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  • 1. Bailey, Greg
    et al.
    Newland, Cassie
    Nilsson, Anna
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology.
    Schofield, John
    Transit, Transition: Excavating J641 VUJ2009In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 19, no 1, 1-27 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In July 2006 archaeologists from the University of Bristol and Atkins Heritage embarked oil a contemporary archaeology project with a difference. We 'excavated' ail old (1991) Ford Transit van, used by archaeologists and later by works and maintenance teams at the Ironbridge Museum The object: to see what can be learnt from a very particular, common and characteristic type of contemporary place; to establish what archaeologists and archaeology can contribute to understanding the way society, and specifically we as archaeologists, use and inhabit these places; and to challenge and critique archaeologies of the contemporary past. In this report we describe our excavation and situate it within a wider debate about research practice in contemporary archaeology.

  • 2.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Competing Historical Narratives: [Review of] Brubaker, Rogers et al: Nationalist Politics and Everyday Ethnicity in a Transylvanian Town'. Princeton, N.J. : Princeton UP, 2007 ISBN 978-0-691-12834-42009In: East Central Europe, ISSN 0094-3037, E-ISSN 1876-3308, Vol. 36, no 1, 138-146 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Entanglements of Economic Nationalizing in the Ethnic Borderland of Transylvania, 1867–19402013In: Hungary and Romania Beyond National Narratives: Comparisons and Entanglements / [ed] Blomqvist, Iordachi &Trencsényi, Oxford: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2013, 155-202 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    ‘Ethnic Division and National Narratives among Romanians and Hungarians in Satu Mare/Szatmárnémeti2008In: Crises and Conflicts in Post-Socialist Societies: The Role of Ethnic, Political and Social Identities / [ed] Sabine Fischer and Heiko Pleines, Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2008, 57-71 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, History.
    Herta Müllers författande i historiens sken2010In: I & M : invandrare & minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, no 1, 39-41 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Hungarian Elite Strategy and Discourse in Interwar Romania: [Review of] Ferenc Sz. Horváth: Elutasítás és alkalmazkodás között: A Romániai magyar kisebbségi elit politikai stratégiai (1931-1940). München: Ungarisches Institut, (Studia Hungarica: Schriften des Ungarischen Instituts München, 50), 20072008In: Regio. Regio. Minorities politics, politics, society, ISSN 0865-557X, 265-270 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Nationalistisk historieskrivning i NE: fallet Transsylvanien2006In: Aktuellt om historia, ISSN 0348-503X, no 3, 17-26 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    One city with two images and two communities: the case of the Romanian-Hungarian city of Satu Mare/Szatmárnémeti2006In: Crossing the border: boundary relations in a changing Europe / [ed] Thomas Lundén, Eslöv: Gondolin , 2006, 159-169 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Recension av] Alnaes, Karsten: Historien om Europa: uppbrott 1800-1900. Stockholm : Bonnier, 2006  ISBN 91-0-010533-32009In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 128, no 1, 110-112 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Recension av] Björn Kumm: Kalla kriget. Lund: Historiska media, 2006. ISBN 91-88930-93-92008In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, Vol. 22, no 3/4Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Recension av] Peter Johnsson: Polen i Europa: en resa i historien 966-2005. Stockholm: Carlsson, 2005. ISBN 91-7203-671-02009In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 129, no 2, 304-306 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Recension av] Susanna Hedenborg och Mats Morell, red.: Sverige – en social och ekonomisk historia, Lund : Studentlitteratur, 2006. ISBN 91-44-03915-82009In: Historielärarnas Förenings Årsskrift, ISSN 0439-2434, 172-173 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Recension av] Victor Sebestyen: Ungernrevolten 1955. Tolv dagar som skakade världen, Stockholm: Prisma, 2006. ISBN 91-518-4612-82009In: Historielärarnas Förenings Årsskrift, ISSN 0439-2434, 120-121 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Review of] Thomas Lundén: On the Boundary: About humans at the end of territory. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2004, ISBN 91-89315-42-12008In: Eurolimes, ISSN 1841-9259, no 6Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Journal Korall and Hungarian Social History: Between International and National Contexts2007In: East Central Europe, ISSN 0094-3037, E-ISSN 1876-3308, Vol. 35, no 1-2, 327-353 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review essay evaluates the evolution of the Hungarian journal of social history, Korall társadalomtörténeti folyóirat (Coral: A journal of social history), founded in 1999 as a new forum of social history research. Korall promoted two distinct understandings of social history, stated only implicitly in the first years of the journal, but later elaborated more explicitely by the editors, as core definitions of their research programme. A first, narrow acceptation places social history within the field of (historical) sociology and favours structural approaches and concepts specific to the social sciences rather than the actual historical context. A second definition is wider, including a variety of topics such as environmental history, cultural history, economic, and demographic history, being meant to function as a powerful counter-discourse against positivistic, traditional and political-orientated history, still dominant in contemporary Hungarian historiography. Based on a combination of qualitative and quantitative content analysis, the review essay argues that, during its eight years of existance to date, Korall has undergone a process of internationalization. Although most articles published in the journal continue to focus on topics pertaining to the history of Hungary—especially during the "dualist period," 1867-1918—references to international events, authors, and theories have lately acquired a greater importance

  • 16.
    Blomqvist, Anders E. B.
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Stockholms universitet, Historiska institutionen.
    Economic Nationalizing in the Ethnic Borderlands of Hungary and Romania: Inclusion, Exclusion and Annihilation in Szatmár/Satu-Mare 1867–19442014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The history of the ethnic borderlands of Hungary and Romania in the years 1867–1944 were marked by changing national borders, ethnic conflicts and economic problems. Using a local case study of the city and county of Szatmár/Satu-Mare, this thesis investigates the practice and social mechanisms of economic nationalizing. It explores the interplay between ethno-national and economic factors, and furthermore analyses what social mechanisms lead to and explain inclusion, exclusion and annihilation.

    The underlying principle of economic nationalizing in both countries was the separation of citizens into ethnic categories and the establishment of a dominant core nation entitled to political and economic privileges from the state. National leaders implemented a policy of economic nationalizing that exploited and redistributed resources taken from the minorities. To pursue this end, leaders instrumentalized ethnicity, which institutionalized inequality and ethnic exclusion. This process of ethnic, and finally racial, exclusion marked the whole period and reached its culmination in the annihilation of the Jews throughout most of Hungary in 1944.

    For nearly a century, ethnic exclusion undermined the various nationalizing projects in the two countries: the Magyarization of the minorities in dualist Hungary (1867–1918); the Romanianization of the economy of the ethnic borderland in interwar Romania (1918–1940); and finally the re-Hungarianization of the economy in Second World War Hungary (1940–1944).

    The extreme case of exclusion, namely the Holocaust, revealed that the path of exclusion brought nothing but destruction for everyone. This reinforces the thesis that economic nationalizing through the exclusion of minorities induces a vicious circle of ethnic bifurcation, political instability and unfavorable conditions for achieving economic prosperity. Exclusion served the short-term elite’s interest but undermined the long-term nation’s ability to prosper. 

  • 17.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Iordachi, ConstatinTrencsényi, Balázs
    Hungary and Romania Beyond National Narratives: Comparisons and Entanglements2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Carlbäck, Helene
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Radicalism for different reasons: Nordic and Soviet Russian family legislation in the 1920’s2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Eellend, Johan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Kõll, Anu Mai
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Wawrzeniuk, Piotr
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Nya plogfåror i agrarforskningen2006In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, no 4, 811-821 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20. Eriksonas, Linas
    et al.
    Müller, LeosSödertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Statehood Before and Beyond Ethnicity: Minor States in Northern and Eastern Europe, 1600-20002005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Jutholmsvraket – en marinarkeologisk klassiker återbesökt2010In: Marinarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Jutholmsvraket – ett handelsfartyg från sent 1600-tal: Arkeologisk undersökning, Södermanland, Haninge kommun2010Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Lejonvraket – ett första fältarbete2010In: Marinarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 4, 4-7 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Tre frusna ögonblick2010In: Marinarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 3, 10-12 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Archaeology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Urbanism Under Sail: An Archaeology of Fluit Ships in Early Modern Everyday Life2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the seventeenth- and early eighteenth centuries, fluits were the most common type of merchant ship used in Baltic trade. Originally a Dutch design, the majority of all goods transported between Sweden and the Republic was carried on board such vessels. Far from all voyages reached their destination. Down in the cold brackish water of the Baltic, the preservation conditions are optimal, and several of these unfortunate vessels remain nearly intact today. Although thousands of more or less identical fluits were built, surprisingly little is known about the arrangement of space on board, their sculptural embellishment and other aspects that formed the physical component of everyday life on and alongside these ships. Fluits were a fixture in early modern society, so numerous that they became almost invisible. The study of wrecks thus holds great potential for revealing vital components of early modern life. Inspired by phenomenological approaches in archaeology, this thesis aims to focus on the lived experience of fluits. It sets out to grasp for seemingly mundane everyday activities relating to these ships, from the physical arrangements for eating, sleeping and answering nature’s call, to their rearrangement for naval use, and ends with a consideration of the architectonical contribution of the fluit to the urban landscape.

  • 26.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology. Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Maritime Archaeological Research Institute.
    Rönnby, Johan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology. Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Maritime Archaeological Research Institute.
    Lejonvrak och Spökskepp: Unika fynd i Östersjön2010In: Populär Arkeologi, ISSN 0281-014X, no 2, 20-23 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Feldmann Eellend, Beate
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, Ethnology.
    "Hela samhället byggde ju på att vi hade ett regemente": Kalla krigets vardagsliv på tre garnisonsorter i Östersjöområdet2011In: Kriget som aldrig kom: 12 forskare om kalla kriget / [ed] Andreas Liljeroth, Karlskrona: Marinmuseum , 2011, 156-173 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28. Flood, Roger
    et al.
    Törnqvist, Oscar
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Maritime Archaeological Research Institute.
    Vad väntar i de digitala arkiven?2010In: Marinarkeologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 3, 13-16 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Fraudet, Xavier
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Politique étrangère francaise en mer Baltique (1871-1914): De l'exclusion à l'affirmation2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Fröhlig, Florence
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Du traumatisme à la reconciliation2010In: Tambov: Le camp des Malgré Nous alsaciens et mosellans prisonniers des Russes. Les révélations des archives soviétiques / [ed] Régis Baty, Strasbourg: La Nuée Bleue , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    "Normative Femininity" Presentation: Review of the Women's Self-Descriptions in the Context of the Reforms in Russia2004In: Contemporary Change in Russia: In From the Margins? / [ed] Rindzeviciute, Egle, Huddinge: Baltic & East European Graduate School, Södertörns högskola , 2004, 111-122 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University College, School of Gender, Culture and History.
    Soviet People with Female Bodies: Performing Beauty and Maternity in Soviet Russia in the mid 1930-1960s2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The everyday practices of maternity and beauty are important for the enactment of femininity. This dissertation deals with femininities created in the context of changing ideas about “normality” in Soviet Russia during the mid 1930s-1960s and explores a diversity of norms, discourses and rituals. The main sources are women’s magazines, advice books, and interviews with women living now in three different cities of the Russian Federation – Moscow, Saratov (Volga region) and Ufa (capital of Bashkortostan Republic).

    The results of the research suggest that some parts of the Soviet discourses on maternity and beauty turn out to be similar to those that were characteristic for other European countries of the same historical period. At the same time the interviews show that the modern practices of medical and welfare institutions, the consumption of clothes as well as advice about appearance and childcare were situated in the context of shortages of goods, women’s work outside of home, rhetorics of the “naturalness” of maternity for every woman as well as that of a woman’s particular need to care about looking nice. Together with the home reproduction of many rural/patriarchal rituals of maternity and beauty it led to a contradictory everyday performance of femininity. Fluctuating categories of social status, ethnical belonging, geographical location and generation also contributed to a diversity of femininity constructions. Common sense normativities concerning practices of becoming a mother, caring for a baby and making oneself beautiful suggest that Soviet discourses on maternity and beauty were only partly accepted and reproduced by women. They were also partly rejected and subverted in everyday practices. The analysis of maternity and beauty practices shows that performative femininities were utterly complex.

  • 33.
    Hillerdal, Charlotta
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Uppsala universitet.
    People in Between: Ethncity and Material Identity, a New Approach to Deconstructed Concepts2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In questions concerning ethnicity and cultural identity in prehistory, there is a great divide between the conclusions maintained on a theoretical level of discussion and the interpretations given to material remains, when these theories are practiced on the archaeological material. Inherited scientific and political structures, usage and ideas contribute to our understanding of ethnicity and the everyday use of the concept, and influence archaeological interpretations. By illuminating these inherited preconceptions, they can be deconstructed, and a workable definition of the concepts found. A categorical approach to material culture needs to be abandoned, along with the hope of identifying ethnic groups in an archaeological material. Analyses should instead concentrate on the concept of ethnicity, as a relational, situational social identity created in the prehistoric present.

    The discussion is here approached through case studies set in different contextual situations, displaying great chronological, geographical and political variation, but also revealing some obvious points of contact. Scientific, materialistic, colonial and national perceptions of ethnic groups and ethnicity are penetrated in the case studies of the Varangians in 8th to 10th century Russia, the history of the Métis in Canada from the 18th century till today, and the Swedish speaking population on the island of Ruhnu outside Estonia at the turn of the 20th century. The Varangians are part of the Russian national myth of origin, and have been understood as a Scandinavian people, especially by Scandinavian researchers. Archaeological material of Scandinavian character dating to between the 8th and 11th centuries confirms intense interaction between Russia and Scandinavia in this time period. The Métis trace their roots back to the fur trade era and the encounter between Indian and European traders. Since 1982, they have been recognised as an indigenous people of Canada. The population of Runö was documented as Swedish speaking in the Middle Ages. They were discovered by Swedish ethnography in the 19th century, and interpreted as archaic Swedish. As a consequence of this narrative, the population was evacuated to Sweden in almost its entirety during the Second World War.

    In these cases, scientific, political and ideological aspects of social practice interface with the everyday practices in communities and influence the outward perception of that group's identity, as well as the self-perception within the community. It can be concluded that the ideological setting is equally important to a historical development as are economic or geographical circumstances. The final chapter introduces an alternative interpretation to the early Scandinavian towns as a disappearing phenomenon towards the end of the 10th century, deduced from the conclusions made in the previous case studies.

  • 34.
    Huss, Markus
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, Comparative literature.
    Male historians in exile: Constantly relating to their background2010In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, Vol. 3, no 1, 17-18 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Hvenekilde Seim, Øyvind
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Including the Serbs of Croatia into Croatia’s history writing2007In: Serbian Studies, ISSN 0742-3330, Vol. 21, no 1, 55-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The central objective of this article is to trace the ideological background of the frequent exclusion of the Serbian minority in Croatia from Croatian history books. Croatian avoidance or non-recognition of its Serbian history is sought-after in relation to the development of the Croatian state-nation ideology in the nineteenth century. In tracking the ideological background for exclusion the explanations appear not to be purely local ones, but to be closely linked to developments of nineteenth-century European nationalism and national ideologies. This paper analyzes some key modern historical events and processes that have influenced the relationship between Croats and Serbs in Croatia. The topic is exemplified through examination of history textbooks for high schools in Croatia. The article suggests strategies to support for achieving inclusion and identifies the main obstacles in this regard, but methodologically it concentrates on bringing about awareness of the background of exclusion as a necessary step in fostering inclusion.

  • 36.
    Ilves, Kristin
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Seaward Landward: Investigations on the archaeological source value of the landing site category in the Baltic Sea region2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a tendency in archaeology dealing with watercraft landing sites in a wider context to assume a direct relationship between sites in coastal and shore-bound areas and the practise of landing, without any deeper practical or theoretical exploration of the reality of any such relationship. This problem has its origins in the poor archaeological and conceptual definitions of watercraft landing sites obstructing any real understanding of the role of these sites in the maritime cultural landscape. Landing sites are taken for granted and they are undervalued as an archaeological source of explanation; notwithstanding, the concept of the landing site is readily used in archaeology in order to underpin archaeological interpretations on the maritime activities of past societies.

    In order to break away from the simplified understandings of past water-bound strategies based on the undefined concept of the landing site, this dissertation suggests a definition of watercraft landing sites in a wider social sense as water-bound contact zones; places of social interaction that can be archaeologically identified and investigated. This perspective integrates the understanding of the intentional character of human activity related to watercraft landing with the remaining archaeological traces. Archaeological definitions of landing sites that can be tested against the archaeological data are provided, and thereby, the dissertation contributes with the possibility to archaeologically evaluate and approach the social function of watercraft landing sites. This dissertation demonstrates that there can be an archaeology of landing sites.

  • 37.
    Johansson, Andreas
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    ’Vad jag har sett i Bessarabien’: Henry Baerleins och Emmanuel de Martonnes resor genom det mellankrigstida Bessarabien2007In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, no 3, 341-361 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Jonsson, Karin
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Fångna i begreppen?: Revolution, tid och politik i svensk socialistisk press 1917–19242017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis studies the uses of the concept of revolution in Swedish socialist press from 1917 to 1924. Political revolution and civil wars shook several countries. The Russian February and October Revolutions were soon followed by uprisings in countries such as Germany and Finland.

    While the social and political history of this period, with its mass demonstrations for bread and voting rights, often called the Swedish revolution, has been covered extensively in existing research, we know much less about the theoretical understanding of revolution among Swedish socialists. This thesis examines the concept of revolution from a perspective inspired by the Begriffsgeschichte of German historian Reinhart Koselleck. This foundation in the history of concepts aims at understanding how Swedish socialists, in a wide sense, understood their own time, how they related to the past and what they expected from the future, during the years of the First World War and the immediately following years. By focusing on what might be the most central, but also the most contested and most difficult to define, concept I hope to complement earlier research focusing on the social and political history of the period and its socialist movements.

    The main purpose of the thesis is to analyse how the labour movement understood revolution with particular weight placed upon the theoretical and ideological tensions between revolution and reform, determinism and voluntarism and localized and universal revolution. The starting point is the political and social changes in Sweden and abroad at that time and the place of the political press as opinion leaders capable of negotiating the space of political action. A secondary aim is to discuss how focusing on temporality can inspire new perspectives on the use of conceptual history.

    My research shows that how the concept of revolution was used was shaped both by already established notions regarding the socialist revolution as well as by the political situation at hand. The October Revolution forced a sharpening of its meaning, wherein different factions elaborated their understanding of it in relation to each other, which in turn determined how the concept was used fom that point on. 

  • 39.
    Kharkina, Anna
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Stockholms universitet, Historiska institutionen.
    From Kinship to Global Brand: The Discourse on Culture in Nordic Cooperation after World War II2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work analyzes the political instrumentalization of culture. Specifically, it studies how this is done through cultural policy within Western democracies. The analysis takes, as an example, official Nordic cultural cooperation in the post-war period. During this time, cultural exchange among Nordic countries became the subject of political attention establishing itself as part of the Nordic inter-governmental cooperation framework.

    This work focuses on three key moments in the history of official Nordic cultural cooperation: (i) the failure of the NORDEK plan (a plan which envisaged extensive economic cooperation between the Nordic countries) and the establishment of the Nordic Council of Ministers in 1971; (ii) the collapse of the Soviet system at the end of the 1980s - beginning of the 1990s; and (iii) the movement towards promoting the Nordic region on the global market in the first decade of the 2000s.

    The analysis traces the lack of convergence between the official arm’s length principle in cultural policy and how cultural cooperation actually worked. The results of the research both demonstrate the various ways culture was instrumentalized and also prove that the politically defined concept of culture can receive different interpretations in the official discourse depending on current political goals.

  • 40.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    In the shadows of Poland and Russia: the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and Sweden in the European crisis of the mid-17th century2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines and analyses the Union between the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and Sweden signed in 1655 at Kėdainiai and the political crisis that followed. The union was a result of strong separatist dreams among the Lithuanian-Ruthenian Protestant elite led by the Radziwiłł family, and if implemented it would radically change the balance of power in the Baltic Sea region. The main legal point of the Union was the breach of Lithuanian federation with Poland and the establishment of a federation with Sweden. The Grand Duchy of Lithuania aspired to return to international relations as a self-governing subject. The Union meant a new Scandinavian alternative to Polish and Russian domination. The author places the events in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the general crisis that occurred in Europe in the middle of the 17th century characterized by a great number of wars, rebellions and civil wars from Portugal to Ukraine, and which builds the background to the crisis for Lithuania and Sweden. The research proved the importance of lesser powers in changing the geopolitical balance between the Great Powers. The conflict over Lithuania and Belarus was the main reason for the Swedish-Russian, Polish-Russian and Ukrainian-Russian wars. The failure of the Union with Sweden was caused by both internal and external factors. Internally, various ethnic, confessional and political groups within the nobility of Lithuania were split in favour of different foreign powers – from Muscovy to Transylvania. The external cause for the failure of the Union project was the failure of Swedish strategy. Sweden concentrated its activity to Poland, not to Lithuania. After the Union, Swedish authorities treated the Grand Duchy as an invaded country, not an equal. The Swedish administration introduced heavy taxation and was unable to control the brutality of the army. As a result Sweden was defeated in both Lithuania and Poland. Among the different economic, political and religious explanations of the general crisis, the case of Lithuania shows the importance of the political conflicts. For the separatists of Lithuania the main motive to turn against Poland and to promote alliance with Sweden, Russia or the Cossacks was the inability of Poland to shield the Grand Duchy from a Russian invasion.The Lithuanian case was a provincial rebellion led by the native nobility against their monarch, based on tradition of the previous independence and statehood period. It was not nationalism in its modern meaning, but instead a crisis of identity in the form of a conflict between Patria and Central Power. However, the cost of being a part of Sweden or Muscovy was greater than the benefit of political protection. Therefore, the pro-Polish orientation prevailed when Poland after 1658 recovered its military ability the local nobility regrouped around Warsaw. The Grand Duchy of Lithuania managed to remain on the political map of Europe, but at the price of general religious Catholization and cultural Polonization. After the crisis, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania gradually changed into a deep province of the Polish state.

  • 41.
    Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Tradition of Belarusian Statehood: Conflicts About the Past of Belarus2004In: Contemporary Change in Belarus / [ed] Egle Rindzeviciute, Huddinge: Baltic & East European Graduate School, Södertörns högskola , 2004, 41-72 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Lundell, Erika
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Crossdressing på Medeltidsveckan i Visby: Om iscensättanden av feminina och maskulina medeltidsgenu2008In: Lambda Nordica: Tidskrift om homosexualitet, ISSN 1100-2573, no 1-2, 97-107 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Lundell, Erika
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Linnell, Sandra
    Gullegrisar2010In: Bang, ISSN 1102-4593, no 1, 56-58 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Malitska, Julia
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Negotiating Imperial Rule: Colonists and Marriage in the Nineteenth-century Black Sea Steppe2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After falling under the power of the Russian Crown, the Northern Black Sea steppe from the end of eighteenth century crystallized as the Russian government’s prime venue for socioeconomic and sociocultural reinvention and colonization. Vast ethnic, sociocultural and even ecological changes followed.  Present study is preoccupied with the marriage of the immigrant population from the German lands who came to the region in the course of its state orchestrated colonization, and was officially categorized as “German colonists.” The book illuminates the multiple ways in which marriage and household formation among the colonists was instrumentalized by the imperial politics in the Northern Black Sea steppe, and conditioned by socioeconomic rationality of its colonization. Marriage formation and dissolution among the colonists were gradually absorbed into the competencies of the colonial vertical power. Intending to control colonist marriage and household formation through the introduced marriage regime, the Russian government and its regional representatives lacked the actual means to exert this control at the local level. On the ground, however, imperial politics was mediated by the people it targeted, and by the functionaries tasked with its implementation. As the study reveals, the paramount importance was given to functional households and sustainable farms based on non-conflictual relations between parties. Situated on the crossroads of state, church, community, and personal interests, colonist marriage engendered clashes between secular and ecclesiastical bodies over the supremacy over it. The interplay of colonization as politics, and colonization as an imperial situation with respect to the marriage of the German colonists is explored in this book by concentrating on both norms and practices. Another important consideration is the ways gender and colonization constructed and determined one another reciprocally, both in legal norms and in actual practices. Secret divorces and unauthorized marriages, open and hidden defiance, imitations and unruliness, refashioning of rituals and discourses, and desertions – a number of strategies and performances which challenged and negotiated the marriage regime in the region, were scholarly examined for the first time in this book. 

  • 45.
    Malitska, Julia
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    People in between: Baltic islanders as colonists on the steppe2014In: The Lost Swedish Tribe: Reapproaching the history of Gammalsvenskby in Ukraine / [ed] Piotr Wawrzeniuk & Julia Malitska, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2014, 1, , 151 p.61-85 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University College, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology. Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    All quiet on the eastern front2011In: Places in between: the archaeology of social, cultural and geographical borders and borderlands / [ed] David Mulllin, Oxford: Oxbow , 2011, 13-22 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Archaeology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Stockholms universitet.
    An Archaeology of the Iron Curtain: Material and Metaphor2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Iron Curtain was seen as the divider between East and West in Cold War Europe. The term is closely connected to the Cold War and expressions such as ‘behind the Iron Curtain’ or ‘after the fall of the Iron Curtain’ are common within historical discussions in the second half of the twentieth century. Even if the term was used regularly as a metaphor there was also a material side with a series of highly militarised borders running throughout Europe. The metaphor and the material borders developed together and individually, sometimes intertwined and sometimes separate.

    In my research I have carried out two fieldwork studies at sites that can be considered part of the former Iron Curtain. The first study area is located between Italy and Slovenia (formerly Yugoslavia) in which the division between the two towns of Nova Gorica on the Slovenian side and Gorizia on the Italian side was investigated. The second study area is located on the border between Austria and Czech Republic (formerly Czechoslovakia) within two national parks. A smaller study was also carried out in Berlin as the Berlin Wall is considered of major importance in the context of the Iron Curtain. This research has resulted in large quantities of sources and information and a constant need to re-evaluate the methods used within an archaeology of a more recent past.

    This thesis falls within what is usually referred to as contemporary archaeology, a fairly young sub-discipline of archaeology. Few large research projects have so far been published, and methods have been described as still somewhat experimental. Through my fieldwork it has been possible to acknowledge and highlight the problems and opportunities within contemporary archaeology. It has become clear how the materials stretch both through time and place demonstrating the complex process of how the material that archaeologists investigate can be created. The material of the Iron Curtain, is also well worth studying in its own right.

  • 48.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Contemporary and historical archaeology in the making: [review of] Mats Burström, Samtidsarkeologi, and Laura McAtackeny, Matthew Palus and Agela Piccini (eds), Contemporary and historical archaeology in theory2008In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 11, no 2-3, 270-273 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 49.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Review of] John Schofield and Wayne Cocroft (eds), A Fearsome Heritage : Diverse Legacies of the Cold War2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 2, 263-265 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 50.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS). Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Maritime Archaeological Research Institute.
    Östersjön som järnridå2011In: Kriget som aldrig kom: 12 forskare om kalla kriget / [ed] Andreas Linderoth, Karlskrona: Marinmuseum , 2011, 32-47 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
12 1 - 50 of 95
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