sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Cosmopolitanism and the pedagogy of immediacy: Preparing teachers for the philosophical life of early childhood2019In: Knowledge Cultures, ISSN 2327-5731, E-ISSN 2375-6527, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 58-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is said that it takes a village to raise a child. It may also be said that it takes the unexplored wilderness to raise a philosopher. In this text I begin with Henry David Thoreau’s trope of going out into the wilderness to “witness our own limits transgressed” as an expression of a cosmopolitan philosophical exercise. This article is an attempt to bear witness to the transgressions of communal village life in the philosophical expressions of children. The sketch of those expressions leads to a depiction of philosophical life in early childhood education where, whatever pedagogical outlook or methods they may use, teachers will depend on a pedagogy of immediacy, of living with the child in the moment of awakening that is the child’s philosophical experience. This is a cosmopolitan moment of going beyond the boundaries of communal life and exercising untaken ways of living in the world.

  • 2.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Filosofi i tidig barndom: Omedelbarhetens pedagogik2019Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Barns filosofi utmanar både etablerade filosofiska idéer och pedagogiska praktiker genom att ställa frågor om det som vuxna ofta tar för givet. Den här boken utgår från de filosofiska frågor och undersökningar som uppstår i barns egna göranden, lekar och växande. Utifrån barnens filosoferande visas hur deras tankar och undersökningar bidrar till filosofiska diskussioner och hur dessa kan påverka vuxnas pedagogiska förhållningssätt. I boken möter barnens tankar filosofi från antiken till vår samtid, från olika traditioner, som existentialism, pragmatism och urfolksfilosofi, samt filosofer som Platon, Thoreau, Diogenes, Wittgenstein, Kierkegaard, Heidegger och Weil. Här behandlas frågor om barndom och lek, språk och mening, politik och etik, liv och död, samt pedagogiska förhållningssätt till barns utforskande av sådana ämnen. Genom att uppmärksamma den filosofi som uppstår i mötet med barnens nyfikenhet förespråkar författaren en omedelbarhetens pedagogik. En pedagogik som består i att kunna ta tillvara barnens filosofi när den uppstår. Detta är en bok som väcker frågor, intresse och en känsla för barns tänkande, snarare än att ge färdiga svar – det är en bok att tala om, diskutera och tänka med. Filosofi i tidig barndom - Omedelbarhetens pedagogik riktar sig i huvudsak till blivande förskollärare och barnskötare och till de som arbetar med barn i förskolan, men även till dem som lever med barn och som intresserar sig för små barns tänkande. Viktor Johansson är Lektor i pedagogik vid Södertörns högskola. Hans forskning har fokus på pedagogisk filosofi, litteraturens roll i pedagogiska undersökningar, samt barns tänkande.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Förskollärares kunskap: En existens- och vardagsspråksfilosofisk betraktelse2019In: Förskoletidningen, ISSN 0348-0364, no 1, p. 30-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Kierkegaard On Dialogical Education: Vulnerable Freedom2019In: The Journal of Aesthetic Education, ISSN 0021-8510, E-ISSN 1543-7809, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 111-122Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Gibbons, Andrew
    et al.
    Auckland University, New Zealand.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    The Unimaginable Future and Teaching2019In: Beijing International Review of Education, ISSN 2590-2547, Vol. 1, no 2-3, p. 246-247Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Örebro universitet.
    Wildly wise in the terrible moment: Kant, Emerson, and improvisatory Bildung in early childhood education2019In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 519-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to show how Emerson provides a reworking of Kantian understandings of moral education in young children’s Bildung. The article begins and ends by thinking of Emersonian self-cultivation as a form of improvisatory or wild Bildung. It explores the role of Bildung and selfcultivation in preschools through a philosophy that accounts for children’s ‘Wild wisdom’ by letting Emerson speak to Kant. The paper argues that Kant’s vision of Bildung essentially involves reason’s turn upon itself and that Emerson, particularly in how he is taken up by Cavell, shows that sucha turn is already present in the processes of children inheriting, learning, and improvising with language. This improvisatory outlook on moral education is contrasted with common goals of moral education prescribed in early childhood education where the Swedish Curriculum for the Preschool Lpfö 98 is used as an example.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education. Dalarna University.
    Fiction and learning realities after postmodernism2018In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 50, no 14, p. 1517-1518Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Chinnery, Ann
    et al.
    Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada.
    Hodgson, Naomi
    Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool, UK.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Introduction: Section 3 – