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  • 151.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Channel surfing: Tuning into the sounds of English2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 202-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 152.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Comic strips2014In: Encyclopedia of Humor Studies / [ed] Salvatore Attardo, Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2014, 1, p. 155-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 153.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    Conversations in comic strip Swedish:: The case for applying conversation analysis to comic strip data2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    English swear words as Swedish humor2015In: Abstracts: 14th International Pragmatics Conference : ANTWERP, BELGIUM, 26-31 July 2015, International Pragmatics Association , 2015, p. 91-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    English-language swearing as humor in Swedish comic strips2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 121, p. 175-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I investigate the Swedish, non-native use of English swear words in Swedish-language comic strips. I first consider the established relationships between both swearing and humor, and comics and humor. I propose that swear word usage and the comic strip framework contribute to a mutual feedback loop, whereby the comic strip derives its humor from the use of English swear words, while at the same time the comic strip context, by invoking a play frame, primes the swear word usage for humorous interpretation. Modeling Siegel (1995), I then consider how a code-switch to English serves as a framing device or contextualization cue for humor in Swedish-language contexts. The analysis of a selection of Swedish comic strips draws from the Encryption Theory of Humor (Flamson and Barrett, 2008), and suggests that humor created via the Swedish practice of swearing in English is a function of shared background knowledge that capitalizes on the fundamental incongruity of two discourse systems operating under different norms of appropriateness.

  • 156.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    FUCK CANCER, Fucking Åmål, Aldrig fucka upp: The standardisation of fuck in Swedish media2017In: Advances in Swearing Research: New languages and new contexts / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten and Karyn Stapleton, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 65-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    I'm learneding!: First language acquisition in The Simpsons2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 257-281Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 158.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Introduction: The linguist's view of Television2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    På svenska svär vi gärna på engelska2018In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 1, p. 26-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 160.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Snuff said!: Conflicting employee and corporate interests in the pursuit of a tobacco client.2015In: Digital Business Discourse / [ed] Erika Darics, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 142-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents an analysis of intranet postings generated within a Swedish web consultancy during its pursuit of a tobacco company as client. Drawing from theories of crisis management, Beers Fägersten focuses on the emergent conflict and debate between employees who are in favor of having a tobacco company as a client, and those who are against it. The intranet thread reflects the use of discursive strategies typical of conflict management, but also strategies specific to the digital environment. A recurring theme in the debate is the navigation, negotiation and distinction of personal vs. corporate identities and interests.

  • 161.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Spritsnack: Samspelet mellan alkohol och samtal i den tecknade serien Rocky.2017In: Spiritus, ISSN 1404-465X, Vol. Webbpublikation, p. 15 s.-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 162.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    The role of swearing in creating an online persona: The case of YouTuber PewDiePie2017In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 18, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an investigation of the use of English-language swear words by Swedish, non-native speaker PewDiePie in the context of self-recorded, Let’s Play horror videos uploaded to the video-sharing website, YouTube. Situating PewDiePie within the greater media landscape to establish both his success and notoriety, this article addresses the local interpretation of the globalization of English and the use of English swear words in Swedish media. The practice of swearing in the gaming context is discussed, and swearing instances in a selection of three of PewDiePie’s horror game videos are analyzed. The article puts forth the argument that the use of English swear words contributes to the performance of PewDiePie as a specific, online persona, one that is both in line with the context of video gaming and conducive to a para-social relationship, allowing PewDiePie to achieve the overall goals of communicating with his viewers as peers and reducing the social distance between them. The article concludes that PewDiePie’s practice of social swearing not only simulates casual conversation between friends, but actively reduces social distance, creates the illusion of intimacy, and contributes to his unprecedented success on YouTube.

  • 163.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    The use of English swear words in Swedish media2014In: Swearing in the Nordic Countries / [ed] Marianne Rathje, Copenhagen: Dansk Sprognævn , 2014, 1, p. 63-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I present, analyze and consider the implications of the use of English swear words in Swedish media. First, I investigate the relationship between language and the media, focusing on the role of standard language forms in media discourse. I continue by exploring, within an Anglophone context, the use of swear words in the media. Next I present a brief survey of the use of English in Swedish. Finally, I present examples of the use of English-language swear words in Swedish media, showing how English-language swear words are appropriated by speakers of Swedish and suggesting that the use of English swear words in the media ratifies this appropriation, in turn establishing this practice as standard. I discuss the implications of this development in terms of the use of English swear words within a non-native speaker speech community, how usage may be in conflict with English native-speaker norms, and how the use of English swear words might come to characterize modern Swedish as well as a Swedish variety of English.

  • 164.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Watching TV with a Linguist2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    What's so funny about swearing in English?: Swearing and language choice in Swedish comics.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    What's the deal with morphemes?: Doing morphology with Seinfeld2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 181-201Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Fiorentini, Ilaria
    Insubria University, Italy.
    Lost and language found2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 282-306Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Stapleton, KarynUlster University.
    Advances in swearing research: New languages and new contexts2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Any behavior that arouses, as swearing does, controversy, disagreement, disdain, shock, and indignation as often as it imbues passion, sincerity, intimacy, solidarity, and jocularity should be an obvious target of in-depth scholarship. Rigorous, scholarly investigation of the practice of swearing acknowledges its social and cultural significance, and allows us to discover and better understand the historical, psychological, sociological, and linguistic aspects (among others) of swearwords and swearword usage. The present volume brings together a range of themes and issues central to the existing knowledge of swearing and considers these in two key ‘new’ arenas, that is, in languages other than English, and/or in contexts and media other than spoken interaction. Many of the chapters analysed are based on large and robust collections of data, such as corpora or questionnaire responses, which allow for patterns of swearing to emerge. In other chapters, personally observed instances of swearing comprise the focus, allowing for a close analysis of the relationship between sociolinguistic context and pragmatic function. In each chapter, the cultural aspects of swearing are considered, ultimately affirming the importance of the study of swearing, and further establishing the legitimacy of swearing as a target of research.

  • 169.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Stapleton, Karyn
    Ulster University.
    Introduction: Swearing research as variations on a theme2017In: Advances in Swearing Research: New languages and new contexts / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten and Karyn Stapleton, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 170.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Sveen, Hanna Andersdotter
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    SaMANtha: Language and gender in Sex and the City2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 85-113Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Boreus, Kristina
    Uppsala University.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University.
    Yazdanpanah, Soheyla
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Speaking up, leaving or keeping silent: racialized employees in the Swedish elderly care sector2017In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 954-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When encountering problems and dissatisfaction in the workplace, employees may choose between three strategies: voice; exit; or silence. Using survey data and interview material from a study of employees in an elderly care organization in Sweden, this article investigates the workers' perceptions of the eligibility and prospects of these strategies and which individual characteristics and situational factors might affect them. The focus is on racialized workers (operationalized through their region of birth) who, according to earlier studies, are less likely than other employees to choose voice behaviour. Contrary to some earlier studies, the results here attribute such a propensity to the importance of power differences across racial hierarchies' rather than to differences in cultural values. Individuals in this (racialized) category have a lower occupational status, earn less and experience less favourable relationships with their managers.

  • 172.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Stockholms universitet.
    Boréus, Kristina
    Uppsala universitet.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköpings universitet.
    Yazdanpanah, Soheyla
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Att verka för jämlika arbetsplatser: En studie av jämlikhet och ojämlikhet mellan anställda i äldrevården2017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Populärvetenskaplig rapport från ett projekt om ojämlikhet mellan kvinnliga och manliga anställda och mellan anställda från olika delar av världen i svensk äldrevård samt förslag till förbättrad jämlikhet på arbetsplatserna.

  • 173.
    Bellander, T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Landqvist, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Becoming the expert constructing health knowledge in epistemic communities online2018In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a discourse analytic framework, the article analyses health blogs and patient’s forum discussions in which parents to children with congenital heart defects recontextualize medical professional knowledge and share their own experiences. The study show how the two types of online media may serve as a means for parents to attain expert status in their own case by sharing lay knowledge expressed as an amalgamation of the two key perspectives–professional and experienced–as an indivisible unit. Monological discourses, such as narrating, in blogs and more direct and immediate responses in forum discussions are noted as examples of differences in how medical facts are explained and negotiated, how advice is provided and how patient expertise is created. The study also show how blogs and especially forum discussions are used to problematize the validity of actions and opinions of medical staff. The role of developing patient expertise in epistemic communities online may therefore come with a risk of spreading misrepresentation of medical cases. 

  • 174.
    Bellander, Theres
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Karlsson, Anna-Malin
    Uppsala universitet.
    Nikolaidou, Zoe
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Blogging as a Health Literacy Practice: Identity construction and knowledge-building in the writing of parents of children with heart defect2018In: Explorations in Ethnography, Language and Communication: Capturing linguistic and cultural diversities / [ed] Stina Hållsten & Zoe Nikolaidou, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2018, p. 127-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Bellander, Theres
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Nikolaidou, Zoe
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Building health knowledge online: Parents’ online information searching on congenital heart defects2017In: Literacy and Numeracy Studies: An international journal in the education and training of adults, ISSN 1441-0559, E-ISSN 1839-2903, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 4-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examines online searching as a digital health literacy practice and focuses on parents of children with congenital heart defects. Over the period of four years, we have conducted interviews with couples at different stages of pregnancy or parenthood and have encouraged them to reflect on their literacy practices when receiving a heart defect diagnosis, during the remaining time of their pregnancy and when living with a child with a heart defect. We have also read and analysed health blogs written by parents and focused on extracts where literacy events are described. Searching for information and support online is one of the most frequent practices amongst the participants in the study. The aim of this paper is therefore to highlight the complexity of looking for information online in order to take health decisions and provide care to a child with congenital illness. Based on what parents say they do when searching online, we focus on three main paths to knowledge: looking for medical facts, looking for other parents’ experiences and looking for practical information. We discuss digital health literacy practices as complex activities that often involve parents in the diagnosis and in the child’s medical care to such an extent that parents build up knowledge and become experts, not only in finding information and support but in talking and writing about their child’s illness. We also problematise the notion of trustworthy health information and show how facts and opinions often go hand in hand in platforms where health issues are discussed. Finally, we show some of the affordances and restrictions inherent in using the internet as a source for meaning making and learning about children’s health. The results reinforce our understanding of the socially framed nature of health literacy and make us focus on the digital as an additional important aspect in the practice of health literacy.

  • 176.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Avatar as second suit: Power and participation in virtual work2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Avatar as Second Suit: Power and Participation in Virtual Work2019In: Games and Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media, ISSN 1555-4120, E-ISSN 1555-4139, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 560-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an analysis of the experiences of user–avatar relations and interaction of people who work in a virtual world. Earlier research often claims that relationships between users and their avatars are, by nature, strong and intense. By analyzing individuals who conducted paid labor in a number of public institutions in a virtual world, this article argues that the frame of work heavily influenced the professional users’ experiences of using an avatar. The user–avatar relationship was mainly related to how and why the user entered the virtual world, their position in their off-line and online workplaces and, as a result, related to aspects of power and control over the framing of the online arena. Because of these factors, many of the professional users regarded their avatar more as a second suit than, as has often been argued, a second self.

  • 178.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Digital distinctions: Mechanisms of difference in digital media use2015In: MedieKultur: Journal of Media and Communication Research, ISSN 0900-9671, E-ISSN 1901-9726, Vol. 31, no 58, p. 30-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to understand the distinctive mechanisms of digital media use, seen in relation to cultural practices at large. The empirical material is a survey study of university students at the Business Administration, Media and Communication Stud-ies, Political Science and Philosophy departments at Södertörn University, Sweden. The empirical analysis deals with the students’ digital media use and preferences, and how these are related to their broader cultural practices and preferences. Spe-cific attention is paid to the webpages the students mention in the survey, and how these are distributed among the groups. By showing detailed information on these areas, the mechanisms of difference of digital media use are revealed.

  • 179.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ethics and morality beyond the Actor-Network: Doing the right thing in an algorithmic culture2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing governance and authority of algorithms and the rapid emergence of the ‘Internet of Things’, has intensified attention to the relationship between humans and machines, and to the ethics of everyday life with technologies. This raises a lot of questions: How should we live with technologies? Can humans make decisions? The question on the authority of humans is clearly debatable. In this paper I discuss the underlying premises for the ethical standpoint of Actor Network Theory (ANT) and explore other existing alternatives. I begin by looking into the basic premises of ANT, and the assumptions of ‘the human’ and of ethics it comprises. I then explore the notion of a ‘disclosive’ ethics and continue by penetrating the relation between agency and ethics in ANT. Following from this I discuss various different approaches to ethics, and how we can still keep a human notion of ethics in an algorithmic culture.

  • 180.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ethics Exists in Communication: Human‐machine ethics beyond the Actor‐Network2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing governance of algorithms and the rapid emergence of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the ‘Internet of Things’, has intensified discussions about the relationship between humans and machines, and the ethics of everyday life with technologies. It raises questions such as: How should we live with technologies? Can humans still make decisions? The earlier taken for granted authority of humans is clearly debatable, and sometimes also dismissed, particularly within Actor Network Theory (ANT). In this paper, I look into the basic premises of the ethics of ANT, explore suggested ethical perspectives within ANT such as ‘disclosive’ ethics, and continue by penetrating the relation between agency and ethics, as well as between morality and ethics in ANT. ANT is further discussed as on the one hand a sociological perspective and on the other hand an ethical approach. Based on this analysis I propose the anthropological perspective of an ‘ethics of the ordinary’ as a possible way to learn from the basic premises of ANT while maintaining a human notion of ethics in a technology‐conflated culture.

  • 181.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Faraway, So Close!: Proximity and distance in ethnography online2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 182.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Faraway, so close!: Proximity and distance in ethnography online2014In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 862-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues for a revised importance of distance, besides the much emphasized closeness, in the debate on and use of ethnographic methods in online environments. When returning to the founding fathers of ethnographic methods, distance is often put forward as a core aspect of ethnographic methods, something widely forgotten, or even rejected, in the current debate in the field. Space has been restructured by digital media technologies, and the spatial and temporal proximity of digital  media cultures present new challenges for research methodologies. Based on the author’s own experiences of ethnographic fieldwork in digital cultures, and with Henri Lefebvre’s theory of everyday life as a rhythm as vantage point, it is here argued that  distance, dialectically interlinked with closeness and proximity, should be given further attention in current research and debate on ethnographic methods used online.

  • 183.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Faraway, So Close!: Proximity and Distance in Ethnography Online2018In: Contemporary Approaches to Ethnographic Research: Volume 3: Digital Ethnography: Researching Online Worlds / [ed] Kahryn Hughes, Jerry Coulton, John Goodwin, and Jason Hughes, New Delhi: Sage Publications, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 184.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Janne Seppänen & Esa Väliverronen: Mediesamhället2013In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, no 1-2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Sensorial Organization as an Ethics of Space: Digital Media in Everyday Life2018In: Media and Communication, ISSN 2083-5701, E-ISSN 2183-2439, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 186.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The presentation of self in a virtual world: Working in Second Life2016In: Virtual Workers and the Global Labour Market / [ed] Juliet Webster and Keith Randle, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 1, p. 219-237Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The producer as vendor: Producing public space in a virtual world2013In: Producing the internet: Critical perspectives of social media / [ed] Tobias Olsson, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2013, p. 165-184Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 188.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The right to the citi(zen): Producing urban space in commercial media environments2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 189.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Right to the Citi(zen): Urban Spaces in Commercial Media Environments2016In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 478-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the publication of Henri Lefebvre’s book Le Droit à la ville (1968), a debate has emerged regarding the neoliberal takeover of urban spaces and activism. Nonetheless, in the past 10 years, we have seen the continuous expansion of public space via social networking media and, today, most public institutions in Western states use social networking sites to communicate with their “citizens.” Although there are many serious problems associated with this takeover, little has been said about them so far. In this article, I address the contribution of The right to the city to this debate by analyzing a public institution which tried to establish communication with its “citizens” in an urban space in a virtual world. My analysis concludes that the users of this new media platform did not regard themselves as citizens when they were dwelling in this urban space online, but instead saw themselves as the consumers they were addressed as in this environment.

  • 190.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Forsman, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Johansson, Sofia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Medielandskap och mediekultur: en introduktion till medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap2016 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 191.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstad University.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University.
    Media and Basic Desires: An Approach to Measuring the Mediatization of Daily Life2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extended indispensability of media can be seen as a key indicator of mediatization, whereby our lives become adapted to media. But even though we can assume that the pervasive character of digital media essentially changes everyday life and the way people experience it, we cannot take consequences of technological transformation for granted. Following from this we argue there is a need for quantitative analyses that can verify mediatization processes in time and space.

     

    Here we present a tool that measures the extent to which media reach into the deeper layers of daily human life, used in an empirical study conducted in Sweden in 2017. The results show that perceived media indispensability is played out along three dimensions of daily human life; (1) (re)production; (2) recognition, and (3) civic life, and appears as a socially structured and structuring process, although not in a very strong way. We argue this tool, in diachronic analyses, works as a measurement of mediatization.

  • 192.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Johansson, Bengt
    University of Gothenburg.
    Media Micro-Generations: How New Technologies Change Our Media Morality2018In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 95-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes and explores the notion of “media micro-generations”. Based on a survey of values and norms in relation to media-related behaviour in Sweden, we identify statistically significant media micro-generations. Through an analysis of the technologies that were introduced during the formative years of different media micro-generations, we propose that media micro-generations are formed with the introduction of new media technologies. Thus, the existence of media micro-generations illustrates how rapid trans- formations of media technologies can shape the moral notions of narrow age groups. It also explains why many earlier studies have detected a rather large span of years (1970-1985, in between the TV generation and the internet generation) during which no generational identity seems to have been formed.

  • 193.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Mediemoral i en digital värld2015In: Fragment / [ed] Bergström, A, Johansson B, Oscarsson H, Oskarsson M, Göteborg: SOM-institutet, Göteborgs universitet , 2015, 1, p. 551-559Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 194.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Vi vantrivs i det kommersiella (ett litet tag till)2016In: Människorna, medierna och marknaden: Medieutredningens forskningsantologi om en demokrati i förändring / [ed] Oscar Westlund, Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer, 2016, p. 189-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 195.
    Benson Marin, Johanna
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Teacher Education.
    Danielsson Jonsson, Petronella
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Teacher Education.
    "Det är roligt!": En studie om hur pedagoger använder estetiska lärprocesser i arbetet med naturvetenskap i förskolan2014Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how teachers perceive that they work with science in preschool through aesthetic learning processes as tools both in the indoor and outdoor environment and make visible what the educators' underlying beliefs are that affect how they perceive aesthetic learning processes as tools used to deepen children's understanding of different scientific phenomena.

    This is an interview study using the phenomenographic approach as a means and method to make visible and report on teachers' views on how aesthetic learning processes can be used to extend preschool children's learning about science. The results are analyzed and discussed based on John Dewey's theoretical ideas about children's learning, aesthetics and science.

    The study clearly shows that teachers' views on aesthetic learning processes and how they can be used in the work whit science is very divided and in some cases unreflective. The most striking results are that teachers often are unaware that they make use of aesthetic learning processes because they have a more limited view of what it is than we have in the paper. All informants have science as a core subject. Their focus of the activity is located at the showing and visualizeing of scientific phenomena and some of them express that they submit the aesthetic learning processes to their colleagues or that they collaborate with someone who has training in some art form. During these collaborations the educators are responsible of their respective subjects, and rarely have deeper knowledge about the other topic.

  • 196.
    Benson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    Ordets tillblivelse: aspekter av Nietzsches tidiga språkfilosofi2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis examines the nineteenth century German philosopher and philologist Friedrich Nietzsche’s early notion of how a word is generated in the process of perception. It does so by looking at the “metaphorical transitions” Nietzsche talks about in the essay “Über Wahrheit und Lüge im außermoralischen Sinne” (“On Truth and Lie in an Extra-MoralSense”). According to the relevant passage in “On Truth and Lie…“ an image is first created as a metaphor for a stimulus and a word is then created as a metaphor for the image. Nietzsche also states that the word has two fundamental aspects: metaphor and concept. The essay, and in particular the passage on the metaphorical transitions, has often been interpreted either from a skeptical viewpoint, saying that Nietzsche’s enterprise is to reject philosophical realism and the Aristotelian/Kantian correspondence theory of truth. Or it has been interpreted from a dogmatic viewpoint, saying that Nietzsche holds that there is an insurmountable barrier between “consciousness” and “the world” and that human knowledge is therefore doomed only to consist of private and erroneous representations of a world beyond the reach of the intellect. This thesis suggests a third way of looking at the passage, where the metaphorical transitions are taken to be the very possibility of knowledge, since they constitute the human way of being in the world. Thus Nietzsche’s train of thought in “On Truth and Lie...” is interpreted as a general model for looking at how knowledge arises. By force of this interpretation, it is argued that a consequence of Nietzsche’s position is that the epistemological strength of language, taken as the ability to pose the question what something is, lies in its image creating aspect, the metaphor, rather than in its discursive aspect, the concept.

  • 197.
    Benyamine, Isak
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Haglund, Liza
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Estetiska erfarenheter och elevers sociala rätt: Den goda människan från Sezuan2017In: Estetiska uttryck och barns rättigheter i utbildning / [ed] Margareta Aspán, Jutta Balldin, Charlotte Engel & Anna Röing Hellberg, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, 1, p. 113-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 198. Benyamine, Isak
    et al.
    Haglund, Liza
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Persson, Anders, J
    Att slippa tänka själv: Filosofiska samtal som undersökande gemenskaper i skolan2014 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 199.
    Berenstein, Natalia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Female Ashes, Knowledge, and the Construction of Masculinity: Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Bradbury’s dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451, knowledge is illegal, and popular culture is promoted as a way to control society. Guy Montag, the central character of the book, undergoes through a journey of liberation from the oppressive system to the further achievement of the forbidden knowledge. The female characters in the book are key to his awakening and evolvement. Unfortunately during the course of the story these women perish. Using the theories of Simone De Beauvoir and Janice Radway, this essay explores the concept of “otherness” and the consumption of popular culture in a patriarchal and oppressive society. This paper also argues that the construction of the masculinity of the protagonist would not be possible without the women, and their death is a violent reaffirmation of a patriarchal order.

  • 200.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    När orden inte räcker till: en kvalitatitv intervjustudie om barns användning av mobilspråket emoji2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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