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  • 351.
    Yakusheva, Natalya
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    The implementation deficit in the European Union: insights from Natura 2000 policy in the Carpathian countries2014In: Local Responses to Global Challenges: Proceedings of Forum Carpaticum 2014 / [ed] Ivan Kruhlov & Bohdan Prots, Lviv: Ukrayinskyy Bestseler , 2014, p. 23-30Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 352.
    Yakusheva, Natalya
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Wildlife conservation policy and practice in Central Asia2017In: Unasylva, ISSN 0041-6436, Vol. 68, no 249, p. 45-52Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 353.
    Zaucha, J.
    et al.
    Maritime Institute in Gdansk, Poland.
    Gilek, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Hassler, Björn
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Luttmann, A.
    Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, Germany.
    Morf, A.
    d Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, Sweden.
    Saunders, Fred
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Piwowarczyk, J.
    Institute of Oceanology of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland.
    Gee, K.
    f Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht Zentrum für Material-und Küstenforschung GmbH, Germany.
    Turski, J.
    Maritime Institute in Gdansk, Poland.
    BONUS Policy Brief: Challenges and Possibilities for MSP integration in the Baltic Sea2017Report (Other academic)
  • 354.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    From the Hope of Engineering Nature to the Fear of Environmental Destruction: Imagining the Oresund Bridge (1950s-1990s)2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at presenting some aspects of the approach to natural environment in Sweden and Denmark in the second half of the twentieth century. It does so by analysing the hopes and fears generated by several societal actors when imagining the building of an engineering megastructure: the Oresund bridge, a project aimed at uniting the shores of the two states on the Oresund Straight. The bridge was built in the year 2000, but it has been imagined and planned since the nineteenth century by those who hoped to shorten the distance between Sweden and the continent and to produce major freedom of mobility of persons and goods across the Sound. Until the late 1960s, domesticating and exploiting the natural environment in order to favour the societal exigencies was still considered unproblematic. Only since the late 1960s the paradigm of engineering shifted from an anthropocentric perspective to a more sceptic view over the overexploitation of nature. Engineering the Oresund with tons of concrete and metal structures in order to favour car traffic was no more considered as a human victory upon the tyranny of nature, but as an irresponsible act. Concerns over the project were raised by scientists of the most diverse disciplines and by the local communities, which started the first “green wave” in the early seventies, soon followed by the bourgeois parties. The environmental concerns grew since the 1980s into a more general critique of liberalism, of capitalism and of the European Community, making of the Oresund bridge an ambivalent symbol to whom environmentalists reacted in different ways.

  • 355.
    Öhlund, Erika
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Hammer, Monica
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Björklund, J.
    Örebro University.
    Managing conflicting goals in pig farming: farmers’ strategies and perspectives on sustainable pig farming in Sweden2017In: International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability, ISSN 1473-5903, E-ISSN 1747-762X, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 693-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial meat production has several negative environmental effects. Governments’ agricultural policies aim for cost efficiency combined with high environmental and animal welfare, which puts farmers in a difficult situation trying to navigate between sometimes contradictory requirements. This paper studies how Swedish pig farmers resolve or cope with conflicting goals in pig farming. We have analysed the regulations governing EU and Swedish pig farming. We have also interviewed five Swedish pig farmers about their views of the different goals of pig farming and strategies for resolving conflicts between the goals of low environmental impact, high animal welfare and enough profitability to continue farming. The greatest divide was between the conventional farmers, who emphasized natural resource efficiency, and the organic farmers who stressed animal welfare, multifunctionality and ecosystem service delivery. We suggest four strategies to contribute to resolving some of the conflicting goals: improve communication about different types of pig farming; use public procurement as a driver towards more sustainable pork production; work towards improving the Common Agricultural Policy, perhaps by implementing payments for ecosystem services or multifunctionality; and finally, decrease the total production of pork to lower the emissions per land unit.

  • 356.
    Öhlund, Erika
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Zurek, Karolina
    Stockholm University / Swedish Institute for European Policy Studies.
    Hammer, Monica
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Towards Sustainable Agriculture?: The EU framework and local adaptation in Sweden and Poland2015In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 270-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agricultural systems can be seen as nested social-ecological systems. European Union (EU) Member States vary considerably in terms of their agricultural, socio-economic and environmental circumstances. Yet, as participants in the common agricultural market, they are subject to a uniform Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). An important question is whether there is enough room for flexibility to sustain diverse agricultural systems and facilitate national targeting of sustainability-promoting measures. This article analyses the institutional arrangements concerning cross-scale interactions and interdependencies at national and regional (EU) levels, focusing on how Poland and Sweden implement CAP funds in relation to sustainable agriculture, in particular the agri-environmental schemes, for the period 2007-2013. What room is there in practice for accommodating national differences and sustainability priorities offered by the EU agricultural policy, and how are the existing opportunities used by the two countries? It is shown that agri-environmental funds are too small to prevent transition towards large-scale farming in new Member States and CAP does not effectively promote transformation towards sustainable practices in the EU.

  • 357.
    Östlund, Simon
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Många bäckar små, blir det bättre då?: En studie om den småskaliga vattenkraftens för- och nackdelar ur ett miljöperspektiv2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today we face many environmental problems such as climate change and biodiversity loss. Hydropower is a renewable energy source that can produce electricity with low greenhouse gas emissions. Sweden has a long tradition of using water as an energy source and has during the past century built hydropower in a majority of the Swedish rivers. Today, hydropower accounts for nearly half of Sweden's electricity production and contributes to Sweden's low greenhouse gas emissions. But hydropower also affects biodiversity and water bodies negatively. Of the approximately 2100 hydropower plants in Sweden, 200 accounts for over 90% of the electricity production. Thus there are a large number of small-scale hydropower plants that contribute to a small portion of the electricity while they are liable to affect streams negative. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether electricity from small-scale hydropower is justifiable in terms of its environmental impact. The study used a qualitative method based on semi-structured interviews with the following stakeholders: Swedenergy, Swedish Hydropower Association, Swedish Energy Agency, Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management, Swedish Society for Nature Conservation, Swedish Anglers’ Association and River Savers Association Sweden.

    The results showed that small-scale hydropower is a cheap and established energy source, it can also contribute with cultural values, it is locally produced and consumed that can give greater stability to the electricity grid and reduce distribution losses. The disadvantages show that small-scale hydropower lacks some of the key features that large-scale hydropower can provide: the regulation of the electricity grid and the ability to store water that can be used if necessary. Furthermore, small-scale hydropower is considered to have a major negative impact on streams and biodiversity. The potential for small-scale hydropower could also be considered lower than for other renewable energy while developing more slowly. Legislation, permits and electricity certificate system has also been identified as factors that do not help the environmental situation in streams.

    The need to produce renewable electricity from small-scale hydropower can be considered lower than the need to protect streams and biodiversity to reach Swedish environmental quality objectives and the Water Framework Directive. There is scope for reducing electricity production from small-scale hydropower and still achieve environmental policy objectives on renewable energy and streams and biodiversity. The conclusion is that electricity production from small-scale hydropower cannot be justified in terms of its environmental impact and that there is a need to examine the possibility of removing the smallest hydropower plants with the greatest environmental impact. It is also stressed that there is a lack of proper incentives to promote biodiversity and aquatic environments and that the view of small-scale hydropower as environmentally friendly should be questioned.

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