sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123 51 - 100 of 122
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Jenny Slatman: Our Strange Body: Philosophical Reflections on Identity and Medical Intervention2015In: Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, ISSN 0047-2662, E-ISSN 1569-1624, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 135-138Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 52. Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Joel-Peter Witkin and the Sublime1993In: Katalog : journal of photography & video, ISSN 0904-2334, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 53.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Kroppen som gåva, resurs eller vara: Transplantationsetiska dilemman2013In: Kroppen i humanioraperspektiv / [ed] Palm, Anders och Stenström, Johan, Lund: Makadam Förlag, 2013, p. 53-67Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Känslornas kunskap: Exemplet emotionell intelligens2009In: Vad är praktisk kunskap? / [ed] Jonna Bornemark & Fredrik Svenaeus, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2009, 1, p. 85-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Känslornas kunskap: Exemplet emotionell intelligens
  • 55.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 1, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Kätterskt tänkande i strid med materialism: Jan Patočka2002In: Axess, ISSN 1651-0941, no 7, p. 25-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 56.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Livet, tänkandet och driften mot oordning2013In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 18 novemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 57.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Medical technologies and the life world: an introduction to the theme2009In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 121-123Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Medicine2006In: A companion to phenomenology and existentialism / [ed] Hubert L. Dreyfus & Mark A. Wrathall, Malden, MA: Blackwell Pub. , 2006, p. 412-424Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, Institutionen för medier, konst och filosofi, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Medicinens hermeneutik: att förstå den sjuka människan2004In: När människan möter medicinen: livsvärldens och berättelsens betydelse för förståelsen av sjukdom och medicinsk teknologi / [ed] Sonja Olin Lauritzen, Fredrik Svenaeus & Ann-Christine Jonsson, Stockholm: Carlsson , 2004, Vol. S. 31-48, p. 31-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Medicinens humaniora: vad skulle det kunna vara? = The Humanities of Medicine: What Could This Be?2010In: En annan humaniora - en annan tid = Another humanities - another time / [ed] Carl Cederberg & Hans Ruin, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2010, p. 53-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Medicinens humaniora: vad skulle det kunna vara? = The Humanities of Medicine: What Could This Be?
  • 61. Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Narrativ medicin: berättelsen om patienten och hennes sjukdom2000In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 97, no 34, p. 3629-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Naturalisticand Phenomenological Theories of Health: Distinctions and Connections2013In: Human Experience and Nature: Examining the Relationship between Phenomenology and Naturalism / [ed] Havi Carel and Darian Meacham, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I present and compare the philosophies and ideas behind naturalistic theories of health on the one hand and phenomenological theories of health on the other. The basic difference between the two sets of theories is no doubt that whereas naturalistic theories claim to rest on value neutral concepts, such as normal biological function, the phenomenological suggestions for theories of health take their starting point in what is often named intentionality: meaningful stances taken by the embodied person in experiencing and understanding her situation and taking action in the world.

    Although naturalism and phenomenology are fundamentally different in their approach to understand and define health, they are not necessarily opposed when it comes to understanding the predicament of ill persons. Naturalism can afford phenomenology an important strategic importance in finding clues for medical investigations, just as phenomenology can envelop a naturalistic understanding of diseases. Furthermore, the two theories display similarities in their emphasis of embodiment as the central element of health theory and in their stress on the alien nature of the body displayed in illness. Theories of biology and phenomenology are, indeed, companionable and in many cases also mutually supportive in the realms of health and illness.

  • 63.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Organ Transplantation and Personal Identity: How Does Loss and Change of Organs Affect the Self?2012In: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, ISSN 0360-5310, E-ISSN 1744-5019, ISSN 0360-5310, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 139-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, changes in identity and selfhood experienced through organ transplantation are analyzed from a phenomenological point of view. The chief examples are heart and face transplants. Similarities and differences between the examples are fleshed out by way of identifying three layers of selfhood in which the procedures have effects: embodied selfhood, self-reflection, and social-narrative identity. Organ transplantation is tied to processes of alienation in the three layers of selfhood, first and foremost a bodily alienation experienced through illness or injury and in going through and recovering from the operation. However, in cases in which the organ in question is taken to harbor the identity of another person, because of its symbolic qualities (the heart) or its expressive qualities (the face), the alienation process may also involve the otherness of another person making itself, at least imaginatively, known.

  • 64.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Organ transplantation ethics from the perspective of embodied personhood2015In: The Routledge Companion to Bioethics / [ed] Arras, J., Fenton E., and Kukla, R., London: Routledge, 2015, p. 570-580Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Phenomenological bioethics: medical technologies, human suffering, and the meaning of being alive2017Book (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, Institutionen för medier, konst och filosofi, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Phenomenological ethics: Potentials and pitfalls: Review article2004In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 109-112Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Phenomenology2014In: The Encyclopedia of Global Bioethics / [ed] ten Have, Henk, Dordrecht: Springer, 2014, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phenomenology is a research tradition in German and French philosophy which has had an influence in many other fields and disciplines, recently also in medicine and nursing. The main idea of phenomenology is to study the structure and content of lived experience from the first-person perspective. This chapter provides an overview of three different ways in which phenomenology has proved useful as a method and inspiration for bioethics so far and how it could do so in the future. Phenomenological bioethics can be carried out either as an integrated part of, or as a critical perspective on, principle-based bioethics. Phenomenology can be used either to inform the application of principles by way of describing the experiences of moral dilemmas, or to criticise the contemporary set-up of bioethics and offer alternative approaches. The critical alternatives may be more or less radical in nature: offering alternative principles or abandoning the idea of application altogether. Phenomenological bioethics may also be viewed as an attempt to strengthen and thicken the philosophical anthropology implicitly present in contemporary bioethical studies by focusing on themes such as body, psyche, life, death, authenticity, suffering, vulnerability, empathy, compassion, integrity, dialogue, gift, and responsibility.

  • 68.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Phenomenology and medicine2016In: The Bloomsbury Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Medicine / [ed] James A. Marcum, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2016, p. 205-226Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present chapter provides an overview of how phenomenology may enhance our understanding of themes central to medicine: the experience of illness, the meaning of suffering, the role of empathy and dialogue in the clinical encounter, the relationship between medical science on the one hand and medical practice on the other, and, finally, the impact of technology development on contemporary medicine. I will start out by explaining why and how a phenomenology of human embodiment is crucial to comprehend the experiences of illness in relation and contrast to biological dysfunctions of the body – diseases. I will then proceed by arguing that such an understanding of embodied illness can be developed and extended by way of comprehending the suffering of patients as embedded in a life world of human concerns. 

  • 69.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet.
    Phenomenology and Psychiatry: A Contemporary Diagnosis Introducing the Work of Thomas Fuchs2005In: Sats: Nordic Journal of Philosophy, ISSN 1600-1974, E-ISSN 1869-7577, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 202-211Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Phenomenology listens to Prozac: analyzing the SSRI revolution2007In: Medical technologies and the life world: the social construction of normality / [ed] Sonja Olin Lauritzen, Lars-Christer Hydén, Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2007, p. 164-183Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Focuses on the ways new health technologies intervene into our lives. This book explores: how new health technologies are understood by lay people and patients; how the outcomes of these technologies are communicated in various clinical settings; and, how these technologies can alter our notions of health and illness and create 'new illness'.

  • 71.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Phenomenology of pregnancy and the ethics of abortion2018In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I investigate the ways in which phenomenology could guide our views on the rights and/or wrongs of abortion. To my knowledge very few phenomenologists have directed their attention toward this issue, although quite a few have strived to better understand and articulate the strongly related themes of pregnancy and birth, most often in the context of feminist philosophy. After introducing the ethical and political contemporary debate concerning abortion, I introduce phenomenology in the context of medicine and the way phenomenologists have understood the human body to be lived and experienced by its owner. I then turn to the issue of pregnancy and discuss how the embryo or foetus could appear for us, particularly from the perspective of the pregnant woman, and what such showing up may mean from an ethical perspective. The way medical technology has changed the experience of pregnancy-for the pregnant woman as well as for the father and/or other close ones-is discussed, particularly the implementation of early obstetric ultra-sound screening and blood tests (NIPT) for Down's syndrome and other medical defects. I conclude the article by suggesting that phenomenology can help us to negotiate an upper time limit for legal abortion and, also, provide ways to determine what embryo-foetus defects to look for and in which cases these should be looked upon as good reasons for performing an abortion.

  • 72.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 1, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Posthumanismens faror: stamcellsforskningen och frågan efter människan2002In: Balder : tidskrift för antroposofi och social tregrening, ISSN 0347-6286, no 1-2, p. 52-59Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 73.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Posthumanisten vill vara en köttig cyborg2017In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 3 juli, p. 20-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 74.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Psychopharmacology and the Self2013In: Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry / [ed] K. W. M Fulford et al., Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 1171-1184Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Psychopharmacology and the Self: An Introduction to the Theme2007In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 115-117Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Psykiatrins etik2016In: Psykiatri / [ed] Jörgen Herlofson et al., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 2 omarb., p. 69-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Psykiatrins hemeneutik: Om samtalets möjligheter och diagnosens makt2014In: Hans-Georg Gadamer och hermeneutikens aktualitet / [ed] Anders Burman, Stockholm: Axl Books, 2014, p. 171-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    På spaning efter det goda dödandet2015In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 5 novemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 79.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Queerteorins uppror mot den mänskliga naturen2019In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 8 juli, p. 16-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 80. Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Radikal översättning: Berättelsen om en utrotad indianstam1999In: Res Publica, ISSN 0282-6062, Vol. 44, p. 127-132Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 81.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, Institutionen för medier, konst och filosofi, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    [Recension av]: Philosophical Aspects on Emotions, ed. Åsa Carlson, Stockholm: Thales, 2005. 351 pp.2005In: Sats: Nordic Journal of Philosophy, ISSN 1600-1974, E-ISSN 1869-7577, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 225-232Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 82. Svenaeus, Fredrik
    [Reflektioner kring:] Hans-Georg Gadamer, Über die Verborgenheit der Gesundheit, David Farrell Krell, Infectious Nietzsche, Lennart Nordenfelt, On the Nature of Health, Martha Nussbaum, The Therapy of Desire: Therapy and Practice in Hellenistic Ethics1997In: Ord och Bild, ISSN 0030-4492, no 1, p. 108-111Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 83.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Robert Whitaker: Pillerparadoxen: varför lider fler och fler av psykiska problem när medicinerna bara blir bättre och bättre?2014In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 3, p. 27-28Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Siby, George K. and Jung, P. G. (eds.): Cultural ontology of the self in pain2016In: Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research, ISSN 0970-7794, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 515-518Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 1, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Sjukdomens mening: det medicinska mötets fenomenologi och hermeneutik2003Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    När läkare och andra som arbetar i vården möter sina patienter står de inför den svåra uppgiften att försöka förstå och hjälpa människor som lider på många olika sätt och av många olika anledningar. Detta är ett tolkningsarbete som kräver stor kunskap och erfarenhet av lyssnandets konst. I tider av tilltagande biologisering är det viktigt att peka på hur sjukdomen rymmer många olika dimensioner. Den sjuka människan lever i ett samhälle och en kultur som präglar hennes upplevelser. Kropp, tanke och känsla är sammanvävda i livet med sjukdomen. Sjukdomar är berättelser på samma gång som de är fysiologiska tillstånd. Utifrån fenomenologin och hermeneutiken, två besläktade filosofiska tanketraditioner, tillhandahåller författaren teorier om sjukdomars natur och mötet med den sjuka människan som kastar nytt ljus över den medicinska praktiken. De förankras i den kliniska vardagen genom fallbeskrivningar om personer med ett vitt spektrum av vanliga tillstånd och sjukdomar: utmattningsdepression, influensa, diabetes, huvudvärk, prostatacancer, ryggproblem, posttraumatiskt stressyndrom och hjärnblödning. Boken är framför allt avsedd att användas på läkarutbildningen i kurser i patientkommunikation och i medicinens filosofi och etik. Den är även av intresse inom andra vårdutbildningar och för alla som vill veta mer om sjukdomars mening, ett ämne som blir mer och mer aktuellt i vår samhällsdebatt.

  • 86.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Sjukdomsbegreppet i psykiatrin2016In: Psykiatri / [ed] Jörgen Herlofson et al., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 2 omarb., p. 37-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Smärtans mening: en Medicinfilosofisk betraktelse2009In: Att tänka smärtan / [ed] Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2009, 1, p. 31-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Smärtans mening: en Medicinfilosofisk betraktelse
  • 88. Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Spöket i arkivet: [recension av:] Jacques Derridas Mal d’Archive: une impression freudienne1998In: Res Publica, ISSN 0282-6062, Vol. 39Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 89.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Tabletter för känsliga själar: den antidepressiva revolutionen2008Book (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    The Body as Alien, Unhomelike and Uncanny: Some Further Clarifications2013In: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology, ISSN 1071-6076, E-ISSN 1086-3303, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 99-101Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    The Body as Gift, Resource or Commodity?: Heidegger and the Ethics of Organ Transplantation2010In: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, ISSN 1176-7529, E-ISSN 1872-4353, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 163-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three metaphors appear to guide contemporary thinking about organ transplantation. Although the gift is the sanctioned metaphor for donating organs, the underlying perspective from the side of the state, authorities and the medical establishment often seems to be that the body shall rather be understood as a resource. The acute scarcity of organs, which generates a desperate demand in relation to a group of potential suppliers who are desperate to an equal extent, leads easily to the gift’s becoming, in reality, not only a resource, but also a commodity. In this paper, the claim is made that a successful explication of the gift metaphor in the case of organ transplantation and a complementary defence of the ethical primacy of the giving of organs need to be grounded in a philosophical anthropology which considers the implications of embodiment in a different and more substantial way than is generally the case in contemporary bioethics. I show that Heidegger’s phenomenology offers such an alternative, with the help of which we can understand why body parts could and, indeed, under certain circumstances, should be given to others in need, but yet are neither resources nor properties to be sold. The phenomenological exploration in question is tied to fundamental questions about what kind of relationship we have to our own bodies, as well as about what kind of relationship we have to each other as human beings sharing the same being-in-the-world as embodied creatures.

  • 92.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    The body uncanny: Alienation, illness, and anorexia nervosa2014In: Feminist phenomenology and medicine / [ed] Zeiler, Kristin & Folkmarson Käll, Lisa, New York: SUNY Press, 2014, p. 201-221Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the basic idea of bodily phenomenology the body is exactly the center and vehicle of my whole existence: I am as a body which feels, acts and thinks in my different ways of making myself at home in the world. The lived body, however, is not only my most fundamental home, it is also a creature with a life of its own that harbors autonomous powers. Sometimes this autonomy of the body turns alien  in the sense that it changes my basic being at home with it (as it) into an experience of bodily alienation: the body becomes not only mine, but also other to me in an uncanny way. In the chapter some such forms of bodily uncanniness are identified and related to the example of anorexia nervosa. This analysis helps us to discern different ways in which our bodies can turn up as alien to us and what types of processes (biological, emotional-cognitive, social-cultural) the forms of otherness in question are tied to. Anorexia nervosa displays several such ways of being alienated from one’s body in an uncanny way. These include forms of alienation that can be found in somatic illness, but they also concern ways of being objectified in an everyday manner in the social world by the gazes of others, finding oneself in a cultural pattern of norms regarding the feminine, the healthy, the beautiful, and the successful. The alienating gazes of the others are soon made into a self-surveying gaze by the anorexic girl, in the process of which the image of the own body is made increasingly unrealistic and self-punishing. Anorexia, in most cases, is set off by cultural influences, but when the starvation and over-exercise have been brought into play, the malnourished body as a kind of self-defence inflicts moods that make its bearer strangely disembodied, increasingly apprehending the body as a thing, and a thing that is still not thin enough, despite its now uncannily thin look to others.

  • 93. Svenaeus, Fredrik
    The body uncanny: further steps towards a phenomenology of illness.2000In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 125-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an attempt to analyse the experience of embodiment in illness. Drawing upon Heidegger's phenomenology and the suggestion that illness can be understood as unhomelike being-in-the-world, I try to show how the way we live our own bodies in illness is experienced precisely as unhomelike. The body is alien, yet, at the same time, myself. It involves biological processes beyond my control, but these processes still belong to me as lived by me. This a priori otherness of the body presents itself in illness in an uncanny and merciless way. The unhomelike breakdown of our everyday being-in-the-world suffered in illness is explored through Heidegger's notion of the world being a "totality of relevance", a pattern of meaning played out between different "tools". The lived body is compared to a broken tool that alters and obstructs our way of being "thrown" and "projecting" ourselves in the meaning patterns of the world through feelings, thoughts and actions. The similarities and differences between this unhomelikeness of illness and the specific unhomelikeness of authentic understanding, reached according to Heidegger in existential anxiety, are discussed. In order to illustrate how the lived body can present itself as "broken" and "other" to its owner, and in what way this unhomelike experience calls for help from health-care professionals, I make use of a clinical example of a severe and common disease: stroke.

  • 94.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    The ethics of self-change: becoming oneself by way of antidepressants or psychotherapy?2009In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 169-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the differences between bringing about self-change by way of antidepressants versus psychotherapy from an ethical point of view, taking its starting point in the concept of authenticity. Given that the new antidepressants (SSRIs) are able not only to cure psychiatric disorders but also to bring about changes in the basic temperament structure of the person—changes in self-feeling—does it matter if one brings about such changes of the self by way of antidepressants or by way of psychotherapy? Are antidepressants a less good alternative than psychotherapy because antidepressants are in some way less authentic than psychotherapy? And, if so, what does this mean exactly? In this paper I try to show that the self-change brought about by way of antidepressants challenges basic assumptions of authentic self-change that are deeply ingrained in our Western culture: that changes in self should be brought about by laborious ‘self-work’ in which one explores the deep layers of the self (the unconscious) and comes to realise who one really is and should become. To become oneself has been held to presuppose such a journey. While the assumed importance of self-work appears to be badly founded on closer inspection, the notions of exploring and knowing oneself appear to be more promising in fleshing out an ethical distinction between psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic practice with the help of the concept of authenticity. Psychotherapy, to a much greater extent than psychopharmacological interventions, involves the whole profile of the self in its attempts to effect a change, not only in the temperament but also in the character of the person in question, and this is important from an ethical point of view. In the article, the concepts of self-change, authenticity, temperament and character are presented and used in order to understand and flesh out the relevant ethical differences between the practice of psychotherapy and the use of antidepressants. Looping, collective effects of psychopharmacological self-change in a cultural context are also considered in this context.

  • 95. Svenaeus, Fredrik
    The Hermeneutics of Medicine1996In: The Goals and Limits of Medicine / [ed] Lennart Nordenfelt and Per-Anders Tengland, Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell International , 1996, p. 117-141Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 96. Svenaeus, Fredrik
    The hermeneutics of medicine and the phenomenology of health: steps towards a philosophy of medical practice2001Book (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet.
    The Hermeneutics of Medicine and the Phenomenology of Health: Steps towards a Philosophy of Medical Practice1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    The lived body and personal identity: The ontology of exiled body parts2015In: Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist and Kristin Zeiler, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 19-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter I will attempt to develop a phenomenology of parts of the human body that have been removed from their site of origin but nevertheless preserve their “aliveness.” What happens when human body parts are stored in the medical laboratory and are even being transformed or cultivated there? How are we to view the ontological and ethical status of cells and organs that are being transplanted from one human body to another? Do these body parts preserve some kind of relationship to their source of origin: that is, the person from whom they have been retrieved? Do they belong to the person they originate from and, if so, in what way? What implications does this type of ownership have for ethical analysis? In some cases, at least, would the concept of sharing be more adequate in describing transfer of body parts between persons than the idea of a gift being made?

  • 99.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    The phenomenology of chronic pain: embodiment and alienation2015In: Continental philosophy review, ISSN 1387-2842, E-ISSN 1573-0611, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 107-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article develops a phenomenological exploration of chronic pain from a first-person perspective that can serve to enrich the medical third-person perspective. The experience of chronic pain is found to be a feeling in which we become alienated from the workings of our own bodies. The bodily-based mood of alienation is extended, however, in penetrating the whole world of the chronic pain sufferer, making her entire life unhomelike. Furthermore, the pain mood not only opens up the world as having an alien quality, it also makes the world more lonesome and poor by forcing the sufferer to attend to the workings of her own body. To suffer pain is to find oneself in a situation of passivity in relation to the hurtful experiences one is undergoing. In making the body and the world more unhomelike places to be in, pain also tends to rob a person of her language. Severe pain is hard to describe because it pushes the person towards the borderlines of imaginable experience and because it makes it hard to see any meaning and purpose in the situation one has been forced into. The analysis of chronic pain in the article is guided by the attempts made by Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Martin Heidegger to understand the nature of human embodiment and existence, and also by descriptions of chronic pain found in the Swedish author Lars Gustafsson’s novel The Death of a Beekeeper.

  • 100.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    The phenomenology of empathy: a Steinian emotional account2016In: Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences, ISSN 1568-7759, E-ISSN 1572-8676, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 227-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a phenomenological account of empathy inspired by the proposal put forward by Edith Stein in her book On the Problem of Empathy, published originally 1917. By way of explicating Stein’s views, the paper aims to present a characterization of empathy that is in some aspects similar to, but yet essentially different from contemporary simulationist theories of empathy. An attempt is made to show that Stein’s proposal articulates the essential ingredients and steps involved in empathy and that her proposal can be made even more comprehensive and elucidating by stressing the emotional aspect of the empathy process. Empathy, according to such a phenomenological proposal, is to be understood as a perceptual-imaginative feeling towards and with the other person’s experiences made possible by affective bodily schemas and being enhanced by a personal concern for her. To experience empathy does not necessarily or only mean to experience the same type of feeling as the target does; it means feeling alongside the feeling of the target in imagining and explicating a rich understanding of the experiences of the very person one is facing.

123 51 - 100 of 122
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf