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  • 1.
    Asnicar, Davide
    et al.
    University of Padova, Italy; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ašmonaitė, Giedrė
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Birgersson, Lina
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ola
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Matematikens didaktik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sturve, Joachim
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sand Goby: An Ecologically Relevant Species for Behavioural Ecotoxicology2018Ingår i: Fishes, E-ISSN 2410-3888, Vol. 3, nr 1, artikel-id 13Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Locomotion-based behavioural endpoints have been suggested as suitable sublethal endpoints for human and environmental hazard assessment, as well as for biomonitoring applications. Larval stages of the sand goby (Pomatoschistus minutus) possess a number of attractive qualities for experimental testing that make it a promising species in behavioural ecotoxicology. Here, we present a study aimed at developing a toolkit for using the sand goby as novel species for ecotoxicological studies and using locomotion as an alternative endpoint in toxicity testing. Exposure to three contaminants (copper (Cu), di-butyl phthalate (DBP) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was tested in the early life stages of the sand goby and the locomotion patterns of the larvae were quantified using an automatic tracking system. In a photo-motor test, sand goby larvae displayed substantially higher activity in light than in dark cycles. Furthermore, all tested compounds exerted behavioural alterations, such as hypo- and hyperactivity. Our experimental results show that sand goby larvae produce robust and quantifiable locomotive responses, which could be used within an ecotoxicological context for assessing the behavioural toxicity of environmental pollutants, with particular relevance in the Nordic region. This study thus suggests that sand goby larvae have potential as an environmentally relevant species for behavioural ecotoxicology, and as such offer an alternative to standard model species.

  • 2.
    Blom, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    University of Gothenburg.
    Dekhla, Isabelle
    University of Gothenburg.
    Schöld, Sofie
    University of Gothenburg.
    Andersson, Mathias H.
    Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Svensson, Ola
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Matematikens didaktik. University of Gothenburg.
    Amorim, M Clara P
    ISPA-Instituto Universitário, Lisboa, Portugal / Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Continuous but not intermittent noise has a negative impact on mating success in a marine fish with paternal care2019Ingår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, nr 1, artikel-id 5494Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic underwater noise is a global pollutant of increasing concern but its impact on reproduction in fish is largely unknown. Hence, a better understanding of its consequences for this important link to fitness is crucial. Working in aquaria, we experimentally tested the impact of broadband noise exposure (added either continuously or intermittently), compared to a control, on the behaviour and reproductive success of the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps), a vocal fish with exclusive paternal care. Compared to the intermittent noise and control treatments, the continuous noise treatment increased latency to female nest inspection and spawning and decreased spawning probability. In contrast, many other female and male pre-spawning behaviours, and female ventilation rate (proxies for stress levels) did not differ among treatments. Therefore, it is likely that female spawning decisions were delayed by a reduced ability to assess male acoustic signals, rather than due to stress per se and that the silent periods in the intermittent noise treatment provided a respite where the females could assess the males. Taken together, we show that noise (of similar frequency range as anthropogenic boat noise) negatively affects reproductive success, particularly under a continuous noise exposure.

  • 3.
    Lindsay, Willow R
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Andersson, Staffan
    University of Gothenburg.
    Bererhi, Badreddine
    University of Gothenburg.
    Höglund, Jacob
    Uppsala University.
    Johnsen, Arild
    Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    University of Gothenburg.
    Leder, Erica H
    Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Lifjeld, Jan T
    Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Ninnes, Calum E
    University of Gothenburg, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
    Olsson, Mats
    University of Gothenburg.
    Parker, Geoff A
    University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Pizzari, Tommaso
    Edward Grey Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Qvarnström, Anna
    Uppsala University.
    Safran, Rebecca J
    University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, United States.
    Svensson, Ola
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik.
    Edwards, Scott
    Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Endless forms of sexual selectionManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of sexual selection has burgeoned with research into trait evolution in the context of ecology, sociality, phylogeny, natural selection, and sexual conflict. This paper is the product of a “stock-taking” workshop; our aim is to stimulate discussion, not to provide an exhaustive review. We identify outstanding questions organized into four thematic sections.

    1) Evolution of mate choice and mating systems. Variation in mate quality can generate mating competition and choice in either sex with implications for the evolution of mating systems. Limitations on mate choice may dictate the importance of direct vs. indirect benefits in mating decisions and consequently, mating systems. Specifically, polyandry evolves in response to the strength of pre- vs. post-copulatory selection. The evolution of polyandry may be related to diversity of pathogens and Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes. MHC genes are also potential cues of kinship in avoidance of inbreeding. The balance between inbreeding avoidance and inclusive fitness in mating decisions deserves greater attention.

    2) Sender and receiver mechanisms shaping signal design. Mediation of honest signal content likely depends on integration of temporally variable social and physiological costs that are a challenge to measure. The neuroethology of sensory and cognitive receiver biases is the main key to signal form and the ‘aesthetic sense’ proposed by Darwin. Since a receiver bias is sufficient to both start and drive ornament or armament exaggeration, without a genetically correlated or even coevolving receiver, this may be the appropriate ‘null model’ of sexual selection.

    3) Genetic architecture of sexual selection. Despite advances in modern molecular techniques, the number and identity of genes underlying performance remain largely unknown. A combination of genomic techniques and long-term field studies that reveal ecological correlates of reproductive success is warranted. In-depth investigations into the genetic basis of sexual dimorphism will reveal constraints and trajectories of sexually selected trait evolution.

    4) Sexual selection and conflict as drivers of speciation. Population divergence and speciation is often driven by an interplay between sexual and natural selection. To what extent sexual selection promotes or counteracts population divergence may differ depending on the genetic architecture of traits as well as covariance between mating competition and local adaptation, if traits have multiple functions and if sensory systems used in mate choice are locally adapted. Also, post-copulatory processes, e.g. selection against heterospecific sperm, may influence the importance of sexual selection. Sexual conflict can shape speciation processes, since mate choice selection on females can restrict gene flow whereas selection on males is permissive.

    We propose that efforts to resolve these four themes can catalyze conceptual progress in the field of sexual selection.

  • 4.
    Olsson, Karin H
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Johansson, Sandra
    University of Gothenburg.
    Blom, Eva-Lotta
    University of Gothenburg.
    Lindström, Kai
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Gothenburg.
    Nilsson Sköld, Helen
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    University of Gothenburg.
    Dark eyes in female sand gobies indicate readiness to spawn2017Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, nr 6, artikel-id e0177714Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In animals, colorful and conspicuous ornaments enhance individual attractiveness to potential mates, but are typically tempered by natural selection for crypsis and predator protection. In species where males compete for females, this can lead to highly ornamented males competing for mating opportunities with choosy females, and vice versa. However, even where males compete for mating opportunities, females may exhibit conspicuous displays. These female displays are often poorly understood and it may be unclear whether they declare mating intent, signal intrasexual aggression or form a target for male mate preference. We examined the function of the conspicuous dark eyes that female sand gobies temporarily display during courtship by experimentally testing if males preferred to associate with females with artificially darkened eyes and if dark eyes are displayed during female aggression. By observing interactions between a male and two females freely associating in an aquarium we also investigated in which context females naturally displayed dark eyes. We found that dark eyes were more likely to be displayed by more gravid females than less gravid females and possibly ahead of spawning, but that males did not respond behaviorally to dark eyes or prefer dark-eyed females. Females behaving aggressively did not display dark eyes. We suggest that dark eyes are not a signal per se but may be an aspect of female mate choice, possibly related to vision.

  • 5.
    Svensson, Ola
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Matematikens didaktik.
    Bokrecension: Field Guide to the Fishes ofthe Amazon, Orinoco, and Guianas2018Ingår i: Ciklidbladet, ISSN 0349-2362, Vol. 51, nr 1, s. 50-51Artikel, recension (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    En bok med alla 564 fisksläkten från ”Storamazonas” det vill sägaAmazonas, Orinoco och kustfloderna i Guayana, Surinam och FranskaGuyana verkar onekligen lovande. Frågan är vad den har atterbjuda en akvarist.

  • 6.
    Svensson, Ola
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik.
    Vetenskapskrönikan2017Ingår i: Ciklidbladet, ISSN 0349-2362, Vol. 50, nr 2, s. 50-51Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    I det här numret skriver jag om lite olika ciklider från olika delar av Amerika och Afrika. Det handlar om ciklider som kissar, slåss och bildar nya arter nästan medan vi tittar på dem.

  • 7.
    Svensson, Ola
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Matematikens didaktik. University of Gothenburg.
    Gräns, Johanna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Celander, Malin C
    University of Gothenburg.
    Havenhand, Jonathan
    University of Gothenburg.
    Leder, Erica H
    University of Gothenburg / University of Turku, Turun yliopisto, Finland.
    Lindström, Kai
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Schöld, Sofie
    University of Gothenburg / Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute.
    van Oosterhout, Cock
    University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    University of Gothenburg.
    Immigrant reproductive dysfunction facilitates ecological speciation2017Ingår i: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 71, nr 10, s. 2510-2521Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The distributions of species are not only determined by where they can survive - they must also be able to reproduce. Although immigrant inviability is a well-established concept, the fact that immigrants also need to be able to effectively reproduce in foreign environments has not been fully appreciated in the study of adaptive divergence and speciation. Fertilization and reproduction are sensitive life history stages that could be detrimentally affected for immigrants in non-native habitats. We propose that 'immigrant reproductive dysfunction' is a hitherto overlooked aspect of reproductive isolation caused by natural selection on immigrants. This idea is supported by results from experiments on an externally fertilizing fish (sand goby, Pomatoschistus minutus). Growth and condition of adults were not affected by non-native salinity whereas males spawning as immigrants had lower sperm motility and hatching success than residents. We interpret these results as evidence for local adaptation or acclimation of sperm, and possibly also components of paternal care. The resulting loss in fitness, which we call 'immigrant reproductive dysfunction', has the potential to reduce gene flow between populations with locally adapted reproduction, and it may play a role in species distributions and speciation.

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