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  • 151.
    Larsson Segerlind, Tommy
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, ENTER (Center for Entrepreneurship).
    Team Entrepreneurship: A Process Analysis of the Venture Team and the Venture Team Roles in relation to the Innovation Process2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Larsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Sölvell, Ingela
    Dalhammar, Tobias
    The Role of Local Professional Support to Becoming Entrepreneurs2004In: Uddevalla Symposium 2003: Entrepreneurship, Spatial Industrial Clusters and Inter-firm Networks / [ed] Iréne Johansson, Kungälv: University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla , 2004, p. 383-400Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Lilliefeldt, Emelie
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political science.
    European Party Politics and Gender: Configuring Gender-Balanced Parliamentary Presence2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 20th century, the proportions of women and men elected into European national parliaments became increasingly equal. Political parties shape these outcomes by selecting and fielding candidates in elections. Scholars recognise that parties' actions do not occur in isolation; yet there is little systematically comparative research about the configurations of conditions in which these actions occur. Previous research also often relies on studies of West European parties. This doctoral thesis investigates how conditions inside and outside parties combine to create gender-equal parliamentary presence. The thesis examines the extent to which Western European experiences apply to Central and East European parties, and explores the conditions that stand in the way of progress towards gender balance. It presents three empirical studies. The first is a qualitative comparative analysis of 57 West European parties during the late 1980s, a period in which the trend towards equality accelerated. The second study applies the knowledge produced in the first analysis to cases in Central and Eastern Europe. It uses an original dataset covering six parties in four EU member states in a structured focused comparison. Finally, the thesis presents an in-depth case study of an unexpectedly gender-balanced Latvian party. The analyses show that gender-equal parliamentary presence is achieved when conditions inside and outside parties combine, and that no condition is necessary or singularly sufficient. The absence of gender-equal parliaments is sustained by combinations other than the absence of those that lead to gender-balance. Operationalisations from Western Europe turn out to be largely applicable to cases in Central and Eastern Europe. These latter cases also demonstrate that organisational instability need not impede women’s presence in elected office.

  • 154.
    Lilliefeldt, Emelie
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political science.
    Party and Gender in Western Europe Revisited: A fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis of Gender Balanced Parliamentary Parties2012In: Party Politics, ISSN 1354-0688, E-ISSN 1460-3683, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 193-214Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars of women’s parliamentary presence have suggested that the proportion of women parliamentarians rests on the interaction between intra-party and party external conditions, and that these can be discussed in terms of necessity and sufficiency. Still, the field lacks systematic cross-case assessments of such relationships. This research takes an explorative approach to necessity, sufficiency and interaction in the field of gender and party. Using fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis to study 57 individual West European parties, it demonstrates that party behaviour is a function of intra-party and party-external conditions. Furthermore, it shows that when the external factors are not present, parties are themselves able to achieve gender-balanced parliamentary delegations. The article reveals that there are several paths to gender balance, and that the absence of conditions sufficient for balance does not explain why parties do not become gender balanced

  • 155.
    Lindelöf Söderholm, Karin
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University College, School of Gender, Culture and History, Ethnology.
    Om vi nu ska bli som Europa: könsskapande och normalitet bland unga kvinnor i transitionens Polen2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 156.
    Lindelöf Söderholm, Karin
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, Avdelning 4, Ethnology.
    Polska femininiteter - globala idéer2003In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 7-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 157.
    Lindén, Tove
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Explaining Civil Society Core Activism in Post-Soviet Latvia2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 158.
    Lundell, Erika
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Crossdressing på Medeltidsveckan i Visby: Om iscensättanden av feminina och maskulina medeltidsgenu2008In: Lambda Nordica: Tidskrift om homosexualitet, ISSN 1100-2573, no 1-2, p. 97-107Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Lundell, Erika
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusvetenskap.
    Förkroppsligad fiktion och fiktionaliserade kroppar: Levande rollspel i Östersjöregionen2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation concerns live action role-playing (larp). Larp may be described as improvised theater without an audience, as participants simultaneously embody both audience and actor in their constant interaction with one another.  Hence, larp can be seen as a participatory culture.  The study is based on participant observation, interviews and online ethnography in Denmark, Latvia, Sweden and Norway.

    The aim of the thesis is to analyze how bodies materialize, take and are given space in larps. At the heart of the study lie questions on how processes of embodiment are enacted before, during and after the game.

    Two central concepts - larp chronotope and matrix of interpretation – shape the analysis. The first denotes the specific timespace in which a larp takes place, e.g a Soviet military camp or a fantasy world. The second concept stands for a general matrix of norms that informs participants on how to enact their characters in the larp chronotope.

    The thesis shows that participants strive to act in ways that are intelligible according to the matrix of interpretation that reigns during the game days. In addition, although game and everyday matrixes of interpretations are always inseparable, while attending a larp the participant’s ordinary lives are temporarily allowed to fade into the background. Thus, larps are complex combinations of objects, spaces and bodies that are given new relations and new meanings.

    Furthermore, the thesis shows that larp embodiment is conditioned by normative ideas of what it means to be an intelligible live action role player. White male bodies are more likely to access the sphere of larp intelligibility than others, which is evident in many of the stories and made up worlds portrayed in the study. Yet, the collaborative narration of game worlds that take place before larps can include all sorts of bodies. Consequently, larps provide an opportunity for alternative forms of embodiment and experiences.

  • 160.
    Lundell, Erika
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Linnell, Sandra
    Gullegrisar2010In: Bang, ISSN 1102-4593, no 1, p. 56-58Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 161.
    Lundén, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Zalamans, Dennis
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Local co-operation, ethnic diversity and state territoriality - The case of Haparanda and Tornio on the Sweden - Finland border2001In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The neighbouring towns of Haparanda and Tornio, separated only by a narrow strip of grass and wetland, are divided by the only inhabited land boundary between Finland and Sweden in the southern part of the Torne River. The population represents four different groups in relation to linguistic and cultural backgrounds. In the daily lives of the inhabitants, the state boundary is probably of less significance than linguistic, social and 'ethnic' differences. On the local government level there is a strong will to unite forces to make the total area a viable region in spite of its peripheral location, but state legislation makes co-ordination difficult. This may be seen as a necessity, but in the daily lives of the populations, the state boundary defines an area of unequal access, sometimes working in favour of and sometimes barring contacts and co-operation. The media consumption reflects a clear 'national' interest with a strong local bias. In their attitudes, Finnish speakers and bilinguals show a greater appreciation of 'the other' than unilingual Swedes. This may reflect the actual possibility space (reach) in the local area.

  • 162.
    Löfmarck, Erik
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Brev till statsministern – en väg in i politiken2010In: Känslan för det allmänna: Medborgarnas relation till staten och varandra / [ed] Jacobsson, Kerstin, Umeå: Boréa , 2010, p. 295-331Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 163.
    Löfmarck, Erik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Den hand som föder dig: en studie av risk, mat och moderskap i Sverige och Polen2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study of how mothers of young children relate to risk in everyday life, with an emphasis on the in­visible risks associated with modernity in general, and with food in particular. It explores variations and similarities in how mothers deal with risk in two cultural contexts: Sweden and Poland. The study is based on twenty qualitative interviews with university educated mothers of small children in Stockholm and Warsaw. While risks more generally challenge how we “get on” with our lives, mothers of young children in particular have a special relationship to risk. During pregnancy and breastfeeding they are subject to all kinds of risk minimization efforts, and mothers are ultimately held "infinitely responsible" for their children's welfare by society. Women's transition to parenthood then makes for a particularly in­teresting case as to how risks manifest in everyday life. The theoretical framework draws on modernization theory, combined with insights from cultural theory. In addition, various contributions from sociological and psychological risk research, family sociology and research on parenting and motherhood are used to highlight contextual aspects and to inter­pret the empirical results. Two aspects of the mothers’ relationship to risk and food are examined in this study: firstly, their risk constructs, i.e. what they perceive as ‘risky’ with regards to food; and, secondly, their risk management strategies, i.e. how they deal with identified risks on a practical and cognitive level. The overall risk management depicted in this study is characterized by reflexivity, critical thinking, infor­mation retrieval, attention to scientific evidence, purposely transferred trust, confidence and the ability to make fairly sophisticated tradeoffs between risks and other aspects of life. Neither the Swedish nor the Polish mothers then conform to popular notions of ‘security junkies’ or ‘paranoid parenting’. Nonetheless, the comparative approach demonstrates how contextual differences, such as general trust levels and family policy, influence both the risk constructs and the employment of different risk management strategies.

  • 164.
    Lönn, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Bruten vithet: om den ryska femininitetens sinnliga och temporala villkor2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual signs like skin color are just one of many factors in how white femininity is being articulated and interpreted. Other important components are the concept of a Eurocentric and linear temporality and the importance of being situated as modern. This thesis explores how certain forms of white femininity, depending on their locus, are privileged while others are seen as broken according to a hierarchy of white femininity

    Key to the dissertation are fashion-oriented white Russian women living in Stockholm, St. Petersburg and Moscow who are trying to embody ideas of modernities and normative temporality through the body and the senses. One way of doing so is by controlling their sensory expressions and thus that which white subjectivity has a long history of trying to transcend: the body. An example of this is the attempt to control smell, which works as a reminder of the primitive, animal, and outdated parts of the human being.

    Instead of investigating the making of the modern body-controlled white femininity through discourses, representations or articulated thoughts, the thesis focuses on how white femininity is inscribed in racialized perceptions through the level of bodily habits – or more specifically bodily habituations of norms and body schedules. This is done through a multisensory method that centers the ways smell, the visual, the haptic and the tactile are used as a way to experience and express modernities. Another important factor is how white femininity never articulates itself alone, but is instead always-already intimately connected to other bodies and objects. Thus, white femininity must always be seen as an intercorporal exchange. 

  • 165.
    Lönn, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Genom monstret skapar vi oss själva2014In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 28 juni, p. 32-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 166.
    Malitska, Julia
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Negotiating Imperial Rule: Colonists and Marriage in the Nineteenth-century Black Sea Steppe2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After falling under the power of the Russian Crown, the Northern Black Sea steppe from the end of eighteenth century crystallized as the Russian government’s prime venue for socioeconomic and sociocultural reinvention and colonization. Vast ethnic, sociocultural and even ecological changes followed.  Present study is preoccupied with the marriage of the immigrant population from the German lands who came to the region in the course of its state orchestrated colonization, and was officially categorized as “German colonists.” The book illuminates the multiple ways in which marriage and household formation among the colonists was instrumentalized by the imperial politics in the Northern Black Sea steppe, and conditioned by socioeconomic rationality of its colonization. Marriage formation and dissolution among the colonists were gradually absorbed into the competencies of the colonial vertical power. Intending to control colonist marriage and household formation through the introduced marriage regime, the Russian government and its regional representatives lacked the actual means to exert this control at the local level. On the ground, however, imperial politics was mediated by the people it targeted, and by the functionaries tasked with its implementation. As the study reveals, the paramount importance was given to functional households and sustainable farms based on non-conflictual relations between parties. Situated on the crossroads of state, church, community, and personal interests, colonist marriage engendered clashes between secular and ecclesiastical bodies over the supremacy over it. The interplay of colonization as politics, and colonization as an imperial situation with respect to the marriage of the German colonists is explored in this book by concentrating on both norms and practices. Another important consideration is the ways gender and colonization constructed and determined one another reciprocally, both in legal norms and in actual practices. Secret divorces and unauthorized marriages, open and hidden defiance, imitations and unruliness, refashioning of rituals and discourses, and desertions – a number of strategies and performances which challenged and negotiated the marriage regime in the region, were scholarly examined for the first time in this book. 

  • 167.
    Malitska, Julia
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    People in between: Baltic islanders as colonists on the steppe2014In: The Lost Swedish Tribe: Reapproaching the history of Gammalsvenskby in Ukraine / [ed] Piotr Wawrzeniuk & Julia Malitska, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2014, 1, , p. 151p. 61-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 168.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University College, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology. Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    All quiet on the eastern front2011In: Places in between: the archaeology of social, cultural and geographical borders and borderlands / [ed] David Mulllin, Oxford: Oxbow , 2011, p. 13-22Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 169.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Archaeology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Stockholms universitet.
    An Archaeology of the Iron Curtain: Material and Metaphor2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Iron Curtain was seen as the divider between East and West in Cold War Europe. The term is closely connected to the Cold War and expressions such as ‘behind the Iron Curtain’ or ‘after the fall of the Iron Curtain’ are common within historical discussions in the second half of the twentieth century. Even if the term was used regularly as a metaphor there was also a material side with a series of highly militarised borders running throughout Europe. The metaphor and the material borders developed together and individually, sometimes intertwined and sometimes separate.

    In my research I have carried out two fieldwork studies at sites that can be considered part of the former Iron Curtain. The first study area is located between Italy and Slovenia (formerly Yugoslavia) in which the division between the two towns of Nova Gorica on the Slovenian side and Gorizia on the Italian side was investigated. The second study area is located on the border between Austria and Czech Republic (formerly Czechoslovakia) within two national parks. A smaller study was also carried out in Berlin as the Berlin Wall is considered of major importance in the context of the Iron Curtain. This research has resulted in large quantities of sources and information and a constant need to re-evaluate the methods used within an archaeology of a more recent past.

    This thesis falls within what is usually referred to as contemporary archaeology, a fairly young sub-discipline of archaeology. Few large research projects have so far been published, and methods have been described as still somewhat experimental. Through my fieldwork it has been possible to acknowledge and highlight the problems and opportunities within contemporary archaeology. It has become clear how the materials stretch both through time and place demonstrating the complex process of how the material that archaeologists investigate can be created. The material of the Iron Curtain, is also well worth studying in its own right.

  • 170.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Contemporary and historical archaeology in the making: [review of] Mats Burström, Samtidsarkeologi, and Laura McAtackeny, Matthew Palus and Agela Piccini (eds), Contemporary and historical archaeology in theory2008In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 11, no 2-3, p. 270-273Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 171.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Review of] John Schofield and Wayne Cocroft (eds), A Fearsome Heritage : Diverse Legacies of the Cold War2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 263-265Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 172.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Maritime Archaeological Research Institute.
    Östersjön som järnridå2011In: Kriget som aldrig kom: 12 forskare om kalla kriget / [ed] Andreas Linderoth, Karlskrona: Marinmuseum , 2011, p. 32-47Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 173. Mejsholm, Lotta
    et al.
    Törnqvist, Oscar
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Maritime Archaeological Research Institute.
    Lillegölens hemligheter: del II2010In: Marinarkeologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 2, p. 9-12Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 174.
    Motiejūnaitė, Akvilė
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Female employment, gender roles, and attitudes: The Baltic countries in a broader context2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Müller, Leos
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Swedish East India trade and international markets: Re-exports of teas, 1731-18132003In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 28-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish East India Company (SEIC) has been traditionally seen as nothing but a peculiar and exotic adventure in Sweden's eighteenth-century history. Hence, only limited attention has been paid to the SEIC's international role, its relationship with other chartered companies, and to the development of international markets for colonial goods. The paper focuses on this unexplored chapter in the company's history. More specifically, it looks into the SEIC's re-exports of Chinese commodities to Western European markets. Although the Swedish operation was limited compared to that of the other East India companies, the SEIC was an important tea trader on the world markets. The major part of the tea imports was re-exported through merchant networks to other European countries, especially to the Austrian Netherlands and Holland. Through illicit trade, part of the SEIC's tea went to Great Britain. The paper shows in detail how the transactions between Gothenburg, Ostend, Gent and Antwerp were organized. The examples are mainly drawn from the business correspondence of the Flemish merchants.

  • 176.
    Nase, Marco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Academics and Politics: Northern European Area Studies at Greifswald University, 1917–19912016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The decision to institute Area Studies in German universities in 1917, was born out of a perceived need to widen the intellectual horizon of the public and academia alike. At Greifswald University this ambitious reform programme saw the foundation of a Nordic Institute, charged with interdisciplinary studies of contemporary Northern Europe. Its interdisciplinarity and implicit role in public diplomacy made the Nordic Institute, and the institutions that succeeded it, an anomaly within the university, until the institute was fundamentally reformed in the early 1990s. The study explores the institutional development of the institute under five different political regimes – Kaiserreich, Weimar Republic, Third Reich, GDR and FRG. It does so through the lens of scholars as utility-seeking actors, manoeuvring between the confines of an academic environment and the possibilities afforded by the institute’s political task. It becomes apparent that the top-down institution of interdisciplinary scholarship produced a number of conflicts between the disciplinarily organized career path on theone hand, and scholars’ investment in broader regional research on the other. Personal conflicts in a confined and competitive environment, and a persistent shortage of funding provided further incentives for scholars to overcome perceived limitations of the academic sphere by offering their cooperation to the political field. Individual attempts to capitalize on a reciprocal exchange of resources with the political field remained a feature under all political regimes, but the opportunity to do so successfully depended on the receptiveness of the political field. Cooperation, where it was established, also proved to be difficult, with the interests of political and academic actors often diverging, and the political side’s interest becoming dominant. The study examines the underlying motivations of scholars to seek assistance from outside the academic field, but also the problems connected with that approach, and demonstrates the specific problems faced by Area Studies in a German context.

  • 177.
    Nase, Marco
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    "Att Sverige skall dominera här": Johannes Paul und das Schwedische Institut der Universität Greifswald 1933-19452014Book (Other academic)
  • 178.
    Nase, Marco
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Forscher - Diplomaten - Spione: Die Nordischen Auslandsinstitute der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität2015In: "...die letzten Schranken fallen lassen": Studien zur Universität Greifswald im Nationalsozialismus / [ed] Dirk Alvermann, Köln: Böhlau, 2015, p. 224-255Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Nase, Marco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Paul, Johannes (1891-1990): Historiker, Universitätsprofessor2013In: Biographisches Lexikon für Pommern: Band 1 / [ed] Alvermann, Dirk & Jörn, Nils, Köln: Böhlau, 2013, p. 212-214Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Nilsson, Anna
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Att gräva eller att inte gräva - det är frågan: om arkeologi och havererade flygplan2008In: Samtidsarkeologi - varför gräva i det nära förflutna?: rapport från en session vid konferensen IX Nordic TAG i Århus 2007 / [ed] Mats Burström, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2008, p. 33-39Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Nilsson, Niklas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Uppsala universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Beacon of Liberty: Role Conceptions, Crises and Stability in Georgia’s Foreign Policy, 2004–20122015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2004, Mikheil Saakashvili was elected president in Georgia, committing to a foreign policy that would ostensibly make his country a leading example of reform and democratization in the post-Soviet space, and a net-contributor to Euro-Atlantic security. Throughout its time in power and until its defeat in Georgia’s 2012 parliamentary elections, the Saakashvili government remained steadfast in its commitment to establishing these international roles for Georgia, despite developments in both the country’s international and domestic contexts that could plausibly have made these roles, and the foreign policy decisions deriving from them, redundant.

    This dissertation explores the relationship between national role conceptions (NRCs) and foreign policy stability. It demonstrates how Georgia’s NRCs as a Beacon of Liberty and a Net-Security Contributor, evolving specifically in the relationship between the Georgian and U.S. governments during these years, contributed to stability in Georgia’s foreign policy. Yet these NRCs were also subjected to serious challenges, particularly relating to two crises ensuing over the November 2007 riots in Tbilisi and the August 2008 war between Georgia and Russia. In both cases, the Georgian government was subjected to conflicting imperatives emanating from its own role conceptions, the expectations voiced by its U.S. counterparts, and the immediate demands of crisis decision making.

    Drawing on recent advances in foreign policy role theory and crisis management theory, two social mechanisms are developed, role location and role conflict management. Role location is a long-term process of interaction between the actor and significant others, resulting in a gradual harmonization of role expectations and intentions. Role conflict management instead represents the actor’s handling of potentially disruptive moments, raising questions about the credibility and legitimacy of existing NRCs in the eyes of others, and confronting the actor with choices regarding stability and change in existing NRCs.

    The framework is applied in an analysis of the Georgian government’s foreign policy vis-à-vis the U.S. in the years 2004-2012, with particular attention to the disruptive effects of the crises in 2007-2008, and the actions taken to address the resulting role conflicts. The analysis draws on unique first-hand material, including interviews with members of the Georgian and U.S. foreign policy elites, confidential diplomatic correspondence and official speeches, to uncover the processes by which the mechanisms of role location and role conflict management played out in Georgia’s foreign policy. The dissertation concludes that the stability in Georgia’s foreign policy stemmed from the fact that the two NRCs became deeply socially embedded in Georgia’s relations with the U.S. over time, but also from the Georgian government’s ability to adapt its NRCs in response to crises, the role expectations of significant others, and contextual change. 

  • 182.
    Nilsson, Niklas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Obstacles to Building a Civic Nation: Georgia’s Armenian Minority and Conflicting Threat Perceptions2009In: Ethnopolitics, ISSN 1744-9057, E-ISSN 1744-9065, Vol. 8, p. 135-153Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 183.
    Nordström, Anders
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Europeanization of Ukraine in the Sphere of Local Self-Governance?: The Monitoring of ECLSG Compliance in Ukraine2006In: Contemporary Change in Ukraine / [ed] Egle Rindzeviciute, Huddinge: Center for Baltic & East European Studies, Södertörns högskola , 2006, p. 35-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Nordström, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Interactive Dynamics of Regulation: Exploring the Council of Europe's Monitoring of Ukraine2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a time when a host of new and untested democracies seek membership in international organisations founded on liberal norms, the question of how to include new members without jeopardizing community values has become of growing concern, particularly as the regulation of practices in sovereign states often relies on soft moral or political commitment rather than on hard legal obligation. The Council of Europe’s (CoE) monitoring of new members after entry represents a soft method of socialising newcomers. In the case of Ukraine, this process has been unusually difficult, and full of strife and open confrontation. This experience runs contrary to the belief that soft regulation is either harmonic or impossible. The aim of the thesis is to explore how a regulated process of inclusion develops over time, and to discuss how such a process can safeguard community values.

    The study shows that an interactive dynamic developed between the European and the Ukrainian levels. The political struggle in Ukraine was, through the actions of the political opposition in Ukraine and the CoE’s monitors, transformed into a contest in the CoE over how to interpret Ukraine’s membership promises. European values were protected by the evolution of a mode of governance based on responsiveness to local concerns and on public discussion. In the process, the legal and political systems of the CoE and Ukraine were intertwined in ever more complex webs of dialogue. By being grounded in both the Ukrainian and European political discourses, the process was able to sustain a critical discussion on the terms of the agreement and maintain its relevance for the actors involved. The monitoring process displays how community values and autonomy of a member state can be combined in an unexpected way without resulting in a hierarchical order. This may not fulfil the requirements of the international rule of law, but it is clearly a case of soft and responsive transnational regulation of state practices.

  • 185.
    Obrenovic Johansson, Sanja
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Från kombifeminism till rörelse: Kvinnlig serbisk organisering i förändring2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is about seven women’s organizations in Belgrade, Serbia and their relations to domestic and international donors during the period 2003-2006. My main research questions focus on their choices of either domestic or international cooperation partners. How and why did the women organize themselves? What factors were essential when selecting donors? In what ways were the organizations influenced by donors?

    Through interviews, with organization representatives’ concepts such as gift and reciprocity, power and dependency, trust and mistrust and collective identity emerged.  These concepts were used as points of departure for developing deeper understanding of women organizations’ choice of cooperation partners.

    The women organizations’ basically had two alternatives for cooperation: cooperation with foreign donors which offered funds, organizational development and social networks. Alternately, cooperation with local donors, which offered the equivalent except for the organizational development. Cooperation with the foreign donor has resulted in more professional attitudes to the work that have been desired by other international donors. A result is that they can compete with other women’s organizations’ for international funding. Cooperation with local donors has led to fewer resources but more independent working practices. For these women organizations’ independence was important so they choose partners who, they felt more respected this allowing them to write articles or discuss gender in the media with little external influence. Regardless of the chosen donor the reciprocity is embedded in the relation between the donor and the receiver of aid, which in various ways is beneficial for both parties.

     

  • 186.
    Petrogiannis, Vasileios
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Rabe, Linn
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    What Is It That Holds A Region Together?2016In: Baltic Worlds In-house edition, p. 5-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Petronis, Vytautas
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Constructing Lithuania: Ethnic Mapping in Tsarist Russia, ca. 1800-19142007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 188.
    Petrov, Kristian
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    A Third Way for the Second World: Russia’s Ambivalent Identity2004In: Contemporary Change in Russia: In From the Margins? / [ed] Rindzeviciute, Egle, Huddinge: Baltic & East European Graduate School, Södertörns högskola , 2004, p. 31-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 189.
    Petrov, Kristian
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Den ojämna kampen: Om fyra säkerheter i Kants teori om det sublima2000In: Kants tredje kritik: Sju essäer / [ed] Liedman, Sven-Eric, Göteborg: Institutionen för litteratur, idéhistoria och religion vid Göteborgs universitet , 2000, p. 25-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 190.
    Petrov, Kristian
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Från vetenskaplig socialism till socialistisk vetenskap: Reflektioner kring sovjetisk vetenskapsideologi mot bakgrund av den ryska idéhistorien2004In: Vetenskapshistoriska uppsatser / [ed] Elzinga, Aant & Nilsson, Ingemar, Göteborg: Institutionen för idéhistoria och vetenskapsteori , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 191.
    Petrov, Kristian
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Replik på Jon Åsgårds 'Det amerikanska undret'2000In: Stockholm News, ISSN 1650-0784, no 8/11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 192.
    Petrov, Kristian
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Tillbaka till framtiden: Modernitet, postmodernitet och generationsidentitet i Gorbačevs glasnost´ och perestrojka2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation deals with the concepts glasnost and perestroika during the Gorbachev era 1985–1991. It offers an explanation to the rise and fall of these concepts and casts light on their modern and postmodern implications, as well as their historical and generational preconditions. In light of the Soviet and Russian conceptual history, Gorbachev’s articulation of glasnost and perestroika is contrasted with the reception of these concepts in what at that time came to be called Russian postmodernism. Glasnost and perestroika both confirm and transcend Soviet modernity. They are both future-oriented but at the same time possess retrospective anchorage. The present study reconstructs the experience encapsulated in the concepts, the expectations they unleashed and the tensions they triggered. The Gorbachev era signaled a rupture in the temporal order of modernity. During this time Soviet modernity lost confidence in its self. With glasnost and perestroika a suppressed past opened up which blocked the futurist potential inherent in the present. The concept-theoretical perspective assumed in the dissertation helps explain essential aspects of the dramatic turn of events. Postmodernism’s relationship to the concepts is mainly antagonistic. At the same time glasnost and perestroika were essential to the self-identity creating process of postmodernism and its development of an understanding of a specific late Soviet postmodern situation. Beneath the surface a conflict evolves, constituted in intergenerational terms. The vast differences in deployment of the two key notions appear related to generation specific historical experiences. This is apparent in the glasnost- and perestroika discussions of the 19th and 20th centuries. In several respects the 20th century discourse reflects that of the 19th century. The analysis in the present dissertation demonstrates how Gorbachev, on the basis of his generation-specific experience as a man of the 1960s actively sought to articulate an alternative reconstruction (perestroika) and did so with a distinct ideological accent. The postmodernists, the last Soviet generation, bore the imprint of the stagnation of the Brezhnev era and had no ideal past to resuscitate. Instead of reconstructing social reality they tried to place themselves outside it. This apolitical stance however embodied both anti-political and political implications.

  • 193.
    Petrusenko, Nadezda
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Stockholms universitet, Historiska institutionen.
    Creating the Revolutionary Heroines: The Case of Female Terrorists of the PSR (Russia, Beginning of the 20th Century)2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Representing revolutionary terrorists as heroes and martyrs was a typical feature of the mythology of the Russian revolutionary underground at the beginning of the 20th century. This mythology described Underground Russia, the world of the revolutionaries, as an ideal country inhabited by ideal people. The purpose of that epos was to represent the revolutionary struggle, and individual revolutionaries in such a way that they would gain sympathy from the wider public and become role models for other revolutionary fighters. Sympathetic representations of women who committed political violence seem to be especially shocking in the context of Russia at the beginning of the twentieth century, since female violent behavior contradicted the existing gender order.

    Employing theoretical perspectives of Critical Discourse Analysis, gender history and intersectionality, the dissertation analyzes the way narratives about the individual life paths of female terrorists of the Party of Socialist Revolutionaries (the PSR), the biggest socialist party in Russia at the beginning of the 20th century, were constructed in their revolutionary auto/biographies. It analyzes how the lives of women from different social and ethnic origins, of different ages, with different life paths, who happened to be united only by their participation in the political terrorism of the PSR, were recounted with the help of narratives used in the Russian revolutionary underground.

    The research findings demonstrate that the accounts of the lives of female PSR terrorists were constructed with the help of the dominant narrative that was formed as a conversion story. Within the framework of that narrative, the lives of individual women were adapted to the dominant discourse of heroism and martyrdom, and at the same time were contextualized within the dominant discourse on “good” femininity that existed in the Russian society, and even within the discourse on Jews as perpetual “Others” in the Russian empire in case of Jewish women. Social and ethnic backgrounds as well as individual circumstances of the terrorist women, however, transformed the dominant narrative, and thus created diversity of representations. The discursive practice of writing a revolutionary life accepted by Bolsheviks influenced the discursive practice employed in revolutionary auto/biographies of female terrorists written during the early Soviet period.

  • 194.
    Petrusenko, Nadezda
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Undervisning om rysk historia i Sverige: Vad påverkar en kurs innehåll?2010In: Tradition och praxis i högre utbildning: Tolv ämnesdidaktiska studier / [ed] Burman, Anders, Ana Graviz, Johan Rönnby, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2010, p. 211-221Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 195.
    Philipson, Joakim
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Purpose of Evolution: the 'struggle for existence' in the Russian-Jewish press 1860-19002008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Decline and revitalization in post-communist urban context: a case of the Polish city d Gdansk2008In: Communist and post-communist studies, ISSN 0967-067X, E-ISSN 1873-6920, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 359-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how different social, economic, historical and physical conditions coincide in the formation of space and processes of decline in the period of transformation in Poland. The focus lies on a specific residential area in the centre of the Polish city of Gdansk and the question why no improvements have been done in this particular area to stop its successive decline. It is among other things argued that clear urban policy together with improved urban planning and clear legislation on ownership are needed in order to improve conditions in this and other deprived areas of the city.

  • 197.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Gated Communities and the Construction of Social Class Markers in Postsocialist Societies: The Case of Poland2010In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 421-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyze how social class markers are constructed in the discourse on gated communities in a postsocialist urban context. The case of Poland is used as an example of apost-Communist country where the number of gated communities is increasing rapidly in urban areas. The material of study consists of 50 articles published in the largest national newspaper.

    This article argues that the discourse on gated communities is constituted by and constitutes class divisions and social class markers prevalent in the country since the fall of Communism. The “new” capitalistic system with its inherent social divisions is described as creating demands for “new” forms of housing where gates function as separators, protectors, and class identifiers. Residential differentiation is a reality in Polish society, and private space has become a symbol of exclusivity and spread throughout the country along with the popularity of gated forms of housing.

  • 198.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The emergence of enclaves of wealth and poverty: A sociological study of residential differentiation in post-communist Poland2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the fall of communism, some crucial political, economic and social changes have been taking place in the former communist societies. The objective of the thesis is to examine the processes of residential differentiation taking place in the urban landscape of the Polish city of Gdańsk after the introduction of the capitalist system. The focus is on different forms of residential differentiation and the social, economic and historical factors behind these forms. The empirical material that forms the basis of the thesis consists of interviews, newspaper articles, a questionnaire, official (national and local) reports and documents. Study I examines the way in which different social, economic, historical and physical conditions coincide in the formation of space and the processes of decline in the period of transformation in Poland. The focus lies on a specific residential area in the center of Gdańsk and the lack of improvements in this particular area, which would stop its successive decline. Study II explains the emergence of gated communities in the post-communist urban context and discusses the reasons for their increasing numbers and popularity. The main argument is that the popularity of gated communities is tightly intertwined with the communist past, emerging in reaction to the housing conditions that prevailed under communism. Study III investigates how social class markers are constructed in the discourse on gated communities in post-socialist Poland. The “new” capitalistic system, with its inherent social divisions, is described in the discourse as creating demands for “new” forms of housing, where gates function as separators, protectors and class identifiers. Study IV concentrates on the support for the formation of gated communities in the legal and regulatory framework in Poland since 1989. The paper asserts that the outcome of liberal politics and legal regulation in the country is the neglect of spatial planning and imprecise urban policies.

  • 199.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The rise of gated neighborhoods in Poland: legal and regulatory frameworkManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the support for the formation of gated communities in the legal and regulatory framework in Poland established since the fall of Communism in 1989. The focus is on how government policy with regard to spatial planning and housing, together with the law on property and ownership, affects the emergence and development of gated forms of housing in the country. The article argues that the outcome of liberal politics and legal regulation in the country is the result of a disregard for spatial planning and imprecise urban policies. Existing spatial plans are of a consultative nature and bear no regulatory capacity at the same time that spatial planning in the country is strongly in favor of landowners and new construction. In light of the present urban disarray, gated housing is an indirect result of neglected urban politics combined with loopholes in the regulations and pro-construction policies, which create a favorable environment for housing developers.

  • 200.
    Prekevicius, Nerijus
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Appraising Fourteen Years of Democratic Change in Lithuania: Institutions, Paricipation, Values2003In: Contemporary change in Lithuania / [ed] Egle Rindzeviciute, Huddinge: Baltic & East European Graduate School, Södertörns högskola , 2003, p. 35-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
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