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  • 1.
    Appelsved, Emelie
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Graffiti på spel: En kvalitativ undersökning, via NUG, om graffitins autonomi2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

     

    Comments regarding Swedish graffiti writer NUG’s film Territorial Pissing (2008) express how graffiti and art appear to be two different worlds and when these worlds come together the expression of graffiti seems to transform. This thesis, Graffiti at stake: a qualitative study, via NUG, about the autonomy in graffiti, aims to both examine and bring about a general discussion on whether graffiti is autonomous when it enters the art world. The thesis also discusses transformed content and expression in the works of NUG when performed in a different context; what is exhibited in an institutional art context and what positions does NUG occupy? The French sociologist Pierre Bourdieus conceptions field and autonomy has been used as a theoretical framework, and partly as method as well. By studying the works of NUG another expression has been found within an institutional art context – black irrational lines and cascades. These are interpreted as energy generated from the act of performing graffiti and have been discussed in relation to the graffiti- and art practice as well as the symbolic capital. The thesis argues that the autonomy is situated in what is recognized and acknowledged. The thesis also concludes that NUG is entering into a masculine, conventional and strong artist position, similar to Pollock.

     

  • 2.
    Bredberg, Eva
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Dräkt och pose i porträtt: En analys av posens fiktion och dräktens avbildning i tre porträtt föreställande Herman Wrangel (1584 - 1643)2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with portraiture as a roleplay and a strategy to communicate the sitter´s identity to affect the viewer. Focusing on the sitter´s pose and the depiction of dress, the study examines three portraits between 1624 and the 1630s, representing Herman Wrangel (1584–1643), Field Marshal and Councilor of the Realm. The analysis is based on the concept, the fiction of the pose, developed by Harry Berger Jr. The idea of Theatricality discussed by Hanneke H Grootenboer´s is also used. The results show that dress, details of dress and the pose which are significant for the identity of the sitter are depicted with emphasis. Therefore, the dress and the pose have a key role in the depiction of the sitter acting his identity. The sitter acts before the artist and in the long run before the beholder. The portrait of the nobleman becomes a monologue for the beholder who can confirm the nobility´s role in society.

  • 3.
    Burga, E.
    et al.
    Konstfack University College of Arts, Crafts and Design.
    Dusant, Macaraena Olmos
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Löfgren, I.
    Stockholm University.
    Nuestras Madres: Forming political subjects en la mesa: IDA (Institutet för diaspora och avkolonisering/institute for the decolonization of art)2017In: Architecture and Culture, ISSN 2050-7828, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 401-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NUESTRAS MADRES is an artwork by the art collective IDA performed at the AHRA Architecture and Feminisms Conference (2016), which consisted of a collective ritual and a poetry reading. The ritual created a safe space where a group of participants sat around a table taking turns in sharing their stories about their mothers while embroidering their names on a single tablecloth. These were synthesized into a poem and presented the following day. IDA investigates issues in private and public space connected to knowledge production and gender normativity. Even though the role of mothers and their knowledge is usually connected to the private sphere, the knowledge of our mothers and their mothers shared en la mesa - over the table - is important in the construction of political subjects. How has this knowledge helped us survive in society as women, queer, indigenous, working class, Muslim, immigrant - as human beings?

  • 4.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Anders Sunna, Area Infected: Den större bilden2017In: Avtryck från ovanlandet = Contemporary art from Sápmi / [ed] Sofia Johansson, Umeå: BildMuseet , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Art, geographies and values: thinking sámi contemporary art archipelagically2014In: Regionality/Mondiality: Perspectives on Art, Aesthetics and Globalization / [ed] Charlotte Bydler & Cecilia Sjöholm, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2014, p. 153-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Decolonial or Creolized Commons?: Sámi duodji in the expanded field2017In: Sámi Art and Aesthetics : Contemporary Perspectives / [ed] Svein Aamold; Elin Haugdal; Ulla Angkjær Jørgensen, Aarhus: Aarhus Universitetsforlag, 2017, p. 141-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    När blir det svenska svenskt i det nationella kulturarvet?2015In: Kulturarv: att skapa historia för framtiden / [ed] Charlotte Bydler; Katarina Wadstein MacLeod, Stockholm: Axelius , 2015, p. 95-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Revisiting the Past: A Brief Introduction to Nordic Art2014In: Nordic Contemporary: Art from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden / [ed] Hossein Amirsadeghi, London: Thames & Hudson, 2014, p. 10-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Samisk-svenskt kulturarv2015In: Kulturarv: att skapa historia för framtiden / [ed] Charlotte Bydler; Katarina Wadstein MacLeod, Stockholm: Axelius , 2015, p. 121-141Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Gedin, AndreasSödertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.Ringarp, JohannaSödertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Pontus Hultén på Moderna Museet: Vittnesseminarium Södertörns högskola, 26 april 20172018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den 9 maj 1958 invigdes Moderna Museet i marinens gamla Exercishall på Skeppsholmen i Stockholm. Museet var inte en självständig institution utan Nationalmuseums avdelning för modern konst med Bo Wennberg som chef. Året därpå tog Pontus Hultén över.

    Under Hulténs ledning blev Moderna ett av Europas viktigaste museer för modern konst. Men det var också något av stockholmarnas kulturhus, bland annat inspirerat av Stedelijk Museum i Amsterdam, med plats för film, musik, teater, happenings och modevisningar.

    Efter de första årens framgångar möttes Hultén av ett kulturpolitiskt motstånd mot slutet av 1960-talet. Hultén kritiserades för ointresse för den svenska konsten, för bristande politiskt engagemang och för att gå den amerikanska imperialismens ärenden.

    Den 26 april 2017 anordnade Samtidshistoriska institutet tillsammans med forskningsprojektet Levande arkiv: Pontus  Hultén på Moderna Museet (1957-73), fiansierat av Vetenskapsrådet och placerat vid ämnet Konstvetenskap, Södertörns högskola, ett vittnesseminarium om Pontus Hulténs tid på Moderna Museet.

  • 11.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Functions of realist art in Sweden circa 1970: Lena Svedberg & Olle Kåks2016In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, Vol. IX, no 4, p. 70-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concepts of social realism and new realism are developed in relation to the artworks of Lena Svedberg and Olle Kåks. A comparison between the artists’ uses of the concepts of social realism and function is presented. How the realist approach during the years around 1970 played out in the force field of society and the psyche, the collective realm and the individual, is exemplified by our two very different case studies. Svedberg’s political narratives compose mon-tages in which fictional, metaphorical figures are inserted side by side with political leaders drawn from newspaper clips. Kåks’s allegory-like oil painting shows a stone worker working in the face of his imminent disappearance. They both reveal myths as opposed to historically manifested commodity relations.

  • 12.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Sjöholm, Cecilia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Aesthetics.
    Introduction2014In: Regionality/Mondiality: Perspectives on Art, Aesthetics and Globalization / [ed] Charlotte Bydler & Cecilia Sjöholm, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2014, p. 9-20Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Sjöholm, CeciliaSödertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Aesthetics.
    Regionality/Mondiality: Perspectives on Art, Aesthetics and Globalization2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The title of this anthology, Regionality/Mondiality: Perspectives on Art, Aesthetics and Globalization, signals the regional dimension inherent in the globalization of the arts. Rejecting a comprehensive theory of globalization, the texts in this anthology instead circumscribe a situated understanding of the production and interpretation of the arts, which serves to condition cultural translatability. The texts of the anthology argue that cultural translatability should be considered through the concept of regionality, that is, the quality of being both territorially and relationally situated. Bypassing the abstract and politically charged category of “nationality,” regionality addresses human relations in and through the more tangible physical environment in and by which they are configured. As seen in the work on archipelagic thinking by the Martinican writer and philosopher Édouard Glissant, both the cultural and physical aspects of one’s immediate environment are used to articulate a form of self-understanding in the face of cultural and economic expansion, the particular character of which is indicated by the term mondiality. This concept derives from the French word for “world” or “people,” and thus affirms the fundamentally social and cultural character of experiences thought of as global. Each of the eleven contributions in this volume brings its own perspective on arts and aesthetics, producing world-views that still share a keen awareness of their partialness.

    The contributors are: Charlotte Bydler, J. Michael Dash, John Drabinski, Martin Svensson Ekström, Anthony Gardner and Charles Green, Christina Kullberg, Lisette Lagnado, André Lepecki, Patricia Lorenzoni, Cecilia Sjöholm, and Terry Smith.

  • 14.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Wadstein MacLeod, Katarina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Editorial2016In: Konsthistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-3609, E-ISSN 1651-2294, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 205-207Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Wadstein MacLeod, KatarinaSödertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art. Konstfack.
    Kulturarv: att skapa historia för framtiden2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Dahlin, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art. Linköping University.
    On not being there2017In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 335-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an expression of the social anthropologist's frustration with not being there, and an attempt to deal with my own chronic disciplinary identity crisis and my "it's complicated" relationship with participant observation.1 I have worked for a long time now in an interdisciplinary setting, and although I sometimes characterize myself as an interdisciplinary bastard, I have retained a rather strong identification as an anthropologist. This identification is perhaps paradoxical as one of my main reasons for applying to an interdisciplinary PhD program was to get away from social anthropology. As a master's student, I became increasingly frustrated with anthropology and its insistence on ethnographic fieldwork as the one (and only) way to do research. I remember my annoyance with my supervisor's question, 'but how is this anthropology' as she was reading my proposals, until I finally included a passage on participant observation, which appeased her. I remember reading master's thesis upon master's thesis where it seemed to me that participant observation was actually quite ill-suited for investigating the issues at hand. And then, finally, I remember my relief when one of our professors tried to instil in us, that there are 'other ways of knowing about the world' than participant observation. I came to my PhD studies with a thematic I wanted to study: the memory and commemoration of the Second World War in Russia. It was a topic I far from exhausted in my master's thesis, and a doctoral dissertation later I could easily devote a few more years to it. I also had a vague idea on how to go about studying it. Participant observation was to be a part of it, but I did not envisage it as the main part. Through serendipity, I happened upon the search for fallen soldiers, and ended up doing far more anthropological fieldwork than I would ever have imagined. It was quite literally field work, where I took part in work on the former battlefields to locate the remains of soldiers, fallen but often officially listed as missing in action. It was heavy, dirty, cold (or sometimes too hot) and very participatory, even hands-on. It was in many ways life-changing; allowing me close. 

  • 17.
    Edling, Marta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    A Radical Academy of Fine Art?: Power and social dimensions in recruitment to the fine art professorships at the Royal College of Art in Stockholm, Sweden 1938-20002015In: Passepartout - Skrifter for kunsthistorie, ISSN 0908-5351, no 36, p. 117-138Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Edling, Marta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Teaching abstraction?: Art historical and sociological perspectives on Nils Wedel and the basic form course at Slöjdskolan in Gothenburg, Sweden 1946–19572015In: Konsthistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-3609, E-ISSN 1651-2294, Vol. 84, no 4, p. 205-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the perspective of art history and sociology, this article investigates the artist Nils Wedel (1897–1967) and his position as head teacher to the department of decorative painting at the art and design school Slöjdskolan in Gothenburg 1938–1953. The article argues that the recruitment of Wedel can be seen as a strategic outcome of combination of his deviant interest in abstract art (compared to his more successful expressionist contemporaries) and his modest career. Supporting his family as a graphic designer, he was, due to his abstract “inclinations”, isolated from the dominant networks of Francophile and well-tempered expressionist art in Stockholm and Gothenburg in the 1930s and 1940s. However, this homology of aesthetic and social characteristics that positioned him in the margins of contemporary Swedish art made him the perfect teacher to meet the increased demand in Sweden in the late 1930s for art and design artists tuned to modernist idioms and skilled in professional methods of visual design. In commercial work in visual imagery, such as advertisements, shop window displays, or even carpet design, abstraction had become fashionable by the early 1930s. Wedel's introduction of a basic form course in 1946 can be seen as a pedagogical confirmation of this attraction of modernist idioms. In the geographical, social and aesthetic periphery, it was possible to build a pedagogical setting that introduced students to the then historical avant-garde of abstract art and modern idioms while also training skills valuable for a commercial career. © 2015 The Author(s)

  • 19.
    Hansson Grönroos, Tove
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Creating Urbanity – Destroying Cultures: Relationships Between Public and Private in Kathputli Colony, New Delhi2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Through the story of Kathputli Colony, thiss essay; Creating Urbanity – Destroying Cultures, Relationships Between Public and Private in Kathputli Colony, New Delhi, India, discusses various degrees of public and private in urban architecture. It compares the architecture of the former Kathputli Colony with the new architecture proposed for the site.

    Striving to become a “world class city”, Delhi has, through the Master Plan 2021, decided to raze all informal settlements and replace them with high-rises. Kathputli Colony was such an informal settlement; an urban environment built up by an architecture that responded to the needs and economic means of its inhabitants. Its design was the result of network connections and personal relationships merging public and private life.

    The essay concludes that Kathputli Colony consisted of a heterogeneous architecture, that had more in common with pre-industrial urbanism and village-architecture, than with the modernist architecture of the high-rises with its clear separation between public and private, work and leisure.

  • 20.
    Hegardt, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Från hem till hemland: Historiens hemvist och funktionärernas uppgift2016In: Historiens hemvist III: Minne, medier och materialitet / [ed] Johan Hegardt & Trond Lundemo, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2016, p. 221-246Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Hegardt, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Historiska museet och framtiden: Från Oscar Montelius typologiska tidsvågor till det goda samhället2017In: Ad Marciam / [ed] Hans Ruin & Jonna Bornemark, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2017, p. 255-264Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hegardt, Johan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Lundemo, Trond
    Inledning2016In: Historiens hemvist III: Minne, medier och materialitet / [ed] Johan Hegardt & Trond Lundemo, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2016, p. 15-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hockings, Paul
    et al.
    University of Illinois, United States.
    Hegardt, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Arnold, David
    University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Visuality in Times Long Past2016In: Visual Anthropology, ISSN 0894-9468, E-ISSN 1545-5920, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 81-92Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Aesthetics: Art and Non-Art2014In: Art History, ISSN 0141-6790, E-ISSN 1467-8365, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 1005-1009Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Review of Jacques Rancière, Aisthesis: Scenes from the Aesthetic Regime of the Arts, London & New York: Verso, 2013

  • 25.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    After Contemporary Art: Actualization and Anachrony2016In: Nordic Journal of Aesthetics, ISSN 2000-1452, E-ISSN 2000-9607, no 51, p. 35-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from a critical assessment of the most widespread and initiated definitions of Contemporary Art from the last decade and a half, sustaining a world-wide discourse on contemporary art and contemporaneity, by Arthur Danto, Hans Belting, Peter Osborne and Terry Smith respectively, I will concentrate this talk on two aspects of an immodest proposal captured by the keywords actualization and anachrony. While current discussions on contemporary art are arguably reproducing modernist assumptions on the primacy of novelty and innovation, bolstered by a veiled avant-garde logic, the proposal to regard contemporary art as actualized art upsets not only ideas on what art after postmodernism might mean, but the whole edifice of historicist historiography. An anachronic perspective, a bi- or polychronic situatedness of the work of art, could be used to liberate art from being defined according to its unique descent, and to embrace, instead, a chronologic open to art’s continuous “life” through its successive aesthetic accessions and actualizations in time.

  • 26.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Contemporary, Now and Forever: [Review of] Terry Smith, Contemporary Art: World Currents (London: Laurence King, 2011)2013In: Art History, ISSN 0141-6790, E-ISSN 1467-8365, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 226-231Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Den möjliga bilden2017In: Ad Marciam / [ed] Hans Ruin & Jonna Bornemark, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2017, p. 265-273Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Då: Historia efter posthistoria2016In: Historiens hemvist I: Den historiska tidens former / [ed] Viktoria Fareld & Hans Ruin, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2016, p. 27-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Filtering Futures: La Biennale di Venezia. 56th. International Art Exhibtion 2015. All the World's Futures. Artistic Director and Curator: Okwui Enwezor.2015In: Konsthistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-3609, E-ISSN 1651-2294, Vol. 84, no 4, p. 248-251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Fragments of a Place called the End of the World2017In: The End of the World: Contemporary Philosophy and Art / [ed] Marcia Sa Cavalcante Schuback & Susanna Lindberg, London: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017, p. 147-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Från Museum till konstmuseum till konsthall2015In: Offentliga och privata museer i Sverige: Traditioner och visioner / [ed] Kurt Almqvist & Louise Belfrage, Stockholm: Axel och Margaret Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse för allmännyttiga ändamål , 2015, 1, p. 21-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Is History To Be Closed, Saved, or Re-Started?: Considering Efficient Art History2018In: Time in the History of Art: Temporality, Chronology, and Anachrony / [ed] Dan Karlholm & Keith Moxey, New York & Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 13-25Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rather than recourse to historicism’s investments in determinative causes, “efficient” history, it is argued, should take its cue from the after-life or the history of the artwork following its creation at a specific moment in time. The perceived temporal crisis of art history today has much to do with developments on the scene of contemporary art related to the idea of contemporaneity more broadly. Post-history and post-future are criticized here for their rather facile dismissal of history. Whereas post-history is predicated upon a teleological philosophy of history, post-future is ultimately indebted to the concept of history it purports to abandon. The concept of the past is turned on its heels and used to characterize the present, which withers away, while the past remains and accumulates into a “present past.” Martin Heidegger and Gilles Deleuze, alongside Bruno Latour, are mobilized to form a future-oriented history model, in which anachronic quasi-objects are traced, linked, and associated in actual patterns of interconnection, in part reminiscent of the model set by the catalogue raissonné rather than the established developmental narrative of the history of art.

  • 33.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Kontemporalism: Om samtidskonstens historia och framtid2014Book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Lärd bok för att komma tidens verkningar på spåren: Recension av Rüdiger Safranski, Tid - vad den gör med oss och vi med den (Daidalos)2017In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 3, p. 32-34Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    När konsten blev subjekt2017In: Samtider: Perspektiv på 2000-talets idéhistoria / [ed] Anders Burman & Lena Lennerhed, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2017, p. 37-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Suecia hodierna antiqua est: nuet är det förflutna2014In: Suecia contemporare / [ed] Pontus Raud, Kalmar: Kalmar konstmuseum , 2014, 1, p. 22-28Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    The Canon of Contemporary Art: From Popular to Academic2017In: Marburger Jahrbuch für Kunstwissenschaft, ISSN 0342-121X, Vol. 44, p. 319-327Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    The Last Book on Installation Art?2017In: Konsthistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-3609, E-ISSN 1651-2294, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 134-137Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Too Much and Not Enough: The Installation of Anton Henning at Magasin 3 in Stockholm2015In: Paradigmen der Kunstbetrachtung: Aktuelle Positionen der Rezeptionsästhetik und Museumspädagogik / [ed] Peter J. Schneemann, Bern: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015, p. 29-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Karlholm, Dan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Kaprow, Allan
    Smithson, Robert
    Vad är ett museum?2013Book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Karlholm, Dan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Moxey, K.
    Barnard College / Columbia University.
    Introduction: Telling art’s time2018In: Time in the History of Art: Temporality, Chronology and Anachrony / [ed] D. Karlholm & K. Moxey, New York & Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Art history as we know it is regarded by many actors in the art world as obsolete. Today, it seems contemporaneity rules in a “post-historical” situation, where art history seems deprived of a future. Some two decades or more after the heyday of postmodernism, it is time to reconsider what kinds of historical claims can still be made for the field of art history and visual studies. If the very word “history” is laden with antiquated expectations of “objectivity” as the discipline goes about its customary business of putting objects back into their chronological place, then the concept of temporality opens up fresh approaches to the temporal organization of the discipline. What if visual art is in a position to explain and expand history rather than vice versa? What if the artwork grounds history? What if the work does not necessarily belong to its own time, but was born prematurely or belatedly, disjointed with respect to a chronological axis? Art historical approaches are still possible, indeed needed, but they do look a little different from those to which we have become accustomed.

  • 42.
    Karlholm, Dan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Moxey, KeithBarnard College/ Columbia University.
    Time in the History of Art: Temporality, Chronology, and Anachrony2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Larsson, Camilla
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Closed Circadian Circuit Notes on the work of Tamara Henderson and Julia Feyrer2016In: Insomnia: sleeplessness as a cultural symptom / [ed] Sara Arrhenius, Sofia Curman, Camilla Larsson, Stockholm: Bonniers Konsthall , 2016Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Lindstrand, Tor
    et al.
    KTH.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art. Konstfack.
    I mitt hus där jag bor2015In: Hjärnstorm, ISSN 0348-6958, no 122, p. 2-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Lindstrand, Tor
    et al.
    KTH.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art. Konstfack.
    Solid Flows2017In: Architecture and Culture, ISSN 2050-7828, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 297-314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Lindstrand, Tor
    et al.
    KTH arkitektur.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art. Konstfack.
    Staging Subversive Opportunism in the Age of Feedback Loop2014In: ALF : Architektüros Fondas, no 04Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Abstraktion för demokrati: Gert Marcus i Huddinge2016In: Konsten på Södertörn: Art at Södertörn University / [ed] Annika Öhrner, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2016, p. 8-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art. Konstfack.
    Artistic research and the grammar of painting2014In: Studio Talks: Thinking Through Painting / [ed] Bength, Kristina, Stockholm: Arvinius + Orfeus , 2014, p. 155-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art. Konstfack.
    Beyond the Borders: Elgaland-Vargaland and Association for Temporary Art2017In: A Cultural History of the Avant-Garde in the Nordic Countries, Vol. 4, 1975-2000 / [ed] Benedikt Hjartarson, Camilla Skovbjerg Paldam, Laura Schultz and Tania Ørum, Rodopi, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art. Konstfack.
    Collective Modernism: Synthesising the Arts, Engaging in Society2017In: Art in Transfer in the Era of Pop: Curatorial Practices and Transnational Strategies / [ed] Annika Öhrner, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2017, p. 289-319Chapter in book (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 109
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