sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12345 151 - 200 of 203
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Increasing Enclaves of Poverty and Wealth in the City of Gdansk: The Impact from Urban Policy and Ownership Regulation?2009In: Poverty, Urbanity and Social Policy: Central and Eastern Europe Compared / [ed] Jolanta Aidukaite, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2009, p. 131-145Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this chapter is to examine the reasons behind the increasing residential disparities in the city of Gdansk. Namely, I will look how the changes in urban policy, urban planning and ownership regulations have affected the development of the old and new residential areas in the city. Processes of decline and the emergence of gated communities are of main interest for illustrating urban development and specific examples of residential areas of Gdansk have been used to demonstrate the important role of urban policy and urban planning together with ownership conditions on the development in the city since the fall of communism. I argue that the lack of an explicit urban policy, including urban planning, has created enclaves of wealth and poverty in the city. Furthermore property rights’ regulations are complicated and unclear and hinder improvements of old and historical residential areas and a more integrated development of housing investments in the city.

  • 152.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The emergence of enclaves of wealth and poverty: A sociological study of residential differentiation in post-communist Poland2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the fall of communism, some crucial political, economic and social changes have been taking place in the former communist societies. The objective of the thesis is to examine the processes of residential differentiation taking place in the urban landscape of the Polish city of Gdańsk after the introduction of the capitalist system. The focus is on different forms of residential differentiation and the social, economic and historical factors behind these forms. The empirical material that forms the basis of the thesis consists of interviews, newspaper articles, a questionnaire, official (national and local) reports and documents. Study I examines the way in which different social, economic, historical and physical conditions coincide in the formation of space and the processes of decline in the period of transformation in Poland. The focus lies on a specific residential area in the center of Gdańsk and the lack of improvements in this particular area, which would stop its successive decline. Study II explains the emergence of gated communities in the post-communist urban context and discusses the reasons for their increasing numbers and popularity. The main argument is that the popularity of gated communities is tightly intertwined with the communist past, emerging in reaction to the housing conditions that prevailed under communism. Study III investigates how social class markers are constructed in the discourse on gated communities in post-socialist Poland. The “new” capitalistic system, with its inherent social divisions, is described in the discourse as creating demands for “new” forms of housing, where gates function as separators, protectors and class identifiers. Study IV concentrates on the support for the formation of gated communities in the legal and regulatory framework in Poland since 1989. The paper asserts that the outcome of liberal politics and legal regulation in the country is the neglect of spatial planning and imprecise urban policies.

  • 153.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    The emergence of gated communities in post-communist urban context: and the reasons for their increasing popularity2010In: Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, ISSN 1566-4910, E-ISSN 1573-7772, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 295-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers the emergence of gated communities in the post-communist urban context and discusses the reasons for their increasing numbers and popularity. Narrowing in on a Polish city, the description focuses on the forms that gated communities take and on who the residents are, as well as their motives for moving into gated housing. Other explanations for the emergence of gated communities are reviewed. Interviews with residents of gated communities, a questionnaire, and previous studies on the topic form the basis of the material used in the study. It is argued that the motives for moving to gated communities are tightly intertwined with the communist past. While Polish gated communities are obviously an effect of the spatial planning and the housing market at the national and local level, they are also emerging in reaction to the housing conditions prevailing under communism.

  • 154.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The rise of gated neighborhoods in Poland: legal and regulatory frameworkManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the support for the formation of gated communities in the legal and regulatory framework in Poland established since the fall of Communism in 1989. The focus is on how government policy with regard to spatial planning and housing, together with the law on property and ownership, affects the emergence and development of gated forms of housing in the country. The article argues that the outcome of liberal politics and legal regulation in the country is the result of a disregard for spatial planning and imprecise urban policies. Existing spatial plans are of a consultative nature and bear no regulatory capacity at the same time that spatial planning in the country is strongly in favor of landowners and new construction. In light of the present urban disarray, gated housing is an indirect result of neglected urban politics combined with loopholes in the regulations and pro-construction policies, which create a favorable environment for housing developers.

  • 155. Rafiqui, Pernilla S.
    et al.
    Gentile, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Vientiane2009In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 38-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vientiane, the capital of the Lao People's Democratic Republic, is a small city that has experienced various rounds of socio-economic experimentation during the past few decades: currently, it is set in a capitalist economic context under the rule of a communist regime. With increasing connectivity to regional and global networks, the city has embarked on a far-reaching path of urban transformation. This city profile describes the historical influences affecting the spatial structure of Vientiane, the urban spatial structures and the land use patterns that have unfolded as a result of the economic liberalization that has been taking place since the late 1980s, as well as some salient aspects of the urban management process with respect to planning procedures.

  • 156.
    Roberts, Bayard
    et al.
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Gilmore, Anna
    University of Bath, Bath, UK.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK / University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Rotman, David
    Belarussian State University, Minsk, Belarus.
    Prohoda, Vladimir
    Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia.
    Haerpfer, Christian
    Aberdeen University, Aberdeen, Scotland.
    McKee, Martin
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Changes in Smoking Prevalence in 8 Countries of the Former Soviet Union Between 2001 and 20102012In: American Journal of Public Health, ISSN 0090-0036, E-ISSN 1541-0048, Vol. 102, no 7, p. 1320-1328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. We sought to present new data on smoking prevalence in 8 countries, analyze prevalence changes between 2001 and 2010, and examine trend variance by age, location, education level, and household economic status. Methods. We conducted cross-sectional household surveys in 2010 in Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, and Ukraine. We compared smoking prevalence with a related 2001 study for the different countries and population subgroups, and also calculated the adjusted prevalence rate ratios of smoking. Results. All-age 2010 smoking prevalence among men ranged from 39% (Moldova) to 59% (Armenia), and among women from 2% (Armenia) to 16% (Russia). There was a significantly lower smoking prevalence among men in 2010 compared with 2001 in Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Russia, but not for women in any country. For all countries combined, there was a significantly lower smoking prevalence in 2010 than in 2001 for men aged 18 to 39 years and men with a good or average economic situation. Conclusions. Smoking prevalence appears to have stabilized and may be declining in younger groups, but remains extremely high among men, especially those in lower socioeconomic groups. (Am J Public Health. 2012;102:1320-1328. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2011.300547)

  • 157. Roberts, Bayard
    et al.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Balabanova, Dina
    Haerpfer, Christian
    McKee, Martin
    The persistence of irregular treatment of hypertension in the former Soviet Union2012In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 66, no 11, p. 1079-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Hypertension is one of the leading causes of avoidable mortality in the former Soviet Union (fSU). In previous work, the authors described patterns of irregular hypertension treatment in eight countries of the fSU in 2001. This paper presents new data on changes in the use of hypertension treatment in the same countries. Methods Using household survey data from 18 420 (2001) and 17 914 (2010) respondents from Armenia, Azerbaijan (2010 only), Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine, the authors describe changes in rates of irregular treatment use (less than daily) between 2001 and 2010. Multivariate logistic regression was also used to analyse the characteristics associated with irregular treatment. Results Irregular treatment was extremely high at 74% in 2001 and only fell to 68% in 2010 (all countries combined). Irregular treatment remained particularly high in 2010 in Armenia (79%), Kazakhstan (73%) and Moldova (73%). Recurring characteristics associated with irregular treatment included gender (men), younger age, higher fitness levels, and consuming alcohol and tobacco. Conclusions Irregular hypertension treatment continues to be a major problem in the countries of the fSU and requires an urgent response.

  • 158. Roberts, Bayard
    et al.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Balabanova, Dina
    McKee, Martin
    Irregular treatment of hypertension in the former Soviet Union2012In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 66, no 6, p. 482-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The USSR failed to establish a modern pharmaceutical industry and lacked the capacity for reliable distribution of drugs. Patients were required to pay for outpatient drugs and the successor states have inherited this legacy, so that those requiring long-term treatment face considerable barriers in receiving it. It was hypothesised that citizens of former Soviet republics requiring treatment for hypertension may not be receiving regular treatment. Aims To describe the regularity of treatment among those diagnosed with hypertension and prescribed treatment in eight countries of the former Soviet Union, and explore which factors are associated with not taking medication regularly. Methods Using data from over 18 000 respondents from eight former Soviet countries, individuals who had been told that they had hypertension by a health professional and prescribed treatment were identified. By means of multivariate logistic analysis the characteristics of those taking treatment daily and less than daily were compared. Results Only 26% of those prescribed treatment took it daily. The probability of doing so varied among countries and was highest in Russia, Belarus and Georgia, and lowest in Armenia ( although Georgia's apparent advantage may reflect low rates of diagnosis). Women, older people, those living in urban areas, and nonsmokers and non-drinkers were more likely to take treatment daily. Conclusions A high proportion of those who have been identified by health professionals as requiring hypertension treatment are not taking it daily. These findings suggest that irregular hypertension treatment is a major problem in this region and will require an urgent response.

