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  • 101.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    'It', or The Art of Verbal Detail in Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw’2005In: Versions of Modernist Fiction: Henry James and Vladimir Nabokov / [ed] I. Kranz, Berlin: Freie Universität , 2005, p. 36-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Kobiecość jako źródło cierpień: Matki i córki w polskim kinie2009In: Ciało i seksualność w kinie polskim / [ed] Stanislaw Jagielski & Agnieszka Morstin-Poplawska, Krakow: Wyd. UJ , 2009, p. 155-172Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Naturalna więź?: Reprezentacje relacji matka-córki w tekstach polskiej kultury popularnej2009In: Kobiety-Feminizm-Demokracja / [ed] Boguslawa Budrowska, Warszawa: Wydawn. IFiS PAN , 2009, p. 43-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Równość płci – ideologia, utopia czy rzeczywistość? 2010In: Szwecja: Przewodnik nieturystyczny, Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Krytyki Politycznej , 2010, p. 203-212Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 105.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    The Social Construction of Motherhood and Daughterhood in Contemporary Poland: a trans-generational perspective2010In: Polish Sociological Review, ISSN 1231-1413, no 4, p. 467-485Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 106.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Z matki na córkę?: Ku międzygeneracyjnemu modelowi przemian kobiecej tożsamości we współczesnej Polsce2010In: Kobiety w polskiej transformacji 1989-2009: Podsumowania, interpretacje, prognozy / [ed] Monika Frąckowiak-Sochańska & Sabina Królikowska, Toruń: Wydawnictwo Adam Marszałek , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Hryciuk, Renata E.
    University of Warsaw.
    Poland2010In: Encyclopedia of Motherhood / [ed] Andrea O'Reilly, Sage Publications, 2010, p. vol. 3-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Kaposvári, Csilla
    Kunst, Anton E
    Is income or employment a stronger predictor of smoking than education in economically less developed countries?: A cross-sectional study in Hungary2011In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, p. 97-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterns of inequalities in smoking in Hungary can be best understood in relation to two processes: the smoking epidemic, and the additional effects of poverty. Equity orientated tobacco control measures should target the low educated to prevent their smoking initiation, and the poor to improve their cessation rates.

  • 109.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands / National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Stirbu, Irina
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institute.
    Kalediene, Ramune
    Kaunas University of Medicine, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Kovacs, Katalin
    Demographic Research Institute, HCSO, Budapest, Hungary.
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland.
    Wróblewska, Wiktoria
    Warsaw School of Economics, Warsaw, Poland.
    Mackenbach, Johan P.
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Kunst, Anton E.
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Educational inequalities in mortality in four Eastern European countries: divergence in trends during the post-communist transition from 1990 to 20002009In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 38, p. 512-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Post-communist transition has had a huge impact on mortality in Eastern Europe. We examined how educational inequalities in mortality changed between 1990 and 2000 in Estonia, Lithuania, Poland and Hungary.

    METHODS:

    Cross-sectional data for the years around 1990 and 2000 were used. Age-standardized mortality rates and mortality rate ratios (for total mortality only) were calculated for men and women aged 35-64 in three educational categories, for five broad cause-of-death groups and for five (seven among women) specific causes of death.

    RESULTS:

    Educational inequalities in mortality increased in all four countries but in two completely different ways. In Poland and Hungary, mortality rates decreased or remained the same in all educational groups. In Estonia and Lithuania, mortality rates decreased among the highly educated, but increased among those of low education. In Estonia and Lithuania, for men and women combined, external causes and circulatory diseases contributed most to the increasing educational gap in total mortality.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Different trends were observed between the two former Soviet republics and the two Central Eastern European countries. This divergence can be related to differences in socioeconomic development during the 1990s and in particular, to the spread of poverty, deprivation and marginalization. Alcohol and psychosocial stress may also have been important mediating factors.

  • 110.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Tekkel, Mare
    Kunst, Anton E
    Social determinants of ever initiating smoking differ from those of quitting: a cross-sectional study in Estonia.2007In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 572-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While educational level was the strongest predictor of ever initiating regular smoking, smoking cessation was related more directly to aspects of social disadvantage originating in adult life. To be effective, tobacco control interventions should not only target lower educated, but also those in material disadvantage.

  • 111.
    Lindström, Jonas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Can only Rich People Study?: Youth, Segregated Suburbs and Higher Education : experience from Sweden2006In: Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning, ISSN 1466-6529, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 6-13Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Widening participation in higher education has been a matter of priority for the Swedish government during recent years. One consequence has been an increase in policy and practice activity at national, regional and institutional level. Higher education institutions have a dual role with regard to widening participation: to help those from under-represented groups by countering the effects of socio-economic and educational disadvantage, and to provide a learning environment that enables them to realise their potential. From January 2002 to December 2004 the Swedish government spent SEK 120 million on approximately 100 projects relating to widening participation. One of these projects, Insatsledare som studieguider (Project Leaders as Guidance Counsellors), was undertaken at Södertörn University College. The aim of the project was to establish cooperation between Södertörn University College and local schools and communities, particularly in the so-called segregated areas of the Stockholm region. The purpose was to gather relevant facts about the transition between school and working life for young people who have been raised in urban communities where immigrants make up a majority of the population. These communities are often described as segregated suburbs.

  • 112.
    Lindström, Jonas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Det post-socialistiska janusansiktet2008In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, no 2, p. 53-58Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Lindström, Jonas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Drömmen om den nya staden: Stadsförnyelse i det postsovjetiska Riga2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to shed light on Post-Soviet urban renewal and people’s perceptions of changes that recently occurred in both the city of Riga and Latvian society more generally since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s. More specifically, this study examines how these perceptions are manifest in Riga’s ongoing renewal. Through applying aspects of continuity and discontinuity, I illustrate how the urban renewal of Post-Soviet Riga uncovers imaginary and emotional aspects of the city and how these are interpreted in relation to the past, present and the future. This study introduces the concept “urban postperestroika” and one important difference between this concept and the more common concepts post-socialist, post-communist or post-Soviet is that the former highlights a process while the latter ones largely highlight the state. The starting point is how urban phantasmagorias – contemporary dreams of the future of the city – elucidate urban renewal processes in general and urban postperestroika in particular. In Riga’s ongoing renewal processes I identify three main trajectories in relation to aspects of the past, present and the future: de-Sovietization, globalization and Lettification. Together, these three trajectories constitute an engine that produces urban phantasmagorias.

    The dissolution of the Soviet Union has given rise to notions that everything is “back to normal” again, and these notions of normalcy have influenced urban renewal processes. The dilemmas, as shown in this thesis, concern the Soviet period and its remaining psychical structure which give the impression of being too conspicuous to eliminate and too contradictory to assimilate. The study illustrates the difficulties of building new urban and societal structures on the remains of pre-existing orders. Such difficulties of course lead to contradictory and ambiguous world views and to new dysfunctional situations that have to be managed in the future.       

  • 114.
    Lindström, Jonas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Skolan mitt Ronna och Hovsjö: skolans roll som 'motor' i två 'utsatta' bostadsområden2006In: Skola, språk och storstad: en antologi om språkutveckling och skolans villkor i det mångkulturella urbana rummet / [ed] Monica Axelsson, Nihad Bunar, Stockholm: Pocky , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Lindström, Jonas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Södertälje - spänningar i Stostadssatsningens kölvatten2007In: Arkiv för studier i arbetarrörelsens historia, ISSN 0345-0333, no 96/97, p. 18-38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Lindström, Jonas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Urban renewal and spatial differentiations in Post-Soviet Riga: From Soviet City to ‘Western’ Metropolis?2009In: Poverty, Urbanity and Social Policy: Central and Eastern Europe Compared / [ed] Jolanta Aidukaite, New York: Nova publishers , 2009, p. 117-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Lindström, Jonas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Vad händer i Södertälje?2007In: I & M : invandrare & minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, no 4/5, p. 33-36Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 118.
    Lindström, Jonas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Är det bara rika som kan plugga vidare?: ungdomar, "utsatta" bostadsområden och universitetsstudier2006In: Locus, ISSN 1100-3197, no 2, p. 29-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Lindvall, Daniel
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    [Recension av:] Torsten Kolind: Post-war Identification: Everyday Muslim Counterdiscourse in Bosnia Herzegovina: Aarhus : Aarhus University Press, 2008, SBN 87-7934-313-92010In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 98-100Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Lindvall, Daniel
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    The Limits of the European Vision in Bosnia and Herzegovina: An Analysis of the Police Reform Negotiations2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 121. Lipsicas, Cendrine Bursztein
    et al.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Apter, Alan
    De Leo, Diego
    Kerkhof, Ad
    Lönnqvist, Jouko
    Michel, Konrad
    Renberg, Ellinor Salander
    Sayil, Isik
    Schmidtke, Armin
    van Heeringen, Cornelis
    Vaernik, Airi
    Wasserman, Danuta
    Attempted suicide among immigrants in European countries: an international perspective2012In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 241-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compares the frequencies of attempted suicide among immigrants and their hosts, between different immigrant groups, and between immigrants and their countries of origin. The material, 27,048 persons, including 4,160 immigrants, was obtained from the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behaviour, the largest available European database, and was collected in a standardised manner from 11 European centres in 1989-2003. Person-based suicide-attempt rates (SARs) were calculated for each group. The larger immigrant groups were studied at each centre and compared across centres. Completed-suicide rates of their countries of origin were compared to the SARs of the immigrant groups using rank correlations. 27 of 56 immigrant groups studied showed significantly higher, and only four groups significantly lower SARs than their hosts. Immigrant groups tended to have similar rates across different centres. Moreover, positive correlation between the immigrant SAR and the country-of-origin suicide rate was found. However, Chileans, Iranians, Moroccans, and Turks displayed high SARs as immigrants despite low suicide rates in the home countries. The similarity of most immigrant groups' SARs across centres, and the correlation with suicidality in the countries of origin suggest a strong continuity that can be interpreted in either cultural or genetic terms. However, the generally higher rates among immigrants compared to host populations and the similarity of the rates of foreign-born and those immigrants who retained the citizenship of their country of origin point to difficulties in the acculturation and integration process. The positive correlation found between attempted and completed suicide rates suggests that the two are related, a fact with strong implications for suicide prevention.

  • 122.
    Lundén, Thomas
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Balogh, Péter
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Borén, Thomas
    Stockholms universitet.
    Chekalina, Tatiana
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå universitet.
    Kravchenko, Zhanna
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Lindström, Jonas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Polanska, Dominika V.
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Vaattovaara, Mari
    University of Helsinki.
    Wichmann Matthiessen, Christian
    A hundred years later: Streetcars are still rattling in Baltic cities2012In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, Vol. 5, no 3-4, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Lundén et al. 2012
  • 123. Mackenbach, Johan P
    et al.
    Stirbu, Irina
    Roskam, Albert-Jan R
    Schaap, Maartje M
    Menvielle, Gwenn
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia .
    Kunst, Anton E
    Socioeconomic inequalities in health in 22 European countries2008In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 358, no 23, p. 2468-2481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We observed variation across Europe in the magnitude of inequalities in health associated with socioeconomic status. These inequalities might be reduced by improving educational opportunities, income distribution, health-related behavior, or access to health care.

  • 124. Magnusson, Sara
    et al.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Sweden: Income and suicide2010In: Psychological Reports, ISSN 0033-2941, E-ISSN 1558-691X, Vol. 107, no 1, p. 157-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous publications have reported two conflicting patterns describing the relationship between income and suicide in Sweden; positive and negative. Methodologically the studies have differed, and the analysis has been limited to a few areas. To better understand the relationship, a nationwide, cross-sectional, ecological study of the 290 municipalities in Sweden was planned. OLS regression analyses showed the overall and female suicide rates were negatively related to income, while the effect on male suicide rates was not statistically significant. The results confirm earlier findings of a negative relationship between income and suicide.

  • 125. Menvielle, Gwen
    et al.
    Stirbu, Irina
    Roskam, Albert-Jan
    Schaap, Maartje M.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonie .
    Kunst, Anton E.
    Mackenbach, Johan P.
    Les inégalités socials de mortalité en Europe: [Socioeconomic inequalities in mortality in Europe]2009In: M S.Médecine Sciences, ISSN 0767-0974, E-ISSN 1958-5381, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 192-196Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 126. Murphy, Adrianna
    et al.
    Roberts, Bayard
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    McKee, Martin
    Social Factors Associated with Alcohol Consumption in the Former Soviet Union: A Systematic Review2012In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 711-718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Alcohol consumption is a major cause of premature mortality in countries of the former Soviet Union (fSU). Despite the unique social profile of the region, we could find no published systematic review of studies of social factors and alcohol consumption in formerly Soviet countries. We aim to critically review the current evidence for social factors associated with alcohol consumption in the fSU and to identify key gaps in the literature. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Global Health databases for cross-sectional, case-control, longitudinal or qualitative studies of demographic, socio-economic, psycho-social and contextual factors associated with alcohol consumption, in any language, published from 1991 until 16 December 2011. Additional studies were identified from the references of selected papers and expert consultation. Our review followed PRISMA guidelines for the reporting of systematic reviews. Results: Our search strategy resulted in 26 articles for review. Although there is strong evidence in the literature that males and smokers in the fSU are more likely to engage in hazardous alcohol consumption, findings regarding other social factors were mixed and there were almost no data on the association of contextual factors and alcohol consumption in this region. Conclusion: This review highlights the extremely limited amount of evidence for social factors associated with heavy alcohol consumption in the fSU. Given the unique social environment of countries of the fSU, future research should take these factors into account in order to effectively address the high levels of alcohol-related mortality in this region.

  • 127.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University College, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Akceptacja samobójstwa oraz jej korelaty w Europie Wschodniej i Zachodniej w okresie przemian ustrojowych2006In: Suicydologia, ISSN 1895-3786, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [pl]

    Wstęp. Celem niniejszej pracy było zbadanie akceptacji samobójstwa i jej związku z umieralnością z powodu samobójstw oraz czynników, od których zależy ocena samobójstwa w Europie. Dane dotyczące postaw: 33 221 wywiadów przeprowadzonych w 25 krajach europejskich (Światowe Badania Wartości, World Values Study, 1990–1991). Dane dotyczące umieralności z powodu samobójstwa: statystyki WHO. Materiał i metody. Obliczono korelację rangową między wskaźnikami samobójstw wśród kobiet i mężczyzn z różnych grup wiekowych a postawami wobec samobójstwa. Czynniki determinujące postawę badano z użyciem analizy regresji zarówno logistycznej, jak i liniowej. Aby opisać różne struktury postaw, przeprowadzono analizę czynnikową. Wyniki. Ogólnie samobójstwo oceniano negatywnie, lecz poszczególne kraje różniły się ze względu na wysokość i rozkład ocen. Statystycznie istotne dodatnie korelacje między umieralnością samobójczą a postawami wobec samobójstwa stwierdzono wśród kobiet w wieku 15-64 lat. Ostateczny model czynników determinujących na poziomie indywidualnym akceptację samobójstwa obejmował: wysoką pozycję Boga (korelat ujemny), religii (ujemny) i rodziny (ujemny) w hierarchii ważności, wiek (ujemny), nietolerancję wobec niezrównoważenia psychicznego (ujemny), dobre zdrowie subiektywne, myśli o śmierci oraz liberalny styl wychowywania dzieci. Ten model wyjaśniał 12,6% wariancji w Europie Zachodniej, ale tylko 2,6% we Wschodniej. Analiza czynnikowa wykazała, że miejsce samobójstwa wśród innych aktów również odróżniało Europę Wschodnią do Zachodniej. Wnioski. Kraje europejskie różnią się pod względem akceptacji samobójstwa. Dodatnie związki między postawami wobec samobójstwa a umieralnością samobójczą istnieją wśród kobiet. Osobista religijność jest najlepszym predyktorem akceptacji samobójstwa w Europie Zachodniej, lecz czynnik ten nie ma znaczenia w Europie Wschodniej, co wskazuje na ogólniejszą różnicę dotyczącą sensu samobójstwa.

  • 128.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University College, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Självmordens geografiska fördelning i Sverige2006In: Ymer, ISSN 0044-0477, p. 251-268Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Självmordsdödligheten varierar mellan olika geografiska områden: mellan kontinenter och enstaka länder, mellan län och landsdelar, mellan kommuner och mellan stadsdelar, t o m mellan husen i samma stadsdel. Den aktuella presentationen fokuserar på att beskriva självmordens geografiska fördelning i Sverige. Eftersom det finns stora skillnader i mäns och kvinnors självmordsdödlighet, samt dödligheten i olika åldrar och med olika metoder, behandlas dessa i viss mån separat. Den statistik som analyseras kommer från databanken hos Nationellt centrum för suicidforskning och –prevention (NASP) . Den omfattar åren 2000-2002 och de angivna talen avser medelvärden för dessa tre år, de senaste för vilka detaljerad statistik fanns tillgänglig. Hela Sverige hade under perioden i genomsnitt 16.6 självmord per 100000 invånare årligen. Detta tal var som högst i Gotlands län (24.4) och lägst i Västerbotten (12.0). Det var högre än genomsnittet i Östergötland, Kronobergs, Blekinge och Skåne län samt i Värmland, Dalarna och Gävleborgs län, medan Västkusten, Jönköpings län, Södermanland och Norrbotten hade lägre än genomsnittliga tal. I historisk jämförelse är dagens fördelning mycket intressant. Självmordens gamla geografiska fördelning, har ändrat sig påtagligt sedan 1965 efter att ha varit mycket stabil i mer än 100 år. Korrelationen mellan 1830- och 2000-talens siffror är nu mycket låg (r=0.09), och den med 1960-talets tal (r=0.33) är inte heller den statistiskt signifikant vilket tyder på att en rumslig omorganisation har ägt rum. Det finns även en viss kontinuitet. Sålunda ligger t ex Skåne, Dalarna och Gävleborgs län fortfarande över riksgenomsnittet i självmord, och Jönköpings, Kalmar, Västra Götalands, Västerbottens och Norrbottens län ligger under det. Självmorden i Kronobergs län och på Gotland har emellertid ökat betydligt i relativt hänseende samtidigt som de har minskat drastiskt i Stockholms och Södermanlands län så att Stockholm nu ligger under riksgenomsnittet. Vidare har skillnaderna mellan länen fortsatt att jämnas ut. På 1830-talet var självmordstalet i Stockholms län nio gånger högre än i Västerbotten, och på 1960-talet nästan tre gånger så högt som i Kronobergs län som då låg sist; 2000-2002 är de ledande gotländska siffrorna bara dubbelt så höga som de västerbottniska.

  • 129.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Social Theories of Suicide2009In: Oxford Textbook of Suicidology and Suicide Prevention / [ed] Danuta Wasserman and Camilla Wasserman, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2009, p. 139-147Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Suicide Mortality of Eastern European Regions before and after the Communist Period2006In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 307-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spatial distribution of Eastern European suicide mortality both before and at the end of the Communist period, as well as the changes that occurred during this period.

    Regional data on suicide mortality were collected from Czarist “European Russia” in 1910 and from the corresponding area in 1989. The distribution of suicide mortality was mapped at both points in time. Regional continuity over time was further studied with the help of geographical units specially constructed for this purpose.

    In 1910, suicide mortality was found to be high in the northern Baltic provinces, in the urban parts of north and central Russia, the more urbanized parts of northern and western Poland, in east Ukraine, and in the northern Caucasus, while suicide rates were generally low in south Russia, Dagestan, and in southern Poland. In 1989, suicide mortality was highest in the Urals, the east Russian “ethnic” areas, and in southeast Russia. The rates were low in Poland, Moldavia, and in most of the northern Caucasus. The across-time analysis using specially constructed comparison units showed that the spatial distributions of suicide mortality in 1910 and 1989 were not correlated with each other. Additional analyses pointed to a short-term consistency of regional patterns both in the 1900s–1920s and the 1980s–1990s.

    The lack of regional continuity in suicide mortality in the area may imply an absence of strong and continuous regional cultures, or a strong influence of other factors, such as societal modernization, on suicide mortality. Suicide as an act changed its social nature during the Communist period, becoming more normal, and more equally distributed among social classes and geographical locations.

  • 131.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Reitan, Therese C.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Continuity and Change in Russian Alcohol Consumption from Tsars to Transition2006In: Social history (London), ISSN 0307-1022, E-ISSN 1470-1200, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 160-179Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Suicide Mortality and Agricultural Rationalization in Post-War Europe2006In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 429-434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The relationship between agricultural rationalization and suicide mortality has been little researched. On the basis of the hypothesis that agricultural rationalization leads to more suicide, this study investigated whether a general relationship could be found between structural change in agriculture and suicide mortality in post-war Europe. Method Due to the expected small size of the effect, the data were deliberately collected so as to maximize the variation in the independent variable. Annual national-level data on suicide mortality, the percentage of the work force in agricultural employment, and the unemployment level were collected from those countries and 10-year periods where the structural changes (reductions in employment) in agriculture between 1950 and 1995 had been most and least pronounced. In order to avoid confounders, the annual changes in the variables’ values were correlated with each other, adding a control for the level of unemployment, and allowing for lagged effects. Results The annual changes in the levels of agricultural employment and those of suicide mortality did not covary at all. Controlling for unemployment levels did not change this, nor could any lagged effects be found. Conclusions At the most general level, no causal relation between agricultural rationalization and suicide mortality was detected. This lack of a universal relation does not, however, preclude the possibility of the relationship existing given certain socio-historical circumstances.

  • 133.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Wasserman, Danuta
    Labour Market, Work Environment and Suicide2009In: Oxford Textbook of Suicidology and Suicide Prevention / [ed] Danuta Wasserman and Camilla Wasserman, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2009, p. 221-229Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 134. Noaksson, Niklas
    et al.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    The Production of Ideas and Expert Knowledge in OECD.: The OECD Jobs Strategy in contrast with the EU employment strategy2003Report (Other academic)
  • 135. O'Hara, Sarah
    et al.
    Gentile, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Household Incomes in Central Asia: The Case of Post-Soviet Kazakhstan2009In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 327-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two European geographers present the findings of a sizeable survey (n = 7,5 15) providing a detailed geographical analysis of household incomes and reliance on personal subsidiary garden plots across Kazakhstan. The authors focus on assessing the extent to which Kazakhstan's rising GDP during the post-Soviet period has coincided with an increase in the general population's personal income and ability to secure adequate food supplies for personal consumption. The fine geographical scale of analysis of the survey data (significantly less coarse than oblast-level data) enabled them to identify regions characterized by "trickle-down" income, largely centered on the country's two main urban centers and areas of resource exploitation. The patterns revealed in the paper have relevance to the debate concerning the uneven distribution of benefits from resource exploitation (notably oil and gas) to Kazakhstan's population.

  • 136. O'Hara, Sarah
    et al.
    Ivlevs, Artjoms
    Gentile, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    The Impact of Global Economic Crisis on Remittances in the Commonwealth of Independent States2009In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 447-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two European geographers and an economist analyze the impact of the 2008-2009 global economic recession on remittances in the Commonwealth of Independent States. Drawing on balance-of-payments data as well as information on money transfers to and from the region, they detail the annual growth of remittances since 2001, illustrating the growing importance of this income stream to a number of countries in the region. Using quarterly data, they then provide details of the impact of the financial crisis on remittances starting with the 2007 credit crunch and intensifying with the collapse of global markets in 2008. Based on the impact of the 1998 Russian Crisis, they suggest that by 2012, remittances to the region could fall to only one-third the 2008 level, and that a return to pre-crisis levels of remittances could take almost a decade.

  • 137. Oja, Leila
    et al.
    Matsi, Ardo
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Estonian Health Interview Survey 2006: Methodological report2008Report (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Papakostas, Apostolis
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Civilizing the public sphere: Distrust, trust and corruption2012 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Papakostas, Apostolis
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    De medlemslösa organisationernas tidevarv2012In: Civilsamhället i samhällskontraktet: en antologi om vad som står på spel / [ed] Wijkström, Filip, Stockholm: European Civil Society Press , 2012, 1, p. 35-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 140.
    Papakostas, Apostolis
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Introduction: Piotr Sztompka and the Sociological Trauma2007In: The ambivalence of social change in post-communist societies: lecture held at Södertörn University College May 31, 2007, Huddinge: Södertörn University College , 2007, p. 5-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 141.
    Papakostas, Apostolis
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Misstro, tillit, korruption och det offentligas civilisering2009Book (Other academic)
  • 142.
    Papakostas, Apostolis
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    More organization with fewer people2011In: Nordic civil society at a cross-roads: transforming the popular movement tradition / [ed] Wijkström, Filip; Zimmer, Annette, Baden-Baden: Nomos , 2011, 1, p. 73-107Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 143.
    Papakostas, Apostolis
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Recension av Frank, Denis: Staten, företagen och arbetskraftsinvandringen. (2005)2006In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, no 4, p. 80-82Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Papakostas, Apostolis
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    The rationalization of civil society2011In: Current Sociology, ISSN 0011-3921, E-ISSN 1461-7064, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 5-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two ideas are almost universally accepted as reality in political sociology. One is that numbers are declining in nearly all membership associations. The usual interpretation of this phenomenon is that it occurs because of individualization. The other is that the character of collective action has changed. This idea, which stems from Touraine, Melucci and Castells, states that a new historical category of social action has emerged, one that resembles action in primary groups rather than in organizations and in some way is a victory over the iron law of oligarchy. This article questions both ideas. The author intends to show that another historical process is in play here, namely, a process of ‘inert rationalization’ in social movements, political parties and associations, which is taking place in Europe with different starting points and at different tempos. The result of this process can be summed up as ‘more organization with fewer people’. Domination, inherent in oligarchic organizations, is being transformed by the creation of a new organizational boundary between elite (or profession) and members. The point is that it is membership itself as a form for affiliation that is disappearing, not just members. The article argues that this is mainly because resource mobilization patterns have historically changed from the mobilization of resources drawn from members to the mobilization of resources drawn from other organizations. Finally, the article analyses the importance of the unstructured power fields (or open spaces) created by rationalization processes for social innovation and new social movements.

  • 145.
    Papakostas, Apostolis
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Polanska, Dominika
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Ett låst samhälle?2009In: Från klass till organisation: en resa genom det sociala landskapet / [ed] Christine Roman & Lars Udehn, Malmö: Liber , 2009Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 146.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Anarchism in post-socialism: A case of Polish anarchists2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 147.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Anarchist movement in post-socialist context2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 148. Plug, Iris
    et al.
    Hoffmann, Rasmus
    Artnik, Barbara
    Bopp, Matthias
    Borrell, Carme
    Costa, Giuseppe
    Deboosere, Patrick
    Esnaola, Santi
    Kalediene, Ramune
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Lundberg, Olle
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Regidor, Enrique
    Rychtarikova, Jitka
    Strand, Bjorn Heine
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    Mackenbach, Johan P
    Socioeconomic inequalities in mortality from conditions amenable to medical interventions: do they reflect inequalities in access or quality of health care?2012In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 12, article id 346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported large socioeconomic inequalities in mortality from conditions amenable to medical intervention, but it is unclear whether these can be attributed to inequalities in access or quality of health care, or to confounding influences such as inequalities in background risk of diseases. We therefore studied whether inequalities in mortality from conditions amenable to medical intervention vary between countries in patterns which differ from those observed for other (non-amenable) causes of death. More specifically, we hypothesized that, as compared to non-amenable causes, inequalities in mortality from amenable causes are more strongly associated with inequalities in health care use and less strongly with inequalities in common risk factors for disease such as smoking. Data and methods Cause-specific mortality data for people aged 30-74 years were obtained for 14 countries, and were analysed by calculating age-standardized mortality rates and relative risks comparing a lower with a higher educational group. Survey data on health care use and behavioural risk factors for people aged 30-74 years were obtained for 12 countries, and were analysed by calculating age-and sex-adjusted odds ratios comparing a low with a higher educational group. Patterns of association were explored by calculating correlation coefficients. RESULTS: In most countries and for most amenable causes of death substantial inequalities in mortality were observed, but inequalities in mortality from amenable causes did not vary between countries in patterns that are different from those seen for inequalities in non-amenable mortality. As compared to non-amenable causes, inequalities in mortality from amenable causes are not more strongly associated with inequalities in health care use. Inequalities in mortality from amenable causes are also not less strongly associated with common risk factors such as smoking. CONCLUSIONS: We did not find evidence that inequalities in mortality from amenable conditions are related to inequalities in access or quality of health care. Further research is needed to find the causes of socio-economic inequalities in mortality from amenable conditions, and caution should be exercised in interpreting these inequalities as indicating health care deficiencies.

  • 149.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Decline and revitalization in post-communist urban context: a case of the Polish city d Gdansk2008In: Communist and post-communist studies, ISSN 0967-067X, E-ISSN 1873-6920, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 359-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how different social, economic, historical and physical conditions coincide in the formation of space and processes of decline in the period of transformation in Poland. The focus lies on a specific residential area in the centre of the Polish city of Gdansk and the question why no improvements have been done in this particular area to stop its successive decline. It is among other things argued that clear urban policy together with improved urban planning and clear legislation on ownership are needed in order to improve conditions in this and other deprived areas of the city.

  • 150.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Gated Communities and the Construction of Social Class Markers in Postsocialist Societies: The Case of Poland2010In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 421-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyze how social class markers are constructed in the discourse on gated communities in a postsocialist urban context. The case of Poland is used as an example of apost-Communist country where the number of gated communities is increasing rapidly in urban areas. The material of study consists of 50 articles published in the largest national newspaper.

    This article argues that the discourse on gated communities is constituted by and constitutes class divisions and social class markers prevalent in the country since the fall of Communism. The “new” capitalistic system with its inherent social divisions is described as creating demands for “new” forms of housing where gates function as separators, protectors, and class identifiers. Residential differentiation is a reality in Polish society, and private space has become a symbol of exclusivity and spread throughout the country along with the popularity of gated forms of housing.

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