sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123 101 - 140 of 140
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    Forsman, Michael
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    Bingolotto: produktion, text, reception2002Book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Bingolotto: produktion, text, reception
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 102.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    Forsman, Michael
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    Medien- und Kommunikationswissenschaft in Schweden: Zergliederung oder Ko-Existenz?2000In: Montage/AV. Zeitschrift für Theorie und Geschichte audiovisueller Kommunikation, ISSN 0942-4954, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 187-201Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    Forsman, Michael
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    Video2002In: Medie-Sverige: statistik och analys. 2001/2002 / [ed] Ulla Carlsson & Ulrika Facht, Göteborg: NORDICOM-Sverige , 2002, p. 281-310Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Institutionen för medier, konst och filosofi, Media and Communication Studies.
    Hammer, MonicaSödertörn University, School of Life Sciences.Kirsch, Frank-MichaelSödertörn University, School of Language and Culture, German language.Szrubka, WojciechSödertörn University, School of Political Science, Economics and Law, Political science.
    The challenge of the Baltic sea region: culture, ecosystems, democracy2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the collapse of the Soviet Union the Baltic Sea Region and Eastern Europe have attracted increasing interest from researchers from various disciplines. This book gathers researchers from the humanities, the social and natural sciences, who in their respective ways, and from a wide range of perspectives, attempt to come to grips with the challenges that the region poses for research.

    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 105.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Hepp, Andreas
    University of Bremen, ZeMKI, Germany.
    The Complexities of Mediatization: Charting the Road Ahead2017In: Dynamics of Mediatization: Institutional Change and Everyday Transformations in a Digital Age / [ed] Driessens, Olivier; Bolin, Göran; Hjarvard, Stig; Hepp, Andreas, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 315-332Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 106.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Jerslev, A.
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Surveillance through media, by media, in media2018In: Northern Lights, ISSN 1601-829X, E-ISSN 2040-0586, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 3-21Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the spread of digital media, the interdisciplinary field of surveillance studies has gained prominence, engaging scholars from the humanities and the social sciences alike. This introductory article aims to map out the main terrain of surveillance through, by and in the media. First, we discuss the phenomenon of, and the scholarly work on, surveillance through and by media, taking into consideration both state and corporate surveillance and how these activities have grown with the new digital and personal media of today. We then discuss surveillance as the phenomenon is represented in the media and how representations relate to surveillance practices. We conclude by presenting the articles of this special issue.

  • 107.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Jerslev, Anne
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Introduction2020In: Nordic Journal of Media Studies, E-ISSN 2003-184X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Jordan, Paul
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    From Nation Branding to Information Warfare: The Management of Information in the Ukraine–Russia Conflict2016In: Media and the Ukraine Crises: Hybrid media practice and narratives of conflict / [ed] Mervi Pantti, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2016, p. 3-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholarly attention regarding the conflict between Russia and Ukraine has mainly concentrated on so-called Russian propaganda, directed both towards Russian-speaking populations and the international public, but less attention has been paid to the management of information from Ukraine. In this chapter is proposed that the conflict between Ukraine and Russia has engaged an entirely new set of actors engaged in the management of information, most notably from PR and nation branding activities, as well as journalists, oligarchs and various individuals with an interest in Ukraine’s international image. These new actors bring with them competences, ideologies and practices from their field of origin which impact on the practice and expressive character of information warfare. In this chapter we analyse three domains of communication used by Ukraine to address external audiences; the Ukraine Crisis Media Centre (UCMC), the English language news channel Ukraine Today and the fact checking website StopFake. With a focus on both individuals as well as the institutions they represent, this chapter explores the way in which actors in Ukraine have attempted to shape the content of the messages communicated.

  • 109.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kalmus, Veronika
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Figueiras, Rita
    Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Portugal.
    Conducting Online Focus Group Interviews With Two Generations: Methodological Experiences and Reflections From the Pandemic Context2023In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, many research projects were forced to adapt their design and conduct interviews online. This paper discusses the benefits and challenges of using online focus groups with participants representing different generations and cultural and social backgrounds. Based on the researchers’ experiences and field notes from a three-country comparative project, aiming at analysing the extent to which previous experience of state surveillance impacted attitudes to commercial monitoring and tracking of online behaviour among two generational cohorts, the paper identifies seven aspects where the move from offline to online interviewing interfered with the original research design. The paper suggests that most of these interferences resulted in a need to adjust the methodology to better fit the online setting. We reflect critically upon the issues of technological preconditions and digital skills, recruitment, group size, degrees of previous acquaintance, the role of the interviewer, participants’ household status and media environment, and ethical considerations concerning privacy and data management. Based on these methodological insights, we conclude that future online focus group research would benefit from using smaller groups and adjusted moderation, flexibility in interviewing tools and channels, and new, online-specific ethical considerations when planning, executing, and analysing interviews. The paper advocates the complementarity between in-person and online focus groups as two modalities of data collection and argues for the normalization of hybrid methods. © The Author(s) 2023.

  • 110.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kalmus, Veronika
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Figueiras, Rita
    Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Portugal.
    Björklund, Erik
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Social Media Surveillance and Authoritarianism: Final Report2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the attitudes of online media users to the vast collection of personal data held by commercial platform companies? Do previous experiences of state surveillance have an impact on these attitudes? Do they differ for those brought up in the surveillance regime of Estonia during the Soviet Union era, or who experienced the surveillance apparatus in Portugal under authoritarian dictatorship? Do Swedish media users without authoritarian surveillance experiences differ in their attitudes to commercial surveillance? 

    These questions are discussed in this final report from the project Social Media Surveillance and Authoritarianism (Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, 2020–2023), a three-country comparative study (Estonia, Portugal, Sweden). The project aimed to analyse the role of past experiences of state surveillance on attitudes to dataveillance, that is, the commercial surveillance stemming from online media that is at the heart of data capitalism. 

    The report accounts for the aims, objectives, theoretical and methodological points of departure and and presents empirical examples of the results. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Social Media Surveillance and Authoritarianism
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 111.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kunelius, Risto
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    The return of propaganda: Historical legacies and contemporary conceptualisations2023In: Nordic Journal of Media Studies, E-ISSN 2003-184X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    In this introductory article, we discuss the rise of the “classical” theories of propaganda, starting with an historical exposé of the concept, which traces its roots and trajectory through the field of academic analysis. Propaganda is then discussed in relation to other adjacent concepts such as soft power, public diplomacy, nation branding, fake news, and so on. In a third section, the concept of propaganda is discussed in relation to the present datafied world, marked by various forms of crises – of democracy and of the environment, for example. In the last section, the articles included in this themed issue are presented and related to the preceding historical and conceptual discussion.

  • 112.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Lindholm, Tommy
    Film, video och DVD2007In: Medie-Sverige: statistik och analys. 2007 / [ed] Ulla Carlsson & Ulrika Facht, Göteborg: NORDICOM-sverige , 2007, p. 273-315Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, Institutionen för medier, konst och filosofi, Media and Communication Studies.
    Lindholm, Tommy
    Film, video och DVD2004In: Medie-Sverige: statistik och analys. 2004 / [ed] Ulla Carlsson & Ulrika Facht, Göteborg: NORDICOM-sverige , 2004, p. 325-385Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Miazhevich, G.
    University of Leicester, UK.
    The soft power of commercialised nationalist symbols: Using media analysis to understand nation branding campaigns2018In: European Journal of Cultural Studies, ISSN 1367-5494, E-ISSN 1460-3551, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 527-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the late 1990s, nation branding has attracted a lot of attention from academics, professional consultants and government actors. The ideas and practices of nation branding are frequently presented by branding advocates as necessary and even inevitable in the light of changing dynamics of political power and influence in a globalised and media-saturated world. In this context, some have argued that nation branding is a way to reduce international conflict and supplant ethno-nationalism with a new form of market-based, national image management. However, a growing body of critical studies has documented that branding campaigns tend to produce ahistorical and exclusionary representations of the nation and advance a form of ‘commercial nationalism’ that is problematic. Importantly, the critical scholarship on nation branding has relied primarily on sociological and anthropological theories of nationhood, identities and markets. By contrast, the role of the media – as institutions, systems and societal storytellers – has been undertheorised in relation to nation branding. The majority of the existing literature tends to treat the media as ‘neutral’ vehicles for the delivery of branding messages to various audiences. This is the guest editors’ introduction to the Special Issue ‘Theorizing Media in Nation Branding’, which seeks to problematise this overly simplistic view of ‘the media’ and aims to articulate the various ways in which specific media are an integral part of nation branding. It adopts an interdisciplinary approach and problematises both the enabling and the inhibiting potentialities of different types of media as they perpetuate nation branding ideas, images, ideologies, discourses and practices.

  • 115.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, Institutionen för medier, konst och filosofi, Media and Communication Studies.
    Notini, Agnes
    Södertörn University College, Institutionen för medier, konst och filosofi, Media and Communication Studies.
    Character of Sample and Responses2005In: The media landscape of Södertörn 2002: media use, values and everyday life in southern Stockholm / [ed] Göran Bolin, Huddinge: Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap, Södertörns högskola , 2005, 1, p. 57-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Skogerbø, Eli
    University of Oslo.
    Age, Generation and the Media2013In: Northern Lights, ISSN 1601-829X, E-ISSN 2040-0586, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 117.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Between community and commodity: Nationalism and Nation Branding2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 118.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Disruption and transformation in media events theory: The case of the Euromaidan Revolution in Ukraine2022In: Nordic Journal of Media Studies, E-ISSN 2003-184X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 99-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Media events, Dayan and Katz argue, compose a narrative genre that follows specific structural principles and narrative tropes and that works toward societal integration. However, a specific subset of media events is labelled transformative, and these work towards societal change. In this article, we point to an unresolved tension between transformative events and what has subsequently been introduced as disruptive events. Our discussion builds on research on the developments in post-Soviet Ukraine, and we analyse, firstly, the transformative and disruptive relations related to the so-called Euromaidan Revolution, and secondly, how these events can be placed in a wider narrative of three Ukrainian revolutions. Our analysis concludes that narrative analysis can help explain the ways in which these events are understood by broader international audiences.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 119.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Mediating the Nation-State: Agency and the Media in Nation-Branding Campaigns2015In: International Journal of Communication, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 9, p. 3065-3083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 120.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Nation branding vs. nation building revisited: Ukrainian information management in the face of the Russian invasion2023In: Place Branding and Public Diplomacy, ISSN 1751-8040, E-ISSN 1751-8059, Vol. 19, p. 218-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article re-evaluates some of the previous assumptions made related to the communication practices and information management in Ukraine since before the Euromaidan revolution in 2013. We highlight two points where previous knowledge about nation branding and nation building must be rethought in light of the latest developments Firstly, nation branding is no longer exclusively an activity that is directed to an audience of foreign investors and tourists, but also toward the international field of politics. Simultaneously, it is also clearly directed toward a domestic audience-the citizens of Ukraine. Secondly, this means that there may no longer be any sharp distinction between nation building and nation branding-at least not in times of an ongoing armed conflict.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 121.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The mediatized nation: Identity, agency and audience in nation branding campaigns2019In: InMediaciones de la Comunicación, ISSN 1510-5091, no 2, p. 187-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nation branding is a dynamic and rapidly developing practice and a subprocess under the wider process of mediatization for promoting or readjusting images of a nation-state for tourists or investors. Especially young nation states have a felt need to build new images of themselves in the eyes of the surrounding world, but since these nation states also have a short history of sovereignty, they simultaneously need to build the social solidarity and community inwards, to form the basis needed for the building of a nation. This article takes its departure in this tension and addresses three themes – agency, audience and identity – that we consider needs further theorizing due to the fact that the practice is yet trying to find its form. These themes are discussed in relation to the branding efforts in the new Eastern European state of Ukraine over the past decade. It is concluded that the nation branding campaigns are today orchestrated also by domestic PR agencies (to the contrary of the previous dominance of British agencies), that the domestic audience is taken into consideration in other ways than in previous branding campaigns, and that the questions of identity construction is more complex than what is previously accounted for. The Ukrainian case thus illustrates the mediatization of national symbols in contemporary society.

  • 122.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The PowerPoint Nation: Branding an Imagined Commodity2021In: European Review, ISSN 1062-7987, E-ISSN 1474-0575, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 445-456Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the formation of the modern nation state and the social imaginary of nationalism in the nineteenth century, the media and representational practices have, among most scholars, been ascribed a prominent position. The question is, however, how have changes in media technologies, from mass media to digital and interactive personal media, impacted on the national imaginaries over the past few decades? This article discusses what happens with the social imaginaries when national(ist) symbols are reproduced through the medium of PowerPoint, as one of the main tools for constructing images of the nation in nation-branding campaigns, i.e. promotional campaigns initiated by governments in conjunction with corporate actors with the aim of producing an attractive image of a country for foreign investors and tourists. It is concluded that the representational technology of PowerPoint produces a nation as an imagined commodity rather than an imagined community.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 123.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Velkova, Julia
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Audience-metric continuity? Approaching the meaning of measurement in the digital everyday2020In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 42, no 7-8, p. 1193-1209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues for an expansion of existing studies on the meaning of metrics in digital environments by evaluating a methodology tested in a pilot study to analyse audience responses to metrics of social media profiles. The pilot study used the software tool Facebook Demetricator by artist Ben Grosser in combination with follow-up interviews. In line with Grosser’s intentions, the software indeed provoked reflection among the users. In this article, we reflect on three kinds of disorientations that users expressed, linked to temporality, sociality and value. Relating these to the history of audience measurement in mass media, we argue that there is merit in using this methodology for further analysis of continuities in audience responses to metrics, in order to better understand the ways in which metrics work to create the ‘audience commodity’.

  • 124.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    von Feilitzen, Cecilia
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    Åker, Patrik
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    Mediekonvergens och innehållsdivergens: Tekniker, genrer och institutioner i förändring2003In: Medie-Sverige: statistik och analys. 2007 / [ed] Ulla Carlsson & Ulrika Facht, Göteborg: NORDICOM-Sverige , 2003, p. 9-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 125.
    Bolin, Göran
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Westlund, Oscar
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Mobile Generations: The Role of Mobile Technology in the Shaping of Swedish Media Generations2009In: International Journal of Communication, E-ISSN 1932-8036, no 3, p. 108-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often argued that young people are among the first to adopt new mediatechnologies, and that they are especially keen on taking on all new featuresconnected with mobile technology and the Internet. In spite of this oft-repeatedclaim, one could suspect that since computers and mobile phones have become sowidespread among large portions of the populations in the industrialised world, itmight not be technology, per se, that distinguishes the young from the old, butrather the actual ways in which it is used. One approach to discuss this is in termsof media generations. It could be expected that generations that have grown upwith different mediated experiences during their formative years will relate to themobile technology in a variety of ways (cf. Mannheim, 1952 & Volkmer, 2006). Inthis article, three such generations are analysed: the radio/print generation (born inthe 1930s), the TV generation (born in the 1950s), and the mobile technologygeneration (born in the 1980s). Access and usage patterns are researched, and thedegree to which the three generations differ when it comes to their relations tomobile technology is discussed, but also the unifying character of the mobiletelephony usage. Our methodological approach is quantitative, analysing resultsfrom annually conducted postal surveys that are representative for the Swedishpopulation.

  • 126.
    Couldry, N.
    et al.
    London School of Economics and Political Science, UK.
    Rodriguez, C.
    Temple University, USA.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Cohen, J.
    Georgetown University, USA.
    Volkmer, I.
    The University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Goggin, G.
    The University of Sydney, Australia.
    Kraidy, M.
    University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    Iwabuchi, K.
    Monash University, Australia.
    Qiu, J. L.
    The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Wasserman, H.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Zhao, Y.
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Rincón, O.
    Universidad de los Andes, Colombia.
    Magallanes-Blanco, C.
    Universidad Iberoamericana de Puebla, México.
    Thomas, P. N.
    The University of Queensland, Australia.
    Koltsova, O.
    National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia.
    Rakhmani, I.
    University of Indonesia, Indonesia.
    Lee, K. -S
    Seoul National University of Science and Technology, South Korea.
    Media, communication and the struggle for social progress2018In: Global Media and Communication, ISSN 1742-7665, E-ISSN 1742-7673, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 173-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the role of media and communications in contributing to social progress, as elaborated in a landmark international project – the International Panel on Social Progress. First, it analyses how media and digital platforms have contributed to global inequality by examining media access and infrastructure across world regions. Second, it looks at media governance and the different mechanisms of corporatized control over media platforms, algorithms and content. Third, the article examines how the democratization of media is a key element in the struggle for social justice. It argues that effective media access – in terms of distribution of media resources, even relations between spaces of connection and the design and operation of spaces that foster dialogue, free speech and respectful cultural exchange – is a core component of social progress.

  • 127.
    Couldry, Nick
    et al.
    London School of Economics and Political Science, UK.
    Rodriguez, Clemencia
    Temple University, USA.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Cohen, Julie
    Georgetown University, USA.
    Goggin, Gerard
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Kraidy, Marwen
    University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    Iwabuchi, Koichi
    Monash University, Australia.
    Lee, Kwang-Suk
    Seoul National University of Science and Technology, South Korea.
    Qiu, Jack
    Chinese University, Hong Kong.
    Volkmer, Ingrid
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Wasserman, Herman
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Zhao, Yuezhi
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Koltsova, Olessia
    National Research University, Russia.
    Rakhmani, Inaya
    University of Indonesia, Indonesia.
    Rincón, Omar
    Fundación Friedrich Ebert, Colombia.
    Magallanes-Blanco, Claudia
    Universidad Iberoamericana Puebla, Mexico.
    Thomas, Pradip
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Media and Communications2018In: Rethinking Society for the 21st Century: Report of the International Panel on Social Progress: Volume 2: Political Regulation, Governance, and Societal Transformations, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 523-562Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Developments in digital technologies over the last 30 years have expanded massively human beings' capacity to communicate and connect. Media infrastructures have acquired huge complexity as a result of rapid technological change and the uneven spread of access. This is a good time to think critically about 'connection' and its potential contribution to social progress. We first explore key developments in media infrastructures and communication flows across the world, bringing out salient differences in the local evolution of, and inequalities in media access. Second, we examine how media – as infrastructures of connection – contribute to public knowledge and enable new types of encounter between people on various scales, while also enabling counter-movements for social progress. Third, we examine the changing governance of media infrastructures, the issues of social justice that such infrastructures raise and the counter-movements to which they give rise. Fourth, we consider media as a specific site of struggle for social progress, arguing that measures of social progress themselves need to be expanded to take account of the human needs (such as voice) that media serve. Overall the chapter reflects on how media and communications flows and infrastructures both maintain and challenge asymmetries of power, with complex implications for social progress.

  • 128. Das, Ranjana
    et al.
    Kleut, Jelena
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    New Genres – New Roles for the Audience?: An Overview of Recent Research2013In: Audience Transformations: Shifting Audience Positions in Late Modernity / [ed] Nico Carpentier, Kim Schröder & Lawrie Hallett, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 30-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Driessens, Oliver
    et al.
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Bolin, GöranSödertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.Hepp, AndreasUniversity of Bremen, ZeMKI, Germany.Hjarvard, StigUniversity of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Dynamics of Mediatization: Institutional Change and Everyday Transformations in a Digital Age2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume sheds light on the underlying dynamics of mediatization, disentangling the actual unfolding of mediatization processes. The wide adoption and deep embedding of digital media and technology brings new questions to mediatization studies: how can we grasp this ‘deep mediatization’? In which way should we develop existing approaches of mediatization to analyse such dynamics? What are the consequences of this for theorising and empirically studying mediatization?  By using these questions as a starting point, this book presents an innovative and original collection that is dedicated to both the underlying dynamics of mediatization and recent dynamics related to digital media.

  • 130.
    Figueiras, Rita
    et al.
    Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Portugal.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kalmus, Veronika
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Toward a Datafied Mindset: Conceptualizing Digital Dynamics and Analogue Resilience2024In: Social Media + Society, E-ISSN 2056-3051, Vol. 10, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the ways in which what we call the analogue and the datafied mindsets perceive the functioning of the datafied world. Based on a qualitative interview study of two generations of media users in Estonia, Portugal, and Sweden, we present and analyze underlying patterns in participants’ media attitudes and related practices. We show that belonging to a media generation does not always produce a homogeneous mindset or a uniform attitude toward media technologies. These mindsets, being ideal-typical constructs, are not bound to individuals: the same person can display features of the analogue and the datafied mindset in relation to different parts of the datafied world. One mindset does not replace the other but rather adds another layer to the social action of the individuals. The mindsets are multi-dimensional and molded by contrasting understandings, indicating that the tenacious structures of the analogue world linger on in the datafied social space. 

  • 131.
    Fuchs, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Introduction to the special section "Critical theory and political economy of the internet (Nordmedia 2011)"2012In: tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique, E-ISSN 1726-670X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 30-32Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an introduction to tripleC's special section "Critical Theory and Political Economy of the Internet" that presents papers from a session at the Nordmedia Conference 2011 (August 11-13, 2011, University of Akureyri, Iceland).

  • 132.
    Hepp, A.
    et al.
    University of Bremen, Germany.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Guzman, A. L.
    Northern Illinois University, USA.
    Loosen, W.
    Leibniz Institute for Media Research, Germany.
    Mediatization and Human-Machine Communication: Trajectories, Discussions, Perspectives2024In: Human-Machine Communication, ISSN 2638-6038, Vol. 7, p. 7-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As research fields, mediatization and Human-Machine Communication (HMC) have distinct historical trajectories. While mediatization research is concerned with the fundamental interrelation between the transformation of media and communications and cultural and societal changes, the much younger field of HMC delves into human meaning-making in interactions with machines. However, the recent wave of “deep mediatization,” characterized by an increasing emphasis on general communicative automation and the rise of communicative AI, highlights a shared interest in technology’s role within human interaction. This introductory article examines the trajectories of both fields, demonstrating how mediatization research “zooms out” from overarching questions of societal and cultural transformations, while HMC tends to “zoom in” to approach the concrete situatedness of the interaction between humans and machines. It is argued that we need to combine both perspectives to better understand how the automation of communication transforms the social construction of culture and society. This article offers an overview of the key themes explored in this thematic issue, highlighting the productive intersection of HMC and mediatization within each article. Additionally, it identifies potential avenues for future research emerging from this fruitful intersection. 

  • 133.
    Kalmus, Veronika
    et al.
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Figueiras, Rita
    Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Portugal.
    Who is afraid of dataveillance?: Attitudes toward online surveillance in a cross-cultural and generational perspective2022In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares surveillance-related experiences and attitudes of two generations of media users in countries with different historical surveillance regimes (Estonia, Portugal, and Sweden) and analyzes the predictors of the attitudes toward contemporary surveillance. A large-scale online survey (N = 3221) reveals that attitudes toward online state and corporate surveillance are interrelated; the two attitudinal components are, however, generation-specific, having different predictors. Tolerance toward state surveillance is more characteristic of the older group, being predicted by trustful and obedient attitudes toward state authorities and institutions. Tolerance toward corporate dataveillance is more characteristic of the younger group, being predicted by active and self-confident media use. While the socio-historical context molds the intergenerational gaps in surveillance-related experiences and attitudes, individual-level experiences of state surveillance do not predict tolerance toward either type of contemporary surveillance, suggesting that global techno-cultural developments are probably more powerful factors than past experiences in forming generation-specific attitudes.

  • 134.
    Kopecka-Piech, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Maria Curie- Skłodowska University, Poland.
    Bolin, GöranSödertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Contemporary Challenges in Mediatisation Research2023Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book focuses on key challenges related to conducting research on mediatisation, presenting the most current theoretical, empirical, and methodological challenges and problems, addressing ignored and less frequently discussed topics, critical and controversial themes, and defining niches and directions of development in mediatisation.

    With a focus on the under-representation of certain topics and aspects, as well as methodological, technological, and ethical dilemmas, the chapters consider the main critical objections formulated against mediatisation studies and exchange critical positions. Moving beyond areas of common focus – culture, sport, and religion – to emerging areas of study such as fashion, the military, business, and the environment, the book then offers a critical assessment of the transformation of fields and the relevance of new and dynamic (meta)processes including datafication, counter-mediatisation, and platformisation.

    Charting new paths of development in mediatisation, this book will be of interest to scholars and students of mediatisation, media studies, media literacy, communication studies, and research methods.

  • 135.
    Kopecka-Piech, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Maria Curie- Skłodowska University, Poland.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Introduction: Approaching the Challenges of Mediatisation2023In: Contemporary Challenges in Mediatisation Research / [ed] Katarzyna Kopecka-Piech; Göran Bolin, London: Routledge, 2023, 1, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter offers a brief characterisation of mediatisation research, and critically discusses mediatisation as a “sensitising concept”, as a research programme, a research field, an approach, or a paradigm. It provides a historical overview of how the concept and the field has developed over the past few decades until now, and what has shaped it in this way. The chapter aims to account for the various approaches (the institutional perspective on mediatisation, the technological, and the cultural or social constructionist); and discusses ontological and epistemological differences. It describes the main challenges and objections/criticisms to mediatisation studies defined so far, types of transformations that have been analysed, and which are neglected and marginalised. The chapter also presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in this book.

  • 136.
    Kopecka-Piech, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Maria Curie- Skłodowska University, Poland.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Limitations and New Directions for the Development of Mediatisation as a Research Field2023In: Contemporary Challenges in Mediatisation Research / [ed] Katarzyna Kopecka-Piech; Göran Bolin, London: Routledge, 2023, 1, p. 195-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this book has been to discuss the key challenges related to mediatisation research, and to highlight and critically examine the methodological, technological, and ethical problems that the field is facing. The ambition has been to identify limitations, gaps, and deficiencies, but also to discuss problematic aspects of particular approaches, to highlight contradictions and paradoxes, and to take note of under-represented areas. This chapter summarises the ways in which the book’s contributors have addressed these topics. The body of work in mediatisation studies is rich enough to build on, and as some authors emphasise, what is needed is an awareness and good knowledge of that body of work, which some studies lack. Interdisciplinarity appears nowadays as a natural paradigm of conducting research on mediatisation. Researchers of mediatisation are in this respect burdened with a kind of responsibility, but they can also be said to be well equipped to contribute with improvements to existing research ethically.

  • 137.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Between community and commodity: nationalism and nation branding2010In: Communicating the nation: national topographies of global media landscapes / [ed] Anna Roosvall & Inga Salovaara-Moring, Göteborg: Nordicom , 2010, p. 79-101Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Having a Soul or Choosing a Face?: Nation Branding, identity and Cosmopolitan Imagination2016In: Social Identities, ISSN 1350-4630, E-ISSN 1363-0296, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 274-290Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Managing Meaning in Ukraine: Information, Communication, and Narration since the Euromaidan Revolution2023Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An in-depth look at Ukraine's attempts to shape how it is perceived by the rest of the world.

    During times of crisis, competing narratives are often advanced to define what is happening, and the stakes of information management by nations are high. In this timely book, Göran Bolin and Per Ståhlberg examine the fraught intersection of state politics, corporate business, and civil activism to understand the dynamics and importance of meaning management in Ukraine. Drawing on fieldwork inside the country, the authors discuss the forms, agents, and platforms within the complex political and communicative situation and how each articulated and acted upon perceptions of the propaganda threat.

    Bolin and Ståhlberg focus their analysis on the period between 2013 and 2022, when political tensions, commercial dynamics, and new communication technologies bred novel forms of information management. As they show, entities from governments and governmental administration to commercial actors, entrepreneurs, and activists formed new alliances in order to claim a stake in information policy. Bolin and Ståhlberg also explore how the various agents engaged in information management and strove to manage meaning in communication practice; the communicative tools they took advantage of; and the subsequent consequences for narrative constructions.

  • 140.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Nationen som vara och gemenskap: Identitet, agens och publik inom nationsmarknadsföring2015In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 289-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
123 101 - 140 of 140
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf