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  • 201.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Estudos culturais: Atravessando fronteiras, defendendo distinções2022In: O que são estudos culturais hoje?: Diferentes praticantes retomam a pergunta do International Journal of Cultural Studies / [ed] Luís Henrique Sacchi dos Santos; Lodenir Becker Karnopp; Maria Lúcia Castagna Wortmann, São Paulo: Pimenta Cultural , 2022, p. 57-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To identify a set of defining traits and goals of the cultural studies field is the task of this intervention. It begins by investigating how leading actors in this field today define it: the Association for Cultural Studies and the journals Cultural Studies, the European Journal of Cultural Studies, the International Journal of Cultural Studies, and the Inter- Asian Cultural Studies. Three main tropes are identified: diversity, contextualisation and critique. Each of them have partly succeeded but other aims remain unfulfilled. Two central tasks are formulated. First, cultural studies needs a reinforced critical reflexivity to explain what it is and why it is needed as a driving force for interactive diversity, contextualising meaning making and communicative critique. Second, the field needs to be on high alert, stepping forward and responding fast and loud to the current totalitarian threats against sustainable and resilient academic knowledge production.

  • 202.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Europa eller tjuren?: Identifierandets korsvägar2014In: Liv, lust och litteratur: Festskrift till Lisbeth Larsson / [ed] Kristina Hermansson, Christian Lenemark & Cecilia Pettersson, Göteborg/Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2014, 1, p. 74-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Här utforskas genusaspekter på hur europeisk identitet förhandlas i symboler. Myten om Europa och tjuren bär på motsägelsefulla tolkningsmöjligheter. Prinsessan Europa kan ses som personifikation av kontinenten, som med våld förs bort av Zeus i tjurhamn. Alternativt kan hon uppfattas som djärvt förförisk grundare av en dynasti, vilket erbjuder en helt annan europeisk självbild. Några tycks rentav hellre identifiera sig med den potent djuriskt-gudomliga tjuren som dramats centrala aktör. Här föreslås en ambivalent strategi som fasthåller dubbelheter i såväl ärvda symboler som dagens Europaprojekt. Varje levande myt är mångtydig och utsatt för en ohejdbar verkningshistoria vars tolkningskonflikter öppnar motsägelsefulla korsvägar för identifikation. Det är viktigt att bibehålla en agens också för Europa – såväl i mytisk symbolik som i dagens vardag – och se den genusifierade herre-slav-dialektiken i det begärsspel som format nutidens Europa: Europa är flerkönat, förenat endast i sin egen mångfald.

  • 203.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Europe faces Europe: An introduction2017In: Europe Faces Europe: Narratives From Its Eastern Half / [ed] Johan Fornäs, Bristol: Intellect Ltd., 2017, p. 1-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 204.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Europe Faces Europe: Narratives From Its Eastern Half2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Europe Faces Europe examines Eastern European perspectives on European identity. The contributors to this volume map narratives of Europe rooted in Eastern Europe, examining their relationship to philosophy, journalism, social movements, literary texts, visual art, and popular music. Moving the debate and research on European identity beyond the geographical power center, the essays explore how Europeanness is conceived of in the dynamic region of Eastern Europe. Offering a fresh take on European identity, Europe Faces Europe comes at an important time, when Eastern Europe and European identity are in an important and vibrant phase of transition.

  • 205.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Euro-visions: East European narratives in televised popular music2017In: Europe Faces Europe: Narratives From Its Eastern Half / [ed] Johan Fornäs, Bristol: Intellect Ltd., 2017, p. 179-235Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 206.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Forever Young: The beginnings of the Nordic Journal of Youth Research2013In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 407-417Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 207.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Framtiden står skriven i stjärnorna2013In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 14 maj, p. 25-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 208.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Frith’s popular music studies: an essay review of 'Popular Music Matters: Essays in Honour of Simon Frith'2015In: Popular Music, ISSN 0261-1430, E-ISSN 1474-0095, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 312-317Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 209.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Fritt fram för open access2013Other (Other academic)
  • 210.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Hermeneutics2020In: Reimagining Communication: Meaning / [ed] Michael Filimowicz & Veronika Tzankova, New York: Routledge, 2020, p. 27-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hermeneutics is a philosophical reflection on interpretation: how people make meaning, for instance, when reading books or looking at pictures. This chapter first defines interpretation, explains why it is central to any reimagining of communication, and clarifies its relations to neighboring concepts like meaning, culture and communication. Then follows a discussion of key assumptions and themes of interpretation theory, including how to locate and reconstruct meaning. Third, a brief historical overview over different hermeneutic contributions traces the transition from the Romanticist tradition with Schleiermacher and Dilthey through Heidegger and Gadamer to the critical hermeneutics of Paul Ricoeur, which is particularly suitable for a theory of communication in the contemporary media age. The hermeneutic circle, expanded to a spiral of interpretation, is then presented as a model of how meaning is made – but also of how it is studied. The chapter concludes with some words on the limits of interpretation, responding to antihermeneutic challenges from posthumanists and new materialists.

  • 211.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Hidden Assumptions and Implicit Normative Conclusions: a Constructivist Critique of the Research on Eastern Euro-visions : Narratives of Europe in the ESC2014In: Communication for Empowerment: Citizens, Markets, Innovations : 5th European Communication Conference : 12-15 November, Lisboa, Portugal : Book of Abstracts, Universidade Lusófona , 2014, p. 267-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union is looking for new narratives of Europe. But which was the old one and was there really just one? Do narratives of Europe in the so-called ‘new’ east Europe offer alternatives for redefining European identity? In order to approach these issues, this paper looks at how Europe is narrated in east European popular music, focusing the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC).

    A wide range of symbols struggle for identifying or signifying Europe (Fornäs 2012). The post-1989 EU enlargement has intensified such redefinition efforts. Popular music offers a fascinating field for such narrative identifications, with the ESC as an influential arena, linking cultural, social and political discourses. Music matters (Hesmondhalgh 2013) to people on many influential levels, combining emotive pleasure with social interaction in ways that offer rich resources for identifying practices. Being perhaps the most successful pan-European venture, the ESC is therefore an excellent source for investigating narratives of Europe.

    Written within an interdisciplinary project on east European ‘Narratives of Europe’, this paper analyses songs from ESC finals since 1989. Using a methodological model for analysing narratives, inspired by Genette (1972/1980), Ricoeur (1981) and Ryan (2004), it looks for who acts in a narrative (setup), what happens in which order (process), how or in what format the story is told (mode) and what identity it constructs for Europe (meaning).

    More than 70 songs were chosen, 40 of them from east Europe. Preliminary results in­dicate an overwhelming dominance of one master narrative of redemptive resur­rection, with a set of sub-variants. In other contexts than the ESC, popular songs may depict Europe as an eternally happy place or as falling from greatness into misery, but the ESC format strongly favours a narrative where Europe had a glorious past but then has been deeply torn by internal strife, wars and suffering, from which it now finally will recover by uniting in mutual co-operation and love. Some variants say little or nothing about the initial golden age, some less triumphantly place the resurrection as a dream for the future, and some east European song narratives add freedom from oppression to peace after internal war as core values, but the master narrative is never really abandoned.

    This resurrection narrative resonates with the founding myth expressed in EU’s key symbols. The inclusion of former Soviet Bloc countries into the European integration process has given new impetus to those founding narratives, and the ESC’s east European narratives indicate important continuities between the old and the new.

    While offering a methodological example of narrative analysis of media texts in the seldom-studied format of televised popular music, the paper also contributes to the understanding of how east European voices construct Europe’s history and future in the processes of transformation that challenge inherited ideas of what Europe means.

  • 212.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Introducing Capitalism: Current crisis and cultural critique2014In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 6, p. 15-38Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 213.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Jag går ut med min hund: om arternas vänskap2024Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    ATT GÅ UT med sin hund är inte bara att röra på benen. Det innebär också att öppna sig och genomströmmas av den omgivande världen; att sätta igång stärkande processer i ben, lungor, hjärta och hjärna. Samt, inte minst, att skapa och fördjupa en vänskap med den sällskapande varelsen.

    I denna bok skildras utegåendets mekanismer, ägaransvar i glädje och sorg, lärorika hundhemligheter och den livsberikande kärlek som kan uppstå mellan hund och människa.

    Kulturforskaren Johan Fornäs skildrar i Jag går ut med min hund den gränsöverskridande kärleken mellan djur och människa. Med schipperkehunden Kim som exempel och samtalspartner ger han inblickar i såväl gåendets filosofi som arternas gemenskap.

  • 214.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Karl Marx: dialektisk samhällskritik2022In: Sociologins klassiker: Upptäckter och återupptäckter / [ed] Lisa Eklund ; Bo Isenberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, p. 69-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 215.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Mediatisation times2014In: Communication for Empowerment: Citizens, Markets, Innovations : 5th European Communication Conference : 12-15 November, Lisboa, Portugal : Book of Abstracts, Universidade Lusófona , 2014, p. 355-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the concept of change in mediatisation theory, bringing in the dimension of temporality in two supplementary ways. Mediatisation denotes a set of social changes in the interface between communications media and other societal spheres. It is thus a truly temporal phenomenon, but it remains unclear how it actually develops over time – and how it affects time.

    The paper first scrutinises alternative ways to understand the temporal coordinates of mediatisation processes, and to explore the affordances of different theorisations in this respect. What does it mean to describe mediatisation as a revolutionary time shift, break or leap? What are the implications of instead depicting it in terms of long-term evolutionary processes of restructuring transition? Comparisons are made with other concepts for various forms of social change, including modernisation, globalisation and individualisation. It is hardly possible to prove one temporal perspective to be ‘correct’, but I will rather reflect on their different implications, as they have repercussions on how mediatisation is understood in terms also of its range, causes and effects.

    There is also another, reverse side of the interrelation between time and mediatisation: namely how mediatisation affects the time-dimension itself: how communications media restructure time consciousness, historical understanding, remembrance and forgetting. This section of the paper will refer to how Ricoeur (in Time and Narrative, 1982–1985 and Memory, History, Forgetting, 2000) analyses different technologies for culturalising or ‘humanising’ time (but also space), by linking cosmic-objective-universal with experiential-subjective-lived time through the use of calendars, generational successions, documents, archives and other intersubjective tools that mediate between the internal and the external (and similarly for spatiality). Media technologies are central to such practices, and mediatisation processes are therefore a testing ground for understanding the two-way traffic between media and time: the cultural mediation of time and the historical mediatisation of society and culture: linking the changing cultural mediation of time – and thus the mediatisation of time – to the historical-temporal aspects of mediatisation processes, as they affect the understanding of temporality itself. The aim here is thus to explore mutual determinations of time and mediatisation, and the bilateral temporal coordinates of media-related social change.

    The paper builds upon discussions in the Scandinavian ‘Mediatisation Times’ network funded the National Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation, and in my chapters in Mediatized Worlds (Hepp & Krotz, 2014) and Mediatization of Communication (Lundby, 2014).

  • 216.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Mediatization of popular culture2014In: Mediatization of Communication / [ed] Lundby, Knut, Berlin/Boston: Mouton de Gruyter, 2014, p. 483-504Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Popular culture is often understood as being linked to mass media and therefore also implicated in the idea of mediatization. Here this is discussed in four main steps. (1) First, key problems in the concept of mediatization are illuminated, with popular culture as a testing ground: if there is always such a mediatization process going on; when (in which periods) this process is particularly intense and how it develops over time (gradually or in leaps); where (in which world regions) it can be located; how it has any effects (if it follows a relatively fixed logic or is more diffuse); and what it affects in terms of societal spheres and levels of practice. (2) Second, four main dimensions of the concept of culture are distinguished – cultivation, life forms, aesthetics, and signifying practice – all of which are found relevant to mediatization. As media are cultural technologies of communication, there is a close link between mediatization and culturalization. (3) Third, popular culture is similarly divided into four main meanings, defining it as mass culture, people’s culture, low culture, or illegitimized culture. (4) On this basis, examples illustrate how mediatization processes affect popular culture through four main phases, each linked to a new demarcation of popular culture itself: graphic mediatization of common culture, print mediatization of low culture, audiovisual mediatization of media culture, and digital mediatization of what again is becoming a more or less indistinguishable common culture.

                Popular culture frequently appears to be one of the most media-saturated spheres or fields of modern societies. It is sometimes even identified with media culture, for instance when contrasted with fine arts and folk handicrafts, and defined through its reliance on mass mediated texts disseminated by cultural industries to dispersed polymorphous audiences all over the globe. This closeness between popular culture and media processes poses a challenge for any effort to more precisely scrutinize whether there is any escalating increase in this kind of media presence, which would deserve to be labeled mediatization.

                In order to bring some clarity to this slightly paradoxical situation, it is helpful to first make some conceptual groundwork. This chapter will first analyze how the concepts of media and mediatization relate to culture and culturalization. Then, a similar discussion follows of popular culture, leading up to an effort to draft a provisional sketch of key steps in the mediatization history of popular culture. This will finally also make it possible to return to the initial definition of mediatization and reconsider its very basis.

  • 217.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Musiken och jag: recension av en bok av Thomas Bossius och Lars Lilliestam2013In: Svensk tidskrift för musikforskning, ISSN 0081-9816, E-ISSN 2002-021X, Vol. 16, p. 149-152Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 218.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Notes on media, culture and resilience2019In: Fritt från fältet: Om medier, generationer och värden. Festskrift till Göran Bolin / [ed] Peter Jakobsson; Fredrik Stiernstedt, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2019, p. 207-218Chapter in book (Other academic)
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    Notes on media, culture and resilience
  • 219.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Preface2018In: The story of Karl Marx 200 years after his birth / [ed] Rachel Basinger, Ocala FL: Atlantic Publishing Group , 2018, p. 11-15Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 220.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Stuart Hall: Kodning och avkodning (1973)2020In: Medievetenskapens idétraditioner / [ed] Stina Bengtsson; Staffan Ericson; Fredrik Stiernstedt, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2020, p. 181-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Stuart Hall vidgade kulturforskningen2014In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 17 februari, p. 21-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 222.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Stuart Hall's dialogical interventions2014In: Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, ISSN 1464-9373, E-ISSN 1469-8447, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 186-190Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 223.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Symbols and narratives of Europe: Three tropes2020In: Punctum: International journal of semiotics, E-ISSN 2459-2943, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 85-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout history, attempts have been made to identify Europe as a geographical, political, social, and cultural entity. Recent efforts to establish key symbols and narratives of Europe have focused on a set of central signifying elements, even if there is a wide and contradictory range of ways to define, structure, and interpret them. An introductory remark on the current debate on the need for renewed European self-reflection paves the way for some conceptual clarifications of my approach to concepts like culture, meaning, identity and mediation. A methodological reflection accompanies this on how to use semiotic tools in cultural studies based on critical hermeneutics. The concept of culture used here is based on the signifying practice of mediating meaning-making, linking imagination to communication in a triangular dynamic between texts, subjects, and contexts. Examples are given from two research projects on a broad and diverse range of European symbols and narratives, illustrating such interpretive research results. European identifications are crystallized and spun around three dominant tropes: supreme universality, resurrection from division, and communicative mobility. Their intricate tensions and interrelations attest to how deeply Europe remains a highly contested and dynamic meaning cluster.

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  • 224.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The dialectics of communicative and immanent critique in cultural studies2013In: tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique, E-ISSN 1726-670X, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 504-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In cultural studies and cultural research, the importance of being critical is often stressed, but it is more rare to scrutinise how such critique is and can be performed. This text discusses differ- ent modes of critique, in three main steps. First, a brief review of the history and signifying layers of the concept of critique itself leads up to a late modern communicative concept of critique, linked to the contested relation between critique and tradition, and based on how Paul Ricoeur has interpreted ide- ology critique and the hermeneutics of suspicion. This communicative mode is contrasted to critical approaches that strive to radically dissociate themselves from others. Second, it is argued that the most powerful sources of critique are to be sought in the inner contradictions of the targeted spheres of social reality rather than applied from the outside. Such immanent – as opposed to transcendent – critique, has been formulated and exercised by Karl Marx, Theodor W. Adorno and Walter Benjamin, among others. The third section sums up the spiral moves of cultural studies as informed by critical hermeneutics: dialectical critique based on communicative and immanent critique must be on the move, never frozen, and may temporarily and locally explore radical and transcendent modes of cri- tique, in ways that have been discussed by Donna Haraway.

  • 225.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Mediatization of Third-Time Tools: Culturalizing and Historicizing Temporality2016In: International Journal of Communication, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 10, p. 5213-5232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time and media have multiple interfaces as media shape temporalities while changing through history. In three steps, this article explores how cultural time is mediated and how it changes through history. First, Paul Ricoeur's hermeneutics is presented as a fruitful way to understand cultural time as "third time," mediating between lived, subjective time and cosmic, objective time. Clocks, calendars, generational successions, archives, and documents are third-time tools linking internal to external time flows and producing text-based intersubjective temporality. Second, Ricoeur's analysis needs to be historicized. After discussing mediatization and its temporal development, the concept of waves is proposed to bridge the concepts of leap and growth. Particular attention is then paid to the latest, digital wave of mediatization. Referring to John Durham Peters and other media historians, some characteristics of this phase of time remediation are listed. Finally, critical, and political aspects are discussed, concluding that, although new technologies may threaten third time, this threat is counteracted by remediation that links digital time back to inherited modes of temporal representation.

  • 226.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The symbolic crisis of the Euro: Trust and distrust in currency as an identifying medium2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the redefinition of European symbols and in particular the euro currency under the current condition of crisis, in which the identity of Europe is challenged and attributed new connotations. The current financial crisis has material effects for institutions and citizens, but also an important cultural aspect. Money is a means of payment but also a symbolic artefact or ‘micro medium’. Every European symbol demands a level of trust among its users, while also aiming to secure basic trust in the legitimacy of European values. When the euro runs into crisis, this therefore has crucial symbolic repercussions. If for instance Greece is forced to leave the Eurozone, this not only creates monetary difficulties but also questions the signifying force of the € symbol, whose name and design intend to express the foundation of European civilisation in the classical culture of Athens.

  • 227.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Till den kommunikativa kritikens dialektik2013In: Tal, makt, vansinne: En vänbok till Ulf Olsson / [ed] Thomas Götselius, Caroline Haux, Jesper Olsson & Per Anders Wiktorsson, Höör: Symposion Brutus Östlings bokförlag, 2013, p. 32-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 228.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Till minne av Stuart Hall (1932-2014): Stuart Halls dialogiska interventioner2014In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 3-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Tältprojektets utopiska spår2023In: alba.nu, no 9 majArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 230.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Vi tar kulturtempen på partiprogrammen2021In: Dagens Arena, no 2021-03-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 231.
    Fornäs, Johan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Fredriksson, M.
    Linköping University.
    Wirtén, E. H.
    Linköping University.
    Stead, N.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Introduction:¨Publishing for public knowledge2015In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 558-564Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 232.
    Fornäs, Johan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Fredriksson, Martin
    Linköping University.
    Stead, Naomi
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Culture Unbound Vol. 5 Editorial2013In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 5, p. 7-13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Fornäs, Johan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Fredriksson, Martin
    Linköping University.
    Stead, Naomi
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Culture Unbound Vol. 6, Editorial2014In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 6, p. 7-11Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With this volume, Culture Unbound celebrates its five-year anniversary. This makes a good opportunity both to look back at what we have achieved and to gaze ahead to what we have planned for the future. This new volume, which will be more extensive and ambitious than ever, thus marks a readiness and willingness to engage with some of the most acute problems and complex transformation that society faces. We hope and believe that this not only expresses the ambitions of Culture Unbound but also reflects a more general tendency within contemporary cultural research. In order to better accommodate the most recent developments within the field of cultural research, and facilitate intellectual discussion and critical analysis of contemporary issues we also plan to expand our repertoire of published material. In the coming year Culture Unbound will therefore introduce a section of texts we have chosen to call ‘Unbound Ideas’. Here we welcome academic essays and texts of a somewhat shorter format and freer approach to scholarly convention than our usual full-length research articles. These essays will take different – perhaps speculative or conjectural – positions, or give a new perspective on pressing topics or recently emerged concerns within cultural research.

  • 234.
    Fornäs, Johan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Johansson, Agneta
    Kennel Corinna, Skövde.
    Proposal to revise the Schipperke FCI Standard2019In: SchipTales International, no December 15, p. 22-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 235.
    Fornäs, Johan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Lindberg, Ulf
    Ungdomskultur som forskningsfält: åren med Ove2016In: Låt alla stenar rulla: lärande, estetik, samhälle : en vänbok till Ove Sernhede / [ed] Johan Söderman; Thomas Johansson, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 236.
    Fornäs, Johan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Manga, Edda
    Uppsala University.
    Universiteten får inte bli företag2014In: Universitetsläraren, ISSN 0282-4973, no 2, p. 30-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 237.
    Fornäs, Johan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Xinaris, Charis
    European University Cyprus.
    Mediated identity formation: Current trends in research and society2013In: Javnost - The Public, ISSN 1318-3222, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 11-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to overview the current processes and challenges that relate to how media developments influence – and are influenced by – the ways in which personal and collective identities are formed in contemporary societies. First, it discusses ways to approach and define the concept of identity from a media perspective. A discussion of how identity formation issues links to the concept of new media literacies forms a transition to three sections that in turn analyse the social trends, the policy trends and the scientific trends that may be discerned in this area. The final section first summarises key research questions and then offers some more concrete ingredients for identifying possible instruments of a new research agenda.

  • 238.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Att få syn på sin skugga: Estetisk erfarenhet som infrastrukturell känslighet i bildämnet2022In: I rörelse: Estetiska erfarenheter i pedagogiska sammanhang / [ed] Anders Burman; Petra Lundberg Bouquelon, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2022, p. 237-253Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    Att få syn på sin skugga: Estetisk erfarenhet som infrastrukturell känslighet i bildämnet
  • 239.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Enabling Media: Infrastructures, imaginaries and cultural techniques in Swedish and Estonian visual arts education2020Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation explores the media environments of visual arts education in Sweden and Estonia and how educators understand, negotiate and enable this infrastructure. Based on the notion that the ongoing digitalization of the educational system in these countries makes established practices appear, it further discusses how visual arts education as a school subject is shaped in relation to different technologies for image making and school administration. The comparative perspective makes visible how these practices have emerged in specific cultural settings, including the historical development of compulsory education and the organization of teacher training in each country. The two-way relation in which media technologies used in education to some extent condition pedagogical practice at the same time as being dependent on the work of educators, is conceptualized in the title as enabling media.

