether it also implies the erosion of mental borders and the emergence of transnational ties. While drawing on experiences from parallel cases, my study focuses on Poles from Szczecin moving just across the boundary to Vorpommern, Germany. Some are integrating there, but their large majority appears to carry on with everyday life in Poland as before moving. This settlement has triggered considerable resentment among local Germans, who as a reaction mark the borderland discursively and physically. As my survey shows, while both groups regularly cross the physical border, many even among the cross-border residents consider it as a necessary dividing line or prefer cooperation to be reserved to some activities. Hence, unlike longdistance migration leading either to diaspora identities or to gradual dissolution in the majority culture, CBRM appears as a specific form of international migration where the physical proximity allows such intensive links with the country of origin that transnational effects are mitigated.

  • 4.
    Bonow, Johan M.
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography. Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Japsen, Peter
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Troels F. D.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    High-level landscapes along the margin of southern East Greenland-A record of tectonic uplift and incision after breakup in the NE Atlantic2014In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 116, 10-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elevated plateaux and deeply incised valleys characterise the large-scale landscapes along the East Greenland margin as in many elevated, passive continental margins around the world. The absence of syn- or post-rift rocks in, for example, the mountains of Norway, hampers the assessment of the age of these landscapes and of the present-day elevation. The mountains of southern East Greenland (68-71°N), however, expose thick basalts that were extruded onto a largely horizontal lava plain near sea level during breakup of the NE Atlantic at the Paleocene-Eocene transition. We take advantage of these favourable geological conditions to investigate the uplift history after continental breakup. In particular, it is clear that present-day elevations of these basalts up to 3.7. km above sea level (a.s.l.) were reached after breakup. We have mapped regional erosion surfaces and integrated the information about the landscape with the stratigraphic record (i.e. stratigraphic landscape analysis). The analysis led to the following relative denudation chronology for southern East Greenland: At breakup, the margin subsided and underwent km-scale burial. Around the Eocene-Oligocene transition, the first phase of uplift, tilting and subsequent erosion led to the formation of an extensive, low-relief erosion surface (the Upper Planation Surface, UPS) that was graded towards the base level of the adjacent ocean before the eruption of Miocene lavas onto that surface. A second uplift that most likely occurred after the Miocene produced a new erosion surface (the Lower Planation Surface, LPS) by incision below the UPS. Finally, a third event in the late Cenozoic lifted the UPS and the LPS to their present elevations of up to 3 and 2. km. a.s.l., respectively and shaped the present-day valleys and fjords by incision of rivers and glaciers below the LPS. The general picture of landscape development is highly similar to West Greenland and the common characteristics between the stepped landscapes in East Greenland and those on the conjugate margin in Scandinavia lead us to conclude that the mountains of Norway also formed after the North Atlantic breakup.

  • 5.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Meal Sciences. Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography.
    Rytkönen, Paulina
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Meal Sciences.
    Platsen som varumärke2013In: Entreprenörskap och varumärken / [ed] Mats Larsson, Mikael Lönnborg & Karin Winroth, Möklinta: Gidlunds förlag, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Meal Sciences. Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography.
    Rytkönen, Paulina
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Meal Sciences.
    Platsen som varumärke2013In: Från matproduktion till gastronomi / [ed] Paulina Rytkönen, Madeleine Bonow, Per Wramner, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2013, 61-75 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Meal Sciences. Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography.
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Karpfiskarnas tillbakagång i svenskt kosthåll2013In: Från matproduktion till gastronomi / [ed] Paulina Rytkönen, Madeleine Bonow, Per Wramner, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2013, 91-114 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Fridfeldt, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Petersson, Mona
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography. Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Malmö högskola.
    Trygger, Sophie
    Stockholms universitet.
    Schaerström, Anders
    Medicinsk geografi på svenska universitet2014In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 72, no 4, 182-187 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Green, P. F.
    et al.
    Geotrack International, Australia.
    Lidmar-Bergström, K.
    Stockholm University.
    Japsen, P.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Denmark.
    Bonow, Johan M.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography. Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Denmark.
    Chalmers, J. A.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Denmark.
    Stratigraphic landscape analysis, thermochronology and the episodic development of elevated, passive continental margins2013In: Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland Bulletin, ISSN 1811-4598, E-ISSN 1604-8156, no 30, 150 p.4-150 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The continental margin of West Greenland is similar in many respects to other elevated, passive continental margins (EPCMs) around the world. These margins are characterised by extensive regions of low relief at elevations of 1-2 kilometres above sea level sloping gently inland, with a much steeper, oceanward decline, often termed a 'Great Escarpment', terminating at a coastal plain. Recent studies, based on integration of geological, geomorphological and thermochronological evidence, have shown that the high topography of West Greenland was formed by differential uplift and dissection of an Oligo-Miocene peneplain since the late Miocene, many millions of years after continental break-up between Greenland and North America. In contrast, many studies of other EPCMs have proposed a different style of development in which the high plateaux and the steep, oceanward decline are regarded as a direct result of rifting and continental separation. Some studies assume that the elevated regions have remained high since break-up, with the high topography continuously renewed by isostasy. Others identify the elevated plains as remnants of pre-rift landscapes. Key to understanding the development of the West Greenland margin is a new approach to the study of landforms, stratigraphic landscape analysis, in which the low-relief, high-elevation plateaux at EPCMs are interpreted as uplifted peneplains: low-relief surfaces of large extent, cutting across bedrock of different age and resistance, and originally graded to sea level. Identification of different generations of peneplain (re-exposed and epigene) from regional mapping, combined with geological constraints and thermochronology, allows definition of the evolution leading to the formation of the modern-day topography. This approach is founded particularly on results from the South Swedish Dome, which document former sea levels as base levels for the formation of peneplains. These results support the view that peneplains grade towards base level, and that in the absence of other options (e.g. widespread resistant lithologies), the most likely base level is sea level. This is particularly so at continental margins due to their proximity to the adjacent ocean. Studies in which EPCMs are interpreted as related to rifting or break-up commonly favour histories involving continuous denudation of margins following rifting, and interpretation of thermochronology data in terms of monotonic cooling histories. However, in several regions, including southern Africa, south-east Australia and eastern Brazil, geological constraints demonstrate that such scenarios are inappropriate, and an episodic development involving post-breakup subsidence and burial followed later by uplift and denudation is more realistic. Such development is also indicated by the presence in sedimentary basins adjacent to many EPCMs of major erosional unconformities within the post-breakup sedimentary section which correlate with onshore denudation episodes. The nature of the processes responsible is not yet understood, but it seems likely that plate-scale forces are required in order to explain the regional extent of the effects involved. New geodynamic models are required to explain the episodic development of EPCMs, accommodating post-breakup subsidence and burial as well as subsequent uplift and denudation, long after break-up which created the characteristic, modern-day EPCM landscapes. © 2013 Pushpa Publishing House, Allahabad, India.

  • 10.
    Green, Paul F.
    et al.
    Geotrack International Pty Ltd, West Brunswick, Australia.
    Duddy, Ian R.
    Geotrack International Pty Ltd, West Brunswick, Australia.
    Japsen, Peter
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bonow, Johan M.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography. Mid-Sweden University.
    Malan, Jean A.
    New Age (African Global Energy) Ltd, London, UK.
    Post-breakup burial and exhumation of the southern margin of Africa2017In: Basin Research, ISSN 0950-091X, E-ISSN 1365-2117, Vol. 29, no 1, 96-127 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite many years of study, the processes involved in the development of the continental margin of southern Africa and the distinctive topography of the hinterland remain poorly understood. Previous thermochronological studies carried out within a monotonic cooling framework have failed to take into account constraints provided by Mesozoic sedimentary basins along the southern margin. We report apatite fission track analysis and vitrinite reflectance data in outcrop samples from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous sedimentary fill of the Oudtshoorn, Gamtoos and Algoa Basins (Uitenhage Group), as well as isolated sedimentary remnants further west, plus underlying Paleozoic rocks (Cape Supergroup) and Permian-Triassic sandstones from the Karoo Supergroup around the Great Escarpment. Results define a series of major regional cooling episodes. Latest Triassic to Early Jurassic cooling which began between 205 and 180 Ma is seen dominantly in basement flanks to the Algoa and Gamtoos Basins. This episode may have affected a wider region but in most places any effects have been overprinted by later events. The effects of Early Cretaceous (beginning between 145 and 130 Ma) and Early to mid-Cretaceous (120-100 Ma) cooling are both delimited by major structures, while Late Cretaceous (85-75 Ma) cooling appears to have affected the whole region. These cooling events are all interpreted as dominantly reflecting exhumation. Higher Late Cretaceous paleotemperatures in samples from the core of the Swartberg Range, coupled with evidence for localised Cenozoic cooling, are interpreted as representing Cenozoic differential exhumation of the mountain range. Late Cretaceous paleotemperatures between 60 degrees C and 90 degrees C in outcropping Uitenhage Group sediments from the Oudtshoorn, Gamtoos and Algoa Basins require burial by between 1.2 and 2.2 km prior to Late Cretaceous exhumation. Because these sediments lie in depositional contact with underlying Paleozoic rocks in many places, relatively uniform Late Cretaceous paleotemperatures across most of the region, in samples of both basin fill and underlying basement, suggest the whole region may have been buried prior to Late Cretaceous exhumation. Cenozoic cooling (beginning between 30 and 20 Ma) is focussed mainly in mountainous regions and is interpreted as representing denudation which produced the modern-day relief. Features such as the Great Escarpment are not related to continental break up, as is often supposed, but are much younger (post-30 Ma). This history of post-breakup burial and subsequent episodic exhumation is very different from conventional ideas of passive margin evolution, and requires a radical re-think of models for development of continental margins.

  • 11.
    Janson, Sven
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Wouters, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography.
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University.
    Olsén, K. Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Population genetic structure of crucian carp (Carassius carassius) in man-made ponds and wild populations in Sweden2015In: Aquaculture International, ISSN 0967-6120, E-ISSN 1573-143X, Vol. 23, no 1, 359-368 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although once popular prior to the last century, the aquaculture of crucian carp Carassius carassius (L. 1758) in Sweden gradually fell from favour. This is the first genetic comparison of crucian carp from historic man-made ponds in the Scandinavian Peninsula. The aim was to identify old populations without admixture and to compare the relationship of pond populations from different provinces in Sweden. In total, nine microsatellite loci from 234 individuals from 20 locations in varied parts of Sweden were analysed. The genetic distances of crucian carp populations indicated that the populations in the southernmost province of Sweden, Scania, shared a common history. A pond population in the province Småland also showed a common inheritance with this group. In the province Uppland, further north in Sweden, the population genetic distances suggested a much more complex history of crucian carp distributions in the ponds. The data showed that there are some ponds with potentially old populations without admixture, but also that several ponds might have been stocked with fish from many sources. © 2014 The Author(s).

  • 12.
    Japsen, P.
    et al.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Green, P. F.
    Geotrack International, Victoria, Australia.
    Bonow, Johan M.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography. Mid Sweden University.
    Erlström, M.
    Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), Lund.
    Episodic burial and exhumation of the southern Baltic Shield: Epeirogenic uplifts during and after break-up of Pangaea2016In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 35, 357-377 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cratons are conventionally assumed to be areas of long-term stability. However, whereas Precambrian basement crops out across most of the Baltic Shield, Palaeozoic and Mesozoic sediments rest on basement in southern Sweden, and thus testify to a complex history of exhumation and burial. Our synthesis of published stratigraphic landscape analysis and new apatite fission-track analysis data reveals a history involving five steps after formation of the extremely flat, Sub-Cambrian Peneplain. (1) Cambrian to Lower Triassic rocks accumulated on the peneplain, interrupted by late Carboniferous uplift and exhumation. (2) Middle Triassic uplift removed the Palaeozoic cover along the south-western margin of the shield, leading to formation of a Triassic peneplain with a predominantly flat relief followed by deposition of Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic rocks. (3) Uplift that began during the Middle Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous caused denudation leading to deep weathering that shaped an undulating, hilly relief that was buried below Upper Cretaceous to Oligocene sediments. (4) Early Miocene uplift and erosion produced the South Småland Peneplain with scattered hills. (5) Early Pliocene uplift raised the Miocene peneplain to its present elevation leading to reexposure of the sub-Cretaceous hilly relief near the coast. Our results thus provide constraints on the magnitude and timing of episodes of deposition and removal of significant volumes of Phanerozoic rocks across the southern portion of the Baltic Shield. Late Carboniferous, Middle Triassic and mid-Jurassic events of uplift and exhumation affected wide areas beyond the Baltic Shield, and we interpret them as epeirogenic uplifts accompanying fragmentation of Pangaea, caused by accumulation of mantle heat beneath the supercontinent. Early Miocene uplift affected north-west Europe but not East Greenland, and thus likely resulted from compressive stresses from an orogeny on the Eurasian plate. Early Pliocene uplift related to changes in mantle convection and plate motion affected wide areas beyond North-East Atlantic margins.

  • 13.
    Japsen, P.
    et al.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Green, P. F.
    Geotrack International, Australia.
    Bonow, Johan M.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography. Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nielsen, T. F. D.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Chalmers, J. A.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    From volcanic plains to glaciated peaks: BURIAL, uplift and exhumation history of southern East Greenland after opening of the NE Atlantic2014In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 116, 91-114 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In southern East Greenland (68-70°N), voluminous flood basalts erupted onto a largely horizontal lava plain near sea level at the Paleocene-Eocene transition when sea-floor spreading started in the NE Atlantic. Based on synthesis of geological observations, stratigraphic landform analysis and apatite fission-track analysis data in 90 rock samples, we show how three regional phases of uplift and exhumation subsequently shaped the present-day margin and controlled the discontinuous history of the Greenland ice sheet. A late Eocene phase of uplift led to formation of a regional erosion surface near sea level (the Upper Planation Surface, UPS). Uplift of the UPS in the late Miocene led to formation of the Lower Planation Surface (LPS) by incision below the uplifted UPS, and a Pliocene phase led to incision of valleys and fjords below the uplifted LPS, leaving mountain peaks reaching 3.7. km above sea level. Local uplift affected the Kangerlussuaq area (~. 68°N) during early Eocene emplacement of the Kangerlussuaq Intrusion and during late Oligocene block movements, that may be related to the detachment of the Jan Mayen microcontinent from Greenland, while middle Miocene thermal activity, coeval with lava eruptions, heated rocks along a prominent fault within the early Cretaceous to Paleocene Kangerlussuaq Basin. The three regional uplift phases are synchronous with phases in West Greenland, overlap in time with similar events in North America and Europe and also correlate with changes in plate motion. The much higher elevation of East Greenland compared to West Greenland suggests support in the east from the Iceland plume. These observations indicate a connection between mantle convection, changes in plate motion and vertical movements along passive continental margins.

  • 14. Lidmar-Bergström, Karna
    et al.
    Bonow, Johan M.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography.
    Japsen, Peter
    Stratigraphic Landscape Analysis and geomorphological paradigms: Scandinavia as an example of Phanerozoic uplift and subsidence2013In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 100, 153-171 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stratigraphic Landscape Analysis (SLA) is based on a) the relationship between peneplains (low-relief denudation surfaces) in basement and their cover rocks of different age, b) the crosscutting relationships between such re-exposed peneplains and never covered (epigene) peneplains, and c) the occurrence of valleys incised below peneplains. Previous studies based on detailed SLA of the South Swedish Dome (SSD) have identified two major re-exposed peneplains, the flat sub-Cambrian peneplain and the sub-Jurassic/Cretaceous peneplain with undulating hilly relief. Both surfaces developed dose to former sea levels, were subsequently transgressed, and buried below sedimentary covers. The preservation of these peneplains documents that uplift of the land surface was followed by subsidence. Crosscutting relationships between these re-exposed and tilted peneplains and a third peneplain, an epigene and horizontal plain with residual hills, demonstrate that the latter is younger and thus of post-Cretaceous age. Three topographic highs characterize Scandinavia, the Northern Scandes (NS), the Southern Scandes (SS), and the low SSD. We show that the three relief types of the SSD can be identified across Scandinavia and that they demonstrate phases of uplift/denudation and subsidence/burial of Scandinavia during the Phanerozoic. In particular, we show that the epigene peneplains of the NS, the SS and the SSD are Cenozoic erosion surfaces and this also leads us to identify three major Cenozoic morphotectonic units. A result of our studies is that the paradigm of continuous uplift of steady state landscapes cannot be assumed as a universal model of landform evolution.

  • 15.
    Rytkönen, Paulina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Meal Sciences.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography.
    Dinnetz, Patrik
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Mountain agriculture at the crossroads, biodiversity, culture, and modernization, conflicting and interacting interests.2014In: Farming systems facing global challenges: Capacities and strategies / [ed] Thomas Aenis, Andrea Knierim, Maja-Catrin Riecher, Rebecka Ridder, Heike Schobert and Holger Fischer, 2014, 893-904 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mountain agriculture emerged at the intersection of the "wild economy," which focused on hunting, fishing and gathering wild plants and the agricultural based economy that is characterized by the domestication of animals and cultivation of the soil. Like other traditional systems based on pasture, the Swedish mountain systems is based on the use of inherited traditional knowledge and mountain pastures have over centuries created a very rare and rich habitat in the form of upland hay meadows. Today, both traditional knowledge and the rich biodiversity in the mountains are endangered by the implementation of modern practices that lead to a number of conflicts that go beyond the tragedy of the commons. One important source of conflict emanates from the changing role of the countryside, a role that creates expectations on farmers to deliver recreation, magnificent landscapes, new job opportunities, operate hotels , produce, cheese, maintain a cultural heritage and contribute to the conservation of native breeds . Another problem is caused by new support systems and regulations that create incentives to intensify the exploitation of summer farms by using the pastures for modern meat cattle breeds, which changes the landscape, but also makes traditional farmers upset, because of the risk of losing the traditions of summer farms.

    An additional source of conflict is created by the state’s changing attitudes towards the mountain world, as the state aims to shut down all existing (state owned) leased mountain flats (fjällägenheter) by cutting down basic infrastructure. The remaining flats are located primarily in the northern parts of Jämtland. They contribute to the maintenance of a very unique flora and insect fauna.  By comparing two cases, one in Klövsjö and one in the northern part of the region, this paper contributes with new knowledge about  mountain agriculture, including interlocking interests, competitive activities, potentials and conflicts.

  • 16.
    Rytkönen, Paulina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Meal Sciences.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology. Örebro universitet.
    Persson, Ylva
    Goat cheese production in Sweden - a pioneering experience in the re-emergence of local food2013In: Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica - Section B, ISSN 0906-4710, E-ISSN 1651-1913, Vol. 63, no SI, 38-46 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The re-emergence and modernization of traditional goat-cheese production in Jamtland led to the articulation of a localized agri-food system that represents the frontline of the return and reinforcement of local food in Sweden. Already in the 1970s, some initiatives were undertaken to formalize the productive activities of this branch and to improve the product quality. The most important project was the articulation of a cooperative that, unlike all other Swedish cooperatives, engaged its members in the development of a joint trademark, development of a standardized assortment, common marketing efforts and finding creative solutions for infrastructure problems. Despite the overall success, we also found some downsides. Producing goat cheese requires that at least two people are involved, because the workload often leads to body injuries and illness for people working alone. By studying the institutional frameworks, rules and regulations, the economic function and entrepr! neurial dynamics, and the dynamics of knowledge and competences, the article highlights how and why farm dairies in Jamtland became reinforced and modernized. This grasps both the actions of individual economic agents and their interaction with their environment. A special emphasis was put on the role of regional authorities in this process. Even though many obstacles have been removed and the trade has found successful ways to solve strategic issues concerning product development and marketing, there are still important structural shortcomings that might decrease the profitability and endanger the future development of the trade. There is a lack of experience and infrastructure to solve more complex problems like animal healthand the potential risks related to the consumption of unpasteurized cheese and the increasing incidence of Tick-Borne Encephalitis (TBE).

  • 17.
    Rytkönen, Paulina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Meal Sciences.
    Wramner, PerSödertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.Bonow, MadeleineSödertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Meal Sciences. Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography.
    Från matproduktion till gastronomi2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Antologin Från matproduktion till gastronomi belyser aktuella frågor kring livsmedel och måltider. Förändringarna inom detta område illustrerar på flera sätt dagens samhällsutveckling. Boken består av tre tematiska delar.

    ”Strukturella förändringar och aktuella trender” tar upp efterfrågemönster, institutionella förhållanden, interaktion mellan olika aktörer och varumärkesstrategier. Fokus ligger på småskalig livsmedelsproduktion.

    ”Måltider och måltidskultur” tar upp kulturella och sociala faktorer bakom förändringar av popularitet, status etc. hos olika livsmedel. Här behandlas också betydelsen av miljön kring måltiden och av restaurangsektorns utveckling.

    ”Maten och naturen” tar upp hur lokalproducerade livsmedel påverkas av naturmiljön på produktionsplatsen och hur deras lokala identitet kan användas i marknadsföringen. Vidare behandlas hur lokal produktion kan gynna naturvården i odlingslandskapet.

  • 18. Solgaard, A. M.
    et al.
    Bonow, Johan M.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Geography. GEUS, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Langen, P. L.
    Japsen, P.
    Hvidberg, C. S.
    Mountain building and the initiation of the greenland ice sheet2013In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 392, 161-176 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of a new hypothesis about mountain building in Greenland on ice sheet initiation are investigated using an ice sheet model in combination with a climate model. According to this hypothesis, low-relief landscapes near sea level characterised Greenland in Miocene times until two phases of km-scale uplift in the late Miocene and in the latest Miocene-Pliocene (beginning at 10 and ~. 5. Ma, respectively) initiated the formation of the present-day mountains. The topography of Greenland, prior to these uplift events is reconstructed from the present-day, isostatically compensated bedrock by mapping the two main steps in the landscape that resulted from the two uplift phases. Ice sheet initiation is studied using the topography before uplift and after each phase of uplift by applying different forcing conditions relevant for the late Cenozoic, which was characterised by long-term cooling superimposed by cold and warm excursions. The modelling results show that no ice initiates in the case of the low-lying and almost flat topography prior to the uplifts. However, the results demonstrate a significant ice sheet growth in response to the orographically induced increase in precipitation and the cooling of surface temperatures accompanying the uplift. Large amounts of ice are able to form after the first uplift event, but the ice sheet is sensitive to changes in climate. The results show that the second phase of uplift facilitates ice sheet build-up further and increases the stability of the ice sheet by providing anchoring points which are not available to the same extent in the lower topographies. However, the results also reveal a Föhn effect that inhibits ice sheet expansion into the interior Greenland and thus shifts the threshold of formation of inland ice towards colder temperatures. Under conditions that are colder than the present, the ice can overcome the Föhn effect, flow into the interior and form a coherent ice sheet. The results thus indicate that the Greenland Ice Sheet of today is a relict formed under colder conditions. The modelling results are consistent with the observed climatic variability superimposed on the general cooling trend in the late Cenozoic: e.g., ice rafted debris in late Miocene deposits off southeast Greenland and the mid-Pliocene Warmth. The late Cenozoic mountain building in Greenland augments the effects of the climatic deterioration leading to the Northern Hemisphere glaciations, and without the second phase of uplift, the Greenland Ice Sheet would have been more sensitive to the changes in climate over the past millions of years.

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