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  • 1. Aareleid, Tiiu
    et al.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Rahu, Mati
    Baburin, Aleksei
    Lung cancer in Estonia in 1968-87: time trends and public health implications.1994Inngår i: European Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 0959-8278, E-ISSN 1473-5709, Vol. 3, nr 5, s. 419-425Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in lung cancer incidence and mortality in Estonia were studied for 20 years (1968-87). A steady upward trend was observed for men and women. The 1983-87/1968-72 age-standardized incidence rate ratio was 1.22 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-1.29) in men and 1.34 (95% CI 1.16-1.54) in women. The corresponding mortality rate ratio was 1.26 (95% CI 1.18-1.34) in men and 1.35 (95% CI 1.16-1.57) in women. The age-specific incidence and mortality rates increased clearly towards the younger birth cohorts. For men and women, the increase was most evident for the age group 45-64 years. In women there was a more rapid increase in incidence and mortality than in men. It may be a result of a substantial increase of tobacco smoking, particularly among women, after the World War II. The high and still rising occurrence of lung cancer is closely related to the high prevalence of smoking; in addition, high tar yields in domestic cigarettes could have been responsible for an elevated lung cancer risk during the past decades. There is not tobacco control programme in Estonia, and existing legislation and regulations do not defend the non-smoking population.

  • 2.
    Ahmed, Iqra Shahzadi
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik.
    Preventing the spread of Tuberculosis via refugees, asylum seekers and immigrants entering Sweden: A study of health communication, prevention strategies, policies and recommendations2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [sv]

    Sverige har under många decennier sett en minskning av tuberkulos (TBC), men infektionen har kontinuerligt ökat från 2003. Majoriteten av TBC-fallen är personer som är födda utanför Sverige. Hälsotillståndet har förbättrats i Sverige men det finns fortfarande problem. Kommunikationen mellan flyktingar och sjukvårdsspecialister är bristande idag, vilket resulterar att endast ett fåtal genomgår hälsokontroller. Detta kan leda till en ökning av infektioner och sjukdomar i Sverige.

    Denna studie undersöker hur hälsokommunikationen idag fungerar mellan den svenska sjukvården, nyanlända immigranter, asylsökande och flyktingar, samt vilken typ av vård som finns tillgänglig för flyktingar med hög risk för att utveckla TBC. Specifikt syftar studien till att förstå på vilket sätt kommunikation brister på samt analysera vilka sätt det finns för att en reducering av TBC i Sverige ska kunna ske och hur kommunikationen kan förbättras. Studien har genomförts med hjälp av både primära källor i form av intervjuer och sekundära källor.

    Baserat på de intervjuer och sekundära källor som genomförts i studien dras slutsatsen att trots att den svenska sjukvården utvecklas positivt så finns det en hel del brister - hälsokommunikation är bristande idag mellan nyanlända flyktingar, sjukvårdspersonal och myndigheter. En av huvudorsakerna som informanterna i studien nämnt är språket, mycket av det som skrivs och sägs är på svenska. Det är viktigt att en mer välfungerad hälsokommunikation utvecklas mellan de nyanlända flyktingarna, sjukvårdspersonal och myndigheterna för att det ska kunna underlättas för flyktingar att söka vård och samarbeta med sjukvårdspersonal med deras arbete för att kunna förhindra spridning av TBC och andra sjukdomar och infektioner i Sverige. 

  • 3. Alvarez, J. L.
    et al.
    Kunst, A. E.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Bopp, M.
    Strand, B. H.
    Menvielle, G.
    Lundberg, O.
    Martikainen, P.
    Deboosere, P.
    Kalediene, R.
    Artnik, B.
    Mackenbach, J. P.
    Richardus, J. H.
    Educational inequalities in tuberculosis mortality in sixteen European populations2011Inngår i: The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, ISSN 1027-3719, E-ISSN 1815-7920, Vol. 15, nr 11, s. 1461-1467Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the magnitude of socioeconomic inequalities in tuberculosis (TB) mortality by level of education in male, female, urban and rural populations in several European countries. DESIGN: Data were obtained from the Eurothine Project, covering 16 populations between 1990 and 2003. Age- and sex-standardised mortality rates, the relative index of inequality and the slope index of inequality were used to assess educational inequalities. RESULTS: The number of TB deaths reported was 8530, with a death rate of 3 per 100000 per year, of which 73% were males. Educational inequalities in TB mortality were present in all European populations. Inequalities in TB mortality were greater than in total mortality. Relative and absolute inequalities were large in Eastern European and Baltic countries but relatively small in Southern European countries and in Norway, Finland and Sweden. Inequalities in mortality were observed among both men and women, and in both rural and urban populations. CONCLUSIONS: Socio-economic inequalities in TB mortality exist in all European countries. Firm political commitment is required to reduce inequalities in the social determinants of TB incidence. Targeted public health measures are called for to improve access to treatment of vulnerable groups and thereby reduce TB mortality.

  • 4. Andersen, Ronald
    et al.
    Smedby, Björn
    Vågerö, Denny
    Cost containment, solidarity and cautious experimentation: Swedish dilemmas2001Inngår i: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 52, s. 1195-1204Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses secondary data analysis and a literature review to explore a “Swedish Dilemma”: Can Sweden continue to provide a high level of comprehensive health services for all regardless of ability to pay — a policy emphasizing “solidarity” — or must it decide to impose increasing constraints on health services spending and service delivery — a policy emphasizing “cost containment?” It examines recent policies and longer term trends including: changes in health personnel and facilities; integration of health and social services for older persons; introduction of competition among providers; cost sharing for patients; dismantling of dental insurance; decentralization of government responsibility; priority settings for treatment; and encouragement of the private sector. It is apparent that the Swedes have had considerable success in attaining cost containment — not primarily through “market mechanisms” but through government budget controls and service reduction. Further, it appears that equal access to care, or solidarity, may be adversely affected by some of the system changes.

  • 5.
    Arillo, Maria-Isabel
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik.
    Cutting the cord: a study on maternal mortality and obstetric care in disaster settings2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines global incentives to reduce maternal mortality, namely the fifth Millenium Developmnet Goal to reduce maternal mortality with 75% by 2015. More specifically it examines maternal mortality and obstetric care in situations of emergency. When exposed to extreme situations the risks of negative pregnancy- and delivey outcomes are increased. Data was collected from seconday sources and from interviews with health staff with experiences from humanitarian work in the field. The findings were analyzed using a theoretical framework explaining maternal mortality be referring to both direct and indirect causes. The two theoretical models used in the study are similar and reminds of each other when explaining maternal mortality. One is based on the assumption that an obstetric complication has occurred and differnt delays in recieving care is the main cause maternal mortality, whilst the other theory is more in depth and elaborates the underlying causes. The first theory is used a base tto analyze the data after which the other theory is applied in order to introdue a deeper dimension to the analysis. The findings suggest that direct causes accounts for 80 per cent of all maternal deaths, homorrhage being the largest, including in disasters. Further causes are infections, unsafe abortions, eclampsia and obstructed labor. Also, underlying socail factors such as gender inequality indirectly has a negative impact on maternal mortality. Moreover, findings suggest that obstetric care is prioritized in disaster relief response.

  • 6.
    Baars, Adája E
    et al.
    Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Rubio-Valverde, Jose R
    Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hu, Yannan
    Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Bopp, Matthias
    University of Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kalediene, Ramune
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Martikainen, Pekka
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Regidor, Enrique
    Universidad Complutense de Madrid, and CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Madrid, Spain.
    White, Chris
    Office for National Statistics, London, United Kingdom.
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    National Institute of Public Health, Warsaw, Poland.
    Mackenbach, Johan P
    Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Nusselder, Wilma J
    Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Fruit and vegetable consumption and its contribution to inequalities in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy in ten European countries2019Inngår i: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 64, nr 6, s. 861-872Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To assess to what extent educational differences in total life expectancy (TLE) and disability-free life expectancy (DFLE) could be reduced by improving fruit and vegetable consumption in ten European countries.

    METHODS: Data from national census or registries with mortality follow-up, EU-SILC, and ESS were used in two scenarios to calculate the impact: the upward levelling scenario (exposure in low educated equals exposure in high educated) and the elimination scenario (no exposure in both groups). Results are estimated for men and women between ages 35 and 79 years.

    RESULTS: Varying by country, upward levelling reduced inequalities in DFLE by 0.1-1.1 years (1-10%) in males, and by 0.0-1.3 years (0-18%) in females. Eliminating exposure reduced inequalities in DFLE between 0.6 and 1.7 years for males (6-15%), and between 0.1 years and 1.8 years for females (3-20%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Upward levelling of fruit and vegetable consumption would have a small, positive effect on both TLE and DFLE, and could potentially reduce inequalities in TLE and DFLE.

  • 7.
    Baburin, Aleksei
    et al.
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia / University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Lai, Taavi
    University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Centre for Health Equity Studies, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet.
    Avoidable mortality in Estonia: Exploring the differences in life expectancy between Estonians and non-Estonians in 2005-2007.2011Inngår i: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 125, nr 11, s. 754-762Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: A considerable increase in social inequalities in mortality was observed in Eastern Europe during the post-communist transition. This study evaluated the contribution of avoidable causes of death to the difference in life expectancy between Estonians and non-Estonians in Estonia.

    STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive study.

    METHODS: Temporary life expectancy (TLE) was calculated for Estonian and non-Estonian men and women aged 0-74 years in 2005-2007. The ethnic TLE gap was decomposed by age and cause of death (classified as preventable or treatable).

    RESULTS: The TLE of non-Estonian men was 3.53 years less than that of Estonian men, and the TLE of non-Estonian women was 1.36 years less than that of Estonian women. Preventable causes of death contributed 2.19 years to the gap for men and 0.78 years to the gap for women, while treatable causes contributed 0.67 and 0.33 years, respectively. Cardiorespiratory conditions were the major treatable causes of death, with ischaemic heart disease alone contributing 0.29 and 0.08 years to the gap for men and women, respectively. Conditions related to alcohol and substance use represented the largest proportion of preventable causes of death.

    CONCLUSIONS: Inequalities in health behaviours underlie the ethnic TLE gap in Estonia, rather than inequalities in access to health care or the quality of health care. Public health interventions should prioritize primary prevention aimed at alcohol and substance use, and should be implemented in conjunction with wider social policy measures.

  • 8.
    Bergfeldt, Vendela
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för naturvetenskap, miljö och teknik.
    Microbes that never sleep: A multidisciplinary study of the antibiotic resistance management in Sweden2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    The hypotheses of this study are that reduction and rational usage of antibiotics reduces development of antibiotic resistance. In Sweden, the trends do not follow this pattern. Despite a decrease in prescriptions of antibiotics, there is an increase in the number of patients infected with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA), Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL) and ESBL selecting for carbapenem-resistance (ESBLCARBA). This study aims to study factors affecting antibiotic resistance management. An additional aim is to use a multidisciplinary approach for a subject that has mostly been studied with quantitative methods. First, linear regressions investigated any possible significant changes of prescription rates in outpatient care, hospital usage of antibiotic groups and antibiotic resistance. After this, nine interviews were conducted with physicians in outpatient care, hospital care and with representatives from the Swedish Strategic Programme for the Rational Use of Antimicrobial Agents and Surveillance of Resistance (Strama), a network working for Swedish prevention against antibiotics resistance. There was a significant decrease in the number of prescriptions of antibiotics in outpatient care among all Swedish counties and a small, but significant increase of antibiotics used in hospitals. The number of patients infected with multidrug resistant bacteria also show a significant increase. The interviews revealed that health care workers in all counties follow the same guidelines and try to be as specific as possible in choosing antibiotics to hit specific bacteria. The respondents suggested migration and extended travelling as explanations to the growing number of cases of multidrug resistant bacteria. Further, two major factors emerged as important for an efficient antibiotic resistance management; Education/knowledge and Discussion. The results indicate a need for further research on rational usage of antibiotics and the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in hospital care, rather than the reduction through prescriptions. The results indicate that rational usage has a bigger impact than reduction. Using a multidisciplinary approach gave a broader perspective on the issue and future studies should see the possibilities of mixing quantitative and qualitative studies.

  • 9. Burström, Bo
    et al.
    Öberg, Lisa
    Södertörns högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Smedman, Lars
    Policy measures and the survival of foster infants in Stockholm 1878-19252012Inngår i: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 56-60Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: At the end of the 19th century, infant mortality was high in urban and rural areas in Sweden. In Stockholm, the mortality rate was particularly high among foster children. This study addresses the importance for health of targeted public policies and their local implementation in the reduction of excess mortality among foster children in Stockholm at the turn of the 19th century. In response to public concern, a law was passed in 1902 on inspections of foster homes. Stockholm city employed a handful of inspectors who visited foster homes and advised parents on child care and feeding. METHODS: Analysis of historical records from the City of Stockholm was combined with epidemiological analysis of mortality rates and hazard ratios on individual-level data for 112 746 children aged <1 year residing in one part of Stockholm between 1878 and 1925. Hazard ratios of mortality were calculated using Cox' regression analysis. RESULTS: Mortality rates of foster infants exceeded 300/1000 before 1903. Ten years later the mortality rates among foster children had declined and were similar to other children born in and out of wedlock. Historical accounts and epidemiological analysis of individual-level data over a longer time period showed similar results. CONCLUSIONS: Targeted policy measures to foster children may have potentiated the positive health effects of other universal policies, such as improved living conditions, clean water and sanitation for the whole population in the city, contributing to an equalization of mortality rates between different groups.

  • 10.
    Carlson, Per
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för sociologi, idéhistoria, samtidshistoria och arkeologi, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Relatively poor, absolutely ill?: A study of regional income inequality in Russia and its possible health consequences2005Inngår i: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 59, nr 5, s. 389-394Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Study objective: To investigate whether the income distribution in a Russian region has a "contextual" effect on individuals' self rated health, and whether the regional income distributions are related to regional health differences. Methods: The Russia longitudinal monitoring survey (RLMS) is a survey (n = 7696) that is representative of the Russian population. With multilevel regressions both individual as well as contextual effects on self rated health were estimated. Main results: The effect of income inequality is not negative on men's self rated health as long as the level of inequality is not very great. When inequality levels are high, however, there is a tendency for men's health to be negatively affected. Regional health differences among men are in part explained by regional income differences. On the other hand, women do not seem to be affected in the same way, and individual characteristics like age and educational level seem to be more important. Conclusions: It seems that a rise in income inequality has no negative effect on men's self rated health as long as the level of inequality is not very great. On the other hand, when inequality levels are higher a rise tends to affect men's health negatively. A curvilinear relation between self rated health and income distribution is an interesting hypothesis. It could help to explain the confusing results that arise when you look at countries with a high degree of income inequality (USA) and those with lower income inequality (for example, Japan and New Zealand).

  • 11.
    Carlson, Per
    Stockholms universitet.
    Self-rated health in East and West Europe: Another European health divide?2000Inngår i: Self-rated health in a European perspective / [ed] Nilsson P, Orth-Gomér K, Stockholm: Forskningsrådsnämnden , 2000, s. 77-84Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 12.
    Carlson, Per
    Statens Folkhälsoinstitut.
    Socialt kapital och psykisk hälsa2007Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 13.
    Cuypers, Koenraad Frans
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.
    Skjei Knudtsen, Margunn
    Nord-Trøndelag County Council, Steinkjer, Norway.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation, Psykologi.
    Krokstad, Steinar
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.
    Wikström, Britt Maj
    Akerhus University, Lilleström, Norway.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm University.
    Cultural activities and public health: research in Norway and Sweden. An overview2011Inngår i: Arts and Health, ISSN 1753-3015, E-ISSN 1753-3023, Vol. 3, nr 1, s. 6-26Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 14.
    Di Girolamo, Chiara
    et al.
    University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy / Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Nusselder, Wilma J
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Bopp, Matthias
    University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Costa, Giuseppe
    University of Turin, Torino, Italy.
    Kovács, Katalin
    Demographic Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallin, Estonia.
    Martikainen, Pekka
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pacelli, Barbara
    Regional Health and Social Care Agency of Emilia-Romagna, Bologna, Italy.
    Rubio Valverde, José
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Mackenbach, Johan P
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Progress in reducing inequalities in cardiovascular disease mortality in Europe2019Inngår i: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, artikkel-id heartjnl-2019-315129Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether recent declines in cardiovascular mortality have benefited all socioeconomic groups equally and whether these declines have narrowed or widened inequalities in cardiovascular mortality in Europe.

    METHODS: In this prospective registry-based study, we determined changes in cardiovascular mortality between the 1990s and the early 2010s in 12 European populations by gender, educational level and occupational class. In order to quantify changes in the magnitude of differences in mortality, we calculated both ratio measures of relative inequalities and difference measures of absolute inequalities.

    RESULTS: Cardiovascular mortality has declined rapidly among lower and higher socioeconomic groups. Relative declines (%) were faster among higher socioeconomic groups; absolute declines (deaths per 100 000 person-years) were almost uniformly larger among lower socioeconomic groups. Therefore, although relative inequalities increased over time, absolute inequalities often declined substantially on all measures used. Similar trends were seen for ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease mortality separately. Best performer was England and Wales, which combined large declines in cardiovascular mortality with large reductions in absolute inequalities and stability in relative inequalities in both genders. In the early 2010s, inequalities in cardiovascular mortality were smallest in Southern Europe, of intermediate magnitude in Northern and Western Europe and largest in Central-Eastern European and Baltic countries.

    CONCLUSIONS: Lower socioeconomic groups have experienced remarkable declines in cardiovascular mortality rates over the last 25 years, and trends in inequalities can be qualified as favourable overall. Nevertheless, further reducing inequalities remains an important challenge for European health systems and policies.

  • 15. Espelt, A.
    et al.
    Borrell, Carme
    Roskam, Albert-Jan
    Rodríguez-Sanz, M
    Stirbu, Irina
    Dalmau-Bueno, A
    Regidor, Enrique
    Bopp, Matthias
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Artnik, Barbara
    Rychtarikova, Jitka
    Kalediene, Ramune
    Dzurova, D
    Mackenbach, Johan P.
    Kunst, Anton E.
    Socioeconomic inequalities in diabetes mellitus across Europe at the beginning of the 21st century2008Inngår i: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 51, nr 11, s. 1971-1979Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe, educational attainment and diabetes are inversely related, in terms of both morbidity and mortality rates. This underlines the importance of targeting interventions towards low SEP groups. Access and use of healthcare services by people with diabetes also need to be improved.

  • 16. Ezendam, Nicole P M
    et al.
    Stirbu, Irina
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Lundberg, Olle
    Kalediene, Ramune
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Mackenbach, Johan P.
    Kunst, Anton E.
    Educational inequalities in cancer mortality differ greatly between countries around the Baltic Sea2008Inngår i: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 44, nr 3, s. 454-464Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Countries of the Baltic Sea region differ strongly with regard to the magnitude and pattern of the educational inequalities in cancer mortality.

  • 17. Farahmand, Bahman
    et al.
    Broman, G.
    de Faire, Ulf
    Vågerö, Denny
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Golf- a game of life and death: Reduced mortality in Swedish golf players2009Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 19, nr 3, s. 419-424Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The specific health benefits achieved from different formsand patterns of leisure-time physical activity are not established.We analyzed the mortality in a cohort of Swedishgolf players. We used the Swedish Golf Federation’s membershipregistry and the nationwide Mortality Registry. Wecalculated standardized mortality ratios (SMR) with stratificationfor age, sex, and socioeconomic status. The cohortincluded 300 818 golfers, and the total number of deaths was1053. The overall SMR was 0.60 [95% confidence intervals(CIs): 0.57–0.64]. The mortality reduction was observed inmen and women, in all age groups, and in all socioeconomiccategories. Golfers with the lowest handicap (the mostskilled players) had the lowest mortality; SMR50.53(95% CI: 0.41–0.67) compared with 0.68 (95% CI: 0.61–0.75) for those with the highest handicap. While we cannotconclude with certainty that all the 40% decreased mortalityrates are explained by the physical activity associatedwith playing golf, we conclude that most likely this is part ofthe explanation. To put the observed mortality reduction incontext, it may be noted that a 40% reduction of mortalityrates corresponds to an increase in life expectancy of about5 years.

  • 18. Friel, Sharon
    et al.
    Marmot, Michael
    McMichael, Anthony J.
    Kjellstrom, Tord
    Vågerö, Denny
    Global health equity and climate stabilisation: a common agenda2008Inngår i: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 372, nr 9650, s. 1677-1683Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Although health has improved for many people, the extent of health inequities between and within countries is growing. Meanwhile, humankind is disrupting the global climate and other life-supporting environmental systems, thereby creating serious risks for health and wellbeing, especially in vulnerable populations but ultimately for everybody. Underlying determinants of health inequity and environmental change overlap substantially; they are signs of an economic system predicated on asymmetric growth and competition, shaped by market forces that mostly disregard health and environmental consequences rather than by values of fairness and support. A shift is needed in priorities in economic development towards healthy forms of urbanisation, more efficient and renewable energy sources, and a sustainable and fairer food system. Global interconnectedness and interdependence enable the social and environmental determinants of health to be addressed in ways that will increase health equity, reduce poverty, and build societies that live within environmental limits.

  • 19. Geyer, Siegfried
    et al.
    Hemström, Örjan
    Peter, Richard
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholms universitet.
    Education, income, and occupational class cannot be used interchangeably in social epidemiology: Empirical evidence against a common practice2006Inngår i: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 60, s. 804-810Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Study objective: Education, income, and occupational class are often used interchangeably in studies showing social inequalities in health. This procedure implies that all three characteristics measure the same underlying phenomena. This paper questions this practice. The study looked for any independent effects of education, income, and occupational class on four health outcomes: diabetes prevalence, myocardial infarction incidence and mortality, and finally all cause mortality in populations from Sweden and Germany.Design: Sweden: follow up of myocardial infarction mortality and all cause mortality in the entire population, based on census linkage to the Cause of Death Registry. Germany: follow up of myocardial infarction morbidity and all cause mortality in statutory health insurance data, plus analysis of prevalence data on diabetes. Multiple regression analyses were performed to calculate the effects of education, income, and occupational class before and after mutual adjustments.Setting and participants: Sweden (all residents aged 25-64) and Germany (Mettman district, Nordrhein-Westfalen, all insured persons aged 25-64).Main results: Correlations between education, income, and occupational class were low to moderate. Which of these yielded the strongest effects on health depended on type of health outcome in question. For diabetes, education was the strongest predictor and for all cause mortality it was income. Myocardial infarction morbidity and mortality showed a more mixed picture. In mutually adjusted analyses each social dimension had an independent effect on each health outcome in both countries.Conclusions: Education, income, and occupational class cannot be used interchangeably as indicators of a hypothetical latent social dimension. Although correlated, they measure different phenomena and tap into different causal mechanisms.

  • 20.
    Griswold, Max G.
    et al.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Fullman, Nancy
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Hawley, Caitlin
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Arian, Nicholas
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Zimsen, Stephanie R. M.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Tymeson, Hayley D.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Venkateswaran, Vidhya
    Harvard Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA..
    Tapp, Austin Douglas
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.
    Seattle Genet, Seattle, WA USA..
    Salama, Joseph S.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Abate, Kalkidan Hassen
    Jimma Univ, Dept Populat & Family Hlth, Jimma, Ethiopia..
    Abate, Degu
    Haramaya Univ, Harar, Ethiopia..
    Abay, Solomon M.
    Addis Ababa Univ, Dept Pharmacol & Clin Pharm, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Abbafati, Cristiana
    Univ Roma La Sapienza, Dept Law Philosophy & Econ Studies, Rome, Italy..
    Abdulkader, Rizwan Suliankatchi
    Minist Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Abebe, Zegeye
    Univ Gondar, Human Nutr, Gondar, Ethiopia..
    Aboyans, Victor
    Dupuytren Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Limoges, France.;Univ Limoges, Inst Epidemiol, Limoges, France..
    Abrar, Mohammed Mehdi
    Addis Ababa Univ, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Acharya, Pawan
    Nepal Dev Soc, Chitwan, Nepal..
    Adetokunboh, Olatunji O.
    Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Global Hlth, Cape Town, South Africa.;South African Med Res Council, Cochrane South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Adhikari, Tara Ballav
    Ctr Social Sci & Publ Hlth Res Nepal, Nepal Hlth Res Environm, Kathmandu, Nepal.;Univ Southern Denmark, Unit Hlth Promot Res, Odense, Denmark..
    Adsuar, Jose C.
    Univ Extremadura, Fac Sport Sci, Badajoz, Spain..
    Afarideh, Mohsen
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Endocrinol & Metab Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Agardh, Emilie Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Agarwal, Gina
    McMaster Univ, Dept Family Med, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Aghayan, Sargis Aghasi
    Yerevan State Univ, Chair Zool, Yerevan, Armenia.;Sci Ctr Zool & Hydroecol, Res Grp Mol Parasitol, Yerevan, Armenia..
    Agrawal, Sutapa
    PHFI, Gurugram, India.;Vital Strategies, Gurugram, India..
    Ahmed, Muktar Beshir
    Jimma Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Jimma, Ethiopia..
    Akibu, Mohammed
    Dept Midwifery, Lexington, KY USA..
    Akinyemiju, Tomi
    Univ Kentucky, Dept Epidemiol, Lexington, KY 40506 USA..
    Akseer, Nadia
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Ctr Global Child Hlth, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Al Asfoor, Deena H.
    Minist Hlth, Off Undersecretary Hlth Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Al-Aly, Ziyad
    Washington Univ, Dept Internal Med, St Louis, MO USA.;Dept Vet Affairs, VA St Louis Hlth Care Syst, Clin Epidemiol Ctr, St Louis, MO USA..
    Alahdab, Fares
    Mayo Clin Fdn Med Educ & Res, Evidence Based Pract Ctr, Rochester, MN USA.;Syrian Amer Med Soc, Res Comm Educ Comm & Avicenna Journal Med Editor, Washington, DC USA..
    Alam, Khurshid
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Albujeer, Ammar
    Naba Al Hayat Fdn Med Sci & Hlth Care, Najaf, Iraq..
    Alene, Kefyalew Addis
    Univ Gondar, Inst Publ Hlth, Gondar, Ethiopia.;Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Populat Hlth, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Ali, Raghib
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Oxford, England.;New York Univ Abu Dhabi, Publ Hlth Res Ctr, Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates..
    Ali, Syed Danish
    Univ London, Islamabad, Pakistan..
    Alijanzadeh, Mehran
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin, Iran..
    Aljunid, Syed Mohamed
    Kuwait Univ, Dept Hlth Policy & Management, Kuwait, Kuwait.;Natl Univ Malaysia, Int Ctr Casemix & Clin Coding, Bandar Tun Razak, Malaysia..
    Alkerwi, Ala'a
    Luxembourg Inst Hlth, Dept Populat Hlth, Strassen, Luxembourg..
    Allebeck, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Swedish Res Council Hlth Working Life & Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Alvis-Guzman, Nelson
    Univ Cartagena, Res Grp Hlth Econ, Cartagena, Colombia.;Univ Coast, Res Grp Hosp Management & Hlth Pol, Barranquilla, Colombia..
    Amare, Azmeraw T.
    Univ South Australia, Sansom Inst, Adelaide, SA, Australia.;Bahir Dar Univ, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia..
    Aminde, Leopold N.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Publ Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Ammar, Walid
    Fed Minist Hlth, Beirut, Lebanon.;Amer Univ Beirut, Fac Hlth Sci, Beirut, Lebanon..
    Amoako, Yaw Ampem
    Komfo Anokye Teaching Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Kumasi, Ghana..
    Amul, Gianna Gayle Herrera
    Natl Univ Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew Sch Publ Pol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Andrei, Catalina Liliana
    Carol Davila Univ Med & Pharm, Bucharest, Romania..
    Angus, Colin
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Hlth & Related Res, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Ansha, Mustafa Geleto
    Dept Publ Hlth, Lexington, KY USA. Debre Berhan Univ, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia..
    Antonio, Carl Abelardo T.
    Univ Philippines Manila, Dept Hlth Policy & Adm, Manila, Philippines..
    Aremu, Olatunde
    Birmingham City Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Birmingham, W Midlands, England..
    Arnlov, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Artaman, Al
    Univ Manitoba, Dept Community Hlth Sci, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Aryal, Krishna K.
    ABT Associates Nepal, Monitoring Evaluat & Operat Res Project, DFID Nepal Hlth Sect Programme 3, Lalitpur, Nepal..
    Assadi, Reza
    Mashhad Univ Med Sci, Educ Dev Ctr, Mashhad, Iran..
    Ausloos, Marcel
    Univ Leicester, Sch Business, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Avila-Burgos, Leticia
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Ctr Hlth Syst Res, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Avokpaho, Euripide F. G. A.
    Benin Clin Res Inst IRCB, Project Deworm3, Calavi, Benin.;Lab Studies & Res Act Hlth LERAS, Control Infect Dis Project, Porto Novo, Benin..
    Awasthi, Ashish
    PHFI, Gurugram, India.;Indian Inst Publ Hlth, Gandhinagar, India..
    Ayele, Henok Tadesse
    McGill Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Occupational Hlth, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;Dilla Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Dilla, Ethiopia..
    Ayer, Rakesh
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Community & Global Hlth, Tokyo, Japan..
    Ayuk, Tambe B.
    Inst Med Res & Plant Med Studies, Ctr Food & Nutr Res, Yaounde, Cameroon.;Univ South Africa, Dept Hlth Studies, Pretoria, South Africa..
    Azzopardi, Peter S.
    South Australian Hlth & Med Res Inst, Wardliparingga Aboriginal Res Unit, Adelaide, SA, Australia.;Burnet Inst, Discipline Int Dev, Maternal & Child Hlth Program, Global Adolescent Hlth Grp, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Badali, Hamid
    Mazandaran Univ Med Sci, Dept Med Mycol, Invas Fungi Res Ctr, Sari, Iran..
    Badawi, Alaa
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Fac Med, Nutr Sci, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, Publ Hlth Risk Sci Div, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Banach, Maciej
    Med Univ Lodz, Dept Hypertens, Lodz, Poland.;PMMHRI, Lodz, Poland..
    Barker-Collo, Suzanne Lyn
    Univ Auckland, Sch Psychol, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Barrero, Lope H.
    Pontificia Univ Javeriana, Dept Ind Engn, Bogota, Colombia..
    Basaleem, Huda
    Univ Aden, Aden, Yemen..
    Baye, Estifanos
    Wollo Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Dessie, Ethiopia..
    Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad
    Charles R Drew Univ Med & Sci, Dept Psychiat, 1621 E 120th St, Los Angeles, CA 90059 USA.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Psychiat & Biobehav Sci, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA..
    Bedi, Neeraj
    Gandhi Med Coll Bhopal, Dept Community Med, Bhopal, India.;Jazan Univ, Jizan, Saudi Arabia..
    Bejot, Yannick
    Univ Hosp Dijon, Dept Neurol, Dijon, France.;Univ Burgundy, Fac Hlth Sci, Dijon Stroke Registry, Dijon, France..
    Belachew, Abate Bekele
    Mekelle Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Belay, Saba Abraham
    Dr Tewelde Legesse Hlth Sci Coll, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Bennett, Derrick A.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Bensenor, Isabela M.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Dept Internal Med, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Bernabe, Eduardo
    Kings Coll London, Dent Inst, London, England..
    Bernstein, Robert S.
    Emory Univ, Hubert Dept Global Hlth, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.;Univ S Florida, Dept Global Hlth, Tampa, FL USA..
    Beyene, Addisu Shunu
    Haramaya Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Harar, Ethiopia.;Univ Newcastle, Sch Publ Hlth & Med, Newcastle, NSW, Australia..
    Beyranvand, Tina
    Iran Univ Med Sci, Tehran, Iran..
    Bhaumik, Soumyadeeep
    George Inst Global Hlth, New Delhi, India..
    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Ctr Global Child Hlth, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Aga Khan Univ, Ctr Excellence Women & Child Hlth, Karachi, Pakistan..
    Biadgo, Belete
    Univ Gondar, Dept Clin Chem, Gondar, Ethiopia..
    Bijani, Ali
    Babol Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Babol Sar, Iran.;Babol Univ Med Sci, Hlth Res Inst, Babol Sar, Iran..
    Bililign, Nigus
    Woldia Univ, Woldia, Ethiopia..
    Birlik, Sait Mentes
    Univ Bologna, Bologna, Italy.;GBS CIDP Fdn Int, Conshohocken, PA USA..
    Birungi, Charles
    UCL, UCL Ctr Global Hlth Econ, London, England.;United Nations Programme HIV AIDS UNAIDS, Fast Track Implementat Dept, Gaborone, Botswana..
    Bizuneh, Hailemichael
    St Pauls Hosp, Publ Hlth, Millennium Med Coll, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Bjerregaard, Peter
    Univ Southern Denmark, Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Odense, Denmark..
    Bjorge, Tone
    Univ Bergen, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Bergen, Norway.;Canc Registry Norway, Oslo, Norway..
    Borges, Guilherme
    Natl Inst Psychiat Ramon de la Fuente Muniz, Dept Epidemiol & Psychosocial Res, Mexico City, DF, Mexico..
    Bosetti, Cristina
    IRCCS, Dept Oncol, Mario Negri Inst Pharmacol Res, Milan, Italy..
    Boufous, Soufiane
    Univ New South Wales, Transport & Rd Safety TARS Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi
    Univ Genoa, Genoa, Italy..
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Butt, Zahid A.
    Univ British Columbia, Sch Populat & Publ Hlth, Vancouver, BC, Canada.;Al Shifa Trust Eye Hosp, Al Shifa Sch Publ Hlth, Rawalpindi, Pakistan..
    Cahuana-Hurtado, Lucero
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Ctr Hlth Syst Res, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Calabria, Bianca
    Australian Natl Univ, Natl Ctr Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Canberra, ACT, Australia.;Univ New South Wales, Natl Drug & Alcohol Res Ctr, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Campos-Nonato, Ismael R.
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Campuzano Rincon, Julio Cesar
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico.;Univ Valley Cuernavaca, Sch Med, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Carreras, Giulia
    Inst Canc Res Prevent & Clin Network ISPRO, Florence, Italy..
    Carrero, Juan J.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Carvalho, Felix
    Univ Porto, Appl Mol Biosci Unit, Porto, Portugal..
    Castaneda-Orjuela, Carlos A.
    Natl Inst Hlth, Colombian Natl Hlth Observ, Bogota, Colombia.;Univ Nacl Colombia, Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Evaluat Grp, Bogota, Colombia..
    Castillo Rivas, Jacqueline
    Costa Rican Dept Social Secur, San Jose, Costa Rica.;Univ Costa Rica, Sch Dent, San Pedro, Costa Rica..
    Catala-Lopez, Ferran
    Inst Hlth Carlos III, Natl Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Hlth Planning & Econ, Madrid, Spain..
    Chang, Jung-Chen
    Natl Taiwan Univ, Coll Med, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Charlson, Fiona J.
    Univ Washington, Dept Global Hlth, Seattle, WA 98121 USA.;Univ Queensland, Sch Publ Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Chattopadhyay, Aparajita
    Int Inst Populat Sci, Dept Dev Studies, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Chaturvedi, Pankaj
    Tata Mem Hosp, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Chowdhury, Rajiv
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England..
    Christopher, Devasahayam J.
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp CMC, Dept Pulm Med, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India..
    Chung, Sheng-Chia
    UCL, Dept Hlth Informat, London, England.;Hlth Data Res UK, London, England..
    Ciobanu, Liliana G.
    Univ Adelaide, Sch Med, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    Claro, Rafael M.
    Univ Fed Minas Gerais, Dept Nutr, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil..
    Conti, Sara
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Dept Med & Surg, Monza, Italy..
    Cousin, Ewerton
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Postgrad Program Epidemiol, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Criqui, Michael H.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA..
    Dachew, Berihun Assefa
    Univ Gondar, Inst Publ Hlth, Gondar, Ethiopia.;Univ Queensland, Sch Publ Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Dargan, Paul, I
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, London, England.;Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Clin Toxicol Serv, London, England..
    Daryani, Ahmad
    Mazandaran Univ Med Sci, Toxoplasmosis Res Ctr, Sari, Iran..
    Das Neves, Jose
    Univ Porto, Inst Biomed Engn INEB, Porto, Portugal.;Univ Porto, Inst Res & Innovat Hlth I3s, Porto, Portugal..
    Davletov, Kairat
    Kazakh Natl Med Univ, Alma Ata, Kazakhstan..
    De Castro, Filipa
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    De Courten, Barbora
    Monash Univ, Monash Ctr Hlth Res & Implementat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    De Neve, Jan-Walter
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Publ Hlth, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Degenhardt, Louisa
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA.;Univ New South Wales, Natl Drug & Alcohol Res Ctr, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Demoz, Gebre Teklemariam
    Addis Ababa Univ, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.;Aksum Univ, Dept Clin Pharm, Aksum, Ethiopia..
    Des Jarlais, Don C.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Psychiat, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Dey, Subhojit
    Disha Fdn, Gurgaon, India..
    Dhaliwal, Rupinder Singh
    Indian Council Med Res, New Delhi, India..
    Dharmaratne, Samath Dhamminda
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA.;Univ Peradeniya, Dept Community Med, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka..
    Dhimal, Meghnath
    Nepal Hlth Res Council, Hlth Res Sect, Kathmandu, Nepal..
    Doku, David Teye
    Univ Cape Coast, Dept Populat & Hlth, Cape Coast, Ghana.;Univ Tampere, Sch Hlth Sci, Tampere, Finland..
    Doyle, Kerrie E.
    RMIT Univ, Sch Hlth & Biomed Sci, Royal Melbourne Inst Technol, Bundoora, Vic, Australia..
    Dubey, Manisha
    United Nations World Food Programme, New Delhi, India..
    Dubljanin, Eleonora
    Univ Belgrade, Fac Med, Belgrade, Serbia..
    Duncan, Bruce B.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Postgrad Program Epidemiol, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Ebrahimi, Hedyeh
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Endocrinol & Metab Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Tehran, Iran..
    Edessa, Dumessa
    Haramaya Univ, Sch Pharm, Harar, Ethiopia..
    Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed
    Mansoura Univ, Dept Clin Pathol, Mansoura, Egypt..
    Ermakov, Sergei Petrovich
    Russian Acad Sci, Lab Socioecon Issues Human Dev & Qual Life, Moscow, Russia.;Minist Hlth FRIHOI, Dept Med Stat & Documentary, Fed Res Inst Hlth Org & Informat, Moscow, Russia..
    Erskine, Holly E.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Publ Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Queensland Ctr Mental Hlth Res, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Esteghamati, Alireza
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Endocrinol & Metab Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Faramarzi, Mahbobeh
    Babol Univ Med Sci, Babol Sar, Iran..
    Farioli, Andrea
    Univ Bologna, Dept Med & Surg Sci, Bologna, Italy..
    Faro, Andre
    Univ Fed Sergipe, Dept Psychol, Sao Cristovao, Brazil..
    Farvid, Maryam S.
    Harvard Univ, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA..
    Farzadfar, Farshad
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Noncommun Dis Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Feigin, Valery L.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA.;Auckland Univ Technol, Natl Inst Stroke & Appl Neurosci, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Felisbino-Mendes, Mariana Santos
    Univ Fed Minas Gerais, Dept Maternal & Child Nursing & Publ Hlth, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil..
    Fernandes, Eduarda
    Univ Porto, Dept Chem, Porto, Portugal..
    Ferrari, Alize J.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Publ Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Queensland Ctr Mental Hlth Res, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Ferri, Cleusa P.
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Fijabi, Daniel Obadare
    Brandeis Univ, Heller Sch Social Policy & Management, Waltham, MA USA.;Univ Memphis, Sch Publ Hlth, Memphis, TN 38152 USA..
    Filip, Irina
    Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, CA USA.;AT Still Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Mesa, AZ USA..
    Finger, Jonas David
    Robert Koch Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Hlth Monitoring, Berlin, Germany..
    Fischer, Florian
    Bielefeld Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Med, Bielefeld, Germany..
    Flaxman, Abraham D.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Franklin, Richard Charles
    James Cook Univ, Coll Publ Hlth Med & Vet Sci, Townsville, Qld, Australia..
    Futran, Neal D.
    Univ Washington, Sch Med, Dept Otolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Gallus, Silvano
    IRCCS, Dept Environm Hlth Sci, Mario Negri Inst Pharmacol Res, Milan, Italy..
    Ganji, Morsaleh
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Endocrinol & Metab Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Gankpe, Fortune Gbetoho
    Lab Studies & Res Act Hlth LERAS, Noncommun Dis Dept, Porto Novo, Benin.;Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah Univ, Neurosurg Dept, Fes, Morocco..
    Gebregergs, Gebremedhin Berhe
    Mekelle Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Gebrehiwot, Tsegaye Tewelde
    Jimma Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Jimma, Ethiopia..
    Geleijnse, Johanna M.
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Div Human Nutr & Hlth, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Ghadimi, Reza
    Babol Univ Med Sci, Hlth Res Inst, Babol Sar, Iran..
    Ghandour, Lilian A.
    Amer Univ Beirut, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Beirut, Lebanon..
    Ghimire, Mamata
    Univ Tsukuba, Dept Hlth Care Policy & Management, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan..
    Gill, Paramjit Singh
    Univ Warwick, Unit Acad Primary Care, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Ginawi, Ibrahim Abdelmageed
    Univ Hail, Dept Family & Community Med, Hail, Saudi Arabia..
    Giref, Ababi Zergaw Z.
    Addis Ababa Univ, Dept Reprod Hlth & Hlth Serv Management, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Gona, Philimon N.
    Univ Massachusetts, Coll Nursing & Hlth Sci, Boston, MA 02125 USA..
    Gopalani, Sameer Vali
    Univ Oklahoma, Dept Biostat & Epidemiol, Oklahoma City, OK USA.;Govt Federated States Micronesia, Dept Hlth & Social Affairs, Palikir, Micronesia..
    Gotay, Carolyn C.
    Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Goulart, Alessandra C.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Ctr Clin & Epidemiol Res, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Greaves, Felix
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Primary Care & Publ Hlth, London, England.;Publ Hlth England, Hlth Improvement Directorate, London, England..
    Grosso, Giuseppe
    Univ Hosp Polyclin Vittorio Emanuele, Integrated Tumor Registry, Catania, Italy..
    Guo, Yuming
    Monash Univ, Sch Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Gupta, Rahul
    West Virginia Bur Publ Hlth, Commissioner Publ Hlth, Charleston, WV USA.;West Virginia Univ, Dept Hlth Policy Management & Leadership, Morgantown, WV USA.;Rajasthan Univ Hlth Sci, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.;Eternal Heart Care Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Prevent Cardiol, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India..
    Gupta, Rajeev
    West Virginia Bur Publ Hlth, Commissioner Publ Hlth, Charleston, WV USA.;West Virginia Univ, Dept Hlth Policy Management & Leadership, Morgantown, WV USA.;Rajasthan Univ Hlth Sci, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.;Eternal Heart Care Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Prevent Cardiol, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India..
    Gupta, Vipin
    Univ Delhi, Dept Anthropol, Delhi, India..
    Alma Gutierrez, Reyna
    Natl Inst Psychiat Ramon de la Fuente Muniz, Dept Epidemiol & Psychosocial Res, Mexico City, DF, Mexico..
    Gvs, Murthy
    Publ Hlth Fdn India, Indian Inst Publ Hlth, Hyderabad, India..
    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Sch Med, Tehran, Iran.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Radiol, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Hagos, Tekleberhan Beyene
    Mekelle Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Inst Biomed Sci, Dept Anat & Embryol, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Hailu, Gessessew Bugssa
    Mekelle Univ, Sch Med, Biomed Sci Div, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Hamadeh, Randah R.
    Arabian Gulf Univ, Dept Family & Community Med, Manama, Bahrain..
    Hamidi, Samer
    Hamdan Bin Mohammed Smart Univ, Sch Hlth & Environm Studies, Dubai, U Arab Emirates..
    Hankey, Graeme J.
    Univ Western Australia, Med Sch, Perth, WA, Australia.;Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Neurol Dept, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Harb, Hilda L.
    Minist Publ Hlth, Dept Vital & Hlth Stat, Beirut, Lebanon..
    Harikrishnan, Sivadasanpillai
    Sree Chitra Tirunal Inst Med Sci & Technol, Cardiol Dept, Trivandrum, Kerala, India..
    Maria Haro, Josep
    Parc Sanit St Joan de Deu CIBERSAM, Res & Dev Unit, St Boi De Llobregat, Spain.;Univ Barcelona, Dept Med, Barcelona, Spain..
    Hassen, Hamid Yimam
    Mizan Tepi Univ, Publ Hlth Dept, Mizan Teferi, Ethiopia.;Univ Hosp Antwerp, Unit Epidemiol & Social Med, Antwerp, Belgium..
    Havmoeller, Rasmus
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hay, Simon, I
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Heibati, Behzad
    Iran Univ Med Sci, Air Pollut Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Henok, Andualem
    Mizan Tepi Univ, Mizan Teferi, Ethiopia..
    Heredia-Pi, Ileana
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Ctr Hlth Syst Res, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Francisco Hernandez-Llanes, Norberto
    Natl Commission Against Addict, Secretary Hlth, Subdirectorate Regulat Guidelines & Tech Procedur, Mexico City, DF, Mexico..
    Herteliu, Claudiu
    Bucharest Univ Econ Studies, Dept Stat & Econometr, Bucharest, Romania..
    Hibstu, Desalegn Ts Tsegaw
    Hawassa Univ, Dept Reprod Hlth, Hawassa, Ethiopia..
    Hoogar, Praveen
    Manipal Univ, Transdisciplinary Ctr Qualitat Methods, Manipal, Karnataka, India..
    Horita, Nobuyuki
    Yokohama City Univ, Dept Pulmonol, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.;NHGRI, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Hosgood, H. Dean
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Bronx, NY 10467 USA..
    Hosseini, Mostafa
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Tehran, Iran..
    Hostiuc, Mihaela
    Carol Davila Univ Med & Pharm, Dept Legal Med & Bioeth, Bucharest, Romania.;Emergency Hosp Bucharest, Dept Internal Med, Bucharest, Romania..
    Hu, Guoqing
    Cent S Univ, Xiangya Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Hlth Stat, Changsha, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Huang, Hsiang
    Cambridge Hlth Alliance, Dept Psychiat, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Husseini, Abdullatif
    Birzeit Univ, Inst Community & Publ Hlth, Birzeit, Palestine.;Qatar Univ, Doha, Qatar..
    Idrisov, Bulat
    Bashkir State Med Univ, Infect Dis Dept, Ufa, Russia..
    Ileanu, Bogdan Vasile
    Bucharest Univ Econ Studies, Bucharest, Romania..
    Ilesanmi, Olayinka Stephen
    Univ Liberia, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Monrovia, Liberia..
    Irvani, Seyed Sina Naghibi
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Endocrine Sci, Tehran, Iran.;Med Res Council South Africa, Noncommun Dis Res Unit, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful
    Deakin Univ, Inst Phys Act & Nutr, Waurn Ponds, Vic, Australia..
    Jackson, Maria D.
    Univ West Indies, Dept Community Hlth & Psychiat, Jamaica, NY USA..
    Jakovljevic, Mihajlo
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA.;Univ Kragujevac, Fac Med Sci, Kragujevac, Serbia..
    Jayatilleke, Achala Upendra
    Univ Colombo, Fac Grad Studies, Colombo, Sri Lanka.;Univ Colombo, Postgrad Inst Med, Colombo, Sri Lanka..
    Jha, Ravi Prakash
    Banaras Hindu Univ, Inst Med Sci, Dept Community Med, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India..
    Jonas, Jost B.
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Ophthalmol, Heidelberg, Germany.;Capital Med Univ, Beijing Inst Ophthalmol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Jozwiak, Jacek Jerzy
    Czestochowa Tech Univ, Inst Hlth & Nutr Sci, Czestochowa, Poland.;Univ Opole, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Opole, Poland..
    Kabir, Zubair
    Univ Coll Cork, Sch Publ Hlth, Cork, Ireland..
    Kadel, Rajendra
    London Sch Econ & Polit Sci, Dept Hlth Policy, Personal Social Serv Res Unit, London, England..
    Kahsay, Amaha
    Mekelle Univ, Nutr & Dietet, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Kapil, Umesh
    ACS Med Coll & Hosp, New Delhi, India..
    Kasaeian, Amir
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Hematol Malignancies Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Hematol Oncol & Stem Cell Transplantat Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Kassa, Tesfaye D. Dessale
    Mekelle Univ, Clin Pharm Unit, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal
    Univ Glasgow, MRC CSO Social & Publ Hlth Sci Unit, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Kawakami, Norito
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Mental Hlth, Tokyo, Japan..
    Kebede, Seifu
    Salale Univ, Midwifery Program, Fiche, Ethiopia..
    Kefale, Adane Teshome
    Mizan Tepi Univ, Pharm Dept, Mizan Teferi, Ethiopia..
    Keiyoro, Peter Njenga
    Univ Nairobi, Odel Campus, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Kengne, Andre Pascal
    Med Res Council South Africa, Noncommun Dis Res Unit, Cape Town, South Africa.;Univ Cape Town, Dept Med, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Khader, Yousef
    Jordan Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Alramtha, Jordan..
    Khafaie, Morteza Abdullatif
    Ahvaz Jundishapur Univ Med Sci, Dept Publ Hlth, Ahwaz, Iran..
    Khalil, Ibrahim A.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Khan, Md Nuruzzaman
    Univ Newcastle, Sch Publ Hlth & Med, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.;Jatiya Kabi Kazi Nazrul Islam Univ, Dept Populat Sci, Mymensingh, Bangladesh..
    Khang, Young-Ho
    Seoul Natl Univ, Inst Hlth Policy & Management, SNU Med Res Ctr, Seoul, South Korea.;Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Hlth Policy & Management, Seoul, South Korea..
    Khater, Mona M.
    Cairo Univ, Dept Med Parasitol, Cairo, Egypt..
    Khubchandani, Jagdish
    Ball State Univ, Dept Nutr & Hlth Sci, Muncie, IN 47306 USA..
    Kim, Cho-Il
    Korea Hlth Ind Dev Inst, Cheongju, South Korea..
    Kim, Daniel
    Northeastern Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Kim, Yun Jin
    Xiamen Univ Malaysia, Sch Med, Sepang, Malaysia..
    Kimokoti, Ruth W.
    Simmons Coll, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Kisa, Adnan
    Univ Oslo, Dept Hlth Management & Hlth Econ, Oslo, Norway.;Tulane Univ, Dept Global Community Hlth & Behav Sci, New Orleans, LA 70118 USA..
    Kivimaki, Mika
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England.;Univ Helsinki, Dept Publ Hlth, Helsinki, Finland..
    Kochhar, Sonali
    Univ Washington, Dept Global Hlth, Seattle, WA 98121 USA.;Erasmus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Med Ctr Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Kosen, Soewarta
    Koul, Parvaiz A.
    Sher Ashmir Inst Med Sci, Dept Internal & Pulm Med, Srinagar, Jammu & Kashmir, India..
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Parc Sanit St Joan de Deu CIBERSAM, Res & Dev Unit, St Boi De Llobregat, Spain..
    Krishan, Kewal
    Panjab Univ, Dept Anthropol, Chandigarh, India..
    Defo, Barthelemy Kuate
    Univ Montreal, Dept Social & Prevent Med, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;Univ Montreal, Dept Demog, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Bicer, Burcu Kucuk
    Yuksek Ihtisas Univ, Fac Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Ankara, Turkey.;Hacettepe Univ, Fac Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Ankara, Turkey..
    Kulkarni, Veena S.
    Arkansas State Univ, State Univ, AR 72467 USA..
    Kumar, Pushpendra
    Int Inst Populat Sci, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Lafranconi, Alessandra
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Dept Med & Surg, Monza, Italy..
    Balaji, Arjun Lakshmana
    Rajiv Gandhi Univ Hlth Sci, Bangalore, Karnataka, India..
    Lalloo, Ratilal
    Univ Queensland, Sch Dent, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Lallukka, Tea
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Publ Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.;Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Populat & Work Abil Program, Helsinki, Finland..
    Lam, Hilton
    Natl Inst Hlth, Inst Hlth Policy & Dev Studies, Manila, Philippines..
    Lami, Faris Hasan
    Acad Med Sci, Dept Community & Family Med, Baghdad, Iraq..
    Lan, Qing
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Rockville, MD USA..
    Lang, Justin J.
    Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, Hlth Promot & Chron Dis Prevent Branch, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Lansky, Sonia
    Municipal Hlth Dept Belo Horizonte, Belo Horizonte City Hall, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil..
    Larsson, Anders O.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Akad Sjukhuset, Dept Clin Chem & Pharmacol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Latifi, Arman
    Maragheh Univ Med Sci, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth, Maragheh, Iran..
    Leasher, Janet L.
    Nova Southeastern Univ, Coll Optometry, Ft Lauderdale, FL 33314 USA..
    Lee, Paul H.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Sch Nursing, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Leigh, James
    Univ Sydney, Asbestos Dis Res Inst, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Leung, Janni
    Univ Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Levi, Miriam
    Tuscany Ctr, CERIMP, Local Hlth Unit, Florence, Italy.;Univ Florence, Dept Hlth Sci, Florence, Italy..
    Li, Yichong
    Shenzen Inst Cardiovasc Dis, Dept Clin & Epidemiol Res, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Lim, Lee-Ling
    Univ Malaya, Dept Med, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.;Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med & Therapeut, Shatin, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Linn, Shai
    Univ Haifa, Sch Publ Hlth, Haifa, Israel..
    Liu, Shiwei
    Ctr Chron Dis Control, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Lobato-Cordero, Andrea
    Natl Inst Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energies, Quito, Ecuador..
    Lotufo, Paulo A.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Dept Internal Med, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    King Macarayan, Erlyn Rachelle
    Harvard Univ, Ariadne Labs, Boston, MA USA.;Univ Philippines Manila, Dev & Commun Studies, Manila, Philippines..
    Machado, Isis Eloah
    Univ Fed Minas Gerais, Sch Nursing, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil..
    Madotto, Fabiana
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Dept Med & Surg, Monza, Italy..
    Abd El Razek, Hassan Magdy
    Damietta Univ, Dumyat, Egypt..
    Abd El Razek, Muhammed Magdy
    Aswan Fac Med, Opthamol Dept, Aswan, Egypt..
    Majdan, Marek
    Trnava Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Trnava, Slovakia..
    Majdzadeh, Reza
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, KURC, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Community Based Participatory Res Ctr CBP, Tehran, Iran..
    Majeed, Azeem
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Primary Care & Publ Hlth, London, England..
    Malekzadeh, Reza
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Shiraz Univ Med Sci, Noncommun Dis Res Ctr, Shiraz, Iran..
    Malta, Deborah Carvalho
    Univ Fed Minas Gerais, Dept Maternal & Child Nursing & Publ Hlth, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil..
    Mapoma, Chabila Christopher
    Univ Zambia, Dept Populat Studies, Lusaka, Zambia..
    Martinez-Raga, Jose
    Doctor Peset Univ Hosp, Psychiat Dept, Valencia, Spain.;Univ Valencia, Dept Med, Valencia, Spain..
    Maulik, Pallab K.
    George Inst Global Hlth, Res, New Delhi, India.;Univ New South Wales, Sch Med, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Mazidi, Mohsen
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mckee, Martin
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Hlth Serv Res & Policy, London, England..
    Mehta, Varshil
    Sevenhills Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Meier, Toni
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Agr & Nutr Sci, Halle, Germany.;Competence Cluster Nutr & Cardiovasc Hlth NUTRICA, Innovat Off Nutricard, Halle, Germany..
    Mekonen, Tesfa
    Bahir Dar Univ, Psychiat, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia..
    Meles, Kidanu Gebremariam
    Mekelle Univ, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Melese, Addisu
    Debre Tabor Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Debre Tabor, Ethiopia..
    Memiah, Peter T. N.
    Univ West Florida, Dept Publ Hlth, Pensacola, FL USA..
    Mendoza, Walter
    United Nations Populat Fund UNFPA, Peru Country Off UNFPA, Lima, Peru..
    Mengistu, Desalegn Tadese
    Mekelle Univ, Sch Med, Biomed Sci Div, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Mensah, George A.
    Univ Cape Town, Groote Schuur Hosp, Cape Town, South Africa.;NHLBI, Ctr Translat Res & Implementat Sci, Bldg 10, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Meretoja, Tuomo J.
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Comprehens Canc Ctr, Breast Surg Unit, Helsinki, Finland..
    Mezgebe, Haftay Berhane
    Ethiopian Acad Med Sci, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Miazgowski, Tomasz
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Hypertens & Internal Med, Szczecin, Poland..
    Miller, Ted R.
    Pacific Inst Res & Evaluat, Calverton, MD USA.;Curtin Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Mini, G. K.
    Sree Chitra Tirunal Inst Med Sci & Technol, Trivandrum, Kerala, India.;Amrita Inst Med Sci, Dept Publ Hlth, Kochi, Kerala, India..
    Mirica, Andreea
    Bucharest Univ Econ Studies, Dept Stat & Econometr, Bucharest, Romania.;Natl Inst Stat Romania, Presidents Off, Bucharest, Romania..
    Mirrakhimov, Erkin M.
    Kyrgyz State Med Acad, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan.;Natl Ctr Cardiol & Internal Dis, Dept Atherosclerosis & Coronary Heart Dis, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan..
    Moazen, Babak
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Publ Hlth, Heidelberg, Germany.;Frankfurt Univ Appl Sci, Inst Addict Res ISFF, Dept Hlth & Social Work, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Mohammad, Karzan Abdulmuhsin
    Salahaddin Univ, Dept Biol, Erbil, Iraq..
    Mohammadifard, Noushin
    Isfahan Univ Med Sci, Isfahan Cardiovasc Res Inst, Nutr & Cohort Studies Dept, Esfahan, Iran..
    Mohammed, Shafiu
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Publ Hlth, Heidelberg, Germany.;Ahmadu Bello Univ, Hlth Syst & Policy Res Unit, Zaria, Nigeria..
    Monasta, Lorenzo
    IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Clin Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Res Unit, Inst Maternal & Child Hlth, Trieste, Italy..
    Moraga, Paula
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster, England..
    Morawska, Lidia
    Queensland Univ Technol, Sci & Engn Fac, Int Lab Air Qual & Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Jalu, Moti Tolera
    Haramaya Univ, Harar, Ethiopia.;St Pauls Hosp, Millennium Med Coll, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Mousavi, Seyyed Meysam
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Hlth Management & Econ, Sch Publ Hlth, Tehran, Iran..
    Mukhopadhyay, Satinath
    Inst Postgrad Med Educ & Res, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, Kolkata, India..
    Musa, Kamarul Imran
    Univ Sains Malaysia, Sch Med Sci, Kubang Kerian, Malaysia..
    Naheed, Aliya
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Initiat Non Commun Dis, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Naik, Gurudatta
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Najafi, Farid
    Kermanshah Univ Med Sci, Epidemiol Dept, Kermanshah, Iran..
    Nangia, Vinay
    Suraj Eye Inst, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India..
    Nansseu, Jobert Richie
    Minist Publ Hlth, Dept Dis Epidem & Pandem Control, Lebanon, NH USA.;Univ Yaounde, Fac Med & Biomed Sci, Dept Publ Heath, Yaounde, Cameroon..
    Nayak, Mudavath Siva Durga Prasad
    Rajiv Gandhi Univ Hlth Sci, Dept Community Med, Bangalore, Karnataka, India..
    Nejjari, Chakib
    Univ Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Fes, Morocco.;Mohammed Vi Univ Hlth Sci, Int Sch Publ Hlth, Casablanca, Morocco..
    Neupane, Subas
    Univ Tampere, Sch Hlth Sci, Tampere, Finland..
    Neupane, Sudan Prasad
    Univ Oslo, Norwegian Ctr Addict Res SERAF, Oslo, Norway.;Innlandet Hosp Trust, Norwegian Natl Advisory Unit Concurrent Subst Abu, Brumunddal, Norway..
    Ngunjiri, Josephine W.
    Univ Embu, Dept Biol Sci, Embu, Kenya..
    Nguyen, Cuong Tat
    Nguyen, Long Hoang
    Nguyen, Trang Huyen
    Ningrum, Dina Nur Anggraini
    Semarang State Univ, Publ Hlth Dept, Kota Semarang, Indonesia.;Taipei Med Univ, Grad Inst Biomed Informat, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Nirayo, Yirga Legesse
    Mekelle Univ, Clin Pharm Unit, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Noubiap, Jean Jacques
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Med, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Ofori-Asenso, Richard
    Monash Univ, Ctr Cardiovasc Res & Educ Therapeut, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Monash Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Hlth Policy Consult, Res Unit, Accra, Ghana..
    Ogbo, Felix Akpojene
    Western Sydney Univ, Penrith, NSW, Australia..
    Oh, In-Hwan
    Kyung Hee Univ, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Seoul, South Korea..
    Oladimeji, Olanrewaju
    HSRC, HIV AIDS STIs & TB HAST Programme, Durban, South Africa.;Univ Namibia, Fac Hlth Sci, Sch Publ Hlth, Osakhati, Namibia..
    Olagunju, Andrew T.
    Univ Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.;Univ Lagos, Dept Psychiat, Lagos, Nigeria..
    Olivares, Pedro R.
    Autonomous Univ Chile, Providencia, Chile..
    Olusanya, Bolajoko Olubukunola
    Olusanya, Jacob Olusegun
    Ctr Hlth Start Initiat, Ikoyi, Nigeria..
    Oommen, Anu Mary
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp CMC, Dept Community Hlth, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India..
    Oren, Eyal
    Univ Washington, Seattle, WA 98121 USA.;San Diego State Univ, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, San Diego, CA 92182 USA..
    Orpana, Heather M.
    Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, Appl Res Div, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Ottawa, Sch Psychol, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Ortega-Altamirano, Doris D., V
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Ctr Hlth Syst Res, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Ortiz, Justin R.
    Univ Washington, Dept Global Hlth, Seattle, WA 98121 USA.;Univ Maryland, Ctr Vaccine Dev, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Ota, Erika
    St Lukes Int Univ, Global Hlth Nursing, Chuo Ku, Tokyo, Japan..
    Owolabi, Mayowa Ojo
    Univ Ibadan, Coll Med, Ibadan, Nigeria..
    Oyekale, Abayomi Samuel
    North West Univ, Agr Econ Grp, Mafikeng, South Africa..
    Mahesh, P. A.
    Jagadguru Sri Shivarathreeswara Univ, Dept TB & Resp Med, Mysore, Karnataka, India..
    Pana, Adrian
    Bucharest Univ Econ Studies, Dept Stat & Econometr, Bucharest, Romania.;Ctr Hlth Outcomes & Evaluat, Bucharest, Romania..
    Park, Eun-Kee
    Kosin Univ, Dept Med Humanities & Social Med, Busan, South Korea..
    Parry, Charles D. H.
    Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Psychiat, Cape Town, South Africa.;Med Res Council South Africa, Alcohol Tobacco & Other Drug Use Res Unit, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Parsian, Hadi
    Babol Univ Med Sci, Dept Clin Biochem, Babol Sar, Iran..
    Patle, Ajay
    Int Inst Populat Sci, Bombay, Maharashtra, India.;Int Inst Hlth Management Res, New Delhi, India..
    Patton, George C.
    Univ Melbourne, Dept Paediat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Murdoch Childrens Res Inst, Populat Hlth Grp, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Paudel, Deepak
    Save Children, Hlth Nutr & HIV AIDS Program, Kathmandu, Nepal.;Ludwigs Maximillians Univ, Ctr Int Hlth, Munich, Germany..
    Petzold, Max
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Witwatersrand, Sch Publ Hlth, Johannesburg, South Africa..
    Phillips, Michael R.
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Shanghai Mental Hlth Ctr, Shanghai, Peoples R China..
    Pillay, Julian David
    Durban Univ Technol, Basic Med Sci Dept, Durban, South Africa..
    Postma, Maarten J.
    Univ Groningen, Dept Econ & Business, Groningen, Netherlands.;Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Pourmalek, Farshad
    Univ British Columbia, Sch Populat & Publ Hlth, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj
    PHFI, Gurugram, India.;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Noncommun Dis Epidemiol, London, England..
    Qorbani, Mostafa
    Alborz Univ Med Sci, Noncommun Dis Res Ctr, Karaj, Iran..
    Radfar, Amir
    AT Still Univ, Mesa, AZ USA.;Medichem, St Joan Despi, Spain..
    Rafay, Anwar
    Contech Sch Publ Hlth, Lahore, Pakistan..
    Rafiei, Alireza
    Mazandaran Univ Med Sci, Mol & Cell Biol Res Ctr, Sari, Iran.;Mazandaran Univ Med Sci, Dept Immunol, Sari, Iran..
    Rahim, Fakher
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Tehran, Iran.;Ahvaz Jundishapur Univ Med Sci, Thalassemia & Hemoglobinopathy Res Ctr, Hlth Res Inst, Ahwaz, Iran..
    Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, INCAS, Tehran, Iran..
    Rahman, Mahfuzar
    Deakin Univ, Natl Ctr Farmer Hlth, Sch Med, Waurn Ponds, Vic, Australia.;BRAC, Res & Evaluat Div, Dhaka, Bangladesh.;La Trobe Univ, Austin Clin Sch Nursing, Heidelberg, Vic, Australia..
    Rahman, Muhammad Aziz
    Deakin Univ, Natl Ctr Farmer Hlth, Sch Med, Waurn Ponds, Vic, Australia.;BRAC, Res & Evaluat Div, Dhaka, Bangladesh.;La Trobe Univ, Austin Clin Sch Nursing, Heidelberg, Vic, Australia..
    Rai, Rajesh Kumar
    Soc Hlth & Demog Surveillance, Suri, India.;Univ Gottingen, Dept Econ, Gottingen, Germany..
    Rajsic, Sasa
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria..
    Raju, Sree Bhushan
    Nizams Inst Med Sci, Dept Nephrol, Hyderabad, India..
    Ram, Usha
    Int Inst Populat Sci, Dept Publ Hlth & Mortal Studies, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Rana, Saleem M.
    Contech Sch Publ Hlth, Lahore, Pakistan.;Univ Hlth Sci, Publ Hlth Dept, Lahore, Pakistan..
    Ranabhat, Chhabi Lal
    Yonsei Univ, Inst Poverty Alleviat & Int Dev, Kathmandu, Nepal..
    Rawaf, David Laith
    Imperial Coll London, WHO Collaborating Ctr Publ Hlth Educ & Training, London, England.;Univ Coll London Hosp, London, England..
    Rawaf, Salman
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Primary Care & Publ Hlth, London, England.;Publ Hlth England, London, England..
    Reiner, Robert C.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Reis, Cesar
    Loma Linda Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Prevent Med & Occupat Med, Loma Linda, CA USA..
    Renzaho, Andre M. N.
    Western Sydney Univ, Sch Social Sci, Penrith, NSW, Australia.;Western Sydney Univ, Psychol Dept, Penrith, NSW, Australia..
    Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh
    Mazandaran Univ Med Sci, Dept Pediat, Sari, Iran..
    Roever, Leonardo
    Univ Uberlandia, Dept Clin Res, Uberlandia, MG, Brazil..
    Ronfani, Luca
    IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Clin Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Res Unit, Inst Maternal & Child Hlth, Trieste, Italy..
    Room, Robin
    La Trobe Univ, Ctr Alcohol Policy Res, Heidelberg, Vic, Australia.;Stockholm Univ, Ctr Social Res Alcohol & Drugs, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Roshandel, Gholamreza
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Golestan Univ Med Sci, Golestan Res Ctr Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Gorgan, Iran..
    Rostami, Ali
    Babol Univ Med Sci, Hlth Res Inst, Babol Sar, Iran.;Babol Univ Med Sci, Infect Dis & Trop Med Res Ctr, Babol Sar, Iran..
    Roth, Gregory A.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Roy, Ambuj
    AIIMS, Dept Cardiol, New Delhi, India..
    Sabde, Yogesh Damodar
    Indian Council Med Res, Natl Inst Res Environm Hlth, Bhopal, India..
    Saddik, Basema
    Univ Sharjah, Coll Med, Sharjah, U Arab Emirates..
    Safiri, Saeid
    Maragheh Univ Med Sci, Managerial Epidemiol Res Ctr, Sch Nursing & Midwifery, Dept Publ Hlth, Maragheh, Iran..
    Sahebkar, Amirhossein
    Mashhad Univ Med Ci, Dept Med Biotechnol, Mashhad, Iran..
    Saleem, Zikria
    Panjab Univ, Coll Pharm, Chandigarh, India..
    Salomon, Joshua A.
    Stanford Univ, Ctr Hlth Policy, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, Ctr Primary Care & Outcomes Res, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Salvi, Sundeep Santosh
    Chest Res Fdn, Clin Res Div, Pune, Maharashtra, India..
    Sanabria, Juan
    Marshall Univ, Dept Surg, Huntington, WV USA.;Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Nutr & Prevent Med, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Dolores Sanchez-Nino, Maria
    Nephrol Grp, LIS Fdn Jimenez Diaz, Madrid, Spain..
    Santomauro, Damian Francesco
    Univ Queensland, Sch Publ Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Queensland Ctr Mental Hlth Res, Policy & Epidemiol Grp, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Santos, Itamar S.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Dept Internal Med, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Milicevic, Milena M. M. Santric
    Univ Belgrade, Fac Med, Ctr Sch Publ Hlth & Hlth Management, Inst Social Med, Belgrade, Serbia..
    Sarker, Abdur Razzaque
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Hlth Econ & Financing Res Grp, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Sarmiento-Suarez, Rodrigo
    Univ Appl & Environm Sci, Fac Med, Dept Hlth & Soc, Bogota, Colombia..
    Sarrafzadegan, Nizal
    Univ British Columbia, Sch Populat & Publ Hlth, Vancouver, BC, Canada.;Isfahan Univ Med Sci, Cardiovasc Res Inst, Esfahan, Iran..
    Sartorius, Benn
    Univ Kwazulu Natal, Dept Publ Hlth Med, Howard Coll Campus, Durban, South Africa..
    Satpathy, Maheswar
    Utkal Univ, UGC Ctr Adv Study Psychol, Bhubaneswar, India.;Udyam Global Assoc Sustainable Dev, Bhubaneswar, India..
    Sawhney, Monika
    Univ North Carolina Charlotte, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlotte, NC USA..
    Saxena, Sonia
    Imperial Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, London, England..
    Saylan, Mete
    Bayer, Market Access, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Schaub, Michael P.
    Univ Zurich, Swiss Res Inst Publ Hlth & Addict, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Schmidt, Maria Ines
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Postgrad Program Epidemiol, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Schneider, Ione J. C.
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Hlth Sci Dept, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Schoettker, Ben
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Schutte, Aletta Elisabeth
    South African Med Res Council, Unit Hypertens & Cardiovasc Dis, Cape Town, South Africa.;North West Univ, HART, Mafikeng, South Africa..
    Schwendicke, Falk
    Char Univ Med Ctr Berlin, Dept Operat & Prevent Dent, Berlin, Germany..
    Sepanlou, Sadaf G.
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Shiraz Univ Med Sci, Noncommun Dis Res Ctr, Shiraz, Iran..
    Shaikh, Masood A. Ali
    Sharif, Mehdi
    Islamic Azad Univ, Dept Lab Sci, Sari, Iran.;Islamic Azad Univ, Dept Basic Sci, Sari, Iran..
    She, Jun
    Fudan Univ, Dept Pulm Med, Shanghai, Peoples R China..
    Sheikh, Aziz
    Harvard Univ, BWH Div Gen Internal Med & Primary Care, Boston, MA USA.;Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Shen, Jiabin
    Nationwide Children sHosp, Res Inst, Columbus, OH USA..
    Shiferaw, Mekonnen Sisay
    Haramaya Univ, Sch Pharm, Harar, Ethiopia..
    Shigematsu, Mika
    Natl Inst Infect Dis, Tokyo, Japan..
    Shiri, Rahman
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland..
    Shishani, Kawkab
    Washington State Univ, Pullman, WA 99164 USA..
    Shiue, Ivy
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Epidemiol Biostat & Informat, Halle, Germany..
    Shukla, Sharvari Rahul
    Symbiosis Int Univ, Symbiosis Inst Hlth Sci, Pune, Maharashtra, India..
    Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora
    Reykjavik Univ, Dept Psychol, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Columbia Univ, Dept Hlth & Behav Studies, New York, NY USA..
    Santos Silva, Diego Augusto
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Hlth Sci Dept, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Da Silva, Natacha Torres
    Portuguese Inst Sport & Youth, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Alves Silveira, Dayane Gabriele
    Fed Minist Hlth, Dept Hlth Ind Complex & Innovat Hlth, Brasilia, DF, Brazil.;Brasilia Univ, Brasilia, DF, Brazil..
    Sinha, Dhirendra Narain Narain
    Sch Prevent Oncol, Patna, Bihar, India.;Healis Sekhsaria Inst Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Sitas, Freddy
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Publ Hlth & Community Med, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sch Publ Hlth, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Soares Filho, Adauto Martins
    Fed Minist Hlth, Dept Dis & Noncommun Dis & Hlth Promot, Brasilia, DF, Brazil..
    Soofi, Moslem
    Kermanshah Univ Med Sci, Res Ctr Environm Determinants Hlth, Kermanshah, Iran..
    Sorensen, Reed J. D.
    Univ Washington, Dept Global Hlth, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Soriano, Joan B.
    Univ Hosp Princess IISP, Pneumol Serv, Res Inst, Madrid, Spain.;Autonomous Univ Madrid, Pneumol Serv, Madrid, Spain..
    Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T.
    Int Med Univ, Div Community Med, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia..
    Steckling, Nadine
    Univ Hosp Munich, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & Environm, Munich, Germany.;Univ Hlth Sci Med Informat & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth, Hlth Serv Res & Hlth Technol Assessment, Hall In Tirol, Austria..
    Stein, Dan J.
    South African Med Res Council, Cape Town, South Africa.;Univ Cape Town, Dept Psychiat & Mental Hlth, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Sufiyan, Mu'awiyyah Babale
    Ahmadu Bello Univ, Dept Community Med, Zaria, Nigeria..
    Sur, Patrick J.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Sykes, Bryan L.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Criminol Law & Soc, Irvine, CA USA..
    Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael
    Univ Valencia, Dept Med, Valencia, Spain.;Carlos III Hlth Inst, CIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain..
    Tabuchi, Takahiro
    Osaka Int Canc Inst, Canc Control Ctr, Osaka, Japan..
    Tavakkoli, Mohammad
    New York Med Coll, Dept Psychiat & Behav Sci, Valhalla, NY 10595 USA..
    Tehrani-Banihashemi, Arash
    Iran Univ Med Sci, Community Med Dept, Tehran, Iran.;Iran Univ Med Sci, Prevent Med & Publ Hlth Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Tekle, Merhawi Gebremedhin
    Haramaya Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Harar, Ethiopia..
    Thapa, Subash
    Univ Southern Denmark, Dept Publ Hlth, Odense, Denmark..
    Thomas, Nihal
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp CMC, Dept Endocrinol, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India..
    Topor-Madry, Roman
    Jagiellonian Univ Med Coll, Inst Publ Hlth, Krakow, Poland..
    Topouzis, Fotis
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Med Sch, Dept Ophthalmol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Tran, Bach Xuan
    Hanoi Univ, Dept Hlth Econ, Hanoi, Vietnam..
    Troeger, Christopher E.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Truelsen, Thomas Clement
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Neurol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Tsilimparis, Nikolaos
    Univ Heart Ctr Hamburg, Dept Vasc Med, Hamburg, Germany..
    Tyrovolas, Stefanos
    Parc Sanit St Joan de Deu CIBERSAM, Res & Dev Unit, St Boi De Llobregat, Spain.;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain..
    Ukwaja, Kingsley Nnanna
    Fed Teaching Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Abakaliki, Nigeria..
    Ullah, Irfan
    Gomal Univ, Gomal Ctr Biochem & Biotechnol, Dera Ismail Khan, Pakistan.;Mufti Mehmood Mem Teaching Hosp, Programmat Management Drug Resistant TB Unit, TB Culture Lab, Dera Ismail Khan, Pakistan..
    Uthman, Olalekan A.
    Univ Warwick, Div Hlth Sci, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Valdez, Pascual R.
    Argentine Soc Med, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.;Hosp Velez Sarsfield, Intens Care Unit, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina..
    Van Boven, Job F. M.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Vasankari, Tommi Juhani
    UKK Inst, Tampere, Finland..
    Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy
    Natl Univ Singapore, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Singapore, Singapore.;Raffles Hosp, Raffles Neurosci Ctr, Singapore, Singapore..
    Violante, Francesco S.
    Univ Bologna, Dept Med & Surg Sci, Bologna, Italy..
    Vladimirov, Sergey Konstantinovitch
    Minist Hlth FRIHOI, Fed Res Inst Hlth Org & Informat, Moscow, Russia.;Sechenov First Moscow State Med Univ, Dept Informat & Internet Technol, Moscow, Russia..
    Vlassov, Vasily
    Natl Res Univ Higher Sch Econ, Dept Hlth Care Adm & Econ, Moscow, Russia..
    Vollset, Stein Emil
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA.;Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Ctr Dis Burden, Bergen, Norway..
    Vos, Theo
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Wagnew, Fasil Wagnew Shiferaw
    Debre Markos Univ, Dept Nursing, Debremarkos, Ethiopia..
    Waheed, Yasir
    Fdn Univ, Fdn Univ Med Coll, Rawalpindi, Pakistan..
    Wang, Yuan-Pang
    Univ Sao Paulo, Dept Psychiat, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Canc Registry Norway, Dept Res, Oslo, Norway..
    Weldegebreal, Fitsum
    Haramaya Univ, Dept Med Lab Sci, Harar, Ethiopia..
    Weldegwergs, Kidu Gidey
    Mekelle Univ, Clin Pharm Unit, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Werdecker, Andrea
    Fed Inst Populat Res, Demog Change & Ageing Res Area, Wiesbaden, Germany..
    Westerman, Ronny
    Fed Inst Populat Res, Competence Ctr Mortal Follow Up, German Natl Cohort, Wiesbaden, Germany..
    Whiteford, Harvey A.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA.;Univ Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Widecka, Justyna
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Zdroje Hosp, Szczecin, Poland..
    Wijeratne, Tissa
    Univ Melbourne, Australian Inst Muscular Skeletal Sci, Dept Med & Neurol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;La Trobe Univ, Dept Psychol & Counselling, Heidelberg, Vic, Australia..
    Wyper, Grant M. A.
    NHS Scotland, Informat Serv Div, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Strathclyde, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Xu, Gelin
    Nanjing Univ, Sch Med, Nanjing, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Yamada, Tomohide
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Diabet & Metab Dis, Tokyo, Japan..
    Yano, Yuichiro
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Dept Prevent Med, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Ye, Pengpeng
    Chinese Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Injury Prevent & Mental Hlth Provement, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Yimer, Ebrahim M.
    Mekelle Univ, Sch Pharm, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Yip, Paul
    Univ Hong Kong, Ctr Suicide Res & Prevent, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Yirsaw, Biruck Desalegn
    Univ South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    Yisma, Engida
    Addis Ababa Univ, Sch Alaide Hlth Sci, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Yonemoto, Naohiro
    Kyoto Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Kyoto, Japan..
    Yoon, Seok-Jun
    Korea Univ, Dept Prevent Med, Seoul, South Korea..
    Yotebieng, Marcel
    Ohio State Univ, Coll Publ Hlth, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.;Univ Kinshasa, Sch Publ Hlth, Kinshasa, DEM REP CONGO..
    Younis, Mustafa Z.
    Jackson State Univ, Dept Hlth Pol & Management, Jackson, MS USA.;Tsinghua Univ, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Zachariah, Geevar
    Mother Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Trichur, India..
    Zaidi, Zoubida
    ACS Med Coll & Hosp, New Delhi, India..
    Zamani, Mohammad
    Babol Univ Med Sci, Student Res Comm, Babol Sar, Iran..
    Zhang, Xueying
    Univ Texas Houston, Houston, TX USA..
    Zodpey, Sanjay
    PHFI, Indian Inst Publ Hlth, Gurugram, India..
    Mokdad, Ali H.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Naghavi, Mohsen
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Murray, Christopher J. L.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Gakidou, Emmanuela
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98121 USA..
    Alcohol use and burden for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 20162018Inngår i: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 392, nr 10152, s. 1015-1035Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol use is a leading risk factor for death and disability, but its overall association with health remains complex given the possible protective effects of moderate alcohol consumption on some conditions. With our comprehensive approach to health accounting within the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016, we generated improved estimates of alcohol use and alcohol-attributable deaths and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 195 locations from 1990 to 2016, for both sexes and for 5-year age groups between the ages of 15 years and 95 years and older.

    Methods: Using 694 data sources of individual and population-level alcohol consumption, along with 592 prospective and retrospective studies on the risk of alcohol use, we produced estimates of the prevalence of current drinking, abstention, the distribution of alcohol consumption among current drinkers in standard drinks daily (defined as 10 g of pure ethyl alcohol), and alcohol-attributable deaths and DALYs. We made several methodological improvements compared with previous estimates: first, we adjusted alcohol sales estimates to take into account tourist and unrecorded consumption; second, we did a new meta-analysis of relative risks for 23 health outcomes associated with alcohol use; and third, we developed a new method to quantify the level of alcohol consumption that minimises the overall risk to individual health.

    Findings: Globally, alcohol use was the seventh leading risk factor for both deaths and DALYs in 2016, accounting for 2.2% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 1.5-3.0) of age-standardised female deaths and 6.8% (5.8-8.0) of age-standardised male deaths. Among the population aged 15-49 years, alcohol use was the leading risk factor globally in 2016, with 3.8% (95% UI 3.2-4-3) of female deaths and 12.2% (10.8-13-6) of male deaths attributable to alcohol use. For the population aged 15-49 years, female attributable DALYs were 2.3% (95% UI 2.0-2.6) and male attributable DALYs were 8.9% (7.8-9.9). The three leading causes of attributable deaths in this age group were tuberculosis (1.4% [95% UI 1. 0-1. 7] of total deaths), road injuries (1.2% [0.7-1.9]), and self-harm (1.1% [0.6-1.5]). For populations aged 50 years and older, cancers accounted for a large proportion of total alcohol-attributable deaths in 2016, constituting 27.1% (95% UI 21.2-33.3) of total alcohol-attributable female deaths and 18.9% (15.3-22.6) of male deaths. The level of alcohol consumption that minimised harm across health outcomes was zero (95% UI 0.0-0.8) standard drinks per week.

    Interpretation: Alcohol use is a leading risk factor for global disease burden and causes substantial health loss. We found that the risk of all-cause mortality, and of cancers specifically, rises with increasing levels of consumption, and the level of consumption that minimises health loss is zero. These results suggest that alcohol control policies might need to be revised worldwide, refocusing on efforts to lower overall population-level consumption.

  • 21.
    Gunnarson, Martin
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för kultur och lärande, Centrum för praktisk kunskap. Avdelningen för etnologi, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, Lunds universitet.
    Lundin, Susanne
    Avdelningen för etnologi, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, Lunds universitet.
    The Complexities of Victimhood: Insights from the Organ Trade2015Inngår i: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 5, nr 1, s. 32-51Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explore the complexity of the concept of the victim within the context of organ trading. By examining the intricate phenomenon of organ trade, we show how prevailing notions of victimhood form the basis of concrete social practices. The empirical basis for this exploration comprises in-depth interviews conducted during fieldwork in South Africa and Kosovo. We also draw on research undertaken at various expert meetings. What our research in these locations attests to is that one-dimensional and generalised conceptualisations of victimhood are rife, and that these tend to be founded on a pre-theorised opposition between agency and victimhood. For persons who become practically and intimately involved in dealing with cases of organ trade – such as investigators and prosecutors – such conceptualisations do not hold. What is required is an understanding of victimhood that takes into account its complexity. In this paper, we explore attempts to grasp and reduce this complexity, and argue against generalised concepts of victimhood and for concepts that are sensitive to contextual and relational variations.

  • 22.
    Isaksson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Schwab-Stone, Mary
    Yale University Medical School, New Haven, USA.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan.
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    Uppsala University / Yale University Medical School, New Haven, USA / Säter Forensic Psychiatric Clinic.
    Risk and Protective Factors for Problematic Drinking in Early Adolescence: A Systematic Approach2019Inngår i: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol use during early adolescence is associated with other risk behaviors as well as future health problems. Within the design of a larger prospective research program, a cohort of U.S. inner-city sixth-grade students (N = 1573, mean age = 12.10) were assessed and reassessed in the seventh-grade. Self-reported information was obtained on problems related to alcohol, fixed markers of risk (e.g. sex, age, SES), individual and interpersonal factors (e.g. internalizing and externalizing symptoms) and contextual factors (e.g. substance availability). Alcohol-related problems in seventh grade were foremost predicted by individual and interpersonal factors in the sixth grade including depressive symptoms, conduct problems, a decreased perception of wrongdoing, and affiliation with delinquent peers. In addition, alcohol use in the sixth grade and being of Hispanic or White ethnicity was also associated with subsequent alcohol-related problems. Interventions should be directed towards assessing and treating individual risk factors such as depression and externalizing symptoms.

  • 23. Kaleta, Dorota
    et al.
    Usidame, Bukola
    Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk, Elżbieta
    Makowiec-Dąbrowska, Teresa
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Prevalence and factors associated with hardcore smoking in Poland: Findings from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (2009–2010)2014Inngår i: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, s. 583-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 24.
    Kamio, Y.
    et al.
    National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry,Tokyo, Japan.
    Haraguchi, H.
    National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry,Tokyo, Japan.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan / University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan .
    Ogino, K.
    National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan / Tokyo Metropolitan Children’s Medical Center, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo, Japan.
    Ishitobi, M.
    National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan.
    Takahashi, H.
    National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan.
    Brief Report : Best Discriminators for Identifying Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder at an 18-Month Health Check-Up in Japan2015Inngår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 45, nr 12, s. 1447-1453Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the best discriminative items for identifying young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), we conducted a secondary analysis using longitudinal cohort data that included the Japanese version of the 23-item modified checklist for autism in toddlers (M-CHAT-JV). M-CHAT-JV data at 18 months of age and diagnostic information evaluated at age 3 or later from 1851 Japanese children was used to isolate six highly discriminative items. Using data from two different community samples (n = 1851, n = 665) these items were shown to have comparable psychometric values with those of the full version. Our results suggest that these items might work as a short form screener for early identification of ASD in primary care settings where there are time constraints on screening. © 2015 The Author(s)

  • 25. Koupil, Ilona
    et al.
    Mann, Vera
    Leon, David A.
    Lundberg, Ulf
    Byberg, Liisa
    Vågerö, Denny
    Morning cortisol does not mediate the association of size at birth with blood pressure in children born from full-term pregnancies2005Inngår i: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 62, s. 661-666Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective It had been suggested that programming of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis may underlie the associations of reduced size at birth with raised blood pressure in later life. We investigated whether morning salivary cortisol mediates the inverse association of birthweight with systolic blood pressure in children.Design Subjects and measurements – a historical cohort study involving 1152 Swedish children aged 5–14 years, who took part in a family study comprised of mother, father, and two full-sibs delivered in 1987–1995 after 38–41 weeks gestation within 36 months of each other. Birthweight and gestational age were available from obstetric records. Blood pressure, weight, height and puberty stage were measured at a clinic. Cortisol was measured by radioimmunoassay in morning salivary samples taken at home, within 30 min of waking.Results Morning cortisol showed a weak negative association with length of gestation in siblings, was not related to birthweight or to systolic or diastolic blood pressure. There was no change in the strength of the negative association between birthweight and systolic blood pressure on adjustment for cortisol (−1·4 mmHg/kg, 95% CI −2·7, −0·2; adjusted for age, sex, puberty stage, weight and height, and cortisol).Conclusions Morning cortisol was not associated with size at birth, and did not mediate the birthweight–blood pressure association in children born from full-term pregnancies. It is possible that basal cortisol levels are of more importance in explaining associations of size at birth with later blood pressure in older subjects, or in populations with more varied length of gestation. Alternatively, our results may be caused by misclassification of the hypothalamo–pituitary-adrenal activity.

  • 26. Koupil, Ilona
    et al.
    Modin, Bitte
    Byberg, Liisa
    Fritzell, Jonas
    Vågerö, Denny
    Early and adult life social influences on circulatory disease mortality [abstract]2004Inngår i: Central European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1210-7778, E-ISSN 1803-1048, Vol. 14, nr Suppl. 1, s. 45-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 27. Koupil, Ilona
    et al.
    Plavinskaja, Svetlana
    Parfenova, Nina
    Shestov, Dmitri B.
    Danziger, Phoebe Day
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Cancer mortality in women and men who survived the siege of Leningrad (1941-1944)2009Inngår i: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 124, nr 6, s. 1416-1421Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The population of Leningrad suffered from severe starvation, coldand psychological stress during the siege in World War II in1941–1944. We investigated the long-term effects of the siege oncancer mortality in 3,901 men and 1,429 women, born between1910 and 1940. All study subjects were residents of St. Petersburg,formerly Leningrad, between 1975 and 1982. One third of themhad experienced the siege as children, adolescents or young adults(age range, 1–31 years at the peak of starvation in 1941–1942).Associations of siege exposure with risk of death from cancer werestudied using a multivariable Cox regression, stratified by genderand period of birth, adjusted for age, smoking, alcohol and socialcharacteristics, from 1975 to 1977 (men) and 1980 to 1982, respectively(women), until the end of 2005. Women who were 10–18 years old at the peak of starvation were taller as adults (ageadjusteddifference, 1.7 cm; 95% CI, 0.5–3.0) and had a higherrisk of dying from breast cancer compared with unexposedwomen born during the same period (age-adjusted HR, 9.9; 95%CI, 1.1–86.5). Mortality from prostate cancer was nonsignificantlyhigher in exposed men. The experience of severe starvation andstress during childhood and adolescence may have long-termeffects on cancer in surviving men and women.

  • 28. Koupil, Ilona
    et al.
    Rahu, Kaja
    Rahu, Mati
    Karro, Helle
    Vågerö, Denny
    Major improvements, but persisting inequalities in infant survival in Estonia 1992-20022006Inngår i: Central European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1210-7778, E-ISSN 1803-1048, Vol. 17, nr 1, s. 8-16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inequality in adult health increased in Estonia during the transition period after 1991. We examined inequality in infant survival from 1992 to 2002. Methods: All 132 854 singleton live births reported to the Estonian Medical Birth Registry in 1992–2001 were linked to the Estonian Mortality Database. The effect of mother's education, nationality, marital status, and place of residence on neonatal (0–27 days) and post-neonatal (28–364 days) death was evaluated in logistic regression with adjustments for maternal age, parity, smoking, sex of the infant, birth weight, and gestational age. Results: Infant mortality decreased substantially. Risk of death in neonatal period was lowest in Tartu, with a decline from 4.9/1000 in infants born in 1992–1996 to 2.1/1000 in those born in 1997–2001. Decline in neonatal mortality in other regions was from 9.2/1000 to 5.1/1000. Persisting regional differences were unexplained by mothers' nationality, education, or marital status, or the infants' length of gestation. Decline in post-neonatal mortality was less marked and although risk differences between different socio-economic groups decreased, mothers' marital status and education in particular remained strongly associated with risk of post-neonatal death [odds ratio for infants born to mothers with basic or lower education compared to university education 3.70 (95% confidence interval 2.34–5.85) in 1992–1996 and 3.56 (2.06–6.14) in 1997–2001]. Conclusions: Infant survival improved appreciably in Estonia after 1991 and risk differences between social groups decreased. The improvements were not accompanied by reduction in the strength of the effects of social characteristics on infant death measured as risk ratios.

  • 29. Koupil, Ilona
    et al.
    Shestov, Dmitri B.
    Sparén, Pär
    Plavinskaja, Svetlana
    Parfenova, Nina
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Blood pressure, hypertension and mortality from circulatory disease in men and women who survived the siege of Leningrad2007Inngår i: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 22, nr 4, s. 223-234Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The population of Leningrad suffered from severe starvation, cold and psychological stress during the siege in 1941–1944. We investigated long-term effects of the siege on cardiovascular risk factors and mortality in surviving men and women. 3905 men born 1916–1935 and 1729 women born 1910–1940, resident in St Petersburg (formerly Leningrad) between 1975 and 1982, of whom a third experienced the siege as children, adolescents or young adults,were examined for cardiovascular risk factors in 1975–1977 and 1980–1982 respectively and followed till end 2005. Effects of siege exposure on bloodpressure, lipids, body size, and mortality were studied in multivariate analysis stratified by gender and period of birth, adjusted for age, smoking, alcohol and social characteristics. Women who were 6–8 years old and men who were 9–15 years-old at the peak of starvation had higher systolic blood pressure compared to unexposed subjects born during the same period of birth (fully adjusted difference 8.8, 95% CI:0.1–17.5 mm Hg in women and 2.9, 95% CI: 0.7–5.0 mm Hg in men). Mean height of women who were exposed to siege as children appeared to be greater than that of unexposed women. Higher mortality from ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease was noted in men exposed at age 6–8 and 9–15, respectively. The experience of severe stress and starvation in childhood and puberty may have long-term effects on systolic blood pressure and circulatory disease in surviving men and women with potential gender differences in the effect of siege experienced at pre-pubertal age.

  • 30. Koupil, Ilona
    et al.
    Shestov, Dmitri B.
    Sparén, Pär
    Plavinskaja, Svetlana
    Parfenova, Nina
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Blood pressure in men and women who survived the siege of Leningrad [abstract]2005Inngår i: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 58, nr 5, s. 1103-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 31. Koupil, Ilona
    et al.
    Shestov, Dmitri B.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Increased breast cancer mortality in women who survived the siege of Leningrad (1941-1944) [abstract]2007Inngår i: Early Human Development, ISSN 0378-3782, E-ISSN 1872-6232, Vol. 83, nr Supplement 1, s. S71-S71Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 32.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    et al.
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain / CIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain / ICREA, Barcelona, Spain.
    Veronese, Nicola
    National Research Council, Padova, Italy / National Institute of Gastroenterology, Bari, Italy.
    Stubbs, Brendon
    South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK / King’s College London, London, UK / Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK.
    Vancampfort, Davy
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan.
    Oh, Hans
    University of Southern California, CA, USA.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seul, Korea / Severance Children’s Hospital, Seuo, Korea.
    Jackson, Sarah
    University College London, London, UK.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Lara, Elvira
    CIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain / Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Madrid, Spain.
    Food Insecurity Is Associated with Mild Cognitive Impairment among Middle-Aged and Older Adults in South Africa: Findings from a Nationally Representative Survey.2019Inngår i: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, nr 4, artikkel-id E749Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There are no studies on the association between food insecurity and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Thus, cross-sectional, community-based data on individuals aged ≥50 years from the World Health Organization's Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE) conducted in South Africa (2007⁻2008) were analyzed to assess this association. The definition of MCI was based on the National Institute on Ageing-Alzheimer's Association criteria. Past 12-month food insecurity was assessed with two questions on frequency of eating less and hunger due to lack of food. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted. The sample consisted of 3,672 individuals aged ≥50 years [mean (SD) age 61.4 (18.3); 56% females]. The prevalence of MCI was 8.5%, while 11.0% and 20.8% experienced moderate and severe food insecurity, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounders, moderate and severe food insecurity were associated with 2.82 (95%CI = 1.65⁻4.84) and 2.51 (95%CI = 1.63⁻3.87) times higher odds for MCI compared with no food insecurity, respectively. The OR for those aged ≥65 years with severe food insecurity was particularly high (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 2.20⁻6.81). In conclusion, food insecurity was strongly associated with MCI among South African older adults. Future longitudinal research is required to assess whether addressing food insecurity may reduce risk of MCI and subsequent dementia.

  • 33.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    et al.
    Universitat de Barcelona, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Barcelona, Spain / ICREA, Barcelona, Spain.
    Veronese, Nicola
    National Research Council, Padova, Italy / National Institute of Gastroenterology “S. De Bellis” Research Hospital, Castellana Grotte, Italy.
    Vancampfort, Davy
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Japan.
    Jackson, Sarah E
    University College London, London, UK.
    Oh, Hans
    University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
    Haro, Josep Maria
    Universitat de Barcelona, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Barcelona, Spain.
    Stubbs, Brendon
    South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK / King's College London, London, UK / Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Association of bullying victimization with overweight and obesity among adolescents from 41 low- and middle-income countries2019Inngår i: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, artikkel-id e12571Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Data on the association between overweight/obesity and bullying victimization among adolescents are scarce from low- and middle-income countries.

    OBJECTIVES: We assessed the associations between overweight/obesity and bullying victimization in 41 low- and middle-income countries.

    METHODS: Cross-sectional data from the Global School-based Student Health Survey were analysed. Data on past 30-day bullying victimization (including type) and body mass index based on measured weight and height were collected. The 2007 WHO Child Growth reference was used to define overweight and obesity. Multivariable logistic regression (multinomial and binary) and meta-analyses based on country-wise estimates were conducted. Data on 114 240 adolescents aged 12 to 15 years were analysed (mean age [SD], 13.8 [1.0] y; 48.8% girls).

    RESULTS: Among girls, compared with normal weight, overweight (OR = 1.08; 95% CI, 1.02-1.16; between-country heterogeneity I2  = 0.0%) and obesity (OR = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07-1.34; I2  = 0.0%) were associated with significantly higher odds for any bullying victimization, but no significant association was observed among boys. However, overweight and obesity were both associated with significantly increased odds for bullying by being made fun of because of physical appearance among both sexes-obesity (vs normal weight): girls OR = 3.42 (95% CI, 2.49-4.71); boys OR = 2.38 (95% CI, 1.67-3.37).

    CONCLUSIONS: Effective strategies to reduce bullying of children with overweight/obesity are needed in low- and middle-income countries.

  • 34. Kulhánová, Ivana
    et al.
    Hoffmann, Rasmus
    Judge, Ken
    Looman, Caspar W N
    Eikemo, Terje A
    Bopp, Matthias
    Deboosere, Patrick
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Rychtaříková, Jitka
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    Menvielle, Gwenn
    Mackenbach, Johan P
    Assessing the potential impact of increased participation in higher education on mortality: Evidence from 21 European populations2014Inngår i: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 117, s. 142-149Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Although higher education has been associated with lower mortality rates in many studies, the effect of potential improvements in educational distribution on future mortality levels is unknown. We therefore estimated the impact of projected increases in higher education on mortality in European populations. We used mortality and population data according to educational level from 21 European populations and developed counterfactual scenarios. The first scenario represented the improvement in the future distribution of educational attainment as expected on the basis of an assumption of cohort replacement. We estimated the effect of this counterfactual scenario on mortality with a 10-15-year time horizon among men and women aged 30-79 years using a specially developed tool based on population attributable fractions (PAF). We compared this with a second, upward levelling scenario in which everyone has obtained tertiary education. The reduction of mortality in the cohort replacement scenario ranged from 1.9 to 10.1% for men and from 1.7 to 9.0% for women. The reduction of mortality in the upward levelling scenario ranged from 22.0 to 57.0% for men and from 9.6 to 50.0% for women. The cohort replacement scenario was estimated to achieve only part (4-25% (men) and 10-31% (women)) of the potential mortality decrease seen in the upward levelling scenario. We concluded that the effect of on-going improvements in educational attainment on average mortality in the population differs across Europe, and can be substantial. Further investments in education may have important positive side-effects on population health.

  • 35.
    Kulhánová, Ivana
    et al.
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands .
    Menvielle, Gwenn
    Pierre Louis Institute of Epidemiology and Public Health, Paris, France .
    Bopp, Matthias
    University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland .
    Borrell, Carme
    Agència de Salut Pública de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain .
    Deboosere, Patrick
    Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium .
    Eikemo, Terje A
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands / Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Hoffmann, Rasmus
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands .
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia .
    Martikainen, Pekka
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland .
    Regidor, Enrique
    Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain .
    Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica
    Agència de Salut Pública de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain .
    Rychtaříková, Jitka
    Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic .
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    National Institute of Public Health, National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland .
    Mackenbach, Johan P
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands .
    Socioeconomic differences in the use of ill-defined causes of death in 16 European countries2014Inngår i: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, artikkel-id 1295Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cause-of-death data linked to information on socioeconomic position form one of the most important sources of information about health inequalities in many countries. The proportion of deaths from ill-defined conditions is one of the indicators of the quality of cause-of-death data. We investigated educational differences in the use of ill-defined causes of death in official mortality statistics.

    METHODS: Using age-standardized mortality rates from 16 European countries, we calculated the proportion of all deaths in each educational group that were classified as due to "Symptoms, signs and ill-defined conditions". We tested if this proportion differed across educational groups using Chi-square tests.

    RESULTS: The proportion of ill-defined causes of death was lower than 6.5% among men and 4.5% among women in all European countries, without any clear geographical pattern. This proportion statistically significantly differed by educational groups in several countries with in most cases a higher proportion among less than secondary educated people compared with tertiary educated people.

    CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence for educational differences in the distribution of ill-defined causes of death. However, the differences between educational groups were small suggesting that socioeconomic inequalities in cause-specific mortality in Europe are not likely to be biased.

  • 36. Kulik, MC
    et al.
    Hoffmann, R
    Judge, K
    Looman, C
    Menvielle, G
    Kulhánová, I
    Toch, M
    Östergren, O
    Martikainen, P
    Borrell, C
    Rodríguez-Sanz, M
    Bopp, M
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn.
    Jasilionis, D
    Eikemo, TA
    Mackenbach, JP
    Smoking and the potential for reduction of inequalities in mortality in Europe2013Inngår i: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 28, s. 959-971Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 37.
    Kulik, MC
    et al.
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Menvielle, G
    Epidemiology of Occupational and Social Determinants of Health, Villejuif, France / University of Versailles Saint Quentin, Versailles, France.
    Eikemo, TA
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Bopp, M
    University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Jasilionis, D
    Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    Kulhánová, I
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Martikainen, P
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Östergren, O
    CHESS, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet.
    Mackenbach, JP
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Educational inequalities in three smoking-related causes of death in 18 European populations2014Inngår i: Nicotine & tobacco research, ISSN 1462-2203, E-ISSN 1469-994X, Vol. 16, nr 5, s. 507-518Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Smoking is an important determinant of socioeconomic inequalities in mortality in many countries. As the smoking epidemic progresses, updates on the development of mortality inequalities attributable to smoking are needed. We provide estimates of relative and absolute educational inequalities in mortality from lung cancer, aerodigestive cancers, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma in Europe and assess the contribution of these smoking-related diseases to inequalities in all-cause mortality.

    Methods: We use data from 18 European populations covering the time period 1998–2007. We present age-adjusted mortality rates, relative indices of inequality, and slope indices of inequality. We also calculate the contribution of inequalities in smoking-related mortality to inequalities in overall mortality.

    Results: Among men, relative inequalities in mortality from the 3 smoking-related causes of death combined are largest in the Czech Republic and Hungary and smallest in Spain, Sweden, and Denmark. Among women, these inequalities are largest in Scotland and Norway and smallest in Italy and Spain. They are often larger among men and tend to be larger for COPD/asthma than for lung and aerodigestive cancers. Relative inequalities in mortality from these conditions are often larger in younger age groups, particularly among women, suggesting a possible further widening of inequalities in mortality in the coming decades. The combined contribution of these diseases to inequality in all-cause mortality varies between 13% and 32% among men and between −5% and 30% among women.

    Conclusion: Our results underline the continuing need for tobacco control policies, which take into account socioeconomic position.              

  • 38. Kunst, Anton E
    et al.
    Groenhof, Feikje
    Andersen, Otto
    Borgan, Jens-Kristian
    Costa, Giuseppe
    Desplanques, Guy
    Filakti, Haroulla
    Giraldes, Maria do R
    Faggiano, Fabrizio
    Harding, Seeromanie
    Junker, Christoph
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Minder, Christoph
    Nolan, Brian
    Pagnanelli, Floriano
    Regidor, Enrique
    Vågerö, Denny
    Valkonen, Tapani
    Mackenbach, Johan P
    Occupational class and ischemic heart disease mortality in the United States and 11 European countries.1999Inngår i: American Journal of Public Health, ISSN 0090-0036, E-ISSN 1541-0048, Vol. 89, s. 47-53Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Twelve countries were compared with respect to occupational class differences in ischemic heart disease mortality in order to identify factors that are associated with smaller or larger mortality differences. METHODS: Data on mortality by occupational class among men aged 30 to 64 years were obtained from national longitudinal or cross-sectional studies for the 1980s. A common occupational class scheme was applied to most countries. Potential effects of the main data problems were evaluated quantitatively. RESULTS: A north-south contrast existed within Europe. In England and Wales, Ireland, and Nordic countries, manual classes had higher mortality rates than nonmanual classes. In France, Switzerland, and Mediterranean countries, manual classes had mortality rates as low as, or lower than, those among nonmanual classes. Compared with Northern Europe, mortality differences in the United States were smaller (among men aged 30-44 years) or about as large (among men aged 45-64 years). CONCLUSIONS: The results underline the highly variable nature of socioeconomic inequalities in ischemic heart disease mortality. These inequalities appear to be highly sensitive to social gradients in behavioral risk factors. These risk factor gradients are determined by cultural as well as socioeconomic developments.

  • 39.
    Lai, Taavi
    et al.
    Fourth View Consulting, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development in Tallinn, Estonia.
    Trends and inequalities in mortality of noncommunicable diseases. Case study for Estonia2015Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study aims to provide a comprehensive overview of trends and inequalities in mortality of noncommunicable diseases in Estonia over the first decade of the 2000s. Decomposition of life expectancy by causes and age groups, and calculation of age-standardized rates for total and cause-specific mortality were used to assess differences over time and across social groups. The findings of the analysis showed significant overall reduction in mortality and increasing life expectancy in Estonia during the 2000s. The considerable improvement in mortality was observed in all groups distinguished by gender, ethnicity, educational level or by place of residence resulting in narrowing absolute inequalities, although the relative inequalities by educational level and by place of residence slightly increased. Despite progress, mortality rates remained higher among non-Estonians, the lower educated and residents of Ida-Viru county. Circulatory diseases and external causes of death contributed the most to the overall life expectancy at birth improvement and to the larger mortality decline among non-Estonians, the lower educated and in Ida-Viru county, with the opposite effect seen for infectious diseases.

  • 40.
    Laidra, K.
    et al.
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Rahu, K.
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Tekkel, M.
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Aluoja, A.
    University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Mental health and alcohol problems among Estonian cleanup workers 24 years after the Chernobyl accident2015Inngår i: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 50, nr 11, s. 1753-1760Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 41.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Avdelning 4, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Avdelning 4, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Social variation in self-rated health in Estonia: a cross-sectional study2002Inngår i: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 55, nr 5, s. 847-861Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past 40 years Estonia has experienced similar developments in mortality to other former Soviet countries. The stagnation in overall mortality has been caused mainly by increasing adult mortality. However, less is known about the social variation in health. This study examines differences in self-rated health by eight main dimensions of the social structure on the basis of the Estonian Health Interview Survey, carried out in 1996/1997. A multistage random sample (n = 4711) of the Estonian population aged 15-79 was interviewed; the response rate was 78.3%. This study includes those respondents aged 25-79 (n = 4011) with analyses being performed separately for men and women. The study revealed that a low educational level, Russian nationality, low personal income and for men only, rural residence were the most influential factors underlying poor health. Education had the biggest independent effect on health ratings: for women with less than an upper secondary education the odds of having poor health were almost fourfold (OR = 3.88) when compared to those with a university education, and for men these odds were almost two and a half times (OR = 2.32). Material resources, in this study measured by personal income, were important factors in explaining some of the educational and ethnic differences (especially for Russian women) in poor self-rated health. Overall, we found no differences between men and women in their health ratings. On the contrary, when we controlled for physical health status, emotional distress and locus of control women reported better health than men. Health selection contributed to, but did not explain the differences by structural dimension. This study also showed a strong association of poor self-rated health with three correlates-physical health status, emotional distress and locus of control, although the influence of these correlates on poor health ratings was not seen equally in the different structural dimensions.

  • 42. Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Grintšak, Marina
    Noorkõiv, Rivo
    Estonian Health Interview Survey 1996: Tables1999Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 43. Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Grintšak, Marina
    Noorkõiv, Rivo
    Silver, Brian
    Estonian Health Interview Survey 1996: Methodological report1998Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 44.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Kaposvári, Csilla
    Kunst, Anton E
    Is income or employment a stronger predictor of smoking than education in economically less developed countries?: A cross-sectional study in Hungary2011Inngår i: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, s. 97-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterns of inequalities in smoking in Hungary can be best understood in relation to two processes: the smoking epidemic, and the additional effects of poverty. Equity orientated tobacco control measures should target the low educated to prevent their smoking initiation, and the poor to improve their cessation rates.

  • 45.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Reile, Rainer
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Vals, Kaire
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Petkeviciene, Janina
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Tekkel, Mare
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Macroeconomic changes and trends in dental care utilization in Estonia and Lithuania in 2004-2012: a repeated cross-sectional study2018Inngår i: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 18, nr 1, artikkel-id 199Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess trends and inequalities in dental care utilization in Estonia and Lithuania in relation to large-scale macroeconomic changes in 2004-2012.

    METHODS: Data on 22,784 individuals in the 20-64 age group were retrieved from nationally representative cross-sectional surveys in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. Age- and sex-standardized prevalence estimates of past 12-month dental visits were calculated for each study year, stratified by gender, age group, ethnicity, educational level and economic activity. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent effect of study year and socioeconomic status on dental visits.

    RESULTS: The age- and sex-standardized prevalence of dental visits in the past 12 months was 46-52% in Estonia and 61-67% in Lithuania. In 2004-2008, the prevalence of dental visits increased by 5.9 percentage points in both countries and fell in 2008-2010 by 3.8 percentage points in Estonia and 4.6 percentage points in Lithuania. In both countries the prevalence of dental care utilization had increased slightly by 2012, although the increase was statistically insignificant. Results from a logistic regression analysis showed that these differences between study years were not explained by differences in socioeconomic status or oral health conditions. Women, the main ethnic group (only in Estonia), and higher educated and employed persons had significantly higher odds of dental visits in both countries, but the odds were lower for 50-64 year olds in Lithuania.

    CONCLUSIONS: In European Union countries with lower national wealth, the use of dental services is sensitive to macroeconomic changes regardless of the extent of public coverage, at the same time, higher public coverage may not relate to lower inequalities in dental care use.

  • 46.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands / National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Stirbu, Irina
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institute.
    Kalediene, Ramune
    Kaunas University of Medicine, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Kovacs, Katalin
    Demographic Research Institute, HCSO, Budapest, Hungary.
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland.
    Wróblewska, Wiktoria
    Warsaw School of Economics, Warsaw, Poland.
    Mackenbach, Johan P.
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Kunst, Anton E.
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Educational inequalities in mortality in four Eastern European countries: divergence in trends during the post-communist transition from 1990 to 20002009Inngår i: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 38, s. 512-525Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Post-communist transition has had a huge impact on mortality in Eastern Europe. We examined how educational inequalities in mortality changed between 1990 and 2000 in Estonia, Lithuania, Poland and Hungary.

    METHODS:

    Cross-sectional data for the years around 1990 and 2000 were used. Age-standardized mortality rates and mortality rate ratios (for total mortality only) were calculated for men and women aged 35-64 in three educational categories, for five broad cause-of-death groups and for five (seven among women) specific causes of death.

    RESULTS:

    Educational inequalities in mortality increased in all four countries but in two completely different ways. In Poland and Hungary, mortality rates decreased or remained the same in all educational groups. In Estonia and Lithuania, mortality rates decreased among the highly educated, but increased among those of low education. In Estonia and Lithuania, for men and women combined, external causes and circulatory diseases contributed most to the increasing educational gap in total mortality.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Different trends were observed between the two former Soviet republics and the two Central Eastern European countries. This divergence can be related to differences in socioeconomic development during the 1990s and in particular, to the spread of poverty, deprivation and marginalization. Alcohol and psychosocial stress may also have been important mediating factors.

  • 47.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Tekkel, Mare
    Kunst, Anton E
    Social determinants of ever initiating smoking differ from those of quitting: a cross-sectional study in Estonia.2007Inngår i: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 17, nr 6, s. 572-578Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    While educational level was the strongest predictor of ever initiating regular smoking, smoking cessation was related more directly to aspects of social disadvantage originating in adult life. To be effective, tobacco control interventions should not only target lower educated, but also those in material disadvantage.

  • 48.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Avdelning 4, Sociologi.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörns högskola, Avdelning 4, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhälle och historia, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Kunst, Anton E
    Estonia 1989-2000: enormous increase in mortality differences by education2003Inngår i: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 32, nr 6, s. 1081-1087Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Social disruption and increasing inequalities in wealth can be considered main recent determinants; however, causal processes, shaped decades before recent reforms, also contribute to this widening gap.

  • 49.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för sociologi, idéhistoria, samtidshistoria och arkeologi, Sociologi.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhälle och historia, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhälle och historia, Sociologi.
    Kunst, Anton E
    Increasing ethnic differences in mortality in Estonia after the collapse of the Soviet Union2004Inngår i: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 58, nr 7, s. 583-589Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Political and economic upheaval, increasing poverty, and alcohol consumption can be considered the main underlying causes of the widening ethnic mortality gap.

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    et al.
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    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
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    El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa
    Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos
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    Murray, Christopher J L
    Measuring the health-related Sustainable Development Goals in 188 countries: a baseline analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 20152016Inngår i: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 388, nr 10053, s. 1813-1850Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIn September, 2015, the UN General Assembly established the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs specify 17 universal goals, 169 targets, and 230 indicators leading up to 2030. We provide an analysis of 33 health-related SDG indicators based on the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015).

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  • asciidoc
  • rtf