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  • 101.
    Hedbom, Shawn
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Klimatdemonstrationer - något för den yngre generationen?: En kvantiativ studie om klimatdemonstrationer och dem som väljer att delta2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine the climate issue. More precisely climate demonstrations around the world with emphasis on the people who participates in them. The study also aims to understand why these people choose to take part in the demonstrations. Also, if there is a difference in motives between the people who participate in relation to when they are born. The material this study is examining is based on several demonstrations around the world in different countries and different cities. The material was collected between 2009 and 2013 at different demonstrations that concerned the subject of climate in some way. The result of the study shows some support for the theoretical frame that was used but it also shed some light on the fact that the result also perhaps is not strong enough to generalize to the rest of the population. The study shows that there is some difference between generations and their motives to participate in the demonstrations although they are not very big differences. The study did however have some problems with the theory and its ability to apply to the studies participants and shed light on possible studies in the future.

  • 102.
    Heldring, Emma
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Vestlin, Ida
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Digitala verktyg inom Human Resources: En kvalitativ undersökning om HR-anställdas inställningar till digitalisering inom HR2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The following study, written by Emma Heldring and Ida Vestlin with the title Digital tools within Human Resources investigates HR-employees attitudes towards digital tools within HR-work. Personal attitudes towards digital tools within HR are intended to be identified with eight semi-structured qualitative interviews. Earlier studies in the field has a management perspective with a focus on increased efficiency and productivity, less research has been done on how the employees working with the tools feel about them. Robert Blauner’s (1964) theoretical concept powerlessness and parts from Bosse Angelöws (2010) reorganizational model, together with previous research about digital tools, constitutes the theoretical framework.

     

    The study's results are in accordance with previous research about digital tools impact on efficiency and show that the use and need of them are comprehensive. The results suggest that new digital tools such as recruitment robots and chatbots entail risks, but their benefits tend to outweigh the disadvantages, which has resulted in a generally positive attitude to digital tools in HR-work. A thorough analysis shows the reoccurring reflection on the advantages and disadvantages of digital tools, which has created the ambivalent attitude that characterizes the result. The study contributes with knowledge of HR-employees attitudes for digital tools.

  • 103.
    Hellström, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö högskola.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    National Myth-Making and Populist Mobilization in Scandinavia2013In: Partecipazione e conflitto, ISSN 1972-7623, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 30-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses if and how the Sweden Democrats (the SD), the Danish People’s Party (the DPP) and the Progress Party (the PP) in Norway use myths of national exclusiveness and myths about the common people to radicalize popularly held sentiments to attract votes and gain political credibility in political space. The specific contribution is that we consider national myths to be a relevant political opportunity structure in the political competition of the votes. We conclude that both the SD and the DPP make use of national myths to gain credibility in the political space, in order to sustain populist mobilization in these countries. However, this is not the case with the PP in Norway. One possible explanation is that already before the PP emerged, other political parties in Norway, such as the Centre Party, occupied the niche of national myths in the electoral market.

  • 104.
    Holmgren, Helga
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Meidanipour, Parisa
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    En studie av interaktionen vid livsmedelskontroll: Ett intersektionellt perspektiv på mötet mellan livsmedelsinspektörer och restaurangägare och -personal2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Food inspection is a part of the Environment Department in Stockholms stad. Their work, among other things, involves inspections of restaurants in different areas of Stockholm. An important part of the working process is the importance of inspectors managing to work professional and impartial. The intention of the study En studie av interaktionen vid livsmedelskontroll – ett intersektionellt perspektiv på mötet mellan livsmedelsinspektörer och restaurangägare och -personal”, written by Helga Holmgren and Parisa Meidanipour, is to find out how the inspector and the owner of the restaurant and the personnel interact. The study has a qualitative approach where observations and interviews have been made. The theoretical framework involves intersectional perspectives as well as Goffman’s dramaturgical perspective and the power perspective of Foucault. The results of the study primarily show that cooperation between inspectors and owners of restaurants and personnel is a qualification for the work to be able to progress. It also shows that owner of restaurants and personnel as well as inspectors use strategies during the meeting to maintain their face. The power is constantly present in the interaction between inspectors and the owner of the restaurant and personnel, while who possesses the power in the interaction shift. 

  • 105.
    Hort, Sven E. O.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Kings, Lisa
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Kravchenko, Zhanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Still awaiting the storm?: The Swedish welfare state after the latest crisis2016In: Challenges to European Welfare Systems / [ed] K. Schubert, P. de Villota, J. Kuhlmann, Springer, 2016, p. 671-691Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the challenges to the Swedish welfare state after the credit crunch of 2008 focusing on several major challenges: the government’s reaction to the fiscal and economic crisis and its outcomes, the (re)balance of welfare policies addressing risks and opportunities. While the situation is almost excellent from a purely fiscal point of view, the outstanding private debt, unemployment, especially among youth, pressures on the pension, health and education systems are prominent concerns. They have led to the revitalization of the social investment paradigm, strict budgetary policies, increased number of welfare-to-work programmes and focus on using tax reductions as a means of stimulating the labour market. In this context, the main demographic concerns and social integration have come to the fore to an unprecedented extent.

  • 106.
    Hort, Sven E. O.
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Zakharov, Nikolay
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    An Authoritarian-populist Welfare State? Reassessing the ‘Belarusian model’ in Comparative Perspective2019In: Globalizing Welfare: An Evolving Asian-European Dialogue / [ed] Kuhnle, S., Selle, P. and Hort S., Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019, p. 286-302Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 107.
    Hryciuk, Renata E.
    et al.
    University of Warsaw.
    Korolczuk, Elzbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. University of Warsaw.
    At the intersection of gender and class: social mobilization around mothers’ rights in Poland2013In: Beyond NGO‐ization?: The Development of Social Movements in Central and Eastern Europe / [ed] Kerstin Jacobsson and Steven Saxonberg, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 49-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Hu, Yannan
    et al.
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    van Lenthe, Frank J
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands .
    Borsboom, Gerard J
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands .
    Looman, Caspar W N
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands .
    Bopp, Matthias
    University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland .
    Burström, Bo
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dzúrová, Dagmar
    Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic .
    Ekholm, Ola
    University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Klumbiene, Jurate
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania .
    Lahelma, Eero
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia .
    Regidor, Enrique
    Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain .
    Santana, Paula
    Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
    de Gelder, Rianne
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands .
    Mackenbach, Johan P
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands .
    Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in self-assessed health in 17 European countries between 1990 and 20102016In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 70, no 7, p. 644-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Between the 1990s and 2000s, relative inequalities in all-cause mortality increased, whereas absolute inequalities decreased in many European countries. Whether similar trends can be observed for inequalities in other health outcomes is unknown. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of trends in socioeconomic inequalities in self-assessed health (SAH) in Europe between 1990 and 2010.

    METHODS: Data were obtained from nationally representative surveys from 17 European countries for the various years between 1990 and 2010. The age-standardised prevalence of less-than-good SAH was analysed by education and occupation among men and women aged 30-79 years. Socioeconomic inequalities were measured by means of absolute rate differences and relative rate ratios. Meta-analysis with random-effects models was used to examine the trends of inequalities.

    RESULTS: We observed declining trends in the prevalence of less-than-good SAH in many countries, particularly in Southern and Eastern Europe and the Baltic states. In all countries, less-than-good SAH was more prevalent in lower educational and manual groups. For all countries together, absolute inequalities in SAH were mostly constant, whereas relative inequalities increased. Almost no country consistently experienced a significant decline in either absolute or relative inequalities.

    CONCLUSIONS: Trends in inequalities in SAH in Europe were generally less favourable than those found for inequalities in mortality, and there was generally no correspondence between the two when we compared the trends within countries. In order to develop policies or interventions that effectively reduce inequalities in SAH, a better understanding of the causes of these inequalities is needed.

  • 109.
    Hylmö, Anders
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Does class matter in anti-austerity protests?: Social class, attitudes towards inequality, and political trust in European demonstrations in a time of economic crisis2015In: Austerity and Protest: Popular Contention in Times of Economic Crisis / [ed] Marco Giugni & Maria T. Grasso, Farnham: Ashgate, 2015, p. 83-107Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we compare the class composition of four types of anti-austerity demonstrations—Occupy/Indignados, trade union, May Day and other anti-austerity protests—with “new social movement” demonstrations. This allow us to, firstly, scrutinize whether contemporary anti-austerity protests attract more participants from the lower classes—in particular the working class—than from the upper strata. Since austerity policies tend to affect the general population differently, and in particular worsen the social conditions for the lower classes, it is interesting to see whether these policies mobilize the groups that are primarily affected by them. In this comparison, we explore and analyze survey data from 75 demonstrations collected within the research program “Caught in the Act of Protest: Contextualizing Contestation” (CCC). Secondly, we use the same data to examine the impact of social class on political attitudes among protesters, focusing issues that have been at the forefront during the last few years’ wave of protest: deepening social inequality, welfare privatization, and distrust in political elites. This analysis allow us to scrutinize to which degree the “framing” of the protests possibly contributes to the demonstrators’ attitudes towards austerity measures, economic inequality and their governments—or if the attitudes of the protesters are best explained by their individual social class, or even the national context in which the demonstration takes place.Social class is measured in two different ways. First, with the recently developed occupation-based Oesch class scheme, in which class is conceptualized as the individual’s “objective” position in the labor market. Secondly, we focus individuals’ self-categorizations of which class they belong to, i.e. their class identity, which can be seen as the “subjective” side of class. Our analysis also show the different merits of these two conceptualizations of class for analyzing political protests.

  • 110. Håkansson, Ellen
    et al.
    Kravchenko, Zhanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Inte inlåst, heller inte fri - den rumsliga dimensionen i konstruktionen av människohandelsoffer för sexuella ändamål2019In: Socialt arbete i storstaden: Villkor och praktik / [ed] Alinia Minoo & Songur Welat, Stockholm: Liber, 2019, 1, p. 14-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Inoue, Y.
    et al.
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, USA / The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Yazawa, A.
    The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Aida, J.
    Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan / Miyagi Prefectural Government Office, Sendai, Japan.
    Kawachi, I.
    Harvard University, Boston, USAChiba University, Chiba, Japan.
    Kondo, K.
    Chiba University, Chiba, Japan / Nihon Fukushi University, Aichi, Japan / National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan.
    Fujiwara, T.
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, USA / Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Adverse childhood experiences, exposure to a natural disaster and posttraumatic stress disorder among survivors of the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami2019In: Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, ISSN 2045-7960, E-ISSN 1827-4331, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims.: To investigate whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) modify the impact of exposure to a natural disaster (the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami) on the occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among older people. Methods.: Data were collected as part of the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES), which is an on-going epidemiological survey investigating social determinants of health among older people across Japan. Information on PTSD symptoms based on the Screening Questionnaire for Disaster Mental Health, traumatic exposure to the earthquake (i.e., house damage and loss of relatives/friends during the earthquake/tsunami) and ACEs was obtained from 580 participants aged 65 or older living in Iwanuma City, Miyagi Prefecture, which suffered severe damage as a result of the earthquake and the subsequent tsunami in March 2011. Associations were examined using Poisson regression analysis with a robust variance estimator after adjusting for covariates. Results.: The prevalence of PTSD was 9.7% in this population; compared to those with no traumatic experience, the prevalence of PTSD was approximately two times higher among those who experienced the loss of close friends/relatives (PR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.11–3.03, p = 0.018), or whose house was damaged (PR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.07–4.34, p = 0.032). ACE was not significantly associated with PTSD. Stratified analyses by the presence of ACE showed that damage due to the earthquake/tsunami was associated with PTSD only among those without ACEs; more specifically, among non-ACE respondents the PR of PTSD associated with house damage was 6.67 (95% CI = 1.66–26.80), while for the loss of a relative or a close friend it was 3.56 (95% CI = 1.18–10.75). In contrast, no statistically significant associations were observed among those with ACEs. Conclusion.: Following the Great East Japan earthquake/tsunami in 2011 a higher risk of developing PTSD symptoms was observed in 2013 especially among older individuals without ACEs. This suggests that ACEs might affect how individuals respond to subsequent traumatic events later in life.

  • 112.
    Inoue, Y.
    et al.
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Yazawa, A.
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Fujiwara, T.
    National Center for Child Health & Development, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kondo, K.
    Chiba University, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan / Nihon Fukushi University, Nagoya City, Aichi, Japan.
    Kondo, N.
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    December birth is associated with higher mortality among older people in Japan: Findings from the JAGES cohort.2016In: American Journal of Human Biology, ISSN 1042-0533, E-ISSN 1520-6300, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 281-282Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Inoue, Y.
    et al.
    University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
    Yazawa, A.
    University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
    Fujiwara, T.
    National Center for Child Health and Development, Setagaya-ku, Japan.
    Kondo, K.
    Chiba University, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan / Nihon Fukushi University, Nagoya City, Aichi, Japan.
    Kondo, N.
    University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
    Month of birth is associated with mortality among older people in Japan: Findings from the JAGES cohort2016In: Chronobiology International, ISSN 0742-0528, E-ISSN 1525-6073, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 441-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Month of birth (MOB) has been linked to a variety of health conditions in adulthood. This study examined the association between MOB and mortality among the healthy elderly in Japan, where a practice of traditional age reckoning was employed up until the late 1940s. The results showed male participants born in December were more likely to die earlier while those born in January had lower mortality. It is possible that social factors in early life, such as the time period when a birth is officially registered, may have implications for health that stretch across the life course.

  • 114.
    Inoue, Y.
    et al.
    The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Yazawa, A.
    The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Li, D.
    Hainan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Haikou, Hainan, China.
    Du, J.
    Hainan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Haikou, Hainan, China.
    Jin, Y.
    Hainan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Haikou, Hainan, China.
    Chen, Y.
    Hainan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Haikou, Hainan, China.
    Watanabe, C.
    The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    The association between economic development, lifestyle differentiation, and C-reactive protein concentration within rural communities in Hainan Island, China2016In: American Journal of Human Biology, ISSN 1042-0533, E-ISSN 1520-6300, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 186-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Earlier fieldwork in rural areas of Hainan Island, China, demonstrated that during the course of economic development increasing differences had emerged in lifestyles within communities. It is possible that these variations might have stratified residents into subpopulations with different health attributes. This study examined the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, a biomarker of future cardiovascular events, and personal lifestyle parameters and the degree of community-level economic development among rural communities. Methods: A cross-sectional field survey was undertaken in 19 rural communities in Hainan. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 1,744 participants. Dried blood spot samples were collected to measure high-sensitivity CRP concentration. Sex-stratified multilevel regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with CRP concentration among the participants. Results: While CRP concentration was negatively associated with being married and (more) education among men, for women CRP concentration was associated with the frequency of poultry consumption (P = 0.014) and the experience of migratory work in the previous year (P = 0.009). In addition, for females, living in communities with a greater degree of inequality, as indexed by the Gini coefficient, was also associated with increased CRP concentration (P = 0.003). Conclusion: Given that CRP concentration is a marker of future CVD risk, this study suggests that within these previously homogenous rural communities, economic development might have stratified people into population subgroups with a different CVD risk. Am. J. Hum. Biol., 2015.

  • 115.
    Inoue, Yosuke
    et al.
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Yazawa, Aki
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Shirai, Kokoro
    University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan.
    Amemiya, Airi
    National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kondo, Naoki
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kondo, Katsunori
    Chiba University, Chiba, Japan / Nihon Fukushi University, Aichi, Japan / National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan.
    Ojima, Toshiyuki
    Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka, Japan.
    Hanazato, Masamichi
    Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.
    Suzuki, Norimichi
    Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.
    Fujiwara, Takeo
    Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Neighborhood Characteristics and Cardiovascular Risk among Older People in Japan: Findings from the JAGES Project2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 10, article id e0164525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have found an association between neighborhood characteristics (i.e., aspects of the physical and social environment) and the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and elevated CVD risk. This study investigated the relationship between neighborhood characteristics and CVD risk among older people in Japan where research on this association is scarce. Data came from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study project; questionnaire data collected from 3,810 people aged 65 years or older living in 20 primary school districts in Aichi prefecture, Japan, was linked to a computed composite CVD risk score based on biomarker data (i.e., hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and estimated glomerular filtration rate). A sex-stratified multilevel linear regression analysis revealed that for male participants, living in neighborhoods with a higher perceived occurrence of traffic accidents and reduced personal safety was associated with an elevated CVD risk (coefficient = 1.08 per interquartile range increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.30 to 1.86) whereas males living in neighborhoods with a higher perceived proximity of exercise facilities had a lower risk (coefficient = −1.00, 95% CI = −1.78 to −0.21). For females, there was no statistically significant association between neighborhood characteristics and CVD risk. This study suggests that aspects of the neighborhood environment might be important for CVD morbidity and mortality in Japan, particularly among men.

  • 116.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Channeling and enrollment: The institutional shaping of animal rights activism in Poland2013In: Beyond NGO-ization: The Development of Social Movements in Central and Eastern Europe / [ed] Jacobsson Kerstin & Saxonberg Steven, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 27-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 117.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Göteborgs universitet.
    Elementary Forms of Religious Life in Animal Rights Activism2014In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 6, p. 305-326Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 118.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholms universitet.
    Post-political regulation: Soft power and post-political visions in global governance2013In: Critical Sociology, ISSN 0896-9205, E-ISSN 1569-1632, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 421-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The debate on global governance points to shifts in the type and nature of regulation as well asin the set of actors involved. The article introduces a novel way of conceptualizing the changes,namely a move towards post-political forms of regulation (see also Garsten and Jacobsson, 2007).Drawing on Chantal Mouffe’s notion of ‘the post-political vision’, the article argues that manycontemporary forms of regulation are premised on consensual relationships as the basis forregulatory activity. These regulatory practices tend to narrow down the conflictual space, therebyexerting a form of soft power. Moreover, in the post-political forms of regulation, unequal powerrelations tend to be rendered invisible. The empirical cases discussed are voluntary regulatoryarrangements, more specifically the Open Method of Coordination of the EU (OMC) and CSR(Corporate Social Responsibility) initiatives.

  • 119.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Göteborgs universitet.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholms universitet.
    Sorting people in and out: The plasticity of the categories of employability, work capacity and disability as technologies of government2013In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 825-850Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 120.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Göteborgs universitet.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Animal Rights Activism: A Moral-Sociological Perspective on Social Movements2016 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 121.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Mälardalen University.
    Emotion work in animal rights activism: A moral-sociological perspective2013In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 55-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social movement activism requires emotional motivation and entails emotional costs, and, because of this, activists tend to be deeply involved in the management of emotions – or emotion work – and not just in connection with protest events, but also on an everyday basis. Based on a case study of animal rights activism in Sweden, this article identifies five types of emotion work that animal rights activists typically perform: containing, ventilation, ritualization, micro-shocking and normalization of guilt. The emotion work performed by activists, it is argued, is best understood from a moral-sociological perspective building on Durkheim’s sociology of morality, based on which the article then outlines key elements of a comprehensive theoretical framework for the study of emotion work in social movements.

  • 122.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Saxonberg, StevenMasaryk University.
    Beyond NGO-ization: The Development of Social Movements in Central and Eastern Europe2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 123.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Saxonberg, Steven
    Masaryk University.
    Introduction: The development of social movements in Central and Eastern Europe2013In: Beyond NGO-ization: The Development of Social Movements in Central and Eastern Europe / [ed] Jacobsson Kerstin and Saxonberg Steven, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 1-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Göteborgs universitet.
    Saxonberg, StevenCharles University.
    Social Movements in Post-Communist Europe and Russia2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Seing, Ida
    Linköping University.
    En möjliggörande arbetsmarknadspolitik?: Arbetsförmedlingens utredning och klassificering av klienters arbetsförmåga, anställbarhet och funktionshinder2013In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 9-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 126.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    After a Cycle of Contention: Post-Gothenburg Strategies of Left-Libertarian Activists in Sweden2015In: Social Movement Studies, ISSN 1474-2837, E-ISSN 1474-2829, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 713-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers the strategic choices that radical activists face when a cycle of contention ends. It investigates the re-orientation of the autonomous anarchists or left-libertarian activist milieu in Sweden after the riots at the Gothenburg summit in 2001, which ended a cycle of anti-globalization protests in Sweden. The article identifies five strategies by which this activist milieu attempted to reconstruct collective agency, build a new alliance structure and renew the repertoire of contention: 1) rescaling and targeting of micro-politics; 2) moving from secluded to open communities; 3) rethinking collective agency with the help of a new movement theory; 4) reversing dominant discourses and opening up discursive space; and 5) redefining militancy and shelving of violent confrontation. The study builds on activist interviews and ethnographic research in Stockholm and Malmö.

  • 127.
    Jannerman, Molly
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Sjöberg, Lina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Många bäckar små blir en administrativ å: En kvalitativ studie om hur grundskollärare upplever och hanterar administrativt arbete i skolan2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    “Många bäckar små blir en administrativ å” is a bachelor thesis in sociology authored by Molly Jannerman and Lina Sjöberg. In light of the fact that Swedish schools has been subject to a series of reforms which has stimulated an increase of administrative work, this study aims to offer an insight in how elementary school teachers experience the administration and how it is dealt with.  The study takes a qualitative approach and is based on semi structured interviews with six elementary school teachers. The analytical framework of the study is made of Lipsky’s theory of street level bureaucracy, Tummer’s theory of policy alienation, Hodson’s model of workers behaviors, and parts of new institutionalism and legitimacy theory. The result indicates that the teachers’ experiences of the administrative work are complex. As well as they view it as relevant and important, they also find some of the tasks overwhelming and stressful. The administrative work is also found to be a way to create legitimacy in the teaching role; it becomes a tool to justify their decisions against the surroundings.The teachers develop strategies to deal with the administration, which tends to relate closely to how it’s experienced, and therefore includes touches of both compliance and resistance. The identified strategies are made up of simplifying of tasks, shortcuts, procrastination and avoidance, and the goals are mainly to create time for the students and make their working hours sufficient.

  • 128.
    Jirek, Therése
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Att vara eller inte vara på rätt plats: Om statushierarkier bland skådespelare2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis Att vara eller inte vara på rätt plats – Om statushierarkier bland skådespelare is a qualitative study, conducted by me, Therése Jirek, with the purpose of investigating the status hierarchies between actors educated at the public Swedish theater universities and actors educated at private/non public/other theater schools. The study also investigates how the hierarchies affect the work, social relations and dynamics between the actors. The study also looks at the professional pride and identity in relation to this.  The information was gathered using semi-structured interviews with six Swedish actors of different age groups and with different educational backgrounds. The theoretical framework with which the information was interpreted is the theories of the field and habitus by Pierre Bourdieu. The results and analysis are presented in three different parts (chapters): Part 1 – about production and reproduction of status, part 2 – about practices that preserve status and part 3 – about professional pride and identity. The study shows that the actors status is determined for the most part by his or her educational background and if and where he or she works. The status preserving practices are largely performed through silent agreements and self-regulatory behavior. The professional title is characterized by a strong sense of pride and is often rooted deep in the personal identity.

  • 129.
    Johansson, Håkan
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Scaramuzzino, Roberto
    Lund University.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Multilevel Strategies for Political Influence: How and Why Do Domestic Civil Society Organisations Seek Political Influence at National and EU Levels?2018In: Journal of Contemporary European Research, ISSN 1815-347X, E-ISSN 1815-347X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 68-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses domestic civil society organisations (CSOs) and their multilevel strategies for gaining political influence in the European Union. Drawing on a theoretical framework identifying different ‘routes’ that CSOs can take in a multilevel system of EU governance, this article analyses which routes or combination of routes CSOs take and investigates what organisational factors can explain similarities and differences among domestic CSOs’ multilevel strategies for political influence. Factors like type of organisation, organisational resources, level of activity and perceived relevance of national and EU political levels are combined. The article shows that CSOs tend to choose a combination of routes and that most of them also participate at the national level when trying to influence EU policy. The article furthermore finds that domestic CSOs seek to influence EU policies above all when they organise around issues that face potential conflicts between national and EU policies, illustrating the analytical significance of how CSOs perceive different political levels.

  • 130.
    Johansson, Håkan
    et al.
    Lund universitet.
    Scaramuzzino, Roberto
    Lund universitet.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Social Movements and Interest Groups Compared: How organisational type matters for explaining Swedish organisations’ advocacy strategies2019In: PArticipation and COnflict, ISSN 1972-7623, E-ISSN 2035-6609, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 353-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The divide between interest groups and social movement studies runs deep, but present developments call for a renewed focus on the relevance of these analytical categories. Both of these two forms of collective action relate to organisations that are assumed to follow distinctive logics and strategies for political influence. This article aims to contribute to the debates on the analytical difference between interest groups and social movements by comparing their political strategies and addressing the relevance of the typology for explaining organisations’ use of political strat-egies. The paper draws on a dataset resulting from a large survey among Swedish civil society organisations among which clear cases of interest group organisations and “old” and “new” social movement organisations (SMOs) were identified. The results show that the distinction between interest groups and social movement organisations has some analytical value when it comes to explaining the use of different types of strategies: e.g. direct lobbying and media-based and protest-based strategies. Also, the distinction between old and new SMOs is shown to be relevant because old SMOs seem to be in a way “in between” interest groups and new SMOs suggesting that social movements tend to develop over time and to become more similar to interest groups.

  • 131.
    Johansson, Linn
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Den endimensionella etnicitetens reproduktion i en kommunal strategi2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this essay is to investigate if Botkyrka municipalitys policy Strategi för ett interkulturellt Botkyrka (Strategy for an intercultural Botkyrka), reproduce a previously discovered discourse about swedishness, etnicity and culture as something static and one-dimensional. How they tackle the challenge to n’either homogenise nor culturaly essentialise their citizens. This is examined with the use of a social constructivist approach on the strategy. By using this approach and with the frameworks from discourse analysis and governmentality, this study shows that despite rethinking in goals and course of action, the examined material follows the previously demonstrated discourse, through their use and articulation of the investigated concepts.  

     

  • 132.
    Johansson, Linnea
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Snecker, Elvira
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    "För min egen vinning och för organisationens vinning”: En sociologisk studie av hur medarbetarsamtal kan påverka individers upplevelser av motivation, tillfredsställelse och välmående2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the employee interview affects the employees’ motivation, work satisfaction, psychosocial work environment and the opportunity to develop. To find out how the employees experience this, the study is of a qualitative nature. The employees’ experience of employee interviews is investigated through semi- structured interviews with consultant managers at various companies. The theoretical framework used to analyze the results is Karasek and Theorell's (1990) theory of stress in working life, Herzberg's (1993) theory of hygiene factors and motivational factors at work, and finally Maslow's (Maslow och Frager 1987) hierarchy of needs. The result shows that the employee interview increases motivation by discussing the employees result, offer support and talk about the opportunity to develop. It also leads to an improved relationship with the boss which increases the work satisfaction. The psychosocial work environment is indirectly affected, since the interview makes room to talk about the employees’ mood, the colleagues and the workplace. Development opportunities are also affected in a positive sense, as the employee can lift his or her long-term goals during the employee interview. The consultant managers in this study have a positive picture of the employee interview and believe that it is necessary to do feel good and do a good job.

  • 133.
    Josefine, Ekenstein
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Mogel, Erica
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Varför engagera sig?: En kvalitativ studie om vilka faktorer som kan vara till grund för ideellt engagemang i organisationen Missing People2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    This qualitative study, "Why get involved?” by Josefine Ekenstein and Erica Mogel examines what motivates the individual to engage in the voluntary organization Missing People and examine what the individual gets in reward. Based on two research questions we gathered our empirical material through semi-structured interviews and were then analyzed through the theoretical frameworks. The theories used are Gagné & Decis Self-determination theory, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory and Bourdieu’s theory of disinterested actions. The study concludes that there are both internal and external factors that primarily motivate the respondents for their involvement in Missing People. It also concludes that the respondents felt good to help others which could be seen as a form of reward.

  • 134.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Självmord som ett avlägsnande från kommunikation: ett nytt luhmannskt perspektiv på ett gammalt sociologiskt problem2013In: Sosiologi i dag, ISSN 0332-6330, E-ISSN 1893-4617, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 58-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 135.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Suicide in Russia: A macro-sociological study2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work constitutes a macro-sociological study of suicide. The empirical focus is on suicide mortality in Russia, which is among the highest in the world and has, moreover, developed in a dramatic manner over the second half of the 20th century. Suicide mortality in contemporary Russia is here placed within the context of development over a longer time period through empirical studies on 1) the general and sex- and age-specific developments in suicide over the period 1870–2007, 2) underlying dynamics of Russian suicide mortality 1956–2005 pertaining to differences between age groups, time periods, and particular generations and 3) the continuity in the aggregate-level relationship between heavy alcohol consumption and suicide mortality from late Tsarist period to post-World War II Russia. In addition, a fourth study explores an alternative to Émile Durkheim’s dominating macro-sociological perspective on suicide by making use of Niklas Luhmann’s theory of social systems. With the help of Luhmann’s macro-sociological perspective it is possible to consider suicide and its causes also in terms of processes at the individual level (i.e. at the level of psychic systems) in a manner that contrasts with the ‘holistic’ perspective of Durkheim. The results of the empirical studies show that Russian suicide mortality, despite its exceptionally high level and dramatic changes in the contemporary period, shares many similarities with the patterns seen in Western countries when examined over a longer time period. Societal modernization in particular seems to have contributed to the increased rate of suicide in Russia in a manner similar to what happened earlier in Western Europe. In addition, the positive relationship between heavy alcohol consumption and suicide mortality proved to be remarkably stable across the past one and a half centuries. These results were interpreted using the Luhmannian perspective on suicide developed in this work. 

  • 136.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). niversity of Tokyo, Japan / European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (ECOHOST), London, United Kingdom.
    The historical development of suicide mortality in Russia, 1870-20072015In: Archives of Suicide Research, ISSN 1381-1118, E-ISSN 1573-8159, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Russia has one of the highest suicide mortality rates in the world. This study investigates the development of Russian suicide mortality over a longer time period in order to provide a context within which the contemporary high level might be better understood. Annual sex- and age-specific suicide-mortality data for Russia for the period 1870-2007 were studied, where available. Russian suicide mortality increased 11-fold over the period. Trends in male and female suicide developed similarly, although male suicide rates were consistently much higher. From the 1990s suicide has increased in a relative sense among the young (15-34), while the high suicide mortality among middle-aged males has reduced. Changes in Russian suicide mortality over the study period may be attributable to modernisation processes.

  • 137.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Uppsala University.
    Baburin, Aleksei
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Sparén, Pär
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Age, period and cohort effects on suicide mortality in Russia, 1956-20052017In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Russian suicide mortality rates changed rapidly over the second half of the twentieth century. This study attempts to differentiate between underlying period and cohort effects in relation to the changes in suicide mortality in Russia between 1956 and 2005.

    METHODS: Sex- and age-specific suicide mortality data were analyzed using an age-period-cohort (APC) approach. Descriptive analyses and APC modeling with log-linear Poisson regression were performed.

    RESULTS: Strong period effects were observed for the years during and after Gorbachev's political reforms (including the anti-alcohol campaign) and for those following the break-up of the Soviet Union. After mutual adjustment, the cohort- and period-specific relative risk estimates for suicide revealed differing underlying processes. While the estimated period effects had an overall positive trend, cohort-specific developments indicated a positive trend for the male cohorts born between 1891 and 1931 and for the female cohorts born between 1891 and 1911, but a negative trend for subsequent cohorts.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the specific life experiences of cohorts may be important for variations in suicide mortality across time, in addition to more immediate effects of changes in the social environment.

  • 138.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Sparén, Pär
    Karolinska institutet.
    Age, period and cohort effects on suicide mortality in Russia, 1956-2007Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Jurkane-Hobein, Iveta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Uppsala University.
    Do I Qualify for a Love Relationship?: Social Norms and Long-Distance Relationships in Post-Soviet Latvia2015In: Sexuality & Culture, ISSN 1095-5143, E-ISSN 1936-4822, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 388-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Not all couples live together; some partners live far from each other, causing potential challenges to relationship maintenance in terms of keeping the relationship ongoing. In the present study, complications in relationship maintenance experienced by heterosexual long-distance partners in post-Soviet Latvia are analysed. The complications are examined in the light of social norms as conceptualized by Parsons and Shils (Toward a general theory of action. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1962) in their notion of dominant value orientations. The article suggests that the norm conflicts experienced by the long-distance partners are illustrative of the value transitions in societies undergoing rapid social change, such as in Latvia. The analysis is based on 19 in-depth interviews with individuals with long-distance relationship (LDR) experience. The social norms complicating or hindering LDR maintenance were found to be generation-specific and gender-specific. The interviewees born and raised in Soviet Latvia referred to collective-oriented norms while the interviewees born in the independent neo-liberal Latvia referred to their own interests that complicated their LDR maintenance.

  • 140.
    Jurkane-Hobein, Iveta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    I Imagine You Here Now: Relationship Maintenance Strategies in Long-Distance Intimate Relationships2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, individuals can relatively easily meet and communicate with each other over great distances due to increased mobility and advances in communication technology. This also allows intimate relationships to be maintained over large geographical distances. Despite these developments, long-distance relationships (LDRs), i.e. intimate relationships maintained over geographical distance, remain understudied. The present thesis aims to fill this knowledge gap and investigates how intimate partners who live so far away from each other that they cannot meet every day make their relationship ongoing beyond face-to-face interaction.

    Theoretically, this study departs from a symbolic interactionist viewpoint that invites us to study phenomena from the actor’s perspective. Conceptually, the thesis builds on the recent development in sociology of intimate lives that sees intimacy as a relational quality that has to be worked on to be sustained, and that focuses on the practices that make a relationship a relationship. Empirically, the thesis is based upon 19 in-depth interviews with individuals from Latvia with long-distance relationship experience.

    The thesis consists of four articles. Article I studies the context in which LDRs in Latvia are maintained, focusing on the normative constraints that complicate LDR maintenance. Article II analyses how intimacy is practiced over geographical distance. Article III examines how long-distance partners manage the experience of the time they are together and the time they are geographically apart. Article IV explores the aspect of idealization in LDRs. Overall, the thesis argues for the critical role of imagination in relationship maintenance. The relationship maintenance strategies identified within the articles are imagination-based mediated communication (creating sensual/embodied intimacy, emotional intimacy, daily intimacy and imagined individual intimacy); time-work strategies that enable long-distance partners to deal with the spatiotemporal borders of the time together and the time apart; and creating bi-directional idealization. The thesis is also one of the few works in the field of intimate lives in Eastern Europe and analyses the normative complications that long-distance partners face in their relationship maintenance in Latvia.

  • 141.
    Jurkane-Hobein, Iveta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    I Know that I Don’t Know: Bi-Directional Idealization in Long-Distance Relationships2015Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Jurkane-Hobein, Iveta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Imagining the absent partner: Intimacy and imagination in long-distance relationships2015In: Innovative Issues and Approaches in Social Sciences, ISSN 1855-0541, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 223-241Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 143.
    Jurkane-Hobein, Iveta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    When Less is More: On Time Work in Long-Distance Relationships2015In: Qualitative Sociology, ISSN 0162-0436, E-ISSN 1573-7837, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 185-203Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Jämte, Jan
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Örebro University.
    Radical anti-fascism in Scandinavia: Shifting frames in relation to the transformation of the far right2017In: Radical Left Movements in Europe / [ed] Magnus Wennerhag; Christian Fröhlich; Grzegorz Piotrowski, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017, p. 248-267Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Jämte, Jan
    et al.
    Örebro Universitet.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Why Did It Not Happen Here?: The Gradual Radicalization of the Anarchist Movement in Sweden 1980–902016In: A European Youth Revolt: European Perspectives on Youth Protest and Social Movements in the 1980s / [ed] Bart van der Steen and Knud Andresen, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 97-111Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines the development and role of the anarchist movement in Sweden during the 1980s. In relation to many other parts of Northern Europe – which had seen an upsurge in radical left-libertarian activism, squatting and urban unrest at the turn of the 1980s – such social movements and confrontations remained a marginal phenomenon in Sweden, at least until the end of the decade. However, by the late 1980s a new generation of younger activists, often with roots in the anarchist milieu, formed the basis for a radical squatter and autonomist movement, which proved very similar to the movements that had developed throughout Europe almost a decade earlier.

  • 146.
    Jämte, Jan
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Brottsförebyggande åtgärder mot radikala vänsterrörelser: effekter och erfarenheter2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under senare år har lokala myndigheter utvecklat brottsförebyggande åtgärder för att motverka politiskt motiverad våldsanvändning och ”våldsbejakande extremism”. I detta projekt undersöks hur lärare, socialarbetare och poliser på lokal nivå tolkar och utför sitt uppdrag inom det specifika arbetet mot ”vänsterextremism” samt hur vänsterradikala aktivister uppfattar och påverkas av dessa åtgärder.

  • 147. Kaleta, Dorota
    et al.
    Usidame, Bukola
    Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk, Elżbieta
    Makowiec-Dąbrowska, Teresa
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Prevalence and factors associated with hardcore smoking in Poland: Findings from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (2009–2010)2014In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, p. 583-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 148.
    Kamio, Y.
    et al.
    National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry,Tokyo, Japan.
    Haraguchi, H.
    National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry,Tokyo, Japan.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan / University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan .
    Ogino, K.
    National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan / Tokyo Metropolitan Children’s Medical Center, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo, Japan.
    Ishitobi, M.
    National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan.
    Takahashi, H.
    National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan.
    Brief Report : Best Discriminators for Identifying Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder at an 18-Month Health Check-Up in Japan2015In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 45, no 12, p. 1447-1453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the best discriminative items for identifying young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), we conducted a secondary analysis using longitudinal cohort data that included the Japanese version of the 23-item modified checklist for autism in toddlers (M-CHAT-JV). M-CHAT-JV data at 18 months of age and diagnostic information evaluated at age 3 or later from 1851 Japanese children was used to isolate six highly discriminative items. Using data from two different community samples (n = 1851, n = 665) these items were shown to have comparable psychometric values with those of the full version. Our results suggest that these items might work as a short form screener for early identification of ASD in primary care settings where there are time constraints on screening. © 2015 The Author(s)

  • 149.
    Karlberg, Eva
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Organizing the Voice of Women: A study of the Polish and Swedish women's movements' adaptation to international structures2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union has become an important arena for international politics. Various actors try to influence the European-level executive and legislative authorities. Lobbyists in Brussels are not the only type of actors promoting the interests of others. Today, national-level social movement actors too are present at the European level, pushing the interests of various citizen groups and social issues. To do so, however, they need to adapt to the European Union’s multilevel governance system by speaking with one voice. As this thesis demonstrates, at the national level this adaptation may entail a number of organizational challenges for movements.

    Organizing the Voice of Women regards national-level social movements adapting to international structures. Taking the cases of the Swedish and the Polish women’s movements and their relation to the European Union as examples, the analysis follows two separate, yet similar, processes of forming and maintaining nationwide meta-organizations – that is, organizations of organizations – that can speak for the two respective movements. Through the cases of the two women’s movements’ adaptation to international structures, the study explores the challenges involved when a new layer of organization is added to a social movement.

    The results show that organizing the voice of the Swedish and the Polish women’s movements has been particularly challenging when conditions such as a tradition of umbrella organizing and stable financial resources are absent at national level. The results also show that competition and conflicts are apparent in both cases and inherent in meta-organizations, and that they have been possible to deal with differently depending on the two movements’ national settings. With an organizational perspective on social movement coalitions, this study contributes to the classic question of institutionalization, formalization and bureaucratization of social movements. It ultimately asks what it means to organize a field of social movement actors and what happens at the junction of organization and social movement, at the intersection of national and international interests. A wider implication of the study is that the issues it highlights are to be expected whenever the internationalization of national movement activities takes the form of meta-organization.

  • 150.
    Karlberg, Eva
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Svensk kvinnorörelse stiger ombord på det europeiska tåget2017In: Civilsamhället i det transnationella rummet / [ed] Filip Wijkström, Marta Reuter & Abbas Emami, Stockholm: European Civil Society Press , 2017, p. 63-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
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