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  • 151.
    Werner, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Moving Forward: A Feminist Analysis of Mobile Music Streaming2015In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 197-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of understanding gender, space and mobility as co-constructed in public space has been emphasized by feminist researchers (Massey 2005; Hanson 2010). And within feminist theory materiality, affect and emotions have been de-scribed as central for experienced subjectivity (Ahmed 2012). Music listening while moving through public space has previously been studied as a way of creat-ing a private auditory bubble for the individual (Bull 2000; Cahir & Werner 2013) and in this article feminist theory on emotion (Ahmed 2010) and space (Massey 2005) is employed in order to understand mobile music streaming. More specifi-cally it discusses what can happen when mobile media technology is used to listen to music in public space and it investigates the interconnectedness of bodies, mu-sic, technology and space. The article is based on autoethnographic material of mobile music streaming in public and concludes that a forward movement shaped by happiness is one desired result of mobile music streaming. The positive value of ‘forward’ is critically examined with feminist theory and the failed music lis-tening moments are discussed in terms of emotion and space.

  • 152.
    Werner, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Organizing music, organizing gender: Algorithmic culture and Spotify recommendations2020In: Popular Communication, ISSN 1540-5702, E-ISSN 1540-5710, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 78-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spotify is self-reporting to have 232 million monthly active users in July 2019, including 108 million paying subscribers. Often naturalized by listeners as a mere window into great collections of music, Spotify is an intricate network of music recommendations governed by algorithms, displayed as a visual interface of photos, text, clickable links, and graphics. With the aim to analyze how three Spotify functions, related artists, discover, and browse, organize and represent gender while organizing and representing music Spotify is here investigated through empirical material collected in qualitative online ethnographic studies during 2013–2015. The article problematizes how music is organized in algorithmic culture and uncovers gendering that can ensue as a result of the service’s recommendation algorithms: creating closer circles for music consumption, and organizing music by similarities in genre and gender.

  • 153.
    Werner, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Sexy Shapes: Girls negotiating gender through popular music2013In: Girlhood Studies, ISSN 1938-8209, E-ISSN 1938-8322, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 30-46Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Werner, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Titiyo: Race, gender and genre in Swedish popular music2016In: Made in Sweden: studies in popular music / [ed] Alf Björnberg & Thomas Bossius, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 189-199Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Werner, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Johansson, Sofia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Experts, dads and technology: Gendered talk about online music2016In: International journal of cultural studies, ISSN 1367-8779, E-ISSN 1460-356X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 177-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the internet and digital media technology increasingly central to practices around music, this shift is often seen as contributing to a networked music use characterized by individualism. Drawing on a focus group study with young adults in Stockholm and Moscow, this article argues, however, that digital music use today is shaped by discourses of difference, with gender a significant factor both in constructions of the ideal music and technology user, and in terms of musical influence and guidance. Taking into account contemporary research on new media technology, as well as feminist studies of technology and music, the article questions ideas of a neutral user of new music technologies, showing how the gendering of music and media technology can be seen as simultaneously context-bound and cutting across geographies.

  • 156.
    Werner, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Johansson, Sofia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Genusskapande i digitalt musikbruk2015In: Mediers känsla för kön: feministisk medieforskning / [ed] Anja Hirdman; Madeleine Kleberg, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2015, p. 155-170Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Werner, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköpings universitet.
    Gender jobs: Dilemmas of Gender Studies education and employability in Sweden2018In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 71-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decades a large number of students have taken courses and degrees in Gender Studies around Europe and proceeded to find employment. This article is based on a quantitative and qualitative study carried out in 2012 of Gender Studies students in Sweden, their education and employment. The design of the study was inspired by a large European research project investigating Women’s Studies in Europe and concerned with the motives for doing Gender Studies among Swedish students, as well as who the students were, how they evaluated their Gender Studies education and what work they proceeded to after they left the university. In this article the results are discussed in terms of dilemmas: between Gender Studies’ critique of neoliberalism,employability and the former students’ wishes to be employed, and their evaluation of their studies and employment. The Swedish study is also compared with previous research in order to understand general and particular traits in Swedish Gender Studies education and employment. Analysis points to interesting contradictions within Gender Studies in relation to the labor market, student groups and employability.

  • 158.
    Werner, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Genusvetenskap, politik och samhällsengagemang2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 159.
    Werner, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköpings universitet.
    Genusvetenskaplig didaktik och högskolepedagogik2016In: Pedagogik för högskolelärare / [ed] Thomas Hansson, Mörklinta: Gidlunds förlag, 2016, p. 241-261Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 160.
    Werner, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Nordström, Marika
    Umeå universitet.
    Starka kvinnor?: Förebilder och tjejer i musikproduktion och musikkonsumtion2013In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 2-3, p. 111-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the concept of ”strong women” in popular music and interrogates the idea of role models. Ideas of ”strong women” are analysed in the context of a contemporary Western society characterised by neo-liberalism and post-feminism. Advocacy of role models is regarded as an example of a political strategy that places the responsibility for social change on the individual. This is done from a feminist cultural theoretical perspective where discourse is seen as having an impact on material subject positions and where post-feminist culture is seen as part of contemporary discourse about Western women. The issue is discussed through the analysis of two empirical materials consisting of interviews; one about teenage girls’ music use and gender in everyday life and the other about female rockmusicians, mainly in their early twenties, participating in feminist music associations. In both studies the participants testify to a positive influence from female singers and musicians as role models, where these artists and musicians in different ways provide strength to the individual girl/woman. The authors regard this mediatised discourse as problematic but it is juxtaposed against the individual narratives where role models are regarded as very important. Questions concerning authenticity, politics and identification are vital themes in our analysis of these narratives. Popular music is, in some respects, described as an arena dominated by white men. Furthermore the research and public discussion about “strong women” and role models take part in reproducing the hierarchies of popular music genres. These hierarchies are understood by the authors as representing asymmetrical power relations of gender, ethnicity/race and class.

  • 161.
    Zemojtel-Piotrowska, Magdalena A.
    et al.
    University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland.
    Piotrowski, Jaroslaw P.
    University of Social Sciences & Humanities, Poznan Fac, Poznan, Poland.
    Cieciuch, Jan
    Wyszynski University, Warsaw, Poland / University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Calogero, Rachel M.
    University of Kent, Kent, OH USA.
    Van Hiel, Alain
    University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Argentero, Piergiorgio
    University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.
    Baltatescu, Sergiu
    Oradea University, Oradea, Romania.
    Baran, Tomasz
    Warsaw University, Warsaw, Poland.
    Bardhwaj, Gopa
    New Delhi University, New Delhi, India.
    Bukowski, Marcin
    Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Chargazia, Melania
    Tbilisi University, Tbilisi, Rep of Georgia.
    Clinton, Amanda
    University Puerto Rico, Puerto Real, Spain.
    Halik, Murnizam H. J.
    University Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia.
    Ilisko, Dzintra
    Daugavpils University, Daugavpils, Latvia.
    Khachatryan, Narine
    Yerevan State University, Yerevan, Armenia.
    Klicperova-Baker, Martina
    Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Kostal, Jaroslav
    Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Kovacs, Monika
    Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Letovancova, Eva
    Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Liik, Kadi
    Tallinn University, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Marganski, Alison
    Virginia Wesleyan Coll, Norfolk, VA USA..
    Michalowski, Jaroslaw
    Warsaw University, Warsaw, Poland / Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Nord, Iwo
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Paspalanova, Elena
    New Bulgarian University, Ctr Cognit Sci, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    de Leon, Pablo Perez
    Universidad Catolica del Uruguay, Montevideo, Uruguay.
    Techera, Jose
    Universidad Catolica del Uruguay, Montevideo, Uruguay.
    Rojas, Mariano
    FLACSO Mexico, Mexico City, DF, Mexico / UPAEP, Puebla, Mexico..
    Rozycka, Joanna
    University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland.
    Sawicka, Aleksandra
    University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland.
    Seibt, Beate
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Semkiv, Iryna
    Lvov University, Lvov, Ukraine.
    Tiliouine, Habib
    Oran University, Oran, Algeria.
    Truong, Ha Khanh
    Vietnam National University Hochiminh City, Vietnam.
    van den Bos, Kees
    University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Wills-Herrera, Eduardo
    Univ Lo Andes, Bogota, Colombia.
    Measurement of Psychological Entitlement in 28 Countries2017In: European Journal of Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1015-5759, E-ISSN 2151-2426, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 207-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the cross-cultural validation of the Entitlement Attitudes Questionnaire, a tool designed to measure three facets of psychological entitlement: active, passive, and revenge entitlement. Active entitlement was defined as the tendency to protect individual rights based on self-worthiness. Passive entitlement was defined as the belief in obligations to and expectations toward other people and institutions for the fulfillment of the individual's needs. Revenge entitlement was defined as the tendency to protect one's individual rights when violated by others and the tendency to reciprocate insults. The 15-item EAQ was validated in a series of three studies: the first one on a general Polish sample (N = 1,900), the second one on a sample of Polish students (N = 199), and the third one on student samples from 28 countries (N = 5,979). A three-factor solution was confirmed across all samples. Examination of measurement equivalence indicated partial metric invariance of EAQ for all national samples. Discriminant and convergent validity of the EAQ was also confirmed.

1234 151 - 161 of 161
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  • de-DE
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