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  • 151.
    Bartonek, Anders
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Philosophy.
    Labour Against Capitalism? Hegel’s Concept of Labour in Between Civil Society and the State2014In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 113-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concepts and phenomena of civil society, political economy and labour are ambivalent matters in Hegel’s political philosophy. They simultaneously contain productive and destructive potential in the realization of the political community. This article investigates Hegel’s concept of labour against the backdrop of his theory of civil society in order to bring forth the ambiguous role of labour in relation to the ’capitalism’ of civil society. According to Hegel, labour is both economically productive and the activity by which the society and its members can transcend the mere capitalistic dimensions of society. Labour can therefore simultaneously be understood as capitalistic and non-capitalistic in Hegel’s political philosophy. The cultivating dimensions of labour in Hegel’s theory offer a counterpart to the mere capitalistic forms of labour. Labour can therefore be used as a promising platform for the discussion of the relation between economy and culture and for the revitalization of capitalism critique.

  • 152.
    Bartonek, Anders
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Philosophy.
    Schellings politiska filosofi, Gud och individens frihet2014In: Tysk idealism / [ed] Anders Burman, Rebecka Lettevall, Stockholm: Axl Books, 2014, p. 195-216Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 153.
    Bartonek, Anders
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Philosophy.
    Theodor W. Adorno: With Hegel Against Capitalism2018In: Hegelian Marxism: The Uses of Hegel’s Philosophy in Marxist Theory from Georg Lukács to Slavoj Žižek / [ed] Anders Burman & Anders Baronek, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2018, p. 127-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    Theodor W. Adorno
  • 154.
    Bartonek, Anders
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Philosophy.
    Tänk om alla skulle göra så, Immanuel?2018In: Filosofisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0348-7482, no 4, p. 28-33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Bartonek, Anders
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Philosophy.
    Vad har reggae gemensamt med Adorno?2017In: Modern Filosofi, ISSN 2002-0473, no 2, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 156.
    Bartonek, Anders
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Philosophy.
    Burman, AndersSödertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History of Ideas.
    Hegelian Marxism: The Uses of Hegel’s Philosophy in Marxist Theory from Georg Lukács to Slavoj Žižek2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since Georg Lukács and Karl Korsch in the 1920s, Hegelian Marxism has played a prominent role as a radical intellectual tradition in modern political theory. This anthology investigates how these Hegelian Marxists, in different historical, political and intellectual contexts during the last century, have employed Hegel’s philosophy with the aim of developing and renewing Marxist theory.

    Besides Lukács and Korsch the volume includes articles dealing with the thoughts of Herbert Marcuse, Theodor W. Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Evald Ilyenkov, Lucio Colletti and Slavoj Žižek. The overall purpose is to investigate if, and the degree to which, these thinkers could be interpreted as Hegelian Marxists, and how they use the Hegelian philosophy to better understand their own current society as well as situate themselves in relation to orthodox forms of Marxism. Taken together, the articles can hopefully contribute to an intensification of discussions about the critical and self-criticalphilosophy of Marxism today.

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    Hegelian Marxism: The Uses of Hegel’s Philosophy in Marxist Theory from Georg Lukács to Slavoj Žižek
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  • 157.
    Basinska, Anna Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    Anmälningspliktens skuggsida: en essä om att hantera orosanmälningar på förskolan i praktiken2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    My essay starts by describing a case of a "declaration of concern" regarding a child that I experienced in my work at a preschool. The duty to make a notification was based on the child's story and led to a meeting at a crisis center. The meeting involved the presence of police, psychologists and prosecutors, without parental knowledge. I chose the essay form for this subject because this writing form offers a reflective approach which is suitable for such a sensitive topic. By describing the negative aspects associated with this duty of notification I want to try to bring some understanding of the very emotional issues associated with a notification. I will highlight what the notification requirement is about and examine what - my obligations are as a teacher in making a declaration of concern leading to a notification to the relevant local authorities and government agencies. I will reflect on the child's vulnerable position as well as the difficult position of parents and notifying teachers.

    The pervading idea in the essay is that the obligation to report your concern may seem like a hard law but a law that has to be followed without reservation. The teacher´s own opinion or judgment is irrelevant in a declaration of concern and subsequent notification. Registration of the concern is done for the child's sake and not the sake of the family.

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  • 158.
    Bawil, Parzin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Teacher Education.
    Spångberg, Emily
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Teacher Education.
    Friskolor med muslimsk profil: En studie om fyra rektorers tankar kring arbetet på en friskola med muslimsk profil2013Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Independent schools are a central issue in the school world, the perception of independent schools varies and many people express opinions about them in the media. An independent school is according to the National Agency a school that has a different principal than the county or municipality. Independent schools may not charge fees but their revenue comes from municipal grants from municipalities (Berglund 2007, p. 10). An independent school can be driven by an association, foundation or company and to run an independent school requires a permit from the Education Department.

    The purpose of this paper is to see how four principals at independent schools with a Muslim profile are working to strengthen their students’ Muslim identity in relation to the society they live in and how schools work with value issues. We also had the intention of studying the schools environment. To help us, we used the following questions: How does the school principal integrate different value issues? What are the principals’ thoughts on their schools work with their students before meeting with the community? What are the principals thoughts on the schools work to enhance their students’ Muslim identity? What is the purpose of the school profile? What is the environment like in and around the school? We have used interviews and observations as a method to find out how principals producing work at an independent school with a Muslim profile, and how they work with students’ identity formation. In this qualitative study, we have interviews with two principals and two assistant principals and observations from three of the schools. Based on our research, we have concluded that there is little to distinguish an independent school with a Muslim profile from a public school. Both are part of the Swedish school system, so they must follow the national curriculum, the time plan, and the Education Act.

    According to the principals that we interviewed, what distinguishes an independent school with a Muslim profile from a public school is that they serve halal food, girls and boys have separate PE lessons, they have one lesson a week for the school's profile subject (Islam or Arabic), schools have a prayer room that students can access throughout the school day and the school is closed during the Muslim feasts.

    According to the principals that we interviewed, the main reason for choosing an independent school with a Muslim profile should be because of the work in the schools that is based on building up students’ Muslim identity. They do this for the students meeting with the society they live in, if the schools have built up a solid cultural foundation of the students, the transition to the community much easier. In our social world is the view of knowledge, learning and parenting culture bound. Lahdenperä writes about "learning -through-culture" and with this she means that children learn through their own culture, that shapes them as individuals and through it they learn what is worth to know (Lahdenperä 2003). Our observations revealed various differences between the schools’; the most obvious difference was the religious texts and symbols that were on Sham School. Our observations also showed different connections between the schools’; one was that they were in abandoned buildings, mostly in industrial areas. Another clear connection between the schools was that all had prayer rooms and these floors were covered with a large red carpet. The prayer rooms looked exactly like they do in a mosque.

    The conclusion of our study is that despite the schools’ public profile, independent schools with Muslim profile, they educate their students in different ways and their priorities are also different. Thus, one can´t assume that all independent schools with Muslim profile works the same way. Just as in public schools, it is about what the staff at the schools believe that the schools purpose and also their efforts to achieve the schools different goals.

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  • 159.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    A Case Study of a Distance Degree Program in Vietnam: Examples from a Learner-Centered Approach to Distance Education2013In: Cases on Professional Distance Education Degree Programs and Practices: Successes, Challenges, and Issues / [ed] Sullivan, Kirk; Peter E. Czigler; Jenny M. Sullivan Hellgren, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2013, p. 233-257Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The English Department at Högskolan Dalarna, Sweden, participates in a distance-learning program with the Faculty of Education at Vietnam National University. Students who enroll in this program are teachers of English at secondary or tertiary institutions, and will study half time for two years to complete a Master’s degree in English Linguistics. The distance program, adapted specifically to accommodate the Vietnamese students in terms of cultural differences as well as inexperience with distance methodology, is characterized by three design features: testing, technical training, and fostering a community of learners. The design of the courses also reflects a learner-centered approach that addresses common problem areas in distance education by promoting interactivity. Central to the overall program is the maintenance of different channels of communication, reflecting an effort to support the students academically and socially, both as individuals and members of a learning community. In this way, the effects of physical and cultural distances are minimized.

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    fulltext
  • 160.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Channel surfing: Tuning into the sounds of English2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 202-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 161.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Comic strips2014In: Encyclopedia of Humor Studies / [ed] Salvatore Attardo, Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2014, 1, p. 155-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    Conversations in comic strip Swedish:: The case for applying conversation analysis to comic strip data2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 163.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    English swear words as Swedish humor2015In: Abstracts: 14th International Pragmatics Conference : ANTWERP, BELGIUM, 26-31 July 2015, International Pragmatics Association , 2015, p. 91-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 164.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    English-language swearing as humor in Swedish comic strips2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 121, p. 175-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I investigate the Swedish, non-native use of English swear words in Swedish-language comic strips. I first consider the established relationships between both swearing and humor, and comics and humor. I propose that swear word usage and the comic strip framework contribute to a mutual feedback loop, whereby the comic strip derives its humor from the use of English swear words, while at the same time the comic strip context, by invoking a play frame, primes the swear word usage for humorous interpretation. Modeling Siegel (1995), I then consider how a code-switch to English serves as a framing device or contextualization cue for humor in Swedish-language contexts. The analysis of a selection of Swedish comic strips draws from the Encryption Theory of Humor (Flamson and Barrett, 2008), and suggests that humor created via the Swedish practice of swearing in English is a function of shared background knowledge that capitalizes on the fundamental incongruity of two discourse systems operating under different norms of appropriateness.

  • 165.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    FUCK CANCER, Fucking Åmål, Aldrig fucka upp: The standardisation of fuck in Swedish media2017In: Advances in Swearing Research: New languages and new contexts / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten and Karyn Stapleton, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 65-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    I'm learneding!: First language acquisition in The Simpsons2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 257-281Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Introduction: The linguist's view of Television2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Linguistics: Comics conversations as data in Swedish comic strips2019In: More critical approaches to comics: Theories and methods / [ed] Matthew Smith, Randy Duncan and Matthew Brown, London: Routledge, 2019, p. 145-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 169.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    På svenska svär vi gärna på engelska2018In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 1, p. 26-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 170.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Snuff said!: Conflicting employee and corporate interests in the pursuit of a tobacco client.2015In: Digital Business Discourse / [ed] Erika Darics, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 142-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents an analysis of intranet postings generated within a Swedish web consultancy during its pursuit of a tobacco company as client. Drawing from theories of crisis management, Beers Fägersten focuses on the emergent conflict and debate between employees who are in favor of having a tobacco company as a client, and those who are against it. The intranet thread reflects the use of discursive strategies typical of conflict management, but also strategies specific to the digital environment. A recurring theme in the debate is the navigation, negotiation and distinction of personal vs. corporate identities and interests.

  • 171.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Spritsnack: Samspelet mellan alkohol och samtal i den tecknade serien Rocky.2017In: Spiritus, ISSN 1404-465X, Vol. Webbpublikation, p. 15 s.-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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    Spritsnack
  • 172.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    The Oxford Handbook of Taboo Words and Language, Keith Allen (Ed.), Oxford University, Press, Oxford (2018), 464 pp., ISBN: 9780198808190, GBP 110,002020In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 155, p. 358-361Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 173.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    The role of swearing in creating an online persona: The case of YouTuber PewDiePie2017In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 18, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an investigation of the use of English-language swear words by Swedish, non-native speaker PewDiePie in the context of self-recorded, Let’s Play horror videos uploaded to the video-sharing website, YouTube. Situating PewDiePie within the greater media landscape to establish both his success and notoriety, this article addresses the local interpretation of the globalization of English and the use of English swear words in Swedish media. The practice of swearing in the gaming context is discussed, and swearing instances in a selection of three of PewDiePie’s horror game videos are analyzed. The article puts forth the argument that the use of English swear words contributes to the performance of PewDiePie as a specific, online persona, one that is both in line with the context of video gaming and conducive to a para-social relationship, allowing PewDiePie to achieve the overall goals of communicating with his viewers as peers and reducing the social distance between them. The article concludes that PewDiePie’s practice of social swearing not only simulates casual conversation between friends, but actively reduces social distance, creates the illusion of intimacy, and contributes to his unprecedented success on YouTube.

  • 174.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    The use of English swear words in Swedish media2014In: Swearing in the Nordic Countries / [ed] Marianne Rathje, Copenhagen: Dansk Sprognævn , 2014, 1, p. 63-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I present, analyze and consider the implications of the use of English swear words in Swedish media. First, I investigate the relationship between language and the media, focusing on the role of standard language forms in media discourse. I continue by exploring, within an Anglophone context, the use of swear words in the media. Next I present a brief survey of the use of English in Swedish. Finally, I present examples of the use of English-language swear words in Swedish media, showing how English-language swear words are appropriated by speakers of Swedish and suggesting that the use of English swear words in the media ratifies this appropriation, in turn establishing this practice as standard. I discuss the implications of this development in terms of the use of English swear words within a non-native speaker speech community, how usage may be in conflict with English native-speaker norms, and how the use of English swear words might come to characterize modern Swedish as well as a Swedish variety of English.

  • 175.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Watching TV with a Linguist2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 176.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    What's so funny about swearing in English?: Swearing and language choice in Swedish comics.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    What's the deal with morphemes?: Doing morphology with Seinfeld2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 181-201Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 178.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Fiorentini, Ilaria
    Insubria University, Italy.
    Lost and language found2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 282-306Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 179.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Stapleton, KarynUlster University.
    Advances in swearing research: New languages and new contexts2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Any behavior that arouses, as swearing does, controversy, disagreement, disdain, shock, and indignation as often as it imbues passion, sincerity, intimacy, solidarity, and jocularity should be an obvious target of in-depth scholarship. Rigorous, scholarly investigation of the practice of swearing acknowledges its social and cultural significance, and allows us to discover and better understand the historical, psychological, sociological, and linguistic aspects (among others) of swearwords and swearword usage. The present volume brings together a range of themes and issues central to the existing knowledge of swearing and considers these in two key ‘new’ arenas, that is, in languages other than English, and/or in contexts and media other than spoken interaction. Many of the chapters analysed are based on large and robust collections of data, such as corpora or questionnaire responses, which allow for patterns of swearing to emerge. In other chapters, personally observed instances of swearing comprise the focus, allowing for a close analysis of the relationship between sociolinguistic context and pragmatic function. In each chapter, the cultural aspects of swearing are considered, ultimately affirming the importance of the study of swearing, and further establishing the legitimacy of swearing as a target of research.

  • 180.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Stapleton, Karyn
    Ulster University.
    Introduction: Swearing research as variations on a theme2017In: Advances in Swearing Research: New languages and new contexts / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten and Karyn Stapleton, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 181.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Sveen, Hanna Andersdotter
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    SaMANtha: Language and gender in Sex and the City2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 85-113Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 182.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Boreus, Kristina
    Uppsala University.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University.
    Yazdanpanah, Soheyla
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Speaking up, leaving or keeping silent: racialized employees in the Swedish elderly care sector2017In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 954-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When encountering problems and dissatisfaction in the workplace, employees may choose between three strategies: voice; exit; or silence. Using survey data and interview material from a study of employees in an elderly care organization in Sweden, this article investigates the workers' perceptions of the eligibility and prospects of these strategies and which individual characteristics and situational factors might affect them. The focus is on racialized workers (operationalized through their region of birth) who, according to earlier studies, are less likely than other employees to choose voice behaviour. Contrary to some earlier studies, the results here attribute such a propensity to the importance of power differences across racial hierarchies' rather than to differences in cultural values. Individuals in this (racialized) category have a lower occupational status, earn less and experience less favourable relationships with their managers.

  • 183.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Boreus, Kristina
    Uppsala University.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University.
    Yazdanpanah, Soheyla
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Why are care workers from the global south disadvantaged?: Inequality and discrimination in Swedish elderly care work2020In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 43, no 16, p. 155-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using quantitative and qualitative methods, this study investigates inequalities in occupational status and wages between native-born and foreign-born employees in elderly care institutions in Sweden. It finds that employees from Africa, Asia and Latin America - the "Global South" - are disadvantaged in both respects. Combinatory explanations of the inequalities are needed. The shorter work experience of foreign-born workers in the care sector plus the lesser value given to educational credentials obtained outside Sweden are among the factors related to human capital theory. Access to less-valuable resources in the workplace social networks of foreign-born employees is related to social capital theory. The processes that result in exclusion from powerful social networks, in turn, are found to be affected by discrimination in the workplace.

  • 184.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Stockholms universitet.
    Boréus, Kristina
    Uppsala universitet.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköpings universitet.
    Yazdanpanah, Soheyla
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Att verka för jämlika arbetsplatser: En studie av jämlikhet och ojämlikhet mellan anställda i äldrevården2017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Populärvetenskaplig rapport från ett projekt om ojämlikhet mellan kvinnliga och manliga anställda och mellan anställda från olika delar av världen i svensk äldrevård samt förslag till förbättrad jämlikhet på arbetsplatserna.

  • 185.
    Bellander, T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Landqvist, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Becoming the expert constructing health knowledge in epistemic communities online2020In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 507-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a discourse analytic framework, the article analyses health blogs and patient’s forum discussions in which parents to children with congenital heart defects recontextualize medical professional knowledge and share their own experiences. The study show how the two types of online media may serve as a means for parents to attain expert status in their own case by sharing lay knowledge expressed as an amalgamation of the two key perspectives–professional and experienced–as an indivisible unit. Monological discourses, such as narrating, in blogs and more direct and immediate responses in forum discussions are noted as examples of differences in how medical facts are explained and negotiated, how advice is provided and how patient expertise is created. The study also show how blogs and especially forum discussions are used to problematize the validity of actions and opinions of medical staff. The role of developing patient expertise in epistemic communities online may therefore come with a risk of spreading misrepresentation of medical cases. 

  • 186.
    Bellander, Theres
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Karlsson, Anna-Malin
    Uppsala universitet.
    Nikolaidou, Zoe
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Blogging as a Health Literacy Practice: Identity construction and knowledge-building in the writing of parents of children with heart defect2018In: Explorations in Ethnography, Language and Communication: Capturing linguistic and cultural diversities / [ed] Stina Hållsten & Zoe Nikolaidou, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2018, p. 127-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Blogging as a Health Literacy Practice
  • 187.
    Bellander, Theres
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Nikolaidou, Zoe
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Building health knowledge online: Parents’ online information searching on congenital heart defects2017In: Literacy and Numeracy Studies: An international journal in the education and training of adults, ISSN 1441-0559, E-ISSN 1839-2903, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 4-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examines online searching as a digital health literacy practice and focuses on parents of children with congenital heart defects. Over the period of four years, we have conducted interviews with couples at different stages of pregnancy or parenthood and have encouraged them to reflect on their literacy practices when receiving a heart defect diagnosis, during the remaining time of their pregnancy and when living with a child with a heart defect. We have also read and analysed health blogs written by parents and focused on extracts where literacy events are described. Searching for information and support online is one of the most frequent practices amongst the participants in the study. The aim of this paper is therefore to highlight the complexity of looking for information online in order to take health decisions and provide care to a child with congenital illness. Based on what parents say they do when searching online, we focus on three main paths to knowledge: looking for medical facts, looking for other parents’ experiences and looking for practical information. We discuss digital health literacy practices as complex activities that often involve parents in the diagnosis and in the child’s medical care to such an extent that parents build up knowledge and become experts, not only in finding information and support but in talking and writing about their child’s illness. We also problematise the notion of trustworthy health information and show how facts and opinions often go hand in hand in platforms where health issues are discussed. Finally, we show some of the affordances and restrictions inherent in using the internet as a source for meaning making and learning about children’s health. The results reinforce our understanding of the socially framed nature of health literacy and make us focus on the digital as an additional important aspect in the practice of health literacy.

  • 188.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Avatar as second suit: Power and participation in virtual work2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 189.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Avatar as Second Suit: Power and Participation in Virtual Work2019In: Games and Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media, ISSN 1555-4120, E-ISSN 1555-4139, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 560-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an analysis of the experiences of user–avatar relations and interaction of people who work in a virtual world. Earlier research often claims that relationships between users and their avatars are, by nature, strong and intense. By analyzing individuals who conducted paid labor in a number of public institutions in a virtual world, this article argues that the frame of work heavily influenced the professional users’ experiences of using an avatar. The user–avatar relationship was mainly related to how and why the user entered the virtual world, their position in their off-line and online workplaces and, as a result, related to aspects of power and control over the framing of the online arena. Because of these factors, many of the professional users regarded their avatar more as a second suit than, as has often been argued, a second self.

  • 190.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Digital distinctions: Mechanisms of difference in digital media use2015In: MedieKultur: Journal of Media and Communication Research, ISSN 0900-9671, E-ISSN 1901-9726, Vol. 31, no 58, p. 30-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to understand the distinctive mechanisms of digital media use, seen in relation to cultural practices at large. The empirical material is a survey study of university students at the Business Administration, Media and Communication Stud-ies, Political Science and Philosophy departments at Södertörn University, Sweden. The empirical analysis deals with the students’ digital media use and preferences, and how these are related to their broader cultural practices and preferences. Spe-cific attention is paid to the webpages the students mention in the survey, and how these are distributed among the groups. By showing detailed information on these areas, the mechanisms of difference of digital media use are revealed.

  • 191.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ethics and morality beyond the Actor-Network: Doing the right thing in an algorithmic culture2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing governance and authority of algorithms and the rapid emergence of the ‘Internet of Things’, has intensified attention to the relationship between humans and machines, and to the ethics of everyday life with technologies. This raises a lot of questions: How should we live with technologies? Can humans make decisions? The question on the authority of humans is clearly debatable. In this paper I discuss the underlying premises for the ethical standpoint of Actor Network Theory (ANT) and explore other existing alternatives. I begin by looking into the basic premises of ANT, and the assumptions of ‘the human’ and of ethics it comprises. I then explore the notion of a ‘disclosive’ ethics and continue by penetrating the relation between agency and ethics in ANT. Following from this I discuss various different approaches to ethics, and how we can still keep a human notion of ethics in an algorithmic culture.

  • 192.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ethics Exists in Communication: Human‐machine ethics beyond the Actor‐Network2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing governance of algorithms and the rapid emergence of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the ‘Internet of Things’, has intensified discussions about the relationship between humans and machines, and the ethics of everyday life with technologies. It raises questions such as: How should we live with technologies? Can humans still make decisions? The earlier taken for granted authority of humans is clearly debatable, and sometimes also dismissed, particularly within Actor Network Theory (ANT). In this paper, I look into the basic premises of the ethics of ANT, explore suggested ethical perspectives within ANT such as ‘disclosive’ ethics, and continue by penetrating the relation between agency and ethics, as well as between morality and ethics in ANT. ANT is further discussed as on the one hand a sociological perspective and on the other hand an ethical approach. Based on this analysis I propose the anthropological perspective of an ‘ethics of the ordinary’ as a possible way to learn from the basic premises of ANT while maintaining a human notion of ethics in a technology‐conflated culture.

  • 193.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Faraway, So Close!: Proximity and distance in ethnography online2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Faraway, So Close!: Proximity and Distance in Ethnography Online2018In: Contemporary Approaches to Ethnographic Research: Volume 3: Digital Ethnography: Researching Online Worlds / [ed] Kahryn Hughes, Jerry Coulton, John Goodwin, and Jason Hughes, New Delhi: Sage Publications, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Faraway, so close!: Proximity and distance in ethnography online2014In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 862-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues for a revised importance of distance, besides the much emphasized closeness, in the debate on and use of ethnographic methods in online environments. When returning to the founding fathers of ethnographic methods, distance is often put forward as a core aspect of ethnographic methods, something widely forgotten, or even rejected, in the current debate in the field. Space has been restructured by digital media technologies, and the spatial and temporal proximity of digital  media cultures present new challenges for research methodologies. Based on the author’s own experiences of ethnographic fieldwork in digital cultures, and with Henri Lefebvre’s theory of everyday life as a rhythm as vantage point, it is here argued that  distance, dialectically interlinked with closeness and proximity, should be given further attention in current research and debate on ethnographic methods used online.

  • 196.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Janice Radway: Reading the Romance (1984)2020In: Medievetenskapens idétraditioner / [ed] Stina Bengtsson; Staffan Ericson; Fredrik Stiernstedt, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2020, p. 305-318Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 197.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Janne Seppänen & Esa Väliverronen: Mediesamhället2013In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, no 1-2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 198.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Sensorial Organization as an Ethics of Space: Digital Media in Everyday Life2018In: Media and Communication, E-ISSN 2183-2439, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 199.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The presentation of self in a virtual world: Working in Second Life2016In: Virtual Workers and the Global Labour Market / [ed] Juliet Webster and Keith Randle, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 1, p. 219-237Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 200.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The producer as vendor: Producing public space in a virtual world2013In: Producing the internet: Critical perspectives of social media / [ed] Tobias Olsson, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2013, p. 165-184Chapter in book (Other academic)
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