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  • 1.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Competing Historical Narratives: [Review of] Brubaker, Rogers et al: Nationalist Politics and Everyday Ethnicity in a Transylvanian Town'. Princeton, N.J. : Princeton UP, 2007 ISBN 978-0-691-12834-42009In: East Central Europe, ISSN 0094-3037, E-ISSN 1876-3308, Vol. 36, no 1, 138-146 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Entanglements of Economic Nationalizing in the Ethnic Borderland of Transylvania, 1867–19402013In: Hungary and Romania Beyond National Narratives: Comparisons and Entanglements / [ed] Blomqvist, Iordachi &Trencsényi, Oxford: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2013, 155-202 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    ‘Ethnic Division and National Narratives among Romanians and Hungarians in Satu Mare/Szatmárnémeti2008In: Crises and Conflicts in Post-Socialist Societies: The Role of Ethnic, Political and Social Identities / [ed] Sabine Fischer and Heiko Pleines, Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2008, 57-71 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, History.
    Herta Müllers författande i historiens sken2010In: I & M : invandrare & minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, no 1, 39-41 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Hungarian Elite Strategy and Discourse in Interwar Romania: [Review of] Ferenc Sz. Horváth: Elutasítás és alkalmazkodás között: A Romániai magyar kisebbségi elit politikai stratégiai (1931-1940). München: Ungarisches Institut, (Studia Hungarica: Schriften des Ungarischen Instituts München, 50), 20072008In: Regio. Regio. Minorities politics, politics, society, ISSN 0865-557X, 265-270 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Nationalistisk historieskrivning i NE: fallet Transsylvanien2006In: Aktuellt om historia, ISSN 0348-503X, no 3, 17-26 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    One city with two images and two communities: the case of the Romanian-Hungarian city of Satu Mare/Szatmárnémeti2006In: Crossing the border: boundary relations in a changing Europe / [ed] Thomas Lundén, Eslöv: Gondolin , 2006, 159-169 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Recension av] Alnaes, Karsten: Historien om Europa: uppbrott 1800-1900. Stockholm : Bonnier, 2006  ISBN 91-0-010533-32009In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 128, no 1, 110-112 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Recension av] Björn Kumm: Kalla kriget. Lund: Historiska media, 2006. ISBN 91-88930-93-92008In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, Vol. 22, no 3/4Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Recension av] Peter Johnsson: Polen i Europa: en resa i historien 966-2005. Stockholm: Carlsson, 2005. ISBN 91-7203-671-02009In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 129, no 2, 304-306 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Recension av] Susanna Hedenborg och Mats Morell, red.: Sverige – en social och ekonomisk historia, Lund : Studentlitteratur, 2006. ISBN 91-44-03915-82009In: Historielärarnas Förenings Årsskrift, ISSN 0439-2434, 172-173 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Recension av] Victor Sebestyen: Ungernrevolten 1955. Tolv dagar som skakade världen, Stockholm: Prisma, 2006. ISBN 91-518-4612-82009In: Historielärarnas Förenings Årsskrift, ISSN 0439-2434, 120-121 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Review of] Thomas Lundén: On the Boundary: About humans at the end of territory. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2004, ISBN 91-89315-42-12008In: Eurolimes, ISSN 1841-9259, no 6Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Journal Korall and Hungarian Social History: Between International and National Contexts2007In: East Central Europe, ISSN 0094-3037, E-ISSN 1876-3308, Vol. 35, no 1-2, 327-353 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review essay evaluates the evolution of the Hungarian journal of social history, Korall társadalomtörténeti folyóirat (Coral: A journal of social history), founded in 1999 as a new forum of social history research. Korall promoted two distinct understandings of social history, stated only implicitly in the first years of the journal, but later elaborated more explicitely by the editors, as core definitions of their research programme. A first, narrow acceptation places social history within the field of (historical) sociology and favours structural approaches and concepts specific to the social sciences rather than the actual historical context. A second definition is wider, including a variety of topics such as environmental history, cultural history, economic, and demographic history, being meant to function as a powerful counter-discourse against positivistic, traditional and political-orientated history, still dominant in contemporary Hungarian historiography. Based on a combination of qualitative and quantitative content analysis, the review essay argues that, during its eight years of existance to date, Korall has undergone a process of internationalization. Although most articles published in the journal continue to focus on topics pertaining to the history of Hungary—especially during the "dualist period," 1867-1918—references to international events, authors, and theories have lately acquired a greater importance

