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  • 1.
    Barot, Camille
    et al.
    N Carolina State Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA..
    Buro, Michael
    Univ Alberta, Dept Comp Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Cook, Michael
    Univ London, Goldsmiths, London WC1E 7HU, England..
    Eladhari, Mirjam
    Stockholm Univiversity / University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet.
    Li, Boyang
    Disney Res, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Liapis, Antonios
    Univ Malta, Inst Digital Games, Msida, Malta..
    McCoy, Josh
    Amer Univ, Dept Comp, Washington, DC 20016 USA..
    Ontanon, Santiago
    Drexel Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Rowe, Jonathan
    N Carolina State Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA..
    Tomai, Emmett
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Dept Comp Sci, Brownsville, TX USA..
    Verhagen, Harko
    Stockholm University.
    Zook, Alexander
    Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Interact Comp, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA..
    The AIIDE 2015 Workshop Program2016Ingår i: The AI Magazine, ISSN 0738-4602, Vol. 37, nr 2, s. 91-94Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The workshop program at the 11th Annual AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment was held November 14-15, 2015, at the University of California, Santa Cruz, USA. The program included four workshops (one of which was a joint workshop): Artificial Intelligence in Adversarial Real-Time Games, Experimental AI in Games, Intelligent Narrative Technologies and Social Believability in Games, and Player Modeling. This article contains the reports of three of the four workshops.

  • 2.
    Eladhari, Mirjam P
    Högskolan på Gotland.
    Game Mechanics and Dynamics of Social Actions in a Prototype Multiplayer Game World2011Ingår i: Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play, Tampere: Digitial Games Research Organisation (DiGRA) , 2011, Vol. 6, s. 1-20Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the social actions called ‘affective actions’ that are implemented in the prototype multiplayer game world The Pataphysic Institute (PI). An aim of this paper is to demonstrate how a game mechanic can result in a certain set of dynamics or play patterns. Affective actions are but one feature of the many that make up the game world of PI. In this paper, the feature is used as a vertical slice into the game design. The aim is to, by using this slice, show the founding the principles of the game, the play tests that informed the design, as well as the play patterns that were observed as they emerged in a series of game mastered play–test sessions.

  • 3.
    Eladhari, Mirjam P
    Högskolan på Gotland.
    Pataphysic Institute: (Demo)2010Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 4.
    Eladhari, Mirjam P
    Högskolan på Gotland.
    Semi-Autonomous Avatars in Virtual Game Worlds2010Ingår i: ECREA 2010 – 3rd European Communication Conference, Avatars and Humans: Representing Users in Digital Games, Hamburg, Germany: Hamburg Media School, Hans Bredow Institute for Media Research, Ilmenau University of Technology , 2010, s. -8Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is concerned with approaches to semi-autonomous avatars in virtual game worlds, and degrees of autonomy in relation to player-control. Approaches to semi-autonomous avatars can be divided into three groups based on the design goals of using them: relief, expression and impression. Players can be relieved of cognitive and operational load by for example automating the animations of body-language of avatars. Means of expression through body-language, types of actions performed, and reaction tendencies can express the nature of specific avatars to other players in the same world. Character-information available only to avatars' own players and personalised, subjective world-representations create individual impressions of worlds and avatars' parts in them. A shared aim of these approaches is to increase the believability of elements in the game worlds and the sense of presence and immersion for players. In this paper the prototype Pataphysic Institute is used to illustrate how expression and impression can be utilized by consideration of the implementation of possible characterising action potential of avatars.

  • 5.
    Eladhari, Mirjam P
    Högskolan på Gotland.
    The Pataphysic Institute2010Ingår i: Proceedings of the Sixth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California: AAAI Press, 2010, s. 219-220Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Pataphysic Institute (PI) is a research prototype multi-player game world. In PI, the personalities of the inhabitants are the base for the game mechanics. When interacting with other characters the potential emotional reactions depend upon avatars' current mood and personality. PI is built with inspiration from personality psychology and affect theory in an attempt to mimic possible emotional responses in order to give the player support in role-playing. The mental states of characters depend on their personalities and on their current moods. Moods differ according to context and to recent experiences. Emotional experiences become memories and define the relationships between characters. The mental state is the sum of the character and governs what actions can be performed in a given moment. In order to do certain things the characters need to be in certain moods — and for this the players need to game their avatars' emotions, and game their relationships.

  • 6.
    Eladhari, Mirjam P
    et al.
    University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
    Lopes, Philip L.
    University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
    Yannakakis, Georgios N.
    University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
    Interweaving Story Coherence and Player Creativity through Story-Making Games2014Ingår i: Interactive Storytelling: 7th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2014, Singapore, Singapore, November 3-6, 2014, Proceedings / [ed] Alex Mitchell, Clara Fernández-Vara, David Thue, Cham, 2014, s. 73-80Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In story-making games, players create stories together by using narrative tokens. Often there is a tension between players playing to win using the rules of a story-making game, and collaboratively creating a good story. In this paper, we introduce a competitive story-making game prototype coupled with computational methods intended to be used for both supporting players’ creativity and narrative coherence.

  • 7.
    Eladhari, Mirjam P
    et al.
    Högskolan på Gotland.
    Sullivan, Anne
    University of California Santa Cruz, USA.
    Smith, Gillian
    University of California Santa Cruz, USA.
    McCoy, Josh
    University of California Santa Cruz, USA.
    AI-Based Game Design: Enabling New Playable Experiences2011Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    With the current set of design tools and methods available to game designers, vast portions of the space of possible games are not currently reachable. In the past, technological advances such as improved graphics and new controllers have driven the creation of new forms of gameplay, but games have still not made great strides into new gameplay experiences. We argue that the development of innovative artificial intelligence (AI) systems plays a crucial role in the exploration of currently unreachable spaces. To aid in exploration, we suggest a practice called AI-based game design, an iterative design process that deeply integrates the affordances of an AI system within the context of game design. We have applied this process in our own projects, and in this paper we present how it has pushed the boundaries of current game genres and experiences, as well as discuss the future AI-based game design.

  • 8.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Bleed-in, Bleed-out A Design Case in Board Game Therapy2018Ingår i: DiGRA '18 - Proceedings of the 2018 DiGRA International Conference: The Game is the Message, Tampere: Digra , 2018, s. -12Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The table-top play situation offers unique opportunities for approaching real-world personal problems in ways where the structures inherent in the problems can be deconstructed, examined, and understood. This paper presents design considerations from the ongoing development of a therapy board-game; how every-day issues can bleed in and out from framed play sessions, and how game rules in this context can benefit from being malleable. The paper also offers a tentative avenue towards how play sessions, in a combination of stances for the design of game mechanics with approaches to game mastering, can be constructed as safe-spaces, affording players to draw near deeply personal issues and find ways to support each other.

  • 9.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Högskolan på Gotland, Avdelningen för Spelutveckling och gestaltning.
    Characterising action potential in virtual game worlds applied with the mind module2009Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Because games set in persistent virtual game worlds (VGWs) have massive numbers of players, these games need methods of characterisation for playable characters (PCs) that differ from the methods used in traditional narrative media. VGWs have a number of particularly interesting qualities. Firstly, VGWs are places where players interact with and create elements carrying narrative potential. Secondly, players add goals, motives and driving forces to the narrative potential of a VGW, which sometimes originates from the ordinary world. Thirdly, the protagonists of the world are real people, and when acting in the world their characterisation is not carried out by an author, but expressed by players characterising their PCs. How they can express themselves in ways that characterise them depend on what they can do, and how they can do it, and this characterising action potential (CAP) is defined by the game design of particular VGWs. In this thesis, two main questions are explored. Firstly, how can CAP be designed to support players in expressing consistent  characters in VGWs? Secondly, how can VGWs support role-play in their rule-systems? By using iterative design, I explore the design space of CAP by building a semiautonomous agent structure, the Mind Module (MM) and apply it in five experimental prototypes where the design of CAP and other game features is derived from the MM. The term semiautonomy is used because the agent structure is designed to be used by a PC, and is thus partly controlled by the system and partly by the player. The MM models a PC's personality as a collection of traits, maintains dynamic emotional state as a function of interactions with objects in the environment, and summarises a PC's current emotional state in terms of `mood'.   The MM consists of a spreading-activation network of affect nodes that are interconnected by weighted relationships.  There are four types of affect node: personality trait nodes, emotion nodes, mood nodes, and sentiment nodes. The values of the nodes defining the personality traits of characters govern an individual PC's state of mind through these weighted relationships, resulting in values characterising for a PC's personality. The sentiment nodes constitute emotionally valenced connections between entities. For example, a PC can `feel' anger toward another PC. This thesis also describes a guided paper-prototype play-test of  the VGW prototype World of Minds, in which the game mechanics build upon the MM's model of personality and emotion. In a case study of AI-based game design, lessons learned from the test are presented. The participants in the test were able to form and communicate mental models of the MM and game mechanics, validating the design and giving valuable feedback for further development. Despite the constrained scenarios presented to test players, they discovered interesting, alternative strategies, indicating that for game design the `mental physics' of the MM may open up new  possibilities.The results of the play-test influenced the further development of the MM as it was used in the digital VGW prototype the Pataphysic Institute. In the Pataphysic Institute the CAP of PCs is largely governed by their mood. Depending on which mood  PCs are in they can cast different `spells', which affect values such as mental energy, resistance and emotion in their targets. The mood also governs which `affective actions' they can perform toward other PCs and what affective actions they are receptive to. By performing affective actions on each other PCs can affect each others' emotions, which - if they are strong - may result in sentiments toward each other. PCs' personalities govern the individual fluctuations of mood and emotions, and define which types of spell PCs can cast. Formalised social relationships such as friendships affect CAP, giving players more energy, resistance, and other benefits. PCs' states of mind are reflected in the VGW in the form of physical manifestations that emerge if an emotion is very strong. These manifestations are entities which cast different spells on PCs in close proximity, depending on the emotions that the manifestations represent. PCs can also partake in authoring manifestations that become part of the world and the game-play in it. In the Pataphysic Institute potential story structures are governed by the relations the sentiment nodes constitute between entities.Because games set in persistent virtual game worlds (VGWs) have massive numbers of players, these games need methods of characterisation for playable characters (PCs) that differ from the methods used in traditional narrative media. VGWs have a number of particularly interesting qualities. Firstly, VGWs are places where players interact with and create elements carrying narrative potential. Secondly, players add goals, motives and driving forces to the narrative potential of a VGW, which sometimes originates from the ordinary world. Thirdly, the protagonists of the world are real people, and when acting in the world their characterisation is not carried out by an author, but expressed by players characterising their PCs. How they can express themselves in ways that characterise them depend on what they can do, and how they can do it, and this characterising action potential (CAP) is defined by the game design of particular VGWs. In this thesis, two main questions are explored. Firstly, how can CAP be designed to support players in expressing consistent  characters in VGWs? Secondly, how can VGWs support role-play in their rule-systems? By using iterative design, I explore the design space of CAP by building a semiautonomous agent structure, the Mind Module (MM) and apply it in five experimental prototypes where the design of CAP and other game features is derived from the MM. The term \textit{semiautonomy} is used because the agent structure is designed to be used by a PC, and is thus partly controlled by the system and partly by the player. The MM models a PC's personality as a collection of traits, maintains dynamic emotional state as a function of interactions with objects in the environment, and summarises a PC's current emotional state in terms of `mood'.   The MM consists of a spreading-activation network of affect nodes that are interconnected by weighted relationships.  There are four types of affect node: personality trait nodes, emotion nodes, mood nodes, and sentiment nodes. The values of the nodes defining the personality traits of characters govern an individual PC's state of mind through these weighted relationships, resulting in values characterising for a PC's personality. The sentiment nodes constitute emotionally valenced connections between entities. For example, a PC can `feel' anger toward another PC. This thesis also describes a guided paper-prototype play-test of  the VGW prototype World of Minds, in which the game mechanics build upon the MM's model of personality and emotion. In a case study of AI-based game design, lessons learned from the test are presented. The participants in the test were able to form and communicate mental models of the MM and game mechanics, validating the design and giving valuable feedback for further development. Despite the constrained scenarios presented to test players, they discovered interesting, alternative strategies, indicating that for game design the `mental physics' of the MM may open up new  possibilities.The results of the play-test influenced the further development of the MM as it was used in the digital VGW prototype the Pataphysic Institute. In the Pataphysic Institute the CAP of PCs is largely governed by their mood. Depending on which mood  PCs are in they can cast different `spells', which affect values such as mental energy, resistance and emotion in their targets. The mood also governs which `affective actions' they can perform toward other PCs and what affective actions they are receptive to. By performing affective actions on each other PCs can affect each others' emotions, which - if they are strong - may result in sentiments toward each other. PCs' personalities govern the individual fluctuations of mood and emotions, and define which types of spell PCs can cast. Formalised social relationships such as friendships affect CAP, giving players more energy, resistance, and other benefits. PCs' states of mind are reflected in the VGW in the form of physical manifestations that emerge if an emotion is very strong. These manifestations are entities which cast different spells on PCs in close proximity, depending on the emotions that the manifestations represent. PCs can also partake in authoring manifestations that become part of the world and the game-play in it. In the Pataphysic Institute potential story structures are governed by the relations the sentiment nodes constitute between entities.

  • 10.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Re-Tellings: The Fourth Layer of Narrative as an Instrument for Critique2018Ingår i: Interactive Storytelling: 11th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2018, Dublin, Ireland, December 5–8, 2018, Proceedings / [ed] Rouse, Rebecca; Koenitz, Hartmut; Haahr, Mads, Cham: Springer, 2018, s. 65-78Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The fourth layer of narrative in Interactive Narrative Systems (INS), such as games, is the players’ re-tellings of the stories they have experienced when playing. The occurrence of re-tellings can be considered as an indicator for a well designed INS and as an instrument of critique - the experiences of play are important and memorable to such a degree to the players that they find them worthy to tell others about. The notion of the fourth layer is added to the structural model of IN Systems having (1) a base architectural layer giving conditions for a (2) second layer of narrative design, while a (3) third layer is the narrative discourse - eg. the unique, session-specific played or traversed sequences of events. In relation to this, the Story Construction model is described.

  • 11.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    The Story Pile - Representing Story in the Board Game Mind Shadows2018Ingår i: Interactive Storytelling: 11th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2018, Dublin, Ireland, December 5–8, 2018, Proceedings / [ed] Rouse, Rebecca; Koenitz, Hartmut; Haahr, Mads, Cham: Springer, 2018, s. 280-284Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mind Shadows illustrates how story can be represented in board games. Here, the game is described, along with design considerations regarding event documentation and co-authoring. In analog games these activities, needs to be designed in a manner that integrate them into game-play, in a manner that is not too cumbersome for the players.

  • 12.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    TOG: An Innovation Centric Approach to teaching Computational Expression and Game Design2019Ingår i: Teaching Games: Pedagogical Approaches: DiGRA 2019 Pre-Conference Workshop, 2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the design approach TOG (standing for Technology, Ontology, and Game Genre), and how it can be used in teaching game design and technologies enabling computational expression. TOG, inspired by the processes of AI Based Game Design, was conceptualized when teaching a course on computational expression at the University of Malta. The main aim with teaching with the approach was to facilitate innovation and to prompt students to expand their palette of methods for computational expression as game designers

  • 13.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Verhagen, Harko
    Stockholm University.
    Eladhari, Mirjam P
    Högskolan på Gotland.
    Model of social believable NPCs for teacher training: Using Second Life2011Ingår i: Computer Games (CGAMES) 2011: 16th International Conference on Computer Games, Louisville, KY: IEEE Computer Society , 2011, s. 270-274Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the possibilities for believable game agents (NPCs) through the implementation of a Model Social Game Agent (MSGA). We present a high level model focusing on the conceptual framework for implementing MSGAs on a Second Life server.

  • 14.
    Koenitz, Hartmut
    et al.
    HKU University of the Arts Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Challenges of IDN Research and Teaching2019Ingår i: Interactive Storytelling: 12th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2019, Little Cottonwood Canyon, UT, USA, November 19–22, 2019, Proceedings / [ed] Cardona-Rivera R., Sullivan A., Young R., Cham: Springer, 2019, s. 26-39Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we react to developments that frame research in interactive digital narrative (IDN) as a field of study and potential future academic discipline. We take stock of the current situation, identify issues with perception and point out achievements. On that basis we identify five critical challenges, areas in need of attention in order to move the research field forward. In particular we discuss the dependency on legacy analytical frameworks (Groundhog Day), the lack of a shared vocabulary (Babylonian Confusion), the missing institutional memory of the field (Amnesia), the absence of established benchmarks (No Yardstick) and the overproduction of uncoordinated and quickly abandoned tools (Sisyphus). For each challenge area, we propose ways to address these challenges and enable increased collaboration in the field. Our paper has the aim to both provide orientation for newcomers to the field of IDN and to offer a basis for a discussion of future shared work.

  • 15.
    Koenitz, Hartmut
    et al.
    HKU University of the Arts Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Ludocriticism: Steps Towards a Critical Framework for Games2019Ingår i: DiGRA '19 - Abstract Proceedings of the 2019 DiGRA International Conference: Game, Play and the Emerging Ludo-Mix, 2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 16.
    Koenitz, Hartmut
    et al.
    HKU University of the Arts Utrecht, Utrecht, The Nederlands.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Teaching Game System Building as an Artistic Practice2019Ingår i: Teaching Games: Pedagogical Approaches: DiGRA 2019 Pre-Conference Workshop, 2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this vision paper, we posit ‘game system building’ as a paradigm for game design. Inspired by earlier perspectives on cybernetic art and generative art we consider the creation of dynamic game systems as an artistic practice where the consideration of complex and often unpredictable behavior and effects are as foundational as the individual elements (rules, graphics, characters, UI etc.). The perspective of ‘game system building’ has important implications for the education of designers and games scholars. In this paper, we introduce the paradigm and its lineage and propose an educational approach that reflects ‘game system building’.

  • 17.
    Koenitz, Hartmut
    et al.
    HKU University of the Arts Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Roth, Christian
    HKU University of the Arts Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Meklar, Elisa D.
    University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Björk, Staffan
    University of Gothenburg.
    Lankoski, Petri
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Kultima, Annakaisa
    Aalto University, Aalto, Finland.
    Medler, Ben
    EA Games, USA.
    Methods, History, and Impact - Directions in Game Design Research2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Research into the design aspect of games has proliferated since the early 1970s. Currently, early historical overviews appear and categorical divisions within the field become more pronounced. It is therefore timely to reflect on the development untiltoday, take stock of the current landscape, and consider future topics. This position paperdoes so by bringing together seasoned and emerging scholars, as well as practitioners and industry insiders. Together, they consider which topics are already engaged, and what new ones might be necessary. In addition, the paperwill discuss the relationship between game design research and independent/industry practices as well as implications for game design education.

  • 18.
    Lankoski, Petri
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Eladhari, Mirjam P.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Constructive Alignment in Teaching Game Research in Game Development Bachelors Programme2019Ingår i: Paper presented at Teaching Games: Pedagogical Approaches - DiGRA 2019 Pre-Conference Workshop(TGPA:DiGRA2019), 2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a case study of a Bachelor level game research methods course (15 ECTS). The course covers observations, interviews, and introduction to statistical analysis. The course set-up follows \textit{constructive alignment} design where the aim is that the learning goals, learning tasks, and evaluation are aligned. During the course, students first learn research design and later design their research based on a set of examples and conduct data gathering and analysis. The evaluation of the pedagogical approach used is based on students' learning diaries where the focus is the methods and applying methods. Qualitative evaluation indicates that students can better describe their research designs and analyses.

  • 19.
    Liapis, Antonios
    et al.
    University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
    André, Elisabeth
    Universität Augsburg, Germany.
    Bakkes, Sander C.J.
    Tilburg University, NL.
    Bidarra, Rafael
    TU Delft, NL.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö University.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Paiva, Ana
    INESC-ID, Porto Salvo, Portugal.
    Preuß, Mike
    Universität Münster, Germany.
    Smith, Gillian
    Worcester Polytechnic Institute, US.
    Sullivan, Anne
    University of Central Florida, Orlando, US.
    Thompson, Tommy
    Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Thue, David
    Reykjavik University, Iceland.
    Yannakakis, Georgios N.
    University of Malta, Msida; Malta.
    Young, R. Michael
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City, US.
    Mixed-media Game AI2018Ingår i: Dagstuhl Reports, E-ISSN 2192-5283, Vol. 7, nr 11, s. 105-107Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 20.
    Liapis, Antonios
    et al.
    University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
    Cook, Michael
    University of London, London, UK.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö University.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Guzdial, Matthew J.
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, US.
    Short, Emily
    Oxford, UK.
    Smith, Gillian
    Worcester Polytechnic Institute, US.
    Sullivan, Anne
    University of Central Florida, Orlando, US.
    Thompson, Tommy
    Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    AI-assisted Board Game Play2018Ingår i: Dagstuhl Reports, E-ISSN 2192-5283, Vol. 7, nr 11, s. 104-105Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 21.
    Smith, Gillian
    et al.
    Worcester Polytechnic Institute, US.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Guzdial, Matthew J.
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, US.
    Short, Emily
    Oxford, UK.
    Smith, Adam M.
    University of California, Santa Cruz, US.
    Sullivan, Anne
    University of Central Florida, Orlando, US.
    Thompson, Tommy
    Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Young, R. Michael
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City, US.
    AI As Reflective Practice2018Ingår i: Dagstuhl Reports, E-ISSN 2192-5283, Vol. 7, nr 11, s. 113-115Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 22.
    Sullivan, A.
    et al.
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, United State.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    Cook, M.
    Max Planck Institute for Software Systems, Saarbrücken, Germany.
    Tarot-based narrative generation2018Ingår i: FDG '18 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, artikel-id 54Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Tarot has been used for centuries as a method to give structure to storytelling, both in game and fortune-telling settings. As such, tarot cards have developed over time, expanding the symbolism and depth of meaning associated with each card. This provides a corpus for a large number of possible stories, making tarot a rich area of exploration for story generation. Therefore, we have created a tarot-based narrative generation system that creates short movie-like story synopses, along with a tagline one might see on a movie poster. This project is in early development; we have created a prototype as a proof of concept. The project exists as a webpage that an interactor can use to draw new tarot cards for the story spread (card layout) and generate new stories from them. In this paper we discuss the details of our system and describe more details about the tarot as a corpus. We also discuss future areas of exploration based on our proof of concept.

  • 23.
    Thue, David
    et al.
    Reykjavik University, Iceland.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik, Medieteknik.
    McCoy, Joshua Allen
    University of California, Davis, US.
    Preuß, Mike
    Universität Münster, Germany.
    Samothrakis, Spyridon
    University of Essex, Colchester, UK.
    Short, Emily
    Oxford, UK.
    Sullivan, Anne
    University of Central Florida, Orlando, US.
    Treanor, Michael
    American University, Washington, US.
    Young, R. Michael
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City, US.
    Backstory Generation2018Ingår i: Dagstuhl Reports, E-ISSN 2192-5283, Vol. 7, nr 11, s. 118-119Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 24.
    Verhagen, Harko
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Eladhari, Mirjam P
    Högskolan på Gotland.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Stockholm University.
    Social believable NPCs: a conceptual model and analysis of current NPC models2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 25.
    Verhagen, Harko
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari
    Malta University, Malta.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet.
    McCoy, Josh
    University of Southern California, USA.
    Social Believability in Games2013Ingår i: Advances in Computer Entertainment: 10th International Conference. Proceedings / [ed] Dennis Reidsma, Haruhiro Katayose, Anton Nijholt, Springer International Publishing , 2013, s. 649-652Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Social Believability in Games Workshop intends to be a point of interaction for researchers and game developers interested in different aspects of modelling, discussing, and developing believable social agents and Non-Player Characters (NPCs). This can include discussions around behaviour based on social and behavioural science theories and models, social affordances when interacting with game worlds and more. The intention is to invite participants from a multitude of disciplines in order to create a broad spectrum of approaches to the area.

  • 26.
    Verhagen, Harko
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Stockholm University.
    Eladhari, Mirjam P
    Högskolan på Gotland.
    Model of Social Believable NPCs for Teacher Training2011Ingår i: Proceedings of the 5th European Conference on Games Based Learning / [ed] Dimitris Gouscos and Michalis Meimaris, Athens, Greece: The National and Kapodistrian University of Athens , 2011, s. 771-774Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a conceptual model for non-player characters for use in a serious game application. The game is aimed for teacher training with a focus on training of social skills related to conflict handling. Conflict handling is difficult to emulate in a realistic way and appears not frequent enough in the practical training part of teacher education to enable sufficient training. Also, training in a real world situation may be ethically less sound. To develop a serious game for conflict handling training, we need to create non-player characters that can emulate conflicts in a realistic way. For this, we need to extend current models with social and emotional aspects. We present previously developed meta-models that enable us to propose such a model and combine these and recent game research to a Model Social Game Agent.

  • 27.
    Verhagen, Harko
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet.
    Eladhari, Mirjam P
    The Need for Socially Believable NPCs: Game Designers' View2012Ingår i: ECREA’s Pre-Conference: Experiencing Digital Games: Use, Effects & Culture of Gaming, 2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
1 - 27 av 27
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