  • 159. Roberts, Bayard
    et al.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Gasparishvili, Alexander
    Haerpfer, Christian
    McKee, Martin
    Changes in household access to water in countries of the former Soviet Union2012In: Journal of Public Health, ISSN 2198-1833, E-ISSN 1613-2238, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 352-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Evidence from the Early 2000s quantified limited coverage of household water supplies in countries of the former Soviet Union. The study objectives were to measure changes in access to piped household water in seven of these countries between 2001 and 2010 and examine how these varied by household economic status. Methods Cross-sectional household sample surveys were conducted in 2010 in Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine. Data on household piped water were compared with a related 2001 study and descriptive, regression and relative risk analyses applied. Results Increases in access to piped water in the home between 2001 and 2010 were recorded in urban and rural areas of all countries, except Kazakhstan. Access remains lower in rural areas. The relative risk of urban households not having piped water in 2010 compared with 2001 diminished by one-third for households with a bad/very bad economic situation [rate ratio (RR): 0.66] and by half for wealthier households (RR: 0.48). In rural areas, the declines were 15% for households with a bad/very bad economic situation (RR: 0.85) and 30% for wealthier households (RR: 0.69). Conclusions Despite encouraging increases in access to piped water, there remain significant gaps for rural and poorer households.

  • 160. Roberts, Bayard
    et al.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Murphy, Adrianna
    Kizilova, Kseniya
    Bryden, Anna
    Rotman, David
    Haerpfer, Christian
    McKee, Martin
    Patterns of Public Support for Price Increases on Alcohol in the Former Soviet Union2012In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 473-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To measure levels of public support for price increases on beer and spirits in nine former Soviet Union countries and to examine the characteristics influencing such support. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys were conducted in 2010 with 18,000 respondents aged 18+ in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine. Descriptive and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. Results: The lowest level of support for price increases on beer were in Georgia (men 5%, women 9%) and Armenia (men 5%, women 11%); and the highest were in Kyrgyzstan (men 30%, women 38%), Azerbaijan (men 27%, women 37%) and Russia (men 23%, women 34%). The lowest levels of support for price increases on spirits were Armenia (men 8%, women 14%) and Georgia (men 14%, women 21%); and the highest were in Kyrgyzstan (men 38%, 47% women) and Moldova (men 36%, women 43%). Characteristics associated with supporting price increases included gender (women), higher education, good economic situation, lower alcohol consumption and greater knowledge of harmful alcohol behaviour. Conclusion: Alcohol price increases are an effective means to reduce hazardous alcohol use. Despite opposition in some groups, there is evidence of public support for alcohol price increases in the study countries.

  • 161. Roberts, Bayard
    et al.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Petticrew, Mark
    McKee, Martin
    The influence of concern about crime on levels of psychological distress in the former Soviet Union2012In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 66, no 5, p. 433-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Previous studies suggest that the fear of crime is associated with worse mental health, with social capital potentially having a mediating influence. However, no studies could be identified on this issue in countries of the former Soviet Union, despite them experiencing increasing rates of crime and profound social change. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between concern about crime and levels of psychological distress in eight countries of the former Soviet Union. Methods Cross-sectional surveys were conducted in eight former Soviet countries using a standardised questionnaire containing items on psychological distress and concern about five criminal activities. Regression analysis was used to investigate the association between concern about criminal activities and psychological distress. Separate regression models were run to explore the influence of social capital on this relationship. Results The first model (excluding social capital) produced significant positive coefficients of association for all five types of criminal activity with psychological distress, with a range from 0.39 (95% CI 0.24 to 0.54) for suffering abuse because of nationality to 0.56 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.70) for being sexually molested. The second model (including social capital) also showed significant associations for all five criminal activities, but coefficients were slightly smaller. Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence of a relationship between fear of crime and psychological distress in the study countries, with possibly a small mediating influence of social capital. Further studies are required to explore the relationship between fear of crime, social capital and mental health in the region.

  • 162.
    Rojas, Yerko
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Carlson, Per
    Mid Sweden University.
    Too poor to binge?: An examination of economic hardship and its relation to alcohol consumption patterns in Taganrog, Russia2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 330-333Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 163.
    Saxonberg, Steven
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Family Policies in New Member States and Their Influence on Gender Roles and Individual Rights2010In: Przemiany rodziny w Polsce i we Włoszech i ich implikacje dla polityki rodzinnej / [ed] Ewa Leś, Stefania Bernini, Warszawa: Wydawnictwa Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Saxonberg, Steven
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Freedom of Choice through the Promotion of Gender Equality2009In: Social Policy & Administration, ISSN 0144-5596, E-ISSN 1467-9515, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 666-679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues that policies that promote gender equality actually also increase freedom of choice. Thus, despite the neo-liberal criticism that welfare policies limit choices and privatization and market solutions increase freedom of choice, this article concludes that market-liberal welfare regimes offer less choice than the Nordic type of social-democratic welfare regimes, which have openly striven to promote gender equality. They do so by making it easier for mothers to choose to work (by making day care available and making it easier for fathers to stay at home with children) and by giving fathers the ability to choose to spend more time with children. However, within the realm of such policies, it is still possible to offer more or less freedom of choice, for example, by making parental leaves either extremely flexible or rigid in how they are utilized. Interestingly, it turns out that, in the real world, policies that promote gender equality even offer greater freedom of choice for the group of women considered to be 'family oriented' as well as for lesbian and homosexual couples.

  • 165.
    Saxonberg, Steven
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    [Review of] Elaine Weiner, Market Dreams: Gender, Class, & Capitalism in the Czech Republic2009In: Canadian Slavonic Papers, ISSN 0008-5006, Vol. 51, no 2-3, p. 380-381Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 166.
    Saxonberg, Steven
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Tjeckien och Slovakien: en lyckad skilsmässa2009In: Det nya Östeuropa: stat och nation i förändring / [ed] Fredrika Björklund & Johnny Rodin, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, p. 245-272Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Saxonberg, Steven
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Sirovatka, Tomas
    Neo-liberalism by Decay?: The Evolution of the Czech Welfare State2009In: Social Policy & Administration, ISSN 0144-5596, E-ISSN 1467-9515, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 186-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we analyse the evolution of the Czech welfare state and we examine the factors explaining its path. We show that although the Czech welfare regime exhibits a 'mixed profile' that includes conservative and universalist elements, it is increasingly moving in a more liberal, residualist direction - not because of conscious steps but rather through decay. Governments have often zig-zagged in their policies and resorted to symbolic reforms at times rather than implementing ideologically based, consistent policies. We argue that historical and sociological institutionalism combined with a social-capital approach can explain this decay better than the more common arguments about economic pressures combined with ideological hegemony or the protest-avoidance strategy. In particular, the social capital approach adds to our institutional framework by explaining why cutbacks in welfare programmes have not met much opposition, even though public opinion surveys consistently show support for more generous welfare policies, and why policies have deviated so much from political rhetoric.

  • 168. Schaap, M. M.
    et al.
    Kunst, Anton E.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia .
    Regidor, Enrique
    Ekholm, Ola
    Dzurova, D.
    Helmert, Uwe
    Klumbiene, Jurate
    Santana, P.
    Mackenbach, Johan P.
    Effect of nationwide tobacco control policies on smoking cessation in high and low educated groups in 18 European countries2008In: Tobacco Control, ISSN 0964-4563, E-ISSN 1468-3318, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 248-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recently a scale was introduced to quantify the implementation of tobacco control policies at country level. Our study used this scale to examine the potential impact of these policies on quit ratios in European countries. Special attention was given to smoking cessation among lower educational groups. Methods: Cross-sectional data were derived from national health surveys from 18 European countries. In the analyses we distinguished between country, sex, two age groups (25-39 and 40-59 years) and educational level. Age-standardised quit ratios were calculated as total former-smokers divided by total ever-smokers. In regression analyses we explored the correlation between national quit ratios and the national score on the Tobacco Control Scale (TCS). Results: Quit ratios were especially high (> 45%) in Sweden, England, The Netherlands, Belgium and France and relatively low (< 30%) in Lithuania and Latvia. Higher educated smokers were more likely to have quit smoking than lower educated smokers in all age-sex groups in all countries. National score on the tobacco control scale was positively associated with quit ratios in all age-sex groups. The association of quit ratios with score on TCS did not show consistent differences between high and low education. Of all tobacco control policies of which the TCS is constructed, price policies showed the strongest association with quit ratios, followed by an advertising ban. Conclusion: Countries with more developed tobacco control policies have higher quit ratios than countries with less developed tobacco control policies. High and low educated smokers benefit about equally from the nationwide tobacco control policies.

  • 169. Schaap, Maartje M
    et al.
    Kunst, Anton E
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Regidor, Enrique
    Espelt, Albert
    Ekholm, Ola
    Helmert, Uwe
    Klumbiene, Jurate
    Mackenbach, Johan P
    Female ever-smoking, education, emancipation and economic development in 19 European countries2009In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 68, no 7, p. 1271-1278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large differences in ever-smoking rates among women are found between countries and socio-economic groups. This study examined the socio-economic inequalities in female ever-smoking rates in 19 European countries, and explored the association between cross-national differences in these inequalities and economic development and women's emancipation. Data on smoking were derived from national health interview surveys from 19 European countries. For each country, age group (25-39, 40-59 and 60+ years), educational level (4 standard levels), and cumulative ever-smoking rates were calculated as the proportion of current and former smokers of the total survey population. A Relative Index of Inequality was estimated for women in the three age groups to measure the magnitude of educational differences. In regression analyses the association of ever-smoking rates of women age 25-39 years with the gross domestic product (GDP) and the Gender Empowerment Measure (GEM) was explored. Less educated women aged 25-39 years were more likely to have ever smoked than more educated women in all countries, except Portugal. In the age groups 40-59 years the educational pattern differed between countries. Women aged 60+ years who were less educated were less likely to have ever smoked in all countries, except Norway and England. The size of inequalities varied considerably between countries and reversed within three age groups. For women 25-39 years, the association of ever-smoking rates with GDP was positive, especially for more educated women. The association of ever-smoking rates with GEM was positive for less educated women, but negative for more educated women. The results are consistent with the idea that economic development and social-cultural processes related to gender empowerment have affected the diffusion of smoking in different ways for more and less educated women.

  • 170. Sirovatka, Tomas
    et al.
    Saxonberg, Steven
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Life satisfaction and happiness in the Czech Republic2010In: Happiness and social policy in Europe / [ed] Bent Greve, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2010, p. 11-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 171.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    On Interpersonal Violence in Russia in the Present and the Past: A Sociological Study2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 172.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Carlson, Per
    Mid Sweden University.
    Factors associated with non-lethal violent victimization in Sweden in 2004-20072010In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 404-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To examine which factors were associated with non-lethal violent ictimization in Sweden in the period 2004 to 2007. Methods: Data come rom the Swedish National Public Health Surveys, undertaken annually etween 2004 and 2007. A total of 29,923 randomly selected respondents ged 16 to 84 from across Sweden responded to a mailed questionnaire. ogistic regression analyses were used to examine which independent ariables were associated with having experienced violence in the revious 12 months. Results: Male and female respondents who were ounger, single, lacking in social capital and who engaged in harmful lcohol consumption were significantly more likely to have been subject o violence. Furthermore, men who were in the lower income groups or who ere Nordic, and women who were of a non-European origin, were also ignificantly more likely to have been victimized. Conclusions: The risk f non-lethal violent victimization is not spread equally throughout wedish society. Specifically, those who are socially and/or conomically disadvantaged are much more likely to experience violence. his highlights the importance of working to reverse the growing nequality that has occurred in Sweden in recent years that continues to e linked to the risk of being a victim of non-lethal violence.

  • 173.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Jukkala, Tanya
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Carlson, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Kislitsyna, Olga
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Institutional Trust in Contemporary Moscow2009In: Europe-Asia Studies, ISSN 0966-8136, E-ISSN 1465-3427, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 779-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Levels of institutional trust in Russia are amongst the lowest in the world. As yet, however, little research has focused on this phenomenon at the sub-national level. The current study examines trust in social and political institutions among citizens in Moscow in 2004. Results showed that levels of institutional trust are extremely low and that there were only three institutions (the church, president and hospitals) that were more trusted than distrusted. Moreover, although the effects of some demographic and other independent variables on trust stretched across institutions, several variables had a unique impact in terms of trust in the president.

  • 174.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Jukkala, Tanya
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Norström, Thor
    Alcohol and Suicide in Russia, 1870-1894 and 1956-2005: Evidence for the Continuation of a Harmful Drinking Culture Across Time?2011In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1937-1888, E-ISSN 1938-4114, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 341-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Previous research suggests that a strong relation exists between alcohol consumption and suicide in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. This study extends this analysis across a much longer historical time frame by examining the relationship between heavy drinking and suicide in tsarist and post-World War 11 Russia. Method: Using alcohol poisoning mortality data as a proxy for heavy drinking, time-series analytical modeling techniques were used to examine the strength of the alcohol-suicide relation in the provinces of European Russia in the period 1870-1894 and for Russia in 1956-2005. Results: During 1870-1894, a decreasing trend was recorded in heavy drinking in Russia that contrasted with the sharp increase observed in this phenomenon in the post-World War 11 period. A rising trend in suicide was recorded in both study periods, although the increase was much greater in the latter period. The strength of the heavy drinking suicide relation nevertheless remained unchanged across time, with a 10% increase in heavy drinking resulting in a 3.5% increase in suicide in tsarist Russia and a 3.8% increase in post-World War II Russia. Conclusions: Despite the innumerable societal changes that have occurred in Russia across the two study periods and the growth in the level of heavy drinking, the strength of the heavy drinking-suicide relation has remained unchanged across time. This suggests the continuation of a highly detrimental drinking culture where the heavy episodic drinking of distilled spirits (vodka) is an essential element in the alcohol-suicide association. (J. Stud. Alcohol Drugs, 72, 341-347, 2011)

  • 175.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Andreev, Evgueni
    Razvodovsky, Yury
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    McKee, Martin
    Alcohol poisoning in Russia and the countries in the European part of the former Soviet Union, 1970-20022007In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 444-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute alcohol poisoning has now reached unprecedented rates in parts of the ex-USSR with worrying trends among men as well as among women. Effective action by the governments concerned is now essential.

  • 176.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Kunst, Anton E.
    Bopp, Matthias
    Strand, Bjorn Heine
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Lundberg, Olle
    Kovacs, Katalin
    Artnik, Barbara
    Kalediene, Ramune
    Rychtarikova, Jitka
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    Mackenbach, Johan P.
    Socioeconomic inequalities in homicide mortality: a population-based comparative study of 12 European countries2012In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 877-884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research has suggested that violent mortality may be socially patterned and a potentially important source of health inequalities within and between countries. Against this background the current study assessed socioeconomic inequalities in homicide mortality across Europe. To do this, longitudinal and cross-sectional data were obtained from mortality registers and population censuses in 12 European countries. Educational level was used to indicate socioeconomic position. Age-standardized mortality rates were calculated for post, upper and lower secondary or less educational groups. The magnitude of inequalities was assessed using the relative and slope index of inequality. The analysis focused on the 35-64 age group. Educational inequalities in homicide mortality were present in all countries. Absolute inequalities in homicide mortality were larger in the eastern part of Europe and in Finland, consistent with their higher overall homicide rates. They contributed 2.5 % at most (in Estonia) to the inequalities in total mortality. Relative inequalities were high in the northern and eastern part of Europe, but were low in Belgium, Switzerland and Slovenia. Patterns were less consistent among women. Socioeconomic inequalities in homicide are thus a universal phenomenon in Europe. Wide-ranging social and inter-sectoral health policies are now needed to address the risk of violent victimization that target both potential offenders and victims.

  • 177.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia..
    Razvodovsky, Yury E
    Homicide in post-Soviet Belarus: urban-rural trends2009In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 117-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is probable that a combination of factors such as high levels of poverty, the effects of alcohol consumption, as well as the poor provision of emergency medical services underlie both the high levels of lethal violence and the growing rural-urban divergence in homicide rates in contemporary Belarus. Urgent action is now needed to address the deteriorating social and economic conditions underpinning violence, especially in rural regions.

  • 178.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Homicide in the Russian Empire and Soviet Union2005In: British Journal of Criminology, ISSN 0007-0955, E-ISSN 1464-3529, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 647-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the collapse of Communism, statistics relating to previously ‘taboo’ phenomena such as homicide became available in the Soviet Union for the first time in over 50 years. The current study builds on several recent studies of homicide in Russia by extending both its time-frame and geographical coverage. Taking data from the end of the tsarist (1910) and Communist (1989) periods, the study maps the changes that occurred in the geographical distribution of homicide rates in ‘European Russia’ across the Soviet years. While non-Russian areas tended to remain or become less violent, Russia became more violent. These differences may have had a cultural component underlying them which was further exacerbated by the role of the state in the Soviet period.

  • 179.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Pridemore, W. A.
    The effects of binge drinking and social capital on violent victimisation: findings from Moscow2010In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 64, no 10, p. 902-907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Rates of violence in Russia are among the highest in the orld, and violent victimisation represents a major public health threat n the country. As yet, however, little research has been undertaken on hat factors are associated with non-lethal violent victimisation in his setting. This study used data from the Moscow Health Survey 2004 to xamine the effects of binge drinking and social capital on individuals' isk of non-fatal violent victimisation. ethods A stratified random sampling strategy was used across Moscow's 25 municipal districts to collect data from 1190 individuals aged 18+ ears. Respondents reported if they had been a victim of physical iolence in the previous 12 months. Data were also collected on binge rinking (defined for men as consuming >= 80 g of pure alcohol, and for omen >= 60 g of pure alcohol, at least once per month) and social apital (frequency of interaction with relatives, friends and cquaintances). esults Overall, 8.7% of the respondents had been a victim of violence n the past 12 months. Men who binge drink were more than twice as ikely to have been a victim of non-lethal violence (OR 2.19, CI 1.23 to .92), while greater levels of social capital acted as a protective actor against male victimisation (OR 0.82, CI 0.69 to 0.97). Neither inge drinking nor social capital was associated with violent ictimisation among women. onclusion Urgent public health measures are now needed to reduce xcessive alcohol consumption and detrimental drinking patterns to bring own the high levels of violent victimisation in Russia.

  • 180.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Razvodovsky, Yury
    The effects of beverage type on homicide rates in Russia, 1970-20052012In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 257-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and Aims. Previous research from Western Europe and North America has suggested that consuming different types of alcoholic beverage may have differing effects on homicide rates both within and between countries. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between the consumption of different beverage types and homicide rates in Russia across the later-Soviet and post-Soviet periods. Design and Methods. Age-standardised male and female homicide data for the period 1970-2005 and data on beverage-specific alcohol sales were obtained from the Russian State Statistical Committee (Rosstat). Time series analysis (autoregressive integrated moving average modelling) was used to examine the relation between the sale (consumption) of different alcoholic beverages and homicide rates. Results. Total alcohol consumption and vodka consumption as measured by sales were significantly associated with both male and female homicide rates: a 1 L increase in overall alcohol sales would result in a 5.9% increase in the male homicide rate and a 5.1% increase in the female homicide rate. The respective figures for vodka were 16.4% and 14.3%. The consumption of beer and wine was not associated with changes in homicide rates. Discussion and Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the consumption of distilled spirits has had an especially detrimental impact on lethal violence in Russia from at least 1970 onwards. In order to reduce homicide rates in this context, alcohol policy should focus on reducing overall consumption as well as attempting to shift the beverage preference away from distilled spirits.

  • 181. Stirbu, Irina
    et al.
    Kunst, Anton E
    Bopp, Matthias
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Regidor, Enrique
    Esnaola, Santiago
    Costa, Giuseppe
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Borrell, Carme
    Deboosere, Patrik
    Kalediene, Ramune
    Rychtarikova, Jitka
    Artnik, Barbara
    Mackenbach, Johan P.
    Educational inequalities in avoidable mortality in Europe2010In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 64, no 10, p. 913-920Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inequalities in avoidable mortality were present in all European countries, but were especially pronounced in CEE and Baltic countries. These educational inequalities point to an important role for healthcare services in reducing inequalities in health.

  • 182.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Dubbla budskap och enkel solidaritet2010In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, Vol. 32-33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 183.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Politikens gränser: Globalisering, socialdemokrati och banden till nationen2012 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Varför fortsätter politiken att vara nationell i en tid av stark globalisering? politiska organisationer talar gärna om gränslösa samarbeten, men det politiska landskapet ser i stort sett likadant ut idag som för 100 år sedan. Med utgångspunkt i den socialdemokratiska arbetarrörelsen i Sverige diskuterar Adrienne Sörbom frågan om politikens långsamma avnationalisering. Rörelsens internationalism till trots visar hon att den binds av starka idéer om Sverige som den självklara platsen för politik. Delvis styrs detta av ideologiskt färgade uppfattningar omvad rörelsen ska och kan göra. Vad som är politik och vem den ska omfatta har inte förändrats, fastän globalisering står högt upp på rörelsens dagordning. Bokens baseras på forskning om socialdemokratin, men här finns intressanta slutsatser för alla som vill lyfta politiken utanför nationen. 

  • 184. Vadelius, Elin
    et al.
    Ljungar, Erik
    Södertörn University.
    Hajighasemi, Ali
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Nilsson, Jenny
    Parallella processer med sikte på ökad integration: storstadssatsningen och fallet Jordbro i Haninge kommun2006Book (Other academic)
  • 185. Van der Heyden, J H A
    et al.
    Schaap, Maartje M.
    Kunst, Anton E.
    Esnaola, Santiago
    Borrell, Carme
    Cox, B
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Stirbu, Irina
    Kalediene, Ramune
    Deboosere, Patrik
    Mackenbach, Johan P.
    Van Oyen, H
    Socioeconomic inequalities in lung cancer mortality in 16 European populations.2009In: Lung Cancer, ISSN 0169-5002, E-ISSN 1872-8332, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 322-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Important socioeconomic inequalities exist in lung cancer mortality in Europe. They are consistent with the geographical spread of the smoking epidemic. In the next decades socioeconomic inequalities in lung cancer mortality are likely to persist and even increase among women. In Southern European countries we may expect a reversal from a positive to a negative association between socioeconomic status and lung cancer mortality. Continuous efforts are necessary to tackle socioeconomic inequalities in lung cancer mortality in all European countries.

  • 186. Van Raalte, AA
    et al.
    Kunst, AE
    Deboosere, P
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). The National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Lundberg, O
    Martikainen, P
    Strand, BH
    Artnik, B
    Wojtyniak, B
    Mackenbach, JP
    More variation in lifespan in lower educated groups: evidence from 10 European countries2011In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 1703-1714Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 187. van Raalte, Alyson A.
    et al.
    Kunst, Anton E.
    Lundberg, Olle
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Artnik, Barbara
    Deboosere, Patrick
    Stirbu, Irina
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    Mackenbach, Johan P.
    The contribution of educational inequalities to lifespan variation2012In: Population Health Metrics, ISSN 1478-7954, E-ISSN 1478-7954, Vol. 10, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies of socioeconomic inequalities in mortality consistently point to higher death rates in lower socioeconomic groups. Yet how these between-group differences relate to the total variation in mortality risk between individuals is unknown. Methods: We used data assembled and harmonized as part of the Eurothine project, which includes census-based mortality data from 11 European countries. We matched this to national data from the Human Mortality Database and constructed life tables by gender and educational level. We measured variation in age at death using Theil's entropy index, and decomposed this measure into its between-and within-group components. Results: The least-educated groups lived between three and 15 years fewer than the highest-educated groups, the latter having a more similar age at death in all countries. Differences between educational groups contributed between 0.6% and 2.7% to total variation in age at death between individuals in Western European countries and between 1.2% and 10.9% in Central and Eastern European countries. Variation in age at death is larger and differs more between countries among the least-educated groups. Conclusions: At the individual level, many known and unknown factors are causing enormous variation in age at death, socioeconomic position being only one of them. Reducing variations in age at death among less-educated people by providing protection to the vulnerable may help to reduce inequalities in mortality between socioeconomic groups.

  • 188.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Unhealthy Societies?: Health Stagnation and Growing Health Inequalities Are Not Consistent with Sustainable Development2006In: Realizing a Common Vision for a Baltic Sea Eco-Region: Report from a Research Symposium on Sustainable Development Patterns 28-29 October 2005 / [ed] Lars Rydén, 2006, p. 39-46Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 189.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). CHESS, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet.
    Kislitsyna, Olga
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation .
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Migranova, Ludmila
    Carlson, Per
    Mid Sweden University.
    Rimachevskaya, Natalia
    Moscow Health Survey 2004: social surveying under difficult circumstances2008In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 171-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this paper is to present the Moscow Health Survey 2004, which was designed to examine health inequalities in Moscow. In particular we want to discuss social survey problems, such as non-response, in Moscow and Russia. Methods: Interviews, covering social and economic circumstances, health and social trust, of a stratified random sample of the greater Moscow population, aged 18+. Reasons for nonresponse were noted down with great care. Odds ratios (ORs) for self-rated health by gender and by six social dimensions were estimated separately for districts with low and high response rates. Bias due to non-response is discussed. Results and conclusions: About one in two (53.1 %) of approached individuals could not be interviewed, resulting in 1190 completed interviews. Non-response in most Russian surveys, but perhaps particularly in Moscow, is large, partly due to fear of strangers and distrust of authorities. ORs for poor health vary significantly by gender, occupational class, education and economic hardship. We find no significant differences in these ORs when comparing districts with low and high response rates. Non-response may be a problem when estimating prevalence rates or population means, but much less so when estimating odds ratios in multivariate analyses.

  • 190.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Another Modernity is Possible?: The Global Justice Movement and the Transformations of Politics2010In: Distinktion Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory, ISSN 1600-910X, E-ISSN 2159-9149, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 25-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using and expanding upon the conception of ‘successive modernities’ that has recently been developed within social theory, this article offers an interpretation of the political aims, ideas, and practices of the ‘global justice movement’ and argues that this contemporary social movement is best understood as an expression of the tensions characterizing the prevailing configuration of Western modernity in our own time. Social movements have often simultaneously challenged, changed, and sustained the institutions, norms, and habits of modern societies. Placing the global justice movement in this historical context, the author elaborates how the notion of the creative capacities of social movements has hitherto been discussed in several major theories about social movements and modernity. The article argues that the movements mobilized since the 1990s in response to issues related to globalization should neither be seen as revolts against the demise of ‘organized modernity’, nor as heralding a new type of Western modernity. Instead, the critique and political claims of the global justice movement are, according to the author, better interpreted as expressing a will to realize a ‘third modernity’ in an alternative way that stresses the values of participatory democracy, democratization of international economic institutions, and the strengthening of social equality on a global level. Thus, the movement should foremost be seen as articulating a crisis in the forms of politics and democracy during our present epoch of modernity.

  • 191.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Bråk – men ingen repris av Båstad -682009In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 1103-9000, no 8 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 192.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    De sociala forumens historia2008In: Stockholms fria tidning, ISSN 1650-4674, no 28 juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 193.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Göteborgs universitet.
    Demonstrerandets normalisering?2012In: I framtidens skugga: fyrtiotvå kapitel om politik, medier och samhälle : SOM-undersökningen 2011 / [ed] Lennart Weibull, Henrik Oscarsson och Annika Bergström, Göteborg: SOM-institutet , 2012, p. 79-94Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 194.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Den globala rättviserörelsen är inte död2011In: Göteborgs fria tidning, ISSN 1651-1190, no 11 juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 195.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    En värld där makten inte går i arv: den är möjlig2009In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 1103-9000, no 1 februariArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 196.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Enfrågerörelser eller morgondagens sakpolitik?2008In: Tvärdrag : en tidning för debatt och kritik / utgiven av Sveriges socialdemokratiska ungdomsförbund, ISSN 0281-2657, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 197.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Göteborgshändelserna2011In: Nationalencyklopedin, Vol. OnlineArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 198.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Hotet mot Amazonas på World Social Forum2009In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 1103-9000, no 30 januariArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 199.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Occupy Wall Street2012In: Nationalencyklopedin. 36, 2011, Malmö: Nationalencykolpedin , 2012, p. 208-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 200.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    The Spatial Transformations of Grassroots Activism2008In: Global Cities / [ed] Ana Betancour, Stockholm: Arkitekturmuseet , 2008, p. 49-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
12345 151 - 200 of 203
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf