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  • 101.
    Götz, Norbert
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    The Future of Area Studies2013Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 102.
    Götz, Norbert
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    The Good Plumpuddings’ Belief’: British Humanitarian and Medical Assistance to Sweden During the Napoleonic Wars2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Götz, Norbert
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    The Good Plumpuddings’ Belief: British Voluntary Aid to Sweden During the Napoleonic Wars2015In: International History Review, ISSN 0707-5332, E-ISSN 1949-6540, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 519-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The London-based Committee for Relieving the Distressed Inhabitants of Germany, and Other Parts of the Continent is an early example of a large-scale voluntary relief programme that has gone unappreciated in the annals of humanitarianism. The present article examines the period in 1808 and 1809 when this committee redirected its relief efforts to Sweden. The case highlights many issues that beset humanitarianism today. With well-preserved recipient records, it offers insight to aspects of humanitarian encounters that have been markedly under-researched. It examines how foreign-policy interests fostered mis-conceptions about those in need and how such misconceptions resulted in corrupt distribution structures. It shows that asymmetries in the development of civil society impeded the relief effort and that the divergent interests of donors and distributors caused the forms of relief to be inadequate and agency to be lost. Moreover, it illustrates how local elites resisted advice from abroad and how the individual personalities involved shaped policy outcomes. These factors remain issues at the present time and the case of two Protestant European countries with a cultural affinity illustrates how significant they are.

  • 104.
    Götz, Norbert
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    The ‘Moral Economy’ Revisited: Conceptual History and Analytical Prospects2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Götz, Norbert
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    The Sea of Identities: A Century of Baltic and East European Experiences with Nationality, Class, and Gender2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The essays in this collection present research on national, class, and gender identities in the Baltic Sea Region and Eastern Europe being conducted by researchers based at the Institute of Contemporary History, Södertörn University, Stockholm. The contributors focus on transnational flow as they explore Danish, Estonian, Finnish, German, Lithuanian, Moldovan, Polish, Russian, and Swedish instances, and the region at large. The studies examine fluid identities in a historical perspective and show how notions of identity have been naturalised in specific contexts.

    This book is issued in conjunction with the fifteenth anniversary of the Swedish Institute of Contemporary History. By bringing to the public the most current findings in Baltic and East European studies and offering an overview of work done by the institute’s researchers, it hopes to demonstrate the fruitfulness of opening contemporary history to broader regional and transnational approaches.

    Dr Norbert Götz is professor of history at the Institute of Contemporary History, Södertörn University, Sweden.

  • 106.
    Götz, Norbert
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Volksgemeinschaft2017In: Handbuch der völkischen Wissenschaften: Akteure, Netzwerke, Forschungsprogramme / [ed] Michael Fahlbusch, Ingo Haar, and Alexander Pinwinkler, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2017, 2, p. 1268-1277Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Götz, Norbert
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Brewis, Georgina
    Werther, Steffen
    Humanitäre Hilfe: Eine Braudel'sche Perspektive2019In: Freiwilligenarbeit und gemeinnützige Organisationen im Wandel: Neue Perspektiven auf das 19. und 20. jahrhundert / [ed] Nicole Kramer und Christine G. Krüger, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2019, p. 89-119Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Götz, Norbert
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Ekengren, Ann-Marie
    The One Per Cent Country: Sweden’s Internalisation of the Aid Norm2013In: Saints and Sinners: Official Development Aid and its Dynamics in a Historical and Comparative Perspective / [ed] Thorsten Borring Olesen, Helge Ø. Pharo, and Kristian Paaskesen, Oslo: Akademika forlag, 2013, p. 21-49Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Götz, Norbert
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Elmgren, Ainur
    Power Investigation: The Political Culture of Nordic Self-Understanding : Special Issue2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 110.
    Götz, Norbert
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Elmgren, Ainur
    University of Helsinki.
    The Political Culture of Nordic Self-Understanding: Power Investigation2015Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Power investigation’, or the practice of power to legitimize itself through commissioned programmes of scientific enquiry, is a hallmark of Nordic democracy. Five power investigations have been conducted in the Nordic countries since 1972. The close connection to state power has not dissuaded prominent scholars from participating in them, nor have their findings evoked strong criticism. Combining politically guided perspectives with collaborative research, power investigations represent public events that typify the ostensibly open political culture of the Nordic countries, rather than simply existing as texts or as a politico-scientific genre. Although such investigations have been thought of as critical studies of power, the authors in this book show that their findings have varied greatly and that they have served as tools for wielding power. Whatever shortcomings they uncover, the utility of these investigations in suggesting transparency and self-reflection enhances the legitimacy of Scandinavian government. The investigations are persuasive exercises through which the commissioning authorities and those scholars hired to carry them out engage in a mutually beneficial exchange. Underlying this strategy is the perception, deeply embedded in Nordic political culture, that politics is a progressive, rational endeavour, and that identification with the state is an honourable role for academics.

    Table of Contents

    1. ‘Power Investigation: The Political Culture of Nordic Self-Understanding’: Introduction Ainur Elmgren and Norbert Götz

    2. Introspective Performance: The Scandinavian Power Investigation as a Politico-Cultural Practice Norbert Götz

    3. From the Swedish Model to the Open Society: The Swedish Power Investigation and the Power to Investigate Power, 1985 – 1990 Carl Marklund

    4. Three Nordic Power Investigations on the Repercussions of the European Union on Sovereignty and Democracy Ann-Cathrine Jungar

    5. ‘Power Investigation’ Neglected: The Case of the Finnish Newspaper Helsingin Sanomat Lotta Lounasmeri

    6. Power and Society in Finland: Change and Continuity Ainur Elmgren

    7. Justice and EU Foreign Policy Alex Prichard

    8. Informal Governance and the Eurozone Crisis Alexandra Hennessy

  • 111.
    Götz, Norbert
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Friberg, Katarina
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Det globala civilsamhällets moraliska ekonomi: Historien om den frivilliga livsmedelshjälpen2013In: Arbetarhistoria : Meddelande från Arbetarrörelsens Arkiv och Bibliotek, ISSN 0281-7446, no 1, p. 23-25Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Götz, Norbert
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Haggrén, Heidi
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Hilson, Mary
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Nordic Cooperation in the Voluntary Sector2015In: Nordic Cooperation: A European Region in Transition / [ed] Strang, Johan, London: Routledge, 2015, p. 49-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Götz, Norbert
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Holmén, Janne
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Introduction to the theme issue: “Mental maps: geographical and historical perspectives”2018In: Journal of Cultural Geography, ISSN 0887-3631, E-ISSN 1940-6320, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 157-161Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 114.
    Götz, Norbert
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Holmén, JanneSödertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Mental Maps: Geographical and Historical Perspectives2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Mental map’ is a term referring to the way people orientate themselves in their spatial surroundings and how they perceive the world. Alongside ‘cognitive map’, its approximate synonym, the concept of a mental map is established in geography, the behavioral sciences, and psychology. Over the past two decades the idea of mental maps has been adopted by historians in analyzing the construction and dissolution of historical regions, the world views of political elites, and patterns of dominance and subalternity. Despite the resonance the concept of mental maps has had in several disciplines, an international multi-disciplinary conversation on mental maps with an emphasis on cultural patterns is still in its earliest stages. The present special journal issue addresses this situation by bringing together scholars from the fields of history, geography, economics, anthropology, and linguistics, and by using a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods. The idea of this themed issue emerged at a workshop entitled “Mental Mapping – Historical and Social Science Perspectives”, held 12–13 November 2015 at the Institute of Contemporary History, Södertörn University, and the Italian Cultural Institute “C.M. Lerici” in Stockholm. The workshop was arranged by the research project Spaces of Expectation: Mental Mapping and Historical Imagination in the Baltic Sea and Mediterranean Region, a joint venture between Södertörn University and Ca’ Foscari University in Venice.

  • 115.
    Götz, Norbert
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Marklund, Carl
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Introduction2014In: The Paradox of Openness: Transparency and Participation in Nordic Cultures of Consensus / [ed] Götz, Norbert; Marklund, Carl, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2014, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Götz, Norbert
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Marklund, CarlSödertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    The Paradox of Openness: Transparency and Participation in Nordic Cultures of Consensus2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ‘open society’ has become a watchword of liberal democracy and the market system in the modern globalized world. Openness stands for individual opportunity and collective reason, as well as bottom-up empowerment and top-down transparency. It has become a cherished value, despite its vagueness and the connotation of vulnerability that surrounds it. Scandinavia has long considered itself a model of openness, citing traditions of freedom of information and inclusive policy making. This collection of essays traces the conceptual origins, development, and diverse challenges of openness in the Nordic countries and Austria. It examines some of the many paradoxes that openness encounters and the tensions it arouses when it addresses such divergent ends as democratic deliberation and market transactions, freedom of speech and sensitive information, compliant decision making and political and administrative transparency, and consensual procedures and the toleration of dissent.

  • 117.
    Götz, Norbert
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Palmowski, Frank
    Erfurt, Germany.
    Humanitäre Hilfe im Zeitalter Napoleons: Bürgerliche Gesellschaft und transnationale Ressour­cen am Beispiel Erfurts2017In: Historische Zeitschrift, ISSN 0018-2613, E-ISSN 2196-680X, Vol. 305, no 2, p. 362-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how monies raised by the London-based „Committee for Relieving the Distresses in Germany and Other Parts of the Continent“ (1805–1815) were distributed by local committees, with the city of Erfurt as an example. Due to a lack of source material for the first campaign in 1805–1806 the focus is on the years 1814–1815. Networks of German immigrants within the British and Foreign Bible Society played a pivotal role on both occasions. Outstanding among them was Ernst August Schwabe, minister of one of the German churches in London and a native of Erfurt. The study shows how the transnational relief effort was organized, the way civil societies in London and Erfurt were interlinked through the aid campaign, and why the Erfurt committee of distribution failed in its trans-regional role. The provision of aid illustrates the diverging interests of donors in immediate emergency relief and of recipients in long-term use of the appropriated resources. A large proportion of the aid eventually went into a fund for war orphans, the disbursal of which was, in practice, controlled by the local women’s association.

  • 118.
    Hirdman, Yvonne
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Jämställdhetspolitiken mellan alla och många2014In: Det långa 1990-talet: när Sverige förändrades / [ed] Ivarsson Westerberg, Anders, Waldemarson, Ylva, Östberg, Kjell, Umeå: Boréa Bokförlag, 2014, 1, p. 277-317Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 119.
    Holmén, Janne
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. Historiska institutionen, Uppsala Universitet.
    A small separate fatherland of our own: regional history writing and regional identity on islands in the Baltic Sea2014In: Island Studies Journal, ISSN 1715-2593, E-ISSN 1715-2593, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 135-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gotland, Åland, Saaremaa, Hiiumaa and Bornholm are five islands in the Baltic Sea which constitute, or have until recently constituted, provinces or counties. Combining perspectives from the fields of island studies and history, this article investigates how regional history writing has contributed to the formation of regional identity on each island since the year 1800. The special geographic situation of the islands somewhat secluded from the mainland but also connected to important waterways has provided their inhabitants with shared historical experiences. Due to varying geographic and historical circumstances, the relationship between regional and national identity is however different on each island. While regional history writing has often aimed at integrating the island into the nation state, it has on Åland in the 20th century been used to portray its inhabitants as a separate nation.

  • 120.
    Holmén, Janne
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. Uppsala universitet / Åbo akademi University, Åbo, Finland.
    Changing mental maps of the Baltic Sea and Mediterranean regions2017In: Journal of Cultural Geography, ISSN 0887-3631, E-ISSN 1940-6320, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 230-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little empirical research has considered the way in which macro-regions are perceived outside academic and political circles. Such studies alone can determine what regional narratives mean for the wider public, and the extent to which they coincide with region-building images produced by elites. This article examines the mental maps of high school seniors in 10 cities in the Baltic Sea and Mediterranean regions, focusing upon their perception and knowledge of other countries in those areas. Despite efforts at region building since the Cold War, the two regions remain divided on mental maps. Students have little knowledge of countries across the sea from their own, although such knowledge is generally greater among those from coastal (and particularly island) locations. A comparison with maps constructed by Gould in 1966 reveals that the perception of countries within one's own region among Italian and Swedish students has become more negative over the last 50 years.

  • 121.
    Holmén, Janne
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. Uppsala University.
    Fluctuating Dynastic and National Affiliation: The Impact of War and Unrest on Bornholm, Åland, and Saaremaa2014In: The Sea of Identities: A Century of Baltic and East European Experiences with Nationality, Class, and Gender / [ed] Götz, Norbert, Huddinge: Södertörn University , 2014, p. 31-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 122.
    Holmén, Janne
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Humorn som vapen under Kalla kriget2013In: Samband historia tema / [ed] Niklas Ericsson, Stockholm: Sanoma utbildning , 2013, p. 100-111Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 123.
    Hurd, Madeleine
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Werther, Steffen
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Retelling the past, inspiring the future: Waffen-SS commemorations and the creation of a ‘European’ far-right counter-narrative2016In: Patterns of Prejudice, ISSN 0031-322X, E-ISSN 1461-7331, Vol. 50, no 4-5, p. 420-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heinrich Himmler created the Waffen-SS in part as a multinational force, willing to fight for a New Europe based on Germanic blood. After the war, many international Waffen-SS units formed veterans' associations (VAs). Like other VAs, these provided veterans with the chance to engage in ‘memory work’ and to keep alive a sense of comradeship and of valiant sacrifice, as well as an emotional commitment to the fallen. Waffen-SS veterans were, however, alone in celebrating their ‘sacrifices’. Others shunned them for their participation in atrocities. To defend themselves, they developed a counter-hegemonic Second World War narrative that presented the Waffen-SS as uniquely heroic ‘European’ volunteers' against Bolshevism. This counter-narrative, however, only gained resonance with the fall of the Berlin Wall. After 1989, in fact, veterans could seek out and establish sites of public commemoration, not in Western but in Eastern Europe. Hurd and Werther use veterans' journals and books to explore the redeployment of SS ideology in a revisionist version of history. They examine the resurrection of a mass Waffen-SS graveyard in East Ukraine as a telling case history, discussing, not least, the implications of a ‘reconciliation’ of the former German soldiers with both Ukrainian villagers and Red Army veterans. Finally, they explore the significance of the veterans' ‘European’ counter-history for a younger generation of neo-Nazis.

  • 124.
    Ivarsson Westerberg, Anders
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Academy of Public Administration. Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Sextisju, sextisju - vart har du tagit vägen nu?2014In: Demokrati och förvaltning: En festskrift till Rune Premfors / [ed] Bengt Jacobsson och Göran Sundström, Stockholm: Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research , 2014, 1, p. 259-277Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 125.
    Ivarsson Westerberg, Anders
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Academy of Public Administration.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Den mångsidiga staten2016 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Ivarsson Westerberg, Anders
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Academy of Public Administration.
    Sundström, GöranSödertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Syns inte men finns ändå...: Ett seminarium om förvaltningspolitik2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ska skolan och sjukvården förstatligas? Hur utses och avskedas myndighetschefer? Vad är egentligen New Public Management? Frågor om hur offentliga åtaganden organiseras och styrs står i centrum för samhällsdebatten. Men varför gör förvaltningspolitiken så lite väsen av sig?

    Så stod det i inbjudan till seminariet ”Syns inte men finns ändå…” som arrangerades av Förvaltningsakademin vid Södertörns högskola den 7 februari 2014.

    Vid seminariet deltog några personer som vid olika tidpunkter och på olika sätt varit delaktiga i svensk förvaltningspolitik. Paneldeltagarna diskuterade hur de uppfattade den förvaltningspolitiska utvecklingen, hur de själva har påverkat utvecklingen och vad som bör göras i framtiden. Även om det fanns skillnader var panelen rörande överens om att förvaltningspolitik är viktigt och borde spela en större roll i den politiska diskussionen.

    I denna skrift publiceras en utskrift av seminariet tillsammans med en inledande artikel av Anders Ivarsson Westerberg och Göran Sundström där de placerar förvaltningspolitik i ett vetenskapligt sammanhang.

    Förvaltningsakademin är en mångvetenskaplig centrumbildning vid Södertörns högskola som bedriver uppdragsutbildning och forskar om statsförvaltning samt verkar för kvalificerade möten mellan forskning och praktik.

  • 127.
    Ivarsson Westerberg, Anders
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Academy of Public Administration. Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Waldemarson, Ylva
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Östberg, Kjell
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Det långa 1990-talet2014In: Det långa 1990-talet: när Sverige förändrades / [ed] Ivarsson Westerberg, Anders, Waldemarson, Ylva & Östberg, Kjell, Umeå: Boréa Bokförlag, 2014, 1, p. 11-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Ivarsson Westerberg, Anders
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Academy of Public Administration. Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Waldemarson, YlvaSödertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.Östberg, KjellSödertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Det långa 1990-talet: när Sverige förändrades2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Ivarsson Westerberg, Anders
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Academy of Public Administration. Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Waldemarson, Ylva
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Östberg, Kjell
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Vad var det som hände?2014In: Det långa 1990-talet: när Sverige förändrades / [ed] Ivarsson Westerberg, Anders, Waldemarson, Ylva & Östberg, Kjell, Umeå: Boréa Bokförlag, 2014, 1, p. 441-457Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Jakobsen, U.
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kurunmäki, Jussi
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. University of Helsinki, Finland.
    The formation of parliamentarism in the nordic countries from the napoleonic wars to the first world war2016In: Parliament and Parliamentarism: A Comparative History of a European Concept / [ed] Pasi Ihalainen, Cornelia Ilie and Kari Palonen, New York: Berghahn Books, 2016, p. 97-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Kortekangas, Otso
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Keskitalo, PiggaUniversity of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.Nyyssönen, JukkaUiT - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.Kotljarchuk, AndrejSödertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.Paksuniemi, MerjaUniversity of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.Sjögren, DavidUppsala University.
    Sámi educational history in a comparative international perspective2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of Sámi education in a historical and internationally comparative perspective. Despite the cross-national character of the Sámi population, academic literature on Sámi education has so far been published within the different nation states in the Sámi area, and rarely in English. Exploring indigenous educational history around the world, this collection spans from Asia to Oceania to Sápmi and the Americas. The chapters frame Sámi school history within an international context of indigenous and minority education. In doing so, two narrative threads are established: both traditional history of education, and perspectives on the decolonisation of education. This pioneering book will appeal to students and scholars of Sámi education, as well as indigenous education around the world.

  • 132.
    Kortekangas, Otso
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology / Stockholm University.
    Keskitalo, Pigga
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Nyyssönen, Jukka
    UiT—The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Sjögren, David
    Uppsala University.
    Paksuniemi, Merja
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Introduction2019In: Sámi Educational History in a Comparative International Perspective / [ed] Otso Kortekangas, Pigga Keskitalo, Jukka Nyyssönen, Andrej Kotljarchuk, Merja Paksuniemi & David Sjögren, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of Sámi education in a historical and internationally comparative perspective. Despite the cross-national character of the Sámi population, academic literature on Sámi education has so far been published within the different nation states in the Sámi area, and rarely in English. Exploring indigenous educational history around the world, this collection spans from Asia to Oceania to Sápmi and the Americas. The chapters frame Sámi school history within an international context of indigenous and minority education. In doing so, two narrative threads are established: both traditional history of education, and perspectives on the decolonisation of education. This pioneering book will appeal to students and scholars of Sámi education, as well as indigenous education around the world.

  • 133.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. Stockholms universitet.
    Ethnic cleansings and Russification2016In: Encyclopedia of the Barents Region: Vol. 1, A-M / [ed] Mats-Olov Olsson, Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2016, p. 189-191Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Barents Encyclopedia will present comprehensive information about the progress of the Barents Region Project, the project to establish international collaboration across national borders through innovative organizational conceptualizations, an active promotion of a transborder regional identity, and the introduction of new forms of regional governance in the most densely populated and industrialized part of the Arctic.

    Articles in the encyclopedia will discuss the historical roots of current developments and review the cultural, socio-economic, and political prerequisites for a continued and intensified transborder interaction among citizens inhabiting the Barents Region, a territory so designated through the signing of the 1993 Kirkenes Declaration.

  • 134.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. Stockholms universitet, Historiska institutionen.
    In the Forge of Stalin: Swedish Colonists of Ukraine in Totalitarian Experiments of the Twentieth Century2014Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gammalsvenskby is the only Swedish settlement to the east from Finland, founded in 1782. In the past of Gammalsvenskby the history of the Soviet Union, Sweden, the international communist movement and Nazi Germany combined in a bizarre form. And even when the ploughmen of the Kherson steppes did not left their native village, the great powers themselves visited them with the intention to rule forever. The history of colony is viewed through the prism of the theory of “forcednormalization” and the concept of “changes of collective identity“. The author intends to study the techniques of forced normalization and the strategy of the collective resistance.

    Andrej Kotljarchuk is an associate professor in history, working as a university lecturer at the Department of History, Stockholm University; and as a senior researcher at the School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Södertörn University. His research focuses on ethnic minorities and role of experts’ communities, mass violence and the politics of memory. His recent publications include the book chapters “The Nordic Threat: Soviet Ethnic Cleansing on the Kola Peninsula” (2014), “The Memory of Roma Holocaust in Ukraine: Mass Graves, Memory Work and the Politics of Commemoration” (2014); as well as the articles “World War II Memory Politics: Jewish, Polish and Roma Minorities of Belarus”, in Journal of Belarusian Studies (2013) and “Kola Sami in the Stalinist terror: a quantitative analysis”, in Journal of Northern Studies (2012).

  • 135.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Indigenous People, Vulnerability and the Security Dilemma: Sami School Education on the Kola Peninsula, 1917–19912019In: Sámi educational history in a comparative international perspective / [ed] Otso Kortekangas, Pigga Keskitalo, Jukka Nyyssönen, Andrej Kotljarchuk, Merja Paksuniemi, and David Sjögren, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 63-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this chapter is to discuss the political aspects of vulnerability in the context of theSami school education system. Until the end of the nineteenth century, the Russian Sami had no native-language school system or native textbooks. The Soviet regime was established on the Kola peninsula only in 1920, three years after the 1917 revolution. The politics of selfdetermination, the so-called korenizatsiya (indigenization), became a tool for Bolsheviks pursuing a nationalist agenda for the “oppressed” Sami people. The Soviet policy of indigenization collapsed in 1937 when the secret police NKVD fabricated the formation of a Sami underground rebel organization. In 1938 all the Sami schools were closed, and the Sami language textbooks were confiscated. The promotion of Sami education in Russia was then completely suspended until the establishment of Perestroika.

  • 136.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Invisible Victims: The Cold War and Representation of the Roma Genocide in Soviet Feature Films, Teleplays and Theater Performances2016In: Russische und Sowjetische Geschichte im Film: Von Väterchen Zar, tragischen Helden, russischen Revolutionären und "kalten Kriegern" / [ed] Alexander Friedman ; Frank Jacob, New York: ALTIJA , 2016, p. 129-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Little Red Sweden in Ukraine: the 1930s Comintern project in Gammalsvenskby2014In: The Lost Swedish Tribe: Reapproaching the history of Gammalsvenskby in Ukraine / [ed] Piotr Wawrzeniuk & Julia Malitska, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2014, 1, , p. 151p. 111-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Nordic fishermen in the Soviet Union: Ethnic Purges and the Cleansing of the Cultural Landscape2017In: The Barents and the Baltic Sea Region: Contacts, Influences and Social Change / [ed] K. Alenius & M. Enbuske, Rovaniemi: Pohjois-Suomen historiallinen yhdistys , 2017, p. 39-56Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. Stockholms universitet.
    Norwegians in the Stalinist Terror: New Perspectives for Research2015In: Fortid, ISSN 1504-1913, E-ISSN 1891-1668, no 2, p. 18-22Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stalinism like Nazism is a Europe-wide phenomenon. This means that the history of Stalinism could not be grasped inside the Soviet Union. In the past of the tiny Norwegian minority in Russia the history of Stalin’s dictatorship, of democratic Norway and of the international communist movement combined in a bizarre form. Access to previously unavailable sources from Soviet archives has brought to light a little-known history, namely “national operations” of the Soviet secret police (NKVD) and the deportation of minorities, one of the central features of Stalinist repression. However, most prior studies have been concerned with large minority groups. The faith of ethnic Norwegians in Stalin’s Soviet Union is under-studied and the main contribution to this subject was made by a journalist Morten Jentoft.

  • 140.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Propaganda of Hatred and the Great Terror: A Nordic Approach2017In: Ethnic and Religious Minorities in Stalin's Soviet Union: New Dimensions of Research / [ed] Andrej Kotljarchuk; Olle Sundström, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2017, p. 91-121Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 141.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Representing genocide. The Nazi massacre of Roma in Babi Yar in Soviet and Ukrainian Historical culture2015In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, no 28 majArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thousands of Roma were killed in Ukraine between 1941 and 1944 by Nazi einsatzgruppen and local collaborators. The Romani victims were practically never deported to extermination camps but instead their bodies were left where they had been murdered. Babi Yar (Babyn Yar in Ukrainian) in Kyiv is considered a single largest Holocaust massacre in Europe. The place is a chine of seven deep ravines in the north-western part of the city. There on September 29-30, 1941, more than 33,000 Jews were exterminated by Nazis in a single mass killing. In 1941-43 hundreds of Ukrainian Roma were also murdered there. The total number of victims (Jews, Roma, underground fighters, mentally ill people, Ukrainian nationalists) killed in Babi Yar is estimated to 100,000 people. However in the postwar report published by the Extraordinary Commission for Investigation of War Crimes (ChGK), the Roma were not specified, they were rather counted as ”murdered civil citizens”. The Soviet leadership discouraged placing any emphasis on the ethnic aspects of this genocide. In April 1945 the leading Soviet newspaper Pravda informed their readers that according to the party decision a memorial and a museum will be built in Babi Yar. Nothing was done. The Nazi policy of extermination of Roma was neglected; the war was depicted as a tragedy for all Soviet peoples.  Until 1966 the site of mass killing in Babi Yar was unmarked and the first monument was built only in 1976 after a number of protest actions.Despite the silence on the Jewish and Roma genocides, the 1976 Soviet memorial legalized practices of memory. Every year September 29 the monument was visited not only by Jews but also Roma. It was then that the Romani tradition was born to bring to the monument the photos of relatives murdered by the Nazis. This practice continues to this day. By this ceremony the Roma are trying to overcome the problem of de-personalization of the genocide victims.

  • 142.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Review of Walke, Anika, Pioneers and Partisans: An Oral History of Nazi Genocide in Belorussia.2017In: H-Net Reviews in the Humanities and Social Sciences, ISSN 1538-0661, no aprilArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    REVIEW on: Alexey Golubev and Irina Takala, The Search for a Socialist El Dorado. Finnish Immigration to Soviet Karelia from the United States and Canada in the 1930s (East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2014), 236 p.2016In: Nordic and Baltic Studies Review, Vol. 1, p. 422-427Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Roma and Travellers in Sweden during World War II: Registration, experts and racial cleansing policy-making in a transnational context: Working paper presented at the 2016 Nordic Conference on Romani Studies, Södertörn University2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On September 23, 2013, the leading Swedish daily newspaper, Dagens Nyheter, published a front-page story revealing that a classified listing of Roma had been found on a server belonging to the regional police of Skåne. The illegal database comprised a register of 4,029 persons of Romani descent, more than 1,000 of whom were children living all over Sweden. This news understandably elicited horrified reactions in Sweden and throughout the world. But how exceptional is the concept of such a register to Sweden? To answer this question, we must examine Sweden’s treatment of Romani people during World War II.

  • 145.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Scandinavian and Finnish settlements on the Kola Peninsula: history and the sites of memory2017In: Conference proceeding Murman and Russian Arctic: history, present and future / [ed] Sergei Nikonov, Murmansk: Murmansk Artic State University , 2017, p. 77-188Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper summarizes the results of the study of Scandinavian and Finnish settlements on the Kola Peninsula supported by the Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies and Södertörn University as a part of the research project “Soviet Nordic Minorities and Ethnic Cleansing on the Kola Peninsula” led by Associate Professor Andrej Kotljarchuk. The focus of this article is on the representation of Kola-Nordic history as well as on the Nordic sites of memory in today’s Russia

  • 146.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Skandinavy v Rossii: Imperiya Romanovykh, Stalinskii Sovetskii Soiuz i mesta pamiati [Scandinavians in Russia: The Romanov Empire, Stalin's Soviet Union and sites of memory]2016In: Problemy i tendentsii razvitiya sotsiokulturnogo prostranstva Rossii: istoriya i sovremennost / [ed] Tatiana Ryabova, Bryansk, 2016, Vol. 3, p. 86-93Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 147.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    State, Experts, And Roma: Historian Allan Etzlerand pseudo-scientific racism in Sweden2019In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like other Nordic countries, Sweden has its dark chapter of ignominious history involving discrimination targeting Roma. However, less is known about the role of historians in the process of bringing so-called ‘scientific grounds’ to solving the ‘Gypsy problem’. In this article, I focus on this topic, using the case of the historian Allan Etzler, in order to analyse the role that Etzler played as a scholar and expert in the development of pseudo-scientific racism in Sweden.

  • 148.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    The 1655 Union of Keidaniai between Lithuania and Sweden: Dynastical Dimensions in Historical Perspective2014In: Lithuania-Poland-Sweden: European Dynastic Unions and Historical-Cultural Ties / [ed] Eugenijus Saviscevas; Marijus Uzorka, Vilnius: National Museum , 2014, p. 377-389Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 149.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    The Memory of Roma Holocaust in Ukraine. Mass Graves, Memory Work and the Politics of Commemoration2016In: Disputed Memories: Emotions and Memory Politics in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe / [ed] Tea Sindbæk Andersen & Barbara Tornqvist-Plewa, Berlin-Boston: Walter de Gruyter, 2016, p. 149-176Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thousands of Soviet Roma were killed in 1941–1944 by Nazi Einsatzgruppen andlocal collaborators. They were almost never deported to extermination camps,but instead their bodies were left at the scenes where these crimes were committed.In the protocols of the Soviet Extraordinary Commission for Investigation ofWar Crimes, the Roma were often counted as murdered civil citizens, withoutspecifying their ethnicity. Despite the existence of a small number of accountsidentifying the victims of these murders as Romani, the Roma part of the Holocausthistory is still little known in post-Soviet space.In 1976 an official memorial at Babi Yar was erected in Kyiv on the locationof the largest massacre during WWII of Eastern European Jews and Roma. However,the Soviet leadership discouraged placing any emphasis on ethnic aspectsof this tragedy. The Nazi policy of extermination of Roma was neglected; the warwas depicted as a tragedy for all Soviet peoples.The discussion of the Romani identity cannot be isolated from the memoryof the genocide during WWII, which makes the struggle over the past a reflexivelandmark that organizes the politics of commemoration.

  • 150.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. Stockholm University.
    The Nordic Threat: Soviet Ethnic Cleansing on the Kola Peninsula2014In: The Sea of Identities: A Century of Baltic and East European Experiences with Nationality, Class, and Gender / [ed] Götz, Norbert, Huddinge: Södertörn University , 2014, p. 53-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
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