  • 15.
    Blomqvist, Anders E. B.
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Stockholms universitet, Historiska institutionen.
    Economic Nationalizing in the Ethnic Borderlands of Hungary and Romania: Inclusion, Exclusion and Annihilation in Szatmár/Satu-Mare 1867–19442014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The history of the ethnic borderlands of Hungary and Romania in the years 1867–1944 were marked by changing national borders, ethnic conflicts and economic problems. Using a local case study of the city and county of Szatmár/Satu-Mare, this thesis investigates the practice and social mechanisms of economic nationalizing. It explores the interplay between ethno-national and economic factors, and furthermore analyses what social mechanisms lead to and explain inclusion, exclusion and annihilation.

    The underlying principle of economic nationalizing in both countries was the separation of citizens into ethnic categories and the establishment of a dominant core nation entitled to political and economic privileges from the state. National leaders implemented a policy of economic nationalizing that exploited and redistributed resources taken from the minorities. To pursue this end, leaders instrumentalized ethnicity, which institutionalized inequality and ethnic exclusion. This process of ethnic, and finally racial, exclusion marked the whole period and reached its culmination in the annihilation of the Jews throughout most of Hungary in 1944.

    For nearly a century, ethnic exclusion undermined the various nationalizing projects in the two countries: the Magyarization of the minorities in dualist Hungary (1867–1918); the Romanianization of the economy of the ethnic borderland in interwar Romania (1918–1940); and finally the re-Hungarianization of the economy in Second World War Hungary (1940–1944).

    The extreme case of exclusion, namely the Holocaust, revealed that the path of exclusion brought nothing but destruction for everyone. This reinforces the thesis that economic nationalizing through the exclusion of minorities induces a vicious circle of ethnic bifurcation, political instability and unfavorable conditions for achieving economic prosperity. Exclusion served the short-term elite’s interest but undermined the long-term nation’s ability to prosper. 

  • 16.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Iordachi, ConstatinTrencsényi, Balázs
    Hungary and Romania Beyond National Narratives: Comparisons and Entanglements2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Carlbäck, Helene
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Radicalism for different reasons: Nordic and Soviet Russian family legislation in the 1920’s2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Eellend, Johan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Kõll, Anu Mai
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Wawrzeniuk, Piotr
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Nya plogfåror i agrarforskningen2006In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, no 4, 811-821 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Eriksonas, Linas
    et al.
    Müller, LeosSödertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Statehood Before and Beyond Ethnicity: Minor States in Northern and Eastern Europe, 1600-20002005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Feldmann Eellend, Beate
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, Ethnology.
    "Hela samhället byggde ju på att vi hade ett regemente": Kalla krigets vardagsliv på tre garnisonsorter i Östersjöområdet2011In: Kriget som aldrig kom: 12 forskare om kalla kriget / [ed] Andreas Liljeroth, Karlskrona: Marinmuseum , 2011, 156-173 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Fraudet, Xavier
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Politique étrangère francaise en mer Baltique (1871-1914): De l'exclusion à l'affirmation2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Fröhlig, Florence
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Du traumatisme à la reconciliation2010In: Tambov: Le camp des Malgré Nous alsaciens et mosellans prisonniers des Russes. Les révélations des archives soviétiques / [ed] Régis Baty, Strasbourg: La Nuée Bleue , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    "Normative Femininity" Presentation: Review of the Women's Self-Descriptions in the Context of the Reforms in Russia2004In: Contemporary Change in Russia: In From the Margins? / [ed] Rindzeviciute, Egle, Huddinge: Baltic & East European Graduate School, Södertörns högskola , 2004, 111-122 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University College, School of Gender, Culture and History.
    Soviet People with Female Bodies: Performing Beauty and Maternity in Soviet Russia in the mid 1930-1960s2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The everyday practices of maternity and beauty are important for the enactment of femininity. This dissertation deals with femininities created in the context of changing ideas about “normality” in Soviet Russia during the mid 1930s-1960s and explores a diversity of norms, discourses and rituals. The main sources are women’s magazines, advice books, and interviews with women living now in three different cities of the Russian Federation – Moscow, Saratov (Volga region) and Ufa (capital of Bashkortostan Republic).

    The results of the research suggest that some parts of the Soviet discourses on maternity and beauty turn out to be similar to those that were characteristic for other European countries of the same historical period. At the same time the interviews show that the modern practices of medical and welfare institutions, the consumption of clothes as well as advice about appearance and childcare were situated in the context of shortages of goods, women’s work outside of home, rhetorics of the “naturalness” of maternity for every woman as well as that of a woman’s particular need to care about looking nice. Together with the home reproduction of many rural/patriarchal rituals of maternity and beauty it led to a contradictory everyday performance of femininity. Fluctuating categories of social status, ethnical belonging, geographical location and generation also contributed to a diversity of femininity constructions. Common sense normativities concerning practices of becoming a mother, caring for a baby and making oneself beautiful suggest that Soviet discourses on maternity and beauty were only partly accepted and reproduced by women. They were also partly rejected and subverted in everyday practices. The analysis of maternity and beauty practices shows that performative femininities were utterly complex.

  • 25.
    Huss, Markus
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, Comparative literature.
    Male historians in exile: Constantly relating to their background2010In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, Vol. 3, no 1, 17-18 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Johansson, Andreas
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    ’Vad jag har sett i Bessarabien’: Henry Baerleins och Emmanuel de Martonnes resor genom det mellankrigstida Bessarabien2007In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, no 3, 341-361 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Jonsson, Karin
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Fångna i begreppen?: Revolution, tid och politik i svensk socialistisk press 1917–19242017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis studies the uses of the concept of revolution in Swedish socialist press from 1917 to 1924. Political revolution and civil wars shook several countries. The Russian February and October Revolutions were soon followed by uprisings in countries such as Germany and Finland.

    While the social and political history of this period, with its mass demonstrations for bread and voting rights, often called the Swedish revolution, has been covered extensively in existing research, we know much less about the theoretical understanding of revolution among Swedish socialists. This thesis examines the concept of revolution from a perspective inspired by the Begriffsgeschichte of German historian Reinhart Koselleck. This foundation in the history of concepts aims at understanding how Swedish socialists, in a wide sense, understood their own time, how they related to the past and what they expected from the future, during the years of the First World War and the immediately following years. By focusing on what might be the most central, but also the most contested and most difficult to define, concept I hope to complement earlier research focusing on the social and political history of the period and its socialist movements.

    The main purpose of the thesis is to analyse how the labour movement understood revolution with particular weight placed upon the theoretical and ideological tensions between revolution and reform, determinism and voluntarism and localized and universal revolution. The starting point is the political and social changes in Sweden and abroad at that time and the place of the political press as opinion leaders capable of negotiating the space of political action. A secondary aim is to discuss how focusing on temporality can inspire new perspectives on the use of conceptual history.

    My research shows that how the concept of revolution was used was shaped both by already established notions regarding the socialist revolution as well as by the political situation at hand. The October Revolution forced a sharpening of its meaning, wherein different factions elaborated their understanding of it in relation to each other, which in turn determined how the concept was used fom that point on. 

  • 28.
    Kharkina, Anna
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Stockholms universitet, Historiska institutionen.
    From Kinship to Global Brand: The Discourse on Culture in Nordic Cooperation after World War II2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work analyzes the political instrumentalization of culture. Specifically, it studies how this is done through cultural policy within Western democracies. The analysis takes, as an example, official Nordic cultural cooperation in the post-war period. During this time, cultural exchange among Nordic countries became the subject of political attention establishing itself as part of the Nordic inter-governmental cooperation framework.

    This work focuses on three key moments in the history of official Nordic cultural cooperation: (i) the failure of the NORDEK plan (a plan which envisaged extensive economic cooperation between the Nordic countries) and the establishment of the Nordic Council of Ministers in 1971; (ii) the collapse of the Soviet system at the end of the 1980s - beginning of the 1990s; and (iii) the movement towards promoting the Nordic region on the global market in the first decade of the 2000s.

    The analysis traces the lack of convergence between the official arm’s length principle in cultural policy and how cultural cooperation actually worked. The results of the research both demonstrate the various ways culture was instrumentalized and also prove that the politically defined concept of culture can receive different interpretations in the official discourse depending on current political goals.

  • 29.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    In the shadows of Poland and Russia: the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and Sweden in the European crisis of the mid-17th century2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines and analyses the Union between the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and Sweden signed in 1655 at Kėdainiai and the political crisis that followed. The union was a result of strong separatist dreams among the Lithuanian-Ruthenian Protestant elite led by the Radziwiłł family, and if implemented it would radically change the balance of power in the Baltic Sea region. The main legal point of the Union was the breach of Lithuanian federation with Poland and the establishment of a federation with Sweden. The Grand Duchy of Lithuania aspired to return to international relations as a self-governing subject. The Union meant a new Scandinavian alternative to Polish and Russian domination. The author places the events in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the general crisis that occurred in Europe in the middle of the 17th century characterized by a great number of wars, rebellions and civil wars from Portugal to Ukraine, and which builds the background to the crisis for Lithuania and Sweden. The research proved the importance of lesser powers in changing the geopolitical balance between the Great Powers. The conflict over Lithuania and Belarus was the main reason for the Swedish-Russian, Polish-Russian and Ukrainian-Russian wars. The failure of the Union with Sweden was caused by both internal and external factors. Internally, various ethnic, confessional and political groups within the nobility of Lithuania were split in favour of different foreign powers – from Muscovy to Transylvania. The external cause for the failure of the Union project was the failure of Swedish strategy. Sweden concentrated its activity to Poland, not to Lithuania. After the Union, Swedish authorities treated the Grand Duchy as an invaded country, not an equal. The Swedish administration introduced heavy taxation and was unable to control the brutality of the army. As a result Sweden was defeated in both Lithuania and Poland. Among the different economic, political and religious explanations of the general crisis, the case of Lithuania shows the importance of the political conflicts. For the separatists of Lithuania the main motive to turn against Poland and to promote alliance with Sweden, Russia or the Cossacks was the inability of Poland to shield the Grand Duchy from a Russian invasion.The Lithuanian case was a provincial rebellion led by the native nobility against their monarch, based on tradition of the previous independence and statehood period. It was not nationalism in its modern meaning, but instead a crisis of identity in the form of a conflict between Patria and Central Power. However, the cost of being a part of Sweden or Muscovy was greater than the benefit of political protection. Therefore, the pro-Polish orientation prevailed when Poland after 1658 recovered its military ability the local nobility regrouped around Warsaw. The Grand Duchy of Lithuania managed to remain on the political map of Europe, but at the price of general religious Catholization and cultural Polonization. After the crisis, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania gradually changed into a deep province of the Polish state.

  • 30.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Tradition of Belarusian Statehood: Conflicts About the Past of Belarus2004In: Contemporary Change in Belarus / [ed] Egle Rindzeviciute, Huddinge: Baltic & East European Graduate School, Södertörns högskola , 2004, 41-72 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Sundström, OlleUmeå universitet.
    Ethnic and Religious Minorities in Stalin’s Soviet Union: New Dimensions of Research2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This anthology presents studies of Stalinism in the ethnic and religious borderlands of the Soviet Union. The authors not only cover hitherto less researched geographical areas, but have also addressed new questions and added new source material. Most of the contributors to this anthology use a micro-historical approach. With this approach, it is not the entire area of the country, with millions of separate individuals that are in focus but rather particular and cohesive ethnic and religious communities.

    Micro-history does not mean ignoring a macro-historical perspective. What happened on the local level had an all-Union context, and communism was a European-wide phenomenon. This means that the history of minorities in the Soviet Union during Stalin’s rule cannot be grasped outside the national and international context; aspects which are also considered in this volume. The chapters of the book are case studies on various minority groups, both ethnic and religious. In this way, the book gives a more complex picture of the causes and effects of the state-run mass violence during Stalinism.

    The publication is the outcome of a multidisciplinary international research network lead by Andrej Kotljarchuk (Södertörn University, Sweden) and Olle Sundström (Umeå University, Sweden) and consisting of specialists from Estonia, France, Germany, Russia, Sweden, Ukraine and the United States. These scholars represent various disciplines: Anthropology, Cultural Studies, History and the History of Religions.

  • 32.
    Lundell, Erika
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Crossdressing på Medeltidsveckan i Visby: Om iscensättanden av feminina och maskulina medeltidsgenu2008In: Lambda Nordica: Tidskrift om homosexualitet, ISSN 1100-2573, no 1-2, 97-107 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Lundell, Erika
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Linnell, Sandra
    Gullegrisar2010In: Bang, ISSN 1102-4593, no 1, 56-58 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Malitska, Julia
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    People in between: Baltic islanders as colonists on the steppe2014In: The Lost Swedish Tribe: Reapproaching the history of Gammalsvenskby in Ukraine / [ed] Piotr Wawrzeniuk & Julia Malitska, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2014, 1, , 151 p.61-85 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Nase, Marco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Academics and Politics: Northern European Area Studies at Greifswald University, 1917–19912016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The decision to institute Area Studies in German universities in 1917, was born out of a perceived need to widen the intellectual horizon of the public and academia alike. At Greifswald University this ambitious reform programme saw the foundation of a Nordic Institute, charged with interdisciplinary studies of contemporary Northern Europe. Its interdisciplinarity and implicit role in public diplomacy made the Nordic Institute, and the institutions that succeeded it, an anomaly within the university, until the institute was fundamentally reformed in the early 1990s. The study explores the institutional development of the institute under five different political regimes – Kaiserreich, Weimar Republic, Third Reich, GDR and FRG. It does so through the lens of scholars as utility-seeking actors, manoeuvring between the confines of an academic environment and the possibilities afforded by the institute’s political task. It becomes apparent that the top-down institution of interdisciplinary scholarship produced a number of conflicts between the disciplinarily organized career path on theone hand, and scholars’ investment in broader regional research on the other. Personal conflicts in a confined and competitive environment, and a persistent shortage of funding provided further incentives for scholars to overcome perceived limitations of the academic sphere by offering their cooperation to the political field. Individual attempts to capitalize on a reciprocal exchange of resources with the political field remained a feature under all political regimes, but the opportunity to do so successfully depended on the receptiveness of the political field. Cooperation, where it was established, also proved to be difficult, with the interests of political and academic actors often diverging, and the political side’s interest becoming dominant. The study examines the underlying motivations of scholars to seek assistance from outside the academic field, but also the problems connected with that approach, and demonstrates the specific problems faced by Area Studies in a German context.

  • 36.
    Nase, Marco
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    "Att Sverige skall dominera här": Johannes Paul und das Schwedische Institut der Universität Greifswald 1933-19452014Book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Nase, Marco
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Forscher - Diplomaten - Spione: Die Nordischen Auslandsinstitute der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität2015In: "...die letzten Schranken fallen lassen": Studien zur Universität Greifswald im Nationalsozialismus / [ed] Dirk Alvermann, Köln: Böhlau, 2015, 224-255 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Nase, Marco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Paul, Johannes (1891-1990): Historiker, Universitätsprofessor2013In: Biographisches Lexikon für Pommern: Band 1 / [ed] Alvermann, Dirk & Jörn, Nils, Köln: Böhlau, 2013, 212-214 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Petronis, Vytautas
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Constructing Lithuania: Ethnic Mapping in Tsarist Russia, ca. 1800-19142007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Rabenschlag, Ann-Judith
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Arbeiten im Bruderland: Arbeitsmigranten in der DDR und ihr Zusammenleben mit der deutschen Bevölkerung2016In: Deutschland Archiv (Online)Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Rabenschlag, Ann-Judith
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Das Beste für die Nation: Vor 30 Jahren musste US-Präsident Richard Nixon wegen seiner Verwicklung in die Watergate-Affäre vom Amt zurücktreten2004In: Berliner Zeitung, no 6.8.2004Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Rabenschlag, Ann-Judith
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Für eine bessere 'Bevölkerungsqualität': Ein Vergleich bevölkerungspolitischer Konzepte in Schweden 1920-19402008In: NORDEUROPAforum, ISSN 1863-639X, E-ISSN 1863-639X, 47-67 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Having founded the rasbiologiska institutet in Uppsala under the leadership of Herman Lundborg in the 1920s, Sweden took over a leading roll in eugenic discourse. Lundborg’s concept of population policy aimed at measuring the racial value of the Swedish popula-tion and to reduce the number of “inferior population elements”. Only a couple of years later, Alva and Gunnar Myrdal assessed the decline in the Swedish birthrate to be a “population crisis”, thus turning the once volkish-conservatively coloured discourse on population policy into a part of social democratic agitation. In spite of obvious ideologi-cal and political differences between the concepts of Lundborg and the Myrdals, some continuity in the premises of their argumentation can be pointed out. In both cases the argument of “population quality” justifies the subordination of individual interests and needs to the collective of the race or the folkhemmet (the people’s home) respectively

  • 43.
    Rabenschlag, Ann-Judith
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Negotiating Anti-Racism: Language, Migration, and State Power in the GDR2016In: Global Humanities: studies in histories, cultures, and societies, ISSN 2199-3939, Vol. 3, 103-119 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Rabenschlag, Ann-Judith
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Recension av] Rydström, Jens & Kati Mustola (eds.), Criminally Queer. Homosexuality and Criminal Law in Scandinavia 1842-1999, Amsterdam: Aksant 2007. ISBN 978-90-5260-245-52010In: H-Soz-u-Kult, no 31.03Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Sjödin Lindenskoug, Susanna
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, History.
    Manlighetens bortre gräns: tidelagsrättegångar i Livland åren 1685-17092011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There were many ways of bordering manliness during the historical period covered by my research. Borders have been metaphorically understood as those invisible, often non-enunciated limits that have safeguarded manliness. There were borders separating masculinity from femininity and from childishnes, but there is also a more distant border, separating masculinity from the bestial. The term un-manliness is a useful concept for this analysis, for it can be used to illuminate the different ways in which masculinity has been interrogated. The concept can also be used in comparative analyses of how tolerance towards men deviating from ideas of ideal masculinity has differed according to situation and culture. It has been my ambition to elucidate the particular attitudes, values, customs, knowledge and requirements that influenced the view of masculinity at both individual and the group level. The clearest-cut aspects of manliness and un-manliness expressed in court proceedings were those having to do with sexuality, relations within the household, and the subordinate and dominant masculinities displayed by different court-room actors. The latter, in turn, reflected contemporary social structures, including the social gap that divided the Livonian peasantry’s serfs or former serfs from the ruling Baltic-German elite. Records from the court proceedings have shown the subordinate masculinity of the defendants, subordinate not only to that of the officers of the court but to that of the witnesses. This subordination was an inevitable consequence of the nature of the accusations, regardless of whether they were deemed well-founded or false.  The defendants were placed in a situation where they were forced constantly to be on the alert, ready to defend themselves and show their best sides. As a result, they would often give extremely clear expression to their views of proper masculinity. Such actors stressed, consciously or unconsciously, certain manly traits and behaviour patterns that characterised themselves and others. Their arguments provide insights into what they thought of each other and how they conceived a man should generally be, behave and act in different situations. By the same token, they clearly showed what kinds of behaviours were considered undesirable or outright unmanly. The positioning of the borders of manliness was linked both to time and to space. Deviations have helped different societies set the borders for what they considered acceptable behaviour. There was a clear cultural and geographical border between Sweden as such, and the Swedish province Livonia. This emerges clearly when one compares Livonian results with earlier studies on bestiality in Sweden. This shows that the view of manliness and the tolerance towards certain kinds of behaviour changed as one moved East.

  • 46.
    Sjödin, Susanna
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Manlighet kontra bestialitet2006In: Blad till Bladh: en vänbok till Christine våren 2006 / [ed] Einarssin Monica, Sandberg Robert, Stadin Kekke, Wottle Martin, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, , 2006, 167-174 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Törnqvist, Oscar
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Maritime Archaeological Research Institute.
    Fler fyrkantiga fartyg2010In: Marinarkeologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 1, 17-18 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Wawrzeniuk, Piotr
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Confessional Civilising in Ukraine: The Bishop Iosyf Shumliansky and the Introduction of Reforms in the Diocese of Lviv 1668-17082005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This work examines and analyses the reform attempts undertaken by the Greek Orthodox and Uniate Bishop of Lviv, Iosyf Shumliansky, during his episcopacy (1668-1708). These reforms are seen as a means of facing the intensified confessionalising pressures at state and regional levels in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The analysis focuses on the Bishop’s model priest as illustrated in his handbook for the clergy; the influence the Bishop and the Consistorial Court had over the parish clergy; the types of litigation and the categories of plaintiff in the cases concerning the parish clergy; and the clergy’s behaviour. Iosyf Shumliansky required the clergy to adjust its behaviour and educational standards to be similar to those of the nobility and Roman Catholic clergy. The parish clergy should refrain from dressing like peasants, becoming too close to the villagers and from participating too enthusiastically in village festivities. They should learn Polish and Latin. The Bishop expected the clergy to adopt a style of dress and behaviour that would distinguish and elevate it as a group above the mass of the peasantry. Included in the analysis, are cases from the Lviv and Halych main deaneries but not the main deanery of Kamianets Podilsky. The Bishop and the Consistorial Court had good control over most of the western and central regions of the Diocese. The Court could not control the situation in the eastern territories, as it was unsafe because of wars, Tatar raids and occupation by Ottoman forces. The possibility for Shumliansky to influence the parish clergy through the Court in these regions was limited. Their participation in court proceedings was negligible. The most common type of litigation was official misconduct by the priests. After that came violence, finance and defamation. The most common category of plaintiff was parish priests, followed by nobles and honest/reputable/townsmen. In the study, violence has been treated as a means of interaction and communication. It would appear that the status of the parish clergy was often frail and had to be publicly, vigorously and violently defended. Many of the clergy could not live up to the demands of the Bishop because they lived as and among peasants.

  • 49.
    Wawrzeniuk, Piotr
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Malitska, Julia
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Approaching the "Lost Swedish Tribe" in Ukraine2014In: The Lost Swedish Tribe: Reapproaching the history of Gammalsvenskby in Ukraine / [ed] Piotr Wawrzeniuk & Julia Malitska, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2014, 1, , 151 p.13-35 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Wawrzeniuk, Piotr
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Malitska, JuliaSödertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Lost Swedish Tribe: Reapproaching the history of Gammalsvenskby in Ukraine2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the spring of 1782 a group of peasants of Swedish origin reached their destination on the right bank of Dnipro River in Ukraine. The village they founded became known as “Gammalsvenskby” (Russian “Staroshvedskoe,” English “Old Swedish Village”). In the 1880s links were established with Sweden and Swedophone Finland where the villagers were seen through a nationalistic-romantic prism and in broad circles became known as a brave group of people who had preserved their Swedish culture in hostile surroundings; in the terminology of this volume, a “lost Swedish tribe”. The village remained largely intact until 1929, when in the aftermath of the Russian revolution a majority of the villagers decided to leave for Sweden. When they arrived, there was disappointment. Neither Sweden nor the lost tribe lived up to expectations. Some of the villagers returned to Ukraine and the USSR.

    This book offers an alternative perspective on Gammalsvenskby. The changing fortunes of the villagers are largely seen in the light of two grand top-down modernization projects – Russia’s imperial, originating in the latter half of the eighteenth century, and the Soviet, carried out in the early 1920s – but also of the modernization projects in Sweden and Finland. The story the book has to tell of Gammalsvenskby is a new one, and moreover, it is a story of relevance also for the history of Russia, Ukraine, Sweden and Finland.

12 1 - 50 of 74
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