    Theoretically, the dissertation draws on infrastructuralism, suggested by Peters (2015), as a unifying concept for media studies interested in the logistical qualities of media. By using this perspective to study schools as media environments, the dissertation builds on an established interest within medium theory on the relation between compulsory education and media technologies. This tradition is developed here through theoretical perspectives and concepts from media philosophy, German media theory, infrastructure studies and science and technology studies.

    Infrastructure studies also informed the methodological approach of this dissertation, a combination of short time ethnographic field work, site visits, interviews, and visual methods.

    The results of the dissertation indicate that it is not only established media literacy competences such as the ability to interpret and create media content that visual arts education can contribute in our contemporary media society, but also the ability to recognize, visualize and reimagine the infrastructures and technologies involved in the distribution of media. This ability is conceptualized here as infrastructure literacy (Parks, 2010) and concretized in a tentative curriculum, including lesson plans and assignments designed to facilitate historicizing, explorative and material approaches to media in school art education.

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  • 240.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Image ecologies: Infrastructures of visual art education in Sweden and Estonia2018In: International Journal of Education Through Art, ISSN 1743-5234, E-ISSN 2040-090X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 239-246, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is a visual interpretation of the media ecologies of visual art education in Sweden and Estonia. As the title of the article suggests, an ecology of visual art education means infrastructures for accessing, producing, showing and sharing images. The study is empirically informed by social network analysis conducted in online communities and by interviews with teachers who are active in those communities. Graphs of activity and connectedness in online communities are included in a media ecology model, based on the teacher interviews. The model visually relates online collaboration with material technologies, such as classroom computers or cameras, and different forms of governance, such as curricula. The essay attempts to contribute to the existing literature regarding the relation between technologies and educational practice by combining digital methods with media ecology and infrastructure theory, and methodologically by using visual methods for interpretation.

  • 241.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Imaginary classrooms: Exploring new directions in visual art education through future workshops in teacher training2021In: IMAG, ISSN 2414-3332, Vol. 11, p. 24-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future workshops were originally developed to facilitate civic participation among groups that otherwise seldom take part in decision making processes, such as children and young people (Jungk & Mullert, 1987). It is a collaborative method where participants identify problems within a specific context and come up with concrete solutions together. This text combines the future workshop model with creative and participatory approaches as a way to discuss and imagine alternative futures for visual arts education with students in teacher training.

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  • 242.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kollaborativa medier för akademisk litteracitet.: Ett exempel på användningen av Prezi i ett textseminarium2016In: Högre Utbildning, E-ISSN 2000-7558, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 165-170Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Här presenteras en modell för att arbeta med presentationsprogrammet Prezi i seminarier. Det pedagogiska upplägget fokuserar på hur Prezi kan användas för att stimulera samarbete och interaktion mellan studenterna och synliggöra den akademiska litteracitet som seminarieformen kräver. Modellen har testats under två år på ett seminarium i textkritik på Södertörns högskola, och har utvärderats av studenterna på kursen. Texten sammanfattar reflektionerna hos såväl undervisande lärande som hos studenter och argumenterar för att digitala medier kan användas för att öka studentaktiviteten samt att synliggöra processen att tolka och diskutera texter.

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    fulltext
  • 243.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Marshall McLuhan: The Medium is the Massage (1967)2020In: Medievetenskapens idétraditioner / [ed] Stina Bengtsson; Staffan Ericson; Fredrik Stiernstedt, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2020, p. 125-138Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 244.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    On trying to feel at home2017In: Self Trackers: Eight Personal Tales of Journeys in Life-Logging / [ed] Morris Villarroel & Alberto Frigo, North Charleston: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform , 2017, p. 29-37Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 245.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Researching Infrastructural Imaginaries in Education Through Future Workshops2018Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case describes the development and implementation of the Future workshops method (Jungk and Müllert 1987), as part of a mixed methodology in a PhD project about media technologies and future imaginaries in school art education. The workshop method described here is an attempt to visualize media infrastructures in teaching and the imaginaries surrounding them, thereby making them possible for the research participants to discuss and critique. The practical lessons learned from this case are that designing a functioning research workshop resembles the pedagogic planning done in teaching. Ritual aspects and emotional labor are highlighted as necessary in the process, as well as staying sensitive to the context where the workshops are performed, and to my role as a researcher in this context. Discussing some of the shortcomings of creative methods, the study concludes that workshop methods benefit from being combined with other methods to include, for example, historical perspectives in the analysis. The messiness and non-linearity of the research process is described in the text as a simultaneous development of research questions, theoretical concepts, experiences, and methods.

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  • 246.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Synlig eller övervakad?: Digitaliseringen och transparensens dilemma2022In: Digitala didaktiska dilemman / [ed] Sofia Lundmark; Janne Kontio, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2022, p. 65-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet diskuterar skolans digitalisering från ett lärarperspektiv med särskilt fokus på relationen mellan transparens och övervakning. Digitala system marknadsförs ofta som ett sätt att öka transparensen i skolan, att göra lärandet synligt och att tydliggöra kunskapskrav och bedömningsgrunder för elever och föräldrar. Samtidigt upplever många lärare att denna transparens också innebär ett slags övervakning av verksamheten som minskar möjligheten till improvisation, kreativitet och öppna lärprocesser.

  • 247.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The mediatization of education: a transparency dilemma?2020In: Anais de resumos Expandidos IV Seminário Internacional de Pesquisas em Militarização e Processos Sociais: Realizado entre Novembro de 2020 e Janeiro de 2021, UNISINOS, São Leopoldo, RS, Brasil, São Leopoldo: Instituto Humanitas Unisinos , 2020, Vol. 1Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Everyday communication is increasingly taking place within media at the same time as media is shaping our society and social life (Couldry & Hepp, 2017). In education we can see this process as the interplay between organizational reforms in schools, often through the entrance of digital administration tools pushed by commercial interest, and the use of data generated through digital systems to measure, compare and evaluate schools (Selwyn & Facer, 2013; Williamson, 2017). The introduction of digital technologies and systems into education is often advertised as increasing transparency – to make learning more visible for students and teachers, to explain previously opaque grading procedures and qualifications to parents and students and to improve communication between schools and the home environment. This paper explores how these claims resonate with how teachers experience the mediatization of their professional environment.

    The proposed article draws on material from a recent study on how visual art educators relate to media and mediatic change within their subject. It suggests that while teachers do see the advantages of school digitalization as increasing the visibility of their subject and, by extension, also their professional status, it also makes possible processes of surveillance and standardization. By exploring how teachers recognize and negotiate the built-in biases of digital technologies, the article wants to contribute with a view on schools as mediatized environments and of teachers not only as media workers but also as agents of change. Theoretically, it draws on critical studies of educational technology, addressing the need not only to acknowledge the sociopolitical and financial interests embedded in educational technology and the relation between these markets and the policy sector (e.g. Selwyn & Facer, 2013; Williamson, 2017) but also to focus more on the everyday encounters that teachers and students have with digital technology (Selwyn, 2011). It also uses theoretical conepts from educational sociology (Ball, 2006) and literature from science and technology studies about the relation between professional practices, infrastructures and visibility (Star & Strauss, 1999; Suchman, 1995).

    As both Star and Strauss (1999) and Suchman (1995) have shown, all representations of work risk leading to a reduction in complexity. From this perspective, the striving to make educational practices visible might come at the cost of specificity and autonomy. This dilemma is summed up by one of the teachers interviewed for this study, saying that “the digital brings the importance of new forms of knowledge to the fore, at the same time as it enables mechanisms of control”. Indeed, much work remains invisible for good reason, including the work of nurses and teachers who “may quietly carry out work reflecting a holistic view of the student or patient, carefully kept out of the range of a more bureaucratic, reductionist set of values” (Star & Strauss, 1999, p. 23). The messy processes of learning, including such elements as play, chaos, failure and confusion, is perhaps best kept at distance from management and parents.

    The teachers in this study accounts for different strategies to keep at least parts of their classroom practices invisible. One of these strategies is to avoid using digital learning management systems and instead focus on interpersonal communication. Another one is to produce convincing manual paperwork in accordance with the perceived demands from an increasingly neoliberal school system as a kind of scene to hide behind. By presenting one thing and doing another, teachers can maintain established work practices and act in accordance with their professional beliefs despite changes in the educational policy landscape.

    These approaches to pedagogical planning and documentation can be defined as what educational sociologist Stephen Ball (2006) calls fabrications, the conscious performance of pedagogical practice. Fabrications is in one sense the opposite to transparency as their aim is not to give a true image of what is going on in the classroom or to help student recognize their own learning, but rather at meeting the constraints of contemporary education. “Truthfulness is not the point – the point is their effectiveness” as Ball (2006, p. 696) puts it. For Ball, the process by which “[w]e articulate ourselves within the representational games of competition, intensification and quality” points to a “struggle over visibility” (p. 693) where teachers on the one hand submit to instrumental models of structuring and monitoring teaching and learning processes, and on the other hand produce convincing representations of these models as a strategy of invisibility.

    The proposed paper discusses how fabrication in used in different ways to manage the demands of accountability and visible learning of the contemporary school system: on the one hand, a strategy double entries, where fabrications are kept at bay from everyday pedagogical practice, and on the other, anoverall dismissal of fabrications based on the fear that they will reshape the idea of education into a reductionist and instrumental model. The latter approach builds on some kind of fidelity to policy and guidelines and relies on the invisibility granted by not entering into systems of monitoring and documentation, whereas the former uses fabrications as a screen behind which other practices can be partly hidden, requiring a distanced and creative view on written rules and standards.

  • 248.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Thinking Together: Online Collaborative Learning Among Swedish Art Teachers2016In: INTED2016 Proceedings: 10th International Technology, Education and Development Conference 7-9 March, 2016 Valencia (Spain), Valencia: International Association for Technology, Education and Development, 2016, p. 6028-6036Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital activities are a natural part of children's and young people's everyday lives and offers opportunities for meaning and learning. Accessible technology has changed the producer and consumer role, and created what Henry Jenkins (2008) call a participation culture. This culture provides possibilities for a kind of collective learning, something that is necessary to master in order to participate in the new media society. In school, this becomes relevant in two ways. Firstly, by empowering all children and young people to participate in digital media culture. This is to overcome the “participation gap” that occurs when only those already interested in digital activities develop and produce content while that majority stays passive (Jenkins 2009, Kalmus et al 2009). Secondly, by using digital platforms in the knowledge and professional development for teachers. The latter has been increasingly used by teachers to create informal networks, forums and archives online to share and develop knowledge (Johnson et al 2014).

    This study aims to understand how art teachers in Sweden understand media as a part of their subject, and how this understanding is brought forward in collegial online communities. The study is a part of an ongoing PhD project that aims to compare this Swedish online collaboration with that between art teachers in Estonia and Finland. The study is conducted as a media ethnography, combining tracings of discussions taking place in digital places (in written and multimodal texts) with interviews conducted with the participating teachers. To understand what online communication tools where used by art teachers and to what purpose, a survey was carried out through a union organizing most Swedish art teachers (Lärarförbundet). The survey was answered by 78 teachers and the results are discussed in this paper, together with material in the form of discussions taking place in online forums, both formal (like the Swedish Department of Education), semiformal (sites designed for teachers) and informal (like Facebook, Twitter or private blogs).

    The results showed that online collaborative learning is very common among Swedish art teachers. They mainly use informal forums and they use it to 1, Discuss specific topics (like suggestions for lessons on a certain theme or recommendations of digital tools), 2. Share own content (like students work or planning) and 3. Engage in meta reflection on the conditions of art education and digital media. In my discussion this is connected to the history and terms for the subject as such. Visual arts education as a school subject in Sweden has undergone a change: from a focus on drawing to a focus on visual culture at large. This narrative is important for the teacher community and has lead to an ongoing discourse on the boundaries and content of the subject. Further, visual art education is a small subject and most art teachers are alone in their subject at their schools. The surveys show a connection between having few or no school colleges in the same subject and the tendency to engage in collegial discussions with other art teachers online.

  • 249.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Towards infrastructure literacy in media education2018In: The Journal of Media Literacy, ISSN 1944-4982, Vol. 65, no 1 & 2, p. 87-91Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper suggests that a broadening of MIL to include what Lisa Parks (2010) call infrastructure literacy - a close understanding of the material and infrastructural conditions of our current media landscape – is necessary in order for citizens to develop the critical skills needed to navigate and participate in the contemporary media society, as well as to shape the world of tomorrow. By exploring digitalization policy and K-12 curricula for Sweden, the paper shows that the field is currently dominated by an understanding of media as content or tools for communication, and of the future as predetermined by technology. It also shows a lack of critical perspectives when it comes to media used within education.

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  • 250.
    Forsler, Ingrid
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ciccone, Michelle
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
    Making visible the invisible: Exploring McLuhan’s figure/ground in digital citizenship education2021In: Explorations in Media Ecology, ISSN 1539-7785, E-ISSN 2048-0717, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 437-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Figure and ground are analytical concepts used to discuss how some elements of a lived situation dominate perception, while others remain in the background. This applies not least to media and research from the medium theoretical tradition as well as later scholarship on media infrastructures, which have been keen to explore the taken for granted or invisible aspects of the media landscape. In media education, however, there is still a tendency to focus on the figure of digital media by treating media technologies as tools or to focus on the critical evaluation of media content. This article draws on McLuhan’s co-authored textbook City as Classroom to suggest a pedagogical turn towards the ground of the internet. Based on concrete examples from middle school digital citizenship education, the article shows how a focus on the ground of digitalization actualizes topics such as environmental concerns, global inequalities and data privacy. These topics are conceptualized and discussed through the environmental/spatial metaphors clouds, exhaust and architecture.

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