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  • 1.
    Albury, Kath
    et al.
    Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Stardust, Zahra
    Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Queer and feminist reflections on sextech2023In: Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters, E-ISSN 2641-0397, Vol. 31, no 4, article id 2246751Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Bromseth, Janne
    et al.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Queering Internet Studies: Intersections of Gender and Sexuality2011In: The Handbook of Internet Studies / [ed] Mia Consalvo, Charles Ess, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell , 2011, p. 270-299Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Dahl, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet..
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Femininity Revisited: Refiguring Critical Femininity Studies introduction. Guest editors' introduction2018In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 269-277Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Dahl, Ulrika
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Guest Editors’ Introduction: Somatechnical Figurations2013In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 225-232Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Fornäs, Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Klein, Kajsa
    Ladendorf, Martina
    Sundén, Jenny
    Sveningsson Elm, Malin
    Into digital borderlands2002In: Digital Borderlands: Cultural Studies of Identity and Interactivity on the Internet / [ed] Johan Fornäs, Kajsa Klein, Martina Ladendorf, Jenny Sundén and Malin Sveningsson, New York: Peter Lang , 2002, p. 1-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Fornäs, Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Klein, KajsaStockholms universitet.Ladendorf, MartinaMalmö högskola.Sundén, JennyKTH.Sveningsson, MalinKarlstads universitet.
    Digital Borderlands: Cultural Studies of Identity and Interactivity on the Internet2002Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 7. Hughes, Rolf
    et al.
    Sundén, JennySödertörn University College, School of Gender, Culture and History, Gender studies.
    Second Nature: Origins and Originality in Art, Science and New Media2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Paasonen, Susanna
    et al.
    Department of Media Studies, University of Turku, Finland.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Shameless dicks: On male privilege, dick pic scandals, and public exposure2021In: First Monday, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 6, no 4-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic debates on shame and the involuntary networked circulation of naked pictures have largely focused on instances of hacked accounts of female celebrities, on revenge porn, and interconnected forms of slut-shaming. Meanwhile, dick pics have been predominantly examined as vehicles of sexual harassment within heterosexual contexts. Taking a somewhat different approach, this article examines leaked or otherwise involuntarily exposed dick pics of men of notable social privilege, asking what kinds of media events such leaked data assemble, how penises become sites of public interest and attention, and how these bodies may be able to escape circuits of public shaming. By focusing on high-profile incidents on an international scale during the past decade, this article moves from the leaked shots of male politicians as governance through shaming to body-shaming targeted at Harvey Weinstein, to Jeff Bezos’s refusal to be shamed through his hacked dick pic, and to an accidentally self-published shaft shot of Lars Ohly, a Swedish politician, we examine the agency afforded by social privilege to slide through shame rather than be stuck in it. By building on feminist media studies and affect inquiry, we attend to the specificities of these attempts to shame, their connections to and disconnections from slut-shaming, and the possibilities and spaces offered for laughter within this all.

  • 9.
    Paasonen, Susanna
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Tiidenberg, Katrin
    Tallinn University, Estonia.
    Vihlman, Maria
    University of Turku, Finland.
    About Sex, Open-Mindedness, and Cinnamon Buns: Exploring Sexual Social Media2023In: Social Media + Society, E-ISSN 2056-3051, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 20563051221147324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    General purpose social media platforms—often incited by American legislation—increasingly exclude sex from acceptable forms of sociality in the abstract name of user safety. This article analyzes interview data (four developer interviews and 56 user interviews) from three North European sexual platforms (Darkside, Alastonsuomi, and Libertine.Center) to explore what follows from including sexual sites in definitions and analyses of social media and, by extension, in including sex in definitions of “the social” itself. We found that instead of context collapse, the users and developers of the studied sites operate with what we call context promiscuity, blending boundaries, but maintaining their structural integrity. This allows for a particular silosociality to emerge based on experiences of safety, risk, and consent. Building on this, we propose thinking of sexual expression as something not contained by, but put in motion across platforms, user cultures, content policies, and sexual norms. Rather than framing sexual social media exchanges in terms of their perceived risks and harms, we would do well to also inquire after the risks and harms involved in ousting sex from networked forms of sociality. Deplatforming of sex truncates our ways of understanding what interests, forces, and attachments drive our sociality. Yet, when analyzing social media as if the socio-sexual matters, platforms designed to support sexual displays and connections become vital nodal points in social media ecologies. 

  • 10. Sundén, Jenny
    A sense of play: affect, emotion and embodiment in "World of Warcraft"2010In: Working with affect in feminist readings: disturbing differences / [ed] Marianne Liljeström, Susanna Paasonen, London: Routledge, 2010, p. 45-57Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11. Sundén, Jenny
    Blonde Birth Machines: Medical Simulation, Techno-Corporeality and Posthuman Feminism2010In: Technology and Medical Practices: Blood, Guts and Machines / [ed] Ericka Johnson, Boel Berner, Farnham: Ashgate , 2010, p. 97-117Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Clockwork Corsets: Pressed Against the Past2015In: International journal of cultural studies, ISSN 1367-8779, E-ISSN 1460-356X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 379-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For a feminist scholar of technology, contemporary steampunk cultures incorporate several interesting elements. They embrace playful ways of relating to technology. They contain thrifty Do-It-Yourself strategies and ethics of recycling, linking the crafting of sexually specific bodies to imaginative time-play. They involve an intermingling of technological extensions with modes of embodiment and costuming. The corset is an emblematic Victorian, industrial technology in steampunk costuming, altering bodies and affects as well as aesthetics and politics. But how far can white, Victorian, middle-class, imperialist, corseted femininity be ‘punked’, twisted, modified, or transformed? And how much do these transpositions in and through time get caught up in a machinery of repetition rather than revision? Or are there ways of thinking the old and the new differently altogether?

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  • 13.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Corporeal Anachronisms: Notes on Affect, Relationality, and Power in Steampunk2013In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 369-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Steampunk is an aesthetic technological movement incorporating science fiction, art, engineering, and a vibrant 21st century Do-It-Yourself counterculture. This article explores the feminist potentials of ‘thinking with’ steampunk as a playful, affective and decidedly political response to the present technological condition. It starts out by navigating the field of affect theory with a Deleuzian reading of Baruch Spinoza on affect, to then engage in the affective renderings of the relations, rhythms, and power of a soma-technology central to steampunks as well as their Victorian predecessors: the corset. The purpose of the article is (at least) threefold: first, it sets out to complicate the notion of the corset as either oppressive or liberating by a move from signification to affect. Secondly, it aims to put a feminist spin on Spinoza, by offering what Moira Gatens (2000) calls a micropolitical feminism of the in-betweens of subjects (or bodies). The argument, thus, takes seriously the seeming lack of distinction in Spinoza between nature and artifice, which opens up possibilities of exploring the affective relations and the in-betweens of human and nonhuman bodies. Finally, and as a result of this interest in the affective relationality of human and nonhuman bodies, the article contributes to the discussion of ‘somatechnics’ (Sullivan and Murray 2009) by proposing an intimate relationship between somatechnics and affect.

  • 14. Sundén, Jenny
    Cyberbodies: writing gender in digital self-presentations2002In: Digital borderlands: cultural studies of identity and interactivity on the Internet / [ed] Johan Fornäs, Kajsa Klein, Martina Ladendorf, Jenny Sundén and Malin Sveningsson, New York: Peter Lang , 2002, Vol. S. [79]-111, p. 79-111Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, Gender studies.
    Desires at Play: On Closeness and Epistemological Uncertainty2012In: Games and Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media, ISSN 1555-4120, E-ISSN 1555-4139, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 164-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This article discusses knowledge production in game studies by exploring notions of emotion, closeness and (queer) desire in new media ethnography. It uses field notes and experiences from an ethnographic study of the online game World of Warcraft. As opposed to the kind of fieldwork where being, living, and staying in the field is the only option, new media ethnography brings with it the possibility of moving through different locations and bodies to the point where the borders between them may start to blur. The text positions itself within this very uncertainty to investigate its consequences for ways of knowing online game cultures.

    Drawing on the body of ethnographic work interrogating erotic subjectivity and desire in the field, the discussion makes use of personal experiences – in particular an in-game as well as out-of-the game love affair - as potentially important sources of knowledge. Was it her, regardless of the game? Was it her through the game? Or was it the game ‘‘itself ’’? The article provides the story of a particular way of being introduced to and of falling for a game, a woman, and the ways in which these two were intensely connected. Set against the backdrop of ‘‘the affective turn’’ in cultural and feminist theory, and in making visible how desire may circulate through game spaces, the article argues for an articulation of desire as intimately related to technology; of desiring technology and of technological, or perhaps technologized desires.

  • 16. Sundén, Jenny
    Digital Geographies: From Storyspace to Storied Places2006In: Geographies of communication: the spatial turn in media studies / [ed] Jesper Falkheimer, André Jansson, Göteborg: Nordicom , 2006, p. 279-296Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Digital kink obscurity: A sexual politics beyond visibility and comprehension2023In: Sexualities, ISSN 1363-4607, E-ISSN 1461-7382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on an interview-driven ethnographic study of the Swedish digital BDSM, fetish and kink platform Darkside, this article explores digital kink expressions at a moment when kink communities are both marginalized and seemingly mainstream, navigating a tricky balance between visibility and invisibility, intelligibility and unintelligibility. Across queer, postcolonial, and digital media theorizing, "opacity" provides a way of rethinking these tensions, challenging the idea of public visibility and identification as that which legitimizes sexual otherness. Building on this work, I suggest the term "kink obscurity" as a way of conceptualizing a set of tactics for sexually marginalized groups to exist, resist, and transgress without becoming fully visible or graspable. To these ends, I foreground a "closet positive" analysis of Darkside, not primarily of shame, secrecy, and isolation, but of shared spaces of vulnerability and intensity, a temporary safe house which partly protects against normative regulation. Although the platform activist ethos speaks to the value of openness and outness for the sake of sexual justice, the users are quite invested in anonymous and pseudonymous online presence and sexual expression. Opacity implies a lack of clarity; something opaque may be both difficult to see clearly as well as to understand. Drawing on edouard Glissant's idea of opacity as a form resistance to surveillance and imperial domination, a digital sexual politics of obscurity could help provide recognition without a demand to fully understand sexual otherness, opening up for new modes of obscure and pleasurable sexual expressions and transgressions.

  • 18. Sundén, Jenny
    Double Life on the Screen2008In: Internet inquiry: conversations about method / [ed] Annette N. Markham, Nancy K. Baym, Los Angeles: Sage , 2008, p. 119-123Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19. Sundén, Jenny
    En förlossningsmaskin utan slut: simulering, realism och postmänsklig feminism2009In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 2-3, p. 5-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from a posthuman feminist understanding of the body (as something always already technological), this article critically explores the design of birth simulators and how simulator design relates to cultural understandings of intimate couplings between female bodies and technologies. The focus is on the construction of simulators, their possibilities, limitations and meanings – and not on actual use in clinical settings. Then again, thinking about design for medical practices is thinking about use in the sense that design processes and practices always inscribe and anticipate use and users in certain ways (and not others). In particular, the article investigates the status of the “real” as well as of “realism” in the simulation world. How are these concepts used within medical simulation? Which are the consequences of this conceptualization for understandings of bodies and technologies? Would a posthuman feminist framework offer other, alternative ways of thinking techno-bodies? The article draws on a range of sources, notably technical manuals, instruction videos, as well as an interview with the simulator’s “founding father”, but it also take into account historical parallels and predecessors, as well as ways of imagining simulator bodies in popular science contexts.

  • 20. Sundén, Jenny
    En hun-cyborgs liv og lyster: den virtuelle kropsligheds paradoks2003In: Cyberkulturer og rekonfigurationer / [ed] Mette Bryld, Randi Markussen, Frederiksberg: Samfundslitteratur , 2003, p. 103-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Glitch, genus, tillfälligt avbrott: Femininitet som trasighetens teknologi2016In: Lambda Nordica, ISSN 1100-2573, E-ISSN 2001-7286, no 1-2, p. 23-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technologies always implicate their own failures, breakdowns, and glitches. The purpose of this article is to develop an understanding of gender in general – and femininity in particular – as something fundamentally technological, and, as such, broken. Drawing on the technological undercurrent in current posthumanist feminist theory, arguing for a re-introduction of technologies in the midst of feminist posthumanist critique, the author puts into play a vocabulary of malfunctioning, broken, vulnerable technologies of gender. In particular, the term “glitch” is put to use to account for machinic failures in gender within the digital domain. By using glitch as a way of theorizing gender, the article is a dual contribution to digital media studies and feminist theory in a technological vein. Glitch is the spinning wheel on the computer screen, the delay between a command given and its execution. Etymologically, glitch (possibly) derives from the Yiddish word glitsh, meaning a “slippery place” or “a slip.” Glitch signals the slipperiness of something or someone off balance and a loss of control. It usually refers to a sudden unexpected event, a surge of current or an illegitimate signal that breaks the flow of energy, information, and affect. Glitch is, fundamentally, a struggle with binary code. Gender is a similar struggle to cope with binaries, with a loss of binaries, and about what happens when the vulnerability of the system is revealed. On this side of glitch, the tendency is toward hesitation and anticipation, irritation and annoyance, as well as pain and anxiety in the face of technologies and bodies that skip, crash, or get stuck. The default mode of gender is technological failure, and cis-gender normativity – what the author calls gender “high fidelity” – an unobtainable ideal of impossible perfection. If to glitch is to slip, to stutter, to stumble, gender high fidelity is to slip by unnoticed. In contrast to the notion of cis-gender normativity as a desire to cover or remove “noise,” to clear the channel, glitch is that which infiltrate, make dirty, and ultimately put pressure on the norms and ideals that structure gender as pure, clear, cold, binary code. In this sense, glitch is also about a perceived beauty in crashing and skipping, holding an intriguing critical, aesthetic, activist potential. In the hands of glitch artists, circuit breakers, and gamers, but also queers, and trans-performers, glitch becomes a celebration of the beauty of malfunction and gender-technological fragility.

  • 22. Sundén, Jenny
    "I’m still not sure she’s a she": textual talk and typed bodies in online interaction2002In: Talking gender and sexuality / [ed] Paul McIlvenny, Amsterdam: John Benjamins , 2002, Vol. S. 289-312, p. 289-312Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23. Sundén, Jenny
    Inte en babe: affekt, känsla och sexualitet i World of Warcraft2010In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 4, p. 23-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feminist game studies scholars are still few and far between, and little has been done in the intersection of queer theory and games. Informed by feminist discussions of affect, and of emotion, this article uses an ethnographic study of queer potentials in the MMOG (Massively Multiplayer Online Game) World of Warcraft as its core example. The article develops an understanding of online gaming by investigating embodied experiences, affective investments and circulations within game spaces. Ultimately, it asks what an online game like World of Warcraft puts in motion, and what consequences such stirring may have for ways of thinking – and feeling – games, critically, yet sensitively. How do emotions circulate in and through games? How do corporeal desires and belongings map onto games? Could certain game spaces or moments of play be termed ‘queer’?

  • 24. Sundén, Jenny
    Kön, kod och kropp i textbaserade virtuella världar2002In: Internet, medier och kommunikation / [ed] Peter Dahlgren, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2002, p. 289-312Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25. Sundén, Jenny
    Material virtualities: approaching online textual embodiment2003Book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Linköpings universitet.
    Material virtualities: approaching online textual embodiment2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Networked intimacies: Pandemic dis/connections between anxiety, joy, and laughter2021In: Disentangling: The Geographies of Digital Disconnection / [ed] André Jansson; Paul Adams, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021, p. 273-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter zooms in on transformations of intimacy and relational spaces in a time of a viral, global crisis. Set against the backdrop of “social distancing” practices, the chapter opens with a discussion of digital intimacy, focusing on the layering of anxiety and anticipation within networked connectivity. Secondly, it moves on to discuss how such anticipatory anxiety may become punctuated by pleasure and joy. Considering the dynamics between physical disconnection and digital intensity within pandemic hookup practices, it explores in particular instances of quarantine humor in queer hookup cultures. This humor stems from impossibly contradictory spaces of self-isolation, desire, and longing, in relation to which the swiftness of the swipe is transformed into a disconnect in the shape of a delay. The chapter ends with an example of Swedish, queer quarantine humor and a discussion of partial disconnections, or selective connectivity in difficult times in the interest of self-care.

  • 28. Sundén, Jenny
    On Cyberfeminist Intersectionality2007In: Cyberfeminism in Northen lights: digital media and gender in a Nordic context / [ed] Malin Sveningsson Elm, Jenny Sundén, Newcastle-upon-Tyn: Cambridge Scholars , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    On trans-, glitch and gender as machinery of failure2015In: First Monday, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 5895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops an understanding of gender as something fundamentally technological, and as such broken. Drawing on the technological undercurrent in current posthumanist feminist theory, it puts into play a vocabulary of malfunctioning, broken, vulnerable technologies, and in particular uses the term ‘glitch’ to account for machinic failures in gender within the digital domain. As an intriguing example of the technologies of (trans)gender, the core example consists of the social media presence and public transition of Isabella Bunny Bennett — a musical performer and a member of the U.S.-based band Steam Powered Giraffe. Drawing on how glitch is understood as an accidental error and a critical potential in aesthetic practices, the article is a contribution to what recently has been coined ‘glitch feminism.’

  • 30. Sundén, Jenny
    Play as Transgression: An Ethnographic Approach toQueer Game Cultures2009In: DiGRA '09 - Proceedings of the 2009 DiGRA International Conference: Breaking New Ground: Innovation in Games, Play, Practice and Theory, Tampere: Digra , 2009, p. -7Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Play, secrecy and consent: Theorizing privacy breaches and sensitive data in the world of networked sex toys2023In: Sexualities, ISSN 1363-4607, E-ISSN 1461-7382, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 926-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a new materialist analysis of “vibrant matter” to understand the liveliness of sexual objects in toy-based sexual play, in this article I investigate the politics of thinking digital technologies as operating partly beyond human forms of agency and control. I use as my core examples privacy breaches and data leaks in the world of networked sex toys – such as a vibrator which allegedly audio recorded its clients’ play sessions without express permission – to engage with questions of intimacy and privacy in digital networks of humans and nonhumans. In particular, the discussion focuses on the consequences of new forms of publicness for how we can understand sexual intimacy and sexual play. What does it mean to have an intimate moment when connected to a device, a medium and a network that is by definition public, corporate and leaky? And how could we imagine other ways of being sexually intimate and exposed – yet safe – in public digital networks? Drawing on discussions of queer intimacy, sexual consent and queer BDSM, I suggest that current understandings of privacy and sensitive data (as per GDPR) may need unconventional sources to further ways of knowing what consent might mean, and how it feels. © The Author(s) 2020.

  • 32.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Queer disconnections: Affect, break, and delay in digital connectivity2018In: Transformations, E-ISSN 1444-3775, no 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I theorise the intricate relation between technology and affect by considering questions of digital vulnerability – of disconnections, breaks, and delays – as a way of rethinking our affective attachments to digital devices. By extension, I also connect this argument with a framework of queer theory, as an opportunity to think differently about relations through questions of technological ruptures and deferrals. My bassline for this endeavour is the idea of the break as formative for how we can both sense and make sense of digital connectivity, in so far as the break has the potential to bring forth what constant connectivity means, and how it feels. Similarly, the break can potentially make tangible relational norms around continuous, coherent, and linear ways of relating and connecting, and thus provide alternative models for ways of being with digital devices, networks, and each other. If constant connectivity provides us with a relational norm of sorts, then disconnection could function as a queer orientation device with the potential of creating openings for other ways of coming together, and other ways of staying together.

  • 33. Sundén, Jenny
    Reproduktionsteknologier, artificiellt liv och cyber(ge)netiska Andra2007In: Kulturstudier i Sverige / [ed] Bodil Axelsson, Johan Fornäs, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2007, p. 149-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Spelförälskelser: om närhet och queera begär i feminisktisk forskning på onlinespel2015In: Mediers känsla för kön: feministisk medieforskning / [ed] Anja Hirdman; Madeleine Kleberg, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2015, p. 107-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Steampunk Practices: Time, Tactility, and a Racial Politics of Touch2014In: Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology, E-ISSN 2325-0496, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Technologies of Feeling: Affect between the Analog and the Digital2015In: Networked Affect / [ed] Ken Hillis, Susanna Paasonen, and Michael Petit, Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2015, p. 135-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the midst of the affective networks of contemporary digital cultures, something seemingly of the opposite order is taking shape. It is a culture that contrasts speed with slowness, displaces the new with the old and the used, and replaces supposedly immaterial streams of data with highly material, tactile technologies, materials and fabrics. This chapter turns to steampunk cultures as compelling examples of a contemporary affective investment in the analog, coupled with intense digital connectivity. Drawing on affect theory in a neo-materialist vein, the author formulates a critique of Brian Massumi’s notion of the superiority of the analog and suggests that steampunk, rather than being understood as analog nostalgia, is more aptly understood in terms of the transdigital. The term transdigital accounts for analog passions that are shaped through the digital in ways that concretely activate, but also move across the borders of, or beyond the digital. Steampunk, rather than merely being a return to a bygone era, is a re-consideration, or transing, of the (digital) present. Within this chapter, steampunk is used as an especially intriguing example of a broader tendency toward transdigital modes of using and sensing media in contemporary media landscapes.

  • 37.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Temporalities of Transition: Trans- temporal Femininity in a Human Musical Automaton2015In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 197-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes as its point of departure the social media presence of a human musical automaton called Rabbit. As part of the US-based band Steam Powered Giraffe, Rabbit is performed by Bunny Bennett, who recently came out as a transgender woman. As a result of this shift, Rabbit is being transformed from a male automaton into a transgender female robot. The news of the transformation hit like a bomb in the emotionally invested fan base. The story of the transitioning robot is an intimate coming together of technologies, imagination, and transgender embodiment. It is a story that deserves scholarly attention for two reasons: This case offers ways of re-casting the discussion in transgender studies within a post-humanist framework of somatechnics. Secondly, it is a case which foregrounds an understanding of gender as a question of time. In focusing on transition as a continuous, open-ended process, gender is primarily understood as a temporal form which cuts or vibrates through the body in highly material, embodied ways. The domain of queer temporality is rather densely theorised, but what about trans- temporality? If queer temporality first and foremost deals with sexuality and time, what would it mean to shift the focus to gender? Drawing on Gilles Deleuze on time, this article is a contribution to the field of transgender studies on the question of trans- temporality in a technological vein.

  • 38.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Vibrator nation: how feminist sex-toy stores changed the business of pleasure: Lynn Comella, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2017, 278 pp.2019In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 980-981Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 39. Sundén, Jenny
    What Happened to Difference in Cyberspace?: The (Re)turn of the She-Cyborg2001In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 215-232Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40. Sundén, Jenny
    What if Frankenstein('s Monster) was a Girl?: Reproduction and Subjectivity in the Digital Age2008In: Bits of Life: Feminism at the Intersections of Media, Bioscience and Technology / [ed] Anneke Smelik, Nina Lykke, Seattle: University of Washington Press , 2008, p. 147-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, Gender studies.
    Ångpunkens politik2012In: Senmoderna reflexioner: Festskrift till Johan Fornäs / [ed] Erling Bjurström, Martin Fredriksson, Ulf OIsson och Ann Werner, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, p. 91-99Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Steampunk – eller vad man på svenska ibland kallar för ångpunk – kan sägas vara en estetisk teknologisk rörelse som inbegriper science fiction, konst, ingenjörskonst och en livfull subkultur. Den kännetecknas av retrofuturistiska drömmar om vad som kunde ha hänt om 1800-talets ångdrivna, mekaniska teknologier hade fått ett annat spelrum. Dess retrofuturism är en anakronism i form av medvetna kronologiska misstag, en inkonsekvent tidslighet som felplacerar personer, händelser, objekt (i det här fallet främst teknologier). Det kan sägas handla om ett fantasins omskapande av det förgångna med hjälp av nutidens teknologiska sensibilitet och kunskap. 

    Den här texten följer några centrala teman inom ångpunken i skärningspunkten mellan teknologi, politik och estetik och organiseras i tre delar. Den första delen fokuserar på det första ledet i begreppet ångpunk, alltså ånga, och söker skissera på vilka sätt rörelsen inspireras och drivs av kraften hos maskiner från en svunnen tid. Den andra delen syftar till att ringa in vad som kan sägas vara ångpunkens punketos i termer av samhällskritik, tekniksyn och motståndsstrategier. Den tredje delen kretsar slutligen kring vad som skulle kunna benämnas ångpunkens kroppsanakronismer. Diskussionen koncentreras främst till de betydelseförskjutningar som uppstår då korsetter och urverksmekanik möter en viktoriansk genuslogik för 2000-talet.

  • 42.
    Sundén, Jenny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Blagojevic, Jelisaveta
    Singidunum University, Belgrade, Serbia.
    Dis/connections: Toward an Ontology of Broken Relationality2019In: Configurations (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 1063-1801, E-ISSN 1080-6520, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 37-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ideas of relationality have come to influence a wide range of theoretical fields. In this article, we develop an understanding of relationality as not necessarily something continuous and uninterrupted (as is often the case), but rather as something fundamentally shaped through breaks and interruptions. We work through notions of relational brokenness by "thinking with" the telephone as an intriguing relational technology, a material metaphor, and a discursive device. The argument moves between Derrida's telephone fascination; the metaphorical black telephone in Sylvia Plath's poem "Daddy"; Proust's narrator waiting for a call from his grandmother in "The Guermantes Way"; and the communication breakdown in Lady Gaga's "Telephone." What the telephone allows for in this discussion is a way of thinking of not only technology as inherently fractured, but also our very ways of relating, connecting, and being in the world.

  • 43.
    Sundén, Jenny
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Gender, Culture and History, Gender studies.
    Hughes, Rolf
    Introduction: Nature Seconded2011In: Second Nature: Origins and Originality in Art, Science and New Media / [ed] Rolf Hughes, Jenny Sundén, Stockholm: AxlBooks , 2011, p. 1-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Sundén, Jenny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Paasonen, S.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Inappropriate Laughter: Affective Homophily and the Unlikely Comedy of #MeToo2019In: Social Media + Society, E-ISSN 2056-3051, Vol. 5, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the affective and ambiguous dynamics of feminist humor as an unexpected strategy of resistance in connection with #MeToo, asking what laughter may do to the sharpness of negative affect of shame and anger driving the movement. Our inquiry comes in three vignettes. First, we deploy Nanette—Hannah Gadsby’s 2018 Netflix success heralded as the comedy of the #MeToo era—arguing that the uniform viral warmth surrounding the show drives the emergence of networked feminisms through “affective homophily,” or a love of feeling the same. With Nanette, the contagious qualities of laughter are tamed by a networked logic of homophily, allowing for intensity while resisting dissent. Our second vignette zooms in on a less known feminist comedian, Lauren Maul, and her online #MeToo musical comedy riffing off on apologies made by male celebrities accused of sexual harassment, rendering the apologies and the men performing them objects of ridicule. Our third example opens up the door to the ambivalence of irony. In considering the unexpected pockets of humor within the #MeToo scandal that ripped apart the prestigious institution of the Swedish Academy, we explore the emergence of carnivalesque comedy and feminist uses of irony in the appropriation of the pussy-bow blouse as an ambiguous feminist symbol. Our examples allow us to argue for the political importance of affective ambiguity, difference, and dissent in contemporary social media feminisms, and to highlight the risk when a movement like #MeToo closes ranks around homogeneous feelings of not only shame and rage, but also love. © The Author(s) 2019.

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  • 45.
    Sundén, Jenny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Paasonen, S.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Shameless hags and tolerance whores: feminist resistance and the affective circuits of online hate2018In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 643-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores shamelessness as a feminist tactic of resistance to online misogyny, hate and shaming within a Nordic context. In our Swedish examples, this involves affective reclaiming of the term “hagga” (hag), which has come to embody shameless femininity and feminist solidarity, as well as the Facebook event “Skamlös utsläckning” (shameless extinction), which extends the solidarity or the hag to a collective of non-men. Our Finnish examples revolve around appropriating derisive terms used of women defending multiculturalism and countering the current rise of nationalist anti-immigration policy and activism across Web platforms, such as “kukkahattutäti” (aunt with a flower hat) and “suvakkihuora” (“overtly tolerant whore”). Drawing on Facebook posts, blogs and discussion forums, the article conceptualizes the affective dynamics and intersectional nature of online hate against women and other others. More specifically, we examine the dynamics of shaming and the possibilities of shamelessness as a feminist tactic of resistance. Since online humor often targets women, racial others and queers, the models of resistance that this article uncovers add a new stitch to its memetic logics. We propose that a networked politics of reclaiming is taking shape, one using collective imagination and wit to refuel feminist communities.

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  • 46.
    Sundén, Jenny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Paasonen, Susanna
    Department of Media Studies, University of Turku, Finland.
    Isso é um absurdo!: Sobre o humor feminista nas redes sociais2021In: Fronteiras – estudos midiáticos, ISSN 1984-8226, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 2-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [pt]

    Nas redes sociais, o humor feminista geralmente chama a atenção pela dinâmica com que aborda o gênero binário, do qual zomba, subverte e comenta. Com foco no Tumblr “Congrats, you have an all male panel”, no perfil “Man Who Has It All” no Twitter e do Facebook e no perfil do Twitter “Men Write Women”, este artigo observa como esses projetos reexecutam o poder assimétrico de gênero binário por meio da repetição e subversão, extraindo seu apelo da própria lógica que eles mesmos criticam para ter um efeito disruptivo. Além disso, o texto questiona como as diferentes dinâmicas de plataforma de mídias sociais ajudam a agrupar certa sociabilidade e como a crítica do riso em rede aborda a importância da diversidade afetiva ao fazer piada de coisas absurdas. Nosso argumento é de que, ao recusar e evitar a lógica que a maioria oferece, e ao focar em situações absurdas, ridículas e inadequadas, este tipo de humor gera zonas produtivas de ambiguidade e risos incontroláveis onde tensões e diferenças se recusam a ser resolvidas.

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  • 47.
    Sundén, Jenny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Paasonen, Susanna
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    “We have tiny purses in our vaginas!!! #thanksforthat”: absurdity as a feminist method of intervention2021In: Qualitative Research Journal, ISSN 1443-9883, E-ISSN 1448-0980, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 233-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: According to thesaurus definitions, the absurd translates as “ridiculously unreasonable, unsound, or incongruous”; “extremely silly; not logical and sensible”. As further indicated in the Latin root absurdus, “out of tune, uncouth, inappropriate, ridiculous,” humor in absurd registers plays with that which is out of harmony with both reason and decency. In this article, the authors make an argument for the absurd as a feminist method for tackling heterosexism. Design/methodology/approach: By focusing on the Twitter account “Men Write Women” (est. 2019), the rationale of which is to share literary excerpts from male authors describing women's experiences, thoughts and appearances, and which regularly broadens into social theater in the user reactions, the study explores the critical value of absurdity in feminist social media tactics. Findings: The study proposes the absurd as a means of not merely turning things around, or inside out, but disrupting and eschewing the hegemonic logic on offer. While both absurd humor and feminist activism may begin from a site of reactivity and negative evaluation, it need not remain confined to it. Rather, by turning things preposterous, ludicrous and inappropriate, absurd laughter ends up somewhere different. The feminist value of absurd humor has to do with both its critical edge and with the affective lifts and spaces of ambiguity that it allows for. Originality/value: Research on digital feminist activism has largely focused on the affective dynamics of anger. As there are multiple affective responses to sexism, our article foregrounds laughter and ambivalence as a means of claiming space differently in online cultures rife with hate, sexism and misogyny. 

  • 48.
    Sundén, Jenny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Paasonen, Susanna
    Department of Media Studies, University of Turku, Finland.
    Who's laughing now?: Feminist tactics in social media2020 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online sexism, hate, and harassment aim to silence women through shaming and fear. In Who's Laughing Now? Jenny Sundén and Susanna Paasonen examine a somewhat counterintuitive form of resistance: humor. Sundén and Paasonen argue that feminist social media tactics that use humor, laughter, and a sense of the absurd to answer name-calling, offensive language, and unsolicited dick pics can rewire the affective circuits of sexual shame and acts of shaming.

    Using laughter as both a theme and a methodological tool, Sundén and Paasonen explore examples of the subversive deployment of humor that range from @assholesonline to the Tumblr “Congrats, you have an all-male panel!” They consider the distribution and redistribution of shame, discuss Hannah Gadsby's Nanette, and describe tactical retweeting and commenting (as practiced by Stormy Daniels, among others). They explore the appropriation of terms meant to hurt and insult—for example, self-proclaimed Finnish “tolerance whores”—and what effect this rerouting of labels may have. They are interested not in lulz (amusement at another's expense)—not in what laughter pins down, limits, or suppresses but rather in what grows with and in it. The contagiousness of laughter drives the emergence of networked forms of feminism, bringing people together (although it may also create rifts). Sundén and Paasonen break new ground in exploring the intersection of networked feminism, humor, and affect, arguing for the political necessity of inappropriate laughter.

  • 49.
    Sundén, Jenny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Paasonen, Susanna
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Tiidenberg, Katrin
    Tallinn University, Estonia.
    Vihlman, Maria
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Locating sex: regional geographies of sexual social media2024In: Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, ISSN 0966-369X, E-ISSN 1360-0524, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 424-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contributing to the field of the geographies of digital sexualities, this article explores the geosocial dimensions of digital sexual cultures by analyzing three regionally operating, linguistically specific social media platforms devoted to sexual expression. Drawing on case studies of an Estonian platform used primarily for group sex, a Swedish platform for kink and BDSM, and a Finnish platform for nude self-expression, we ask how these contribute to and shape sexual geographies in digital and physical registers. First, we focus on the platforms as tools for digital wayfinding and hooking up. Second, we consider how the platforms help to reimagine and sexualize physical locations as ones of play, and how this transforms the ways of inhabiting such spaces. Third, we analyze how the platforms operate as sexual places in their own right, designed to accommodate certain forms of display, relating, and belonging. We argue, in particular, that these platforms shape how users imagine and engage with location by negotiating notions of proximity and distance, risk and safety, making space for sexual sociability. We approach geographies of sexuality both through the regional and linguistic boundaries within which these platforms operate, as well as through our participants' sense of comfort and investment in local spaces of sexual play. As sexual content is increasingly pushed out of large, U.S.-owned social media platforms, we argue that locally operating platforms provide a critical counterpoint, allowing for a vital re-platforming of sex on a regional level.

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  • 50. Sundén, Jenny
    et al.
    Sveningsson Elm, Malin
    Introduction: Cyberfeminism in Northern Lights2007In: Cyberfeminism in Northern Lights: digital media and gender in a Nordic context / [ed] Malin Sveningsson Elm, Jenny Sundén, Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars , 2007, p. 1-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
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