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  • 101.
    Stadin, Kekke
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    The Formal call as Bourgeois distinction2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Sundstedt, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Gevärssmederna och den frätande dyrheten: En studie av konflikter vid Söderhamns gevärsfaktori 1749–17962016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay brings new knowledge about the terms and conditions for the artisans in the swedish armament industry in Sweden during the 1800th-century. It was a time of opportunity for entrepreneurs and a time when the social and economic standing for the artistans where under pressure. This led to conflicts, and this study shows that the artisans did use multiple strategies in order to maintain their social and economic position in a changing world.

    The purpose of this essay is to examine conflicts regarding the social organization of the work at the gun manufactory in Söderhamn between 1749 and 1796. During this period the ownership of the facility shifted from state owned to private and back.

    The main sources examined in this essay are documents regarding the Söderhamns gun manufactory, found in the archive of the artilleridepartement at krigskollegium. Other sources are protocols from the the local council, the magistrat, and church records.

    A marxist method of analyzing the social organization of work is used. By using a model of the whole of the production process the areas of conflicts are analysed. The theoretical approach is influenced by Marx and Foucault's theories of power.

    The essay shows that the governmental objectives in mid 1800-th century was to rationalize the production and privatize the swedish arm manufactories in order to gain a lower prize for muskets used by the armed forces.

    The new organization of the production led to resistance among the artisans. The guild was the organizer of the protests, and the artisans acted strategic. They cooperated with different parties to put pressure behind their demands. Several times this was a fruitful strategy. In spite of the mercantilistic visions of their superiors, the majority of the artisans had their own workshops and where able to maintain a substantial production for the private market during the whole time.

    During the Seven year war the production of the infantry musket where stopped at the same time as the workers in Jönköping where stiking for better payment. Four of five facilities had problems delivering armament in 1761.

    When krigskollegium regained the ownership of the manufactory in 1778 the artisans lost influence. The division of labour progressed during the crown´s management.

  • 103.
    Törnquist-Plewa, Barbara
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Memory politics in contemporary Ukraine: Reflections from the postcolonial perspective2017In: Memory Studies, ISSN 1750-6980, E-ISSN 1750-6999, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reporting from the events of the so-called ‘Euro-revolution’ in Ukraine 2013–2014, the Western media were prompt to point out the excessive use of national symbols, including those connected with the memory of the Ukrainian nationalist organizations ‘OUN’ and ‘UPA’, which for some periods of time had cooperated with Nazi Germany and were involved in the killing of civilians. By using a postcolonial perspective, the article aims to explain this phenomenon, as well as a number of other elements of the politics of memory in contemporary Ukraine, such as the so-called ‘Decommunization Laws’ adopted in 2015. Special attention is paid to Frantz Fanon’s idea of ‘anticolonial nationalism’ and Homi Bhabha’s idea of hybridity and their realization in Ukraine.

  • 104.
    Umland, Andreas
    et al.
    Institute for Euro‐Atlantic Cooperation, Kyiv, Ukraine.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Introduction: The Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) in Post‐Soviet Ukrainian Memory Politics, Public Debates, and Foreign Affairs2017In: Journal of Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society, ISSN 2364-5334, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 115-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Voronova, Liudmila
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Challenges of ongoing conflict research: Transdisciplinary ethnography in post-2014 Ukraine2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transdisciplinary collaborative project “Propaganda and management of information in the Ukraine-Russia conflict” that the authors are a part of, focuses on the Ukrainian media and uses ethnography as its primary methodology. We have been interviewing various actors involved in production of information flows in the post-2014 Ukraine: journalists, media and security experts, historians, PR-managers etc. What most of the informants pointed to was the recent shift in their perception of their role in the changes that the country is going through: they highlight their roles as activists and change agents in the society. Coming from different research fields (history and media and communication studies), we have been reflecting upon the tension between our striving at academic neutrality and the different disciplinary approaches, as well as unavoidable emotional involvement in the subject we scrutinize. 

    The paper is based on auto-ethnography wherein we reflect on the challenges the researchers face when conducting ethnographic research on activists and dealing with such sensitive issues as information warfare and armed conflict. This becomes especially problematic when scholars come from the countries involved in the conflict, Ukraine and Russia. How do our feelings of guilt, shame, anger, affection, attachment, love, interact with our professional goals and with our dealing with the material? How do they influence our interaction with the informants and each other? And how can we empower our informants, while remaining in the framework of academic research?

    This analysis contributes to the ethnographic studies on crisis and post-crisis societies. It continues the discussion about the role of emotions in ethnographic research, where we compare our experiences of ethical dilemmas, inspired by, e.g., Hoffmann (2007). Although this issue, in the context of Ukraine, has been partly addressed (e.g., Malyutina 2017),such an auto-ethnographic, self-reflexive work is rare in the Western scholarship that largely applies quantitative methods and focuses on the content, not people’s experiences.

  • 106.
    Wawrzeniuk, Piotr
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Malitska, Julia
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Approaching the "Lost Swedish Tribe" in Ukraine2014In: The Lost Swedish Tribe: Reapproaching the history of Gammalsvenskby in Ukraine / [ed] Piotr Wawrzeniuk & Julia Malitska, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2014, 1, , p. 151p. 13-35Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 107.
    Wawrzeniuk, Piotr
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Malitska, JuliaSödertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Lost Swedish Tribe: Reapproaching the history of Gammalsvenskby in Ukraine2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the spring of 1782 a group of peasants of Swedish origin reached their destination on the right bank of Dnipro River in Ukraine. The village they founded became known as “Gammalsvenskby” (Russian “Staroshvedskoe,” English “Old Swedish Village”). In the 1880s links were established with Sweden and Swedophone Finland where the villagers were seen through a nationalistic-romantic prism and in broad circles became known as a brave group of people who had preserved their Swedish culture in hostile surroundings; in the terminology of this volume, a “lost Swedish tribe”. The village remained largely intact until 1929, when in the aftermath of the Russian revolution a majority of the villagers decided to leave for Sweden. When they arrived, there was disappointment. Neither Sweden nor the lost tribe lived up to expectations. Some of the villagers returned to Ukraine and the USSR.

    This book offers an alternative perspective on Gammalsvenskby. The changing fortunes of the villagers are largely seen in the light of two grand top-down modernization projects – Russia’s imperial, originating in the latter half of the eighteenth century, and the Soviet, carried out in the early 1920s – but also of the modernization projects in Sweden and Finland. The story the book has to tell of Gammalsvenskby is a new one, and moreover, it is a story of relevance also for the history of Russia, Ukraine, Sweden and Finland.

  • 108.
    Werther, Steffen
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    "Nordic-Germanic" Dreams and National Realities: A Case Study of the Danish Region of Sønderjylland, 1933-19452013In: Racial Science in Hitler's New Europe, 1938-1945 / [ed] Anton Weiss-Wendt and Rory Yeomans, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2013, 1, p. 129-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Werther, Steffen
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Review of Bath, Matthias, Danebrog gegen Hakenkreuz: Der Widerstand in Dänemark 1940–1945 and Sørensen, Jakob, For Danmarks ære: Danskere i allieret krigstjeneste 1939–19452014In: H-Soz-u-Kult, H-Net Reviews, Vol. AprilArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Werther, Steffen
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES). Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Review of: Nathaniel Hong, Occupied: Denmark's Adaptation and Resistance to German Occupation 1940-1945, Frihedsmuseets Venners Forlag Copenhagen 2012.2015In: Historisk Tidsskrift (DK), ISSN 0106-4991, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 621-622Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Werther, Steffen
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    ›Volksgemeinschaft‹ vs. ›Rassegemeinschaft‹: Nationalsozialisten in der dänischen Grenzregion Nordschleswig/Sønderjylland 1933–392014In: Gemeinschaft als Erfahrung: Kulturelle Inszenierungen und soziale Praxis 1930-1960 / [ed] David Reinicke, Kathrin Stern, Kerstin Thieler, Gunnar Zamzow, Paderborn: Verlag Ferdinand Schöningh, 2014, p. 35-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Werther, Steffen
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Hurd, Madeleine
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Go East Old Man: The Ritual Spaces of SS Veteran's Memory Work2014In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 6, p. 327-359Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Werther, Steffen
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Hurd, Madeleine
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Waffen-SS veterans and their sites of memory today2016In: The Waffen-SS: A European History / [ed] Jochen Böhler & Robert Gerwarth, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Book abstract: This is the first systematic pan-European study of the hundreds of thousands of non-Germans who fought ― either voluntarily or under different kinds of pressures ― for the Waffen-SS (or auxiliary police formations operating in the occupied East). Building on the findings of regional studies by other scholars ― many of them included in this volume ― The Waffen-SS aims to arrive at a fuller picture of those non-German citizens (from Eastern as well as Western Europe) who served under the SS flag. Where did the non-Germans in the SS come from (socially, geographically, and culturally)? What motivated them? What do we know about the practicalities of international collaboration in war and genocide, in terms of everyday life, language, and ideological training? Did a common transnational identity emerge as a result of shared ideological convictions or experiences of extreme violence? In order to address these questions (and others), The Waffen-SS adopts an approach that does justice to the complexity of the subject, adding a more nuanced, empirically sound understanding of collaboration in Europe during World War II, while also seeking to push the methodological boundaries of the historiographical genre of perpetrator studies by adopting a transnational approach.

  • 114.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Memories of the War-Time Nationalist Movement during the Orange Revolution (2004) and the Euromaidan (2014): Similarities, Differences, and Purposes of the Use of the Past in the Turbulent Times of the Present2019In: World War II Re-explored Some New Millennium Studies in the History of the Global Conflict / [ed] Jarosław Suchoples, Stephanie James and Barbara Törnquist-Plewa, Berlin: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2019, p. 411-430Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter analyses how the memory of the war-time nationalist movement represented by the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and its military arm the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA) was used in the Ukraine during the most turbulent moments of its recent history, the Orange Revolution in 2004 and the Euromaidan in 2013/2014. It shows how in 2004 the memory of the OUN and UPA was used with propaganda intent in the election campaign which resulted in fraud, and consequently led to mass protests. During the Euromaidan, the memory of these organizations was used primarily as a symbol of radicalism and revolution. Furthermore, it is argued that constant insecurity about the end of the ‘struggle for independence,’ i.e. fear that independence can be lost again, strengthened adherence to the heroic memory of OUN and UPA for both the political right and the political center. In this way, the heroic memory of the OUN and UPA presented a means to existential security. In this usage, this memory is full of ‘factual’ drawbacks as it neglects, ignores, and circumvents historical evidence about the atrocities committed by the OUN and UPA.

  • 115.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Memory and history in Ukraine after the Euromaidan2018In: ZOiS Spotlight, article id 24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    After the Euromaidan, some of the most visible changes in Ukraine took place in the areas of history and memory politics. As result of decommunisation laws, over 50,000 places have been renamed. This exemplifies the continued tendency in Ukraine to treat the past as a matter of national security.

  • 116.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Monuments as Reminders and Triggers: A contemporary comparison between memory work in Ukraine and US2017In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, Vol. X, no 3, p. 12-17Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are parallels in discussions about monuments in Ukraine and the USA. The reminder of the Soviet past (or in the American context, of the Confederacy) is an abject that is difficult to assimilate. On the one hand, the abject is our unwillingness to see the past and accept it; on the other hand, for those who associate themselves with this past, this is the threat of castration because through the negation of a given past a certain group is cast out from the space of representation. That is why it is questionable whether a monument can be inclusive at all. Which memory does the monument recall? Which past is castrated when a new monument is built? Which groups are fighting for recognition and representation? Which groups lose this right? These questions confront researchers and memory workers and are discussed in this essay.

  • 117.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Movers and Shakers of Soviet Ukrainian culture in the 1920s–1930s, “Beau Monde on Empire’s Edge. State and Stage in Soviet Ukraine”, Mayhill C. Fowler, University of Toronto Press, 20172018In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, Vol. 2-3, p. 118-119Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Reclaiming the Past, Confronting the Past: OUN-UPA Memory Politics and Nation-Building in Ukraine (1991-2016)2017In: War and Memory in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus / [ed] Julie Fedor, Markku Kangaspuro, Jussi Lassila, Tatiana Zhurzhenko,, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 107-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Religion and Memory Entwined: The Role of Religious Groups in Holocaust Remembering. The Case of Ukraine2019In: Memory Studies Association, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In religious studies there is a rich discussion on how social memory can be used for understanding social dimension of religion, how religious communities are constructed through memory, how religions remember, so to say (Hervieu-Leger 2000; Assmann 2006). In my presentation, I want to discuss how religion can be used for better understanding of how social remembrance functions.

    Based on the analysis of interviews, participant observations, and published sources I want to see how different religious groups – Jewish, Christian (Orthodox and Catholic), Protestant – work for establishing the remembrance of the Holocaust in Ukraine. I want to see what it means for each of the group to engage in the memory work, what this participation brings for shaping the memory as well as for self-understanding and functioning of the group. My empirical material shows that religion opens the ways for building trans- and inter-national memory networks. These networks actively engage in local contexts and through a process of negotiations and adjustments create memory projects that reflect both global and local features. More concretely, I was tracing the work of Jewish memory actors from the USA and Protestant memory actors from Germany who worked on the projects of Holocaust remembrance in Ukraine. In these concrete cases, I was also looking into how local Jewish, Christian and Protestant communities were engaged in this work.

     

  • 120.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Stockholms universitet.
    Reordering of Meaningful Worlds: Memory of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists and the Ukrainian Insurgent Army in Post-Soviet Ukraine2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Ukrainian society faced a new reality. The new reality involved consolidation and transformation of collective identities. The reinvigoration of national identity led to a change in the emphasis on how the past was dealt with – many things which were regarded as negative by the Soviet regime became presented as positive in independent Ukraine. The war-time nationalist movement, represented by the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA), became one of the re-configured themes of history.

    While most of the studies of memory of the OUN and UPA concentrated on the use of the history of the OUN and UPA by nationalist parties, this study goes beyond the analysis of such use of history and scrutinizes the meaning of this history in nation- and state-building processes in relation to memory work realized on the small-scale regional and local levels with the main focus on Rivne and Rivne oblast’. Moreover, this book focusses not only on the “producers” of memory, but also on the “consumers” of memory, the area which is largely understudied in the field of memory studies. In the book the main emphasis is put on monuments which are regarded as catalysts and symptoms of memory.

    The present study showed that the OUN and UPA are used more as the metaphors of the anti-Soviet and anti-communist struggle for independence than as historical entities. This past is largely mythologized. Functioning as a myth the memory of the OUN and UPA obliterates difficult knowledge that the historical research reveals on the questionable activities and ideology of those organizations. As a result, the past of the OUN and UPA is re-imagined, re-filled with new meanings so that it is used along even with the democratic and pro-European claims in the present. It was especially well-observed during the Orange Revolution in 2004 and during the Euromaidan in 2013-2014, when the European Union’s flags were seen next to the OUN’s red-and-black flags or when the pro-European slogans were proclaimed alongside the OUN and UPA slogans.

    At the same time, the results demonstrated an intricate complexity of memory work shaped by intensive dynamics of private and public, grassroots and official, local and national encounters. Although there have been attempts made by political actors to draw a direct link between the national identity, political allegiances and proposed heroic version of memory, the study showed, that such attempts did not really work. In the pluralistic context the meanings are too fluid and adherence to one version of history does not preclude adherences to other versions of history which are presented as diametrically opposite in the political sphere. As result, on the recipients’ grassroots level, the memory reveals its amalgamated characteristics.

    Drawing on studies about post-colonial subjectivities and theories of remediation developed in memory studies, this book explores the changes in memory culture of contemporary Ukraine and examines the role of memory in producing new meanings under the rapidly changing conditions after the collapse of the Soviet Union up to 2014.

    The book contributes to the studies of memory culture in post-Communist countries as well as to the studies of society in contemporary Ukraine.

     

  • 121.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Review of the book: Serhy Yekelchyk. The Conflict in Ukraine. What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2015)2017In: Ukraina Moderna, Vol. 24Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Review of the Book “Ukrainian Intelligentsia in Post-Soviet L'viv. Narratives, Identity, and Power” by Eleonora Narvselius2014In: Europe-Asia Studies, ISSN 0966-8136, E-ISSN 1465-3427, Vol. 66, no 8, p. 1374-1375Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 123.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Review of the book “Warped Mourning: Stories of the Undead in the Land of the Unburied” by Alexander Etkind2013In: Ab Imperio: Theory and History of Nationalities and Nationalism in the post-Soviet Realm, ISSN 2166-4072, E-ISSN 2164-9731, Ab Imperio, Vol. 4, p. 249-253Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    The Memory of Taras Bul'ba-Borovets': A Regional Perspective on the Formation of the Founding Myth of the UPA2017In: Journal of Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society, ISSN 2364-5334, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 219-252Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Writing the War: Literature about the War in Donbas2019In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, E-ISSN 2001-7308, Vol. 2, p. 89-90Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Marchenko, Alla
    Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Intellectuals in times of troubles: Between empowerment and disenchantment during the Orange Revolution and Euromaidan2017In: Traitors, Collaborators and Deserters in Contemporary European Politics of Memory: Formulas of Betrayal / [ed] Eleonora Narvselius and Gelinada Grinchenko, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 141-168Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Yuliya Yurchuk and Alla Marchenko present an analysis of intellectuals’ narratives on betrayal in the most transformative period of recent Ukrainian history—the Orange Revolution and the Euromaidan protests. While it was observed that after both these revolutions the people’s attitudes oscillated between two polarities of great expectations and great disillusionments, the authors analyze the narratives of betrayal through the concept of disenchantment. The analysis shows that disenchantment can be an empowering device, which serves as a push for the search for internal powers and capabilities. At the same time, the authors also observed that some groups of Ukrainian people were dismissed by intellectuals as betrayers or not sufficiently capable of acting in accordance with intellectual ideals.

  • 127.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Marchenko, Alla
    Kashyn, Andrey
    Rethinking Perestroika in Ukraine: Waking up a “Sleeping Beauty”2019In: When the Future Came: The Collapse of the USSR and the Emergence of National Memory in Post-Soviet History Textbooks / [ed] Li Bennich-Björkman & Sergiy Kurbatov, Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Narvselius, Eleonora
    Про деконфедерацію у Сполучених Штатах Америки і про те, який це може мати стосунок до України2017In: Ukraina ModernaArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Yurchuk, Yuliya
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Umland, Andreas
    Institute for Euro-Atlantic Cooperation .
    Introduction: Essays in the Historical Interpretation of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists2018In: Journal of Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society, ISSN 2364-5334, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [A review of] Alexandru Ofrim, Strădi vechi din Bucureştiul de azi2015In: Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea, ISSN 2038-0925, Vol. 22, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [A review of] Keith Hitchins, A Concise History of Romania2015In: Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea, ISSN 2038-0925, Vol. 22, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 132.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [A review of] Liliana Corobca, Controlul cărţii. Censura literaturii în regimul comunist din România2015In: Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea, ISSN 2038-0925, Vol. 22, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 133.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [A review of] Lucian Boia, Suveranii României. Monarhia, o soluţie2015In: Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea, ISSN 2038-0925, Vol. 22, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 134.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [A review of] Melinda Mitu, Sorin Mitu, Ungurii despre români. Naşterea unei imagini etnice2015In: Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea, ISSN 2038-0925, Vol. 22, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 135.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [A review of] Ruxandra Cesereanu, Panopticum. Eseu despre tortură în secolul XX2015In: Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea, ISSN 2038-0925, Vol. 22, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 136.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [A review of] Ştefan Bosomitu, Miron Constantinescu. O biografie2015In: Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea, ISSN 2038-0925, Vol. 22, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    American-Soviet cultural diplomacy. The Bolshoi ballet's American premiere, by Cadra Peterson McDaniel2017In: East European Politics, ISSN 2159-9165, E-ISSN 2159-9173, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 428-430Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES). Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Appealing Locally for Transnational Humanitarian Aid: Italian Bishops and the Great Irish Famine2019In: Quellen und Forschungen aus italienischen Archiven und Bibliotheken, ISSN 1865-8865Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Beyond the iron curtain of historiography, between party canon and scholarly standard: A theoretical and methodological approach to the analysis of East European national-communist historiographies: the case of Romania2014In: Diacronie, ISSN 2038-0925, Vol. 3, no 19, p. 5-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article aims at elaborating a new theoretical framework and a new methodology in order to identify the location of history discipline endorsed by the East European communist regimes between scholarly production and propaganda. The case study considered is the historiography produced by the History Institute of the Romanian Communist Party (Isisp) during the Ceausescu regime (1965-1989). This highly ideological, but still polymorphic historiography is placed into the context of the 19th and 20th centuries’ professionalization of history in Europe. Since historiography has been the main mean to develop nationalist messages, this paper is also a contribution to the study of nationalism. Since history-writing is a myth-breaker but also a (national) myths-maker, the theory considers that the Isisp historians were elaborating an academic, scholarly standard while performing the mandatory metanarrative canon imposed by the communist Party, creating a double-set of coherence, for the party and for their own profession. The theory implies also a methodology of analysis which integrates the study of the history-writings, considered in diachronical perspective, together with the collective biographies of Isisp and of its historians.

  • 140.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Comunisti per Caso: Regime e Consenso in Romania durante e dopo la Guerra Fredda2014 (ed. 1st)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the end of the Second World War, Stalin forged the communist regimes in Eastern Europe as satellites of Soviet Union. After ten hard years of Soviet Stalinism, with the changings introduced by the 20th Congress of the CPSU, the leaderships of satellites' communist parties risked to be overthrown by their internal rivals. In Romania, in 1956, Party Secretary Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej converted Romania into a Stalinist system guided by Romanians: the Romanian receipe in order to prevent the change included the recovery of the national elite and intellectuals previously ostracized. While presenting itself as communist, the regime increasingly used nationalism for the creation of domestic consensus in anti-Soviet function. Nicolae Ceausescu, came to power in 1965, continued this strategy and led it to its climax, expanding dramatically the propaganda machine, that flooded into the everyday life of the Romanians. In particular, it was the discourse on national history that was manipulated and falsified for mere political needs, and declined in each type of cultural product, both in the academic literature as well as in popular literature and the arts. This book narrates how Romanian culture was subservient to the maintenance of a political system for over forty years and the consequences of this forced regimentation after the demolition of the Berlin Wall.

  • 141.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Filtering and AdaptingForeign Cultural Influences in Ceauşescu’s Romania2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 142.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    From Movements to Networks: The Romanian Iron Guard in Exile in Rome, 1945-19502018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    From the Hope of Engineering Nature to the Fear of Environmental Destruction: Imagining the Oresund Bridge (1950s-1990s)2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at presenting some aspects of the approach to natural environment in Sweden and Denmark in the second half of the twentieth century. It does so by analysing the hopes and fears generated by several societal actors when imagining the building of an engineering megastructure: the Oresund bridge, a project aimed at uniting the shores of the two states on the Oresund Straight. The bridge was built in the year 2000, but it has been imagined and planned since the nineteenth century by those who hoped to shorten the distance between Sweden and the continent and to produce major freedom of mobility of persons and goods across the Sound. Until the late 1960s, domesticating and exploiting the natural environment in order to favour the societal exigencies was still considered unproblematic. Only since the late 1960s the paradigm of engineering shifted from an anthropocentric perspective to a more sceptic view over the overexploitation of nature. Engineering the Oresund with tons of concrete and metal structures in order to favour car traffic was no more considered as a human victory upon the tyranny of nature, but as an irresponsible act. Concerns over the project were raised by scientists of the most diverse disciplines and by the local communities, which started the first “green wave” in the early seventies, soon followed by the bourgeois parties. The environmental concerns grew since the 1980s into a more general critique of liberalism, of capitalism and of the European Community, making of the Oresund bridge an ambivalent symbol to whom environmentalists reacted in different ways.

  • 144.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Fusing the Horizons: A Criticism of Archival Sources and Oral and Written Accounts2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Fusing the Horizons: A Criticism of Archival Sources and Oral and Written Accounts in the Study of the History of the Historiography of Communist Romania2015In: Archiva Moldaviae, ISSN 2067-3930, Vol. VII, p. 255-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a contribution to the understanding of the bias and limitations that different kind of sources offer to the researcher in the contemporary history. Specifically, the study addresses how the researcher poses him/herself in front of the problems generated by different kinds of source materials, acknowledging Hans-Georg Gadamer’s Truth and Method, and proposes how to deal with the different kind of narratives proposed by the sources. The specific field of investigation chosen for this study is the history of historiography under communism, and specifically of the History Institute of the Romanian Communism Party, a central party institution for history-writing existing in Romania between 1951 and 1990. The researcher has at his/her disposition different typologies of sources for this study, first of all the archival sources conserved at the National Archives of Romania (the archive of the Institute, the funds of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party, the familial fund of the Institute’s director, Ion Popescu-Puţuri), and the funds present at the National Council for the Study of the Securitate Archives on the Institute’s historians. The article demonstrates, relying on a consolidated tradition of historical methodology, that these sources offer several limitations: they already offer a narrative, they are incomplete, and they have been subject to manipulation. A second resource for the historian are the memoires of the historians of the communist period, working at the Institute or in similar institutions. This second kind of sources, analysed trough the instruments offered by memory studies and post-colonial studies, is considerate as biased for numerous reasons: they were written after 1989, in some cases with an apologetic or justificatory intent; the researcher cannot easily distinguish information from the affection of memory, which is generated by the collective and vernacular memory that has been created after 1989. The authors of these autobiographies have imagined and framed the materials of their memory according to the discourses elaborated by a series of social frameworks (and networks) in which they lived, including the national one, and they contributed with their memories to the forging of a new image of the networks in which they are inserted. A third kind of sources is offered by the methodology of oral history, namely interviews with former historians of the Institute. In this case, the advantage for the researcher to create ad hoc sources for the purposes of the study is counterbalanced by the limitations of these sources, which are the same as for the autobiographies, with the addition of the performative aspect that is contextual within the interview. The article concludes that no source can claim the status of “truth”. Therefore, the distance between different typologies of sources result to be shortened. In conclusion, the researcher has only partially the possibility to obviate the bias offered by the sources with a strong research question. The researcher’s only possibility to establish a new narrative on a topic is to merge the horizon and the research questions and expectations with the narrative presented by the sources, as explained by Gadamer.

  • 146.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    "Historiography has been a minefield": A conversation with Vladimir Tismaneanu2013In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 10-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Interview with political scientist Vladimir Tismaneanu about the condition of history discipline in Romania nowadays and its clashes with politics.

  • 147.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    History between Scholarly Production and Propaganda in Romania during the Ceauşesu Regime2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Il discorso storico in Romania e Ungheria tra teorie della cospirazione e liste di proscrizione2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Inter-national roads towards socialism: Romanian communist cultural products in Italy2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 150.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    La latinità nel Novecento romeno. I dibattiti intellettuali interbellici e le politiche culturali comuniste2014In: Sulle spalle degli antichi: Eredità classica e costruzione delle identità nazionali nel Novecento / [ed] Jacopo Bassi, Gianluca Canè, Milan: Edizioni Unicopli, 2014, p. 85-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Romania: land of conquest by Romans, Huns, Turks, last outpost of Christendom in Eastern Europe, part of the Eastern front during the 20th century wars, a Soviet satellite and, finally, member of the European Union and of NATO. Romania has always been subject to different ideas of identity meant to define its essence: latinity or dacianism? Europe or authochthonism? The essay aims at analysing the debate regarding the ethnogenesis of the Romanian people since its origin in the 17th century, through the debates of the 19th century and the interwar period and, finally, analysing the debate between latinity and dacianism during the Ceauşescu regime in the light of the cultural politics of the regime and of the debate between different factions of intellectuals.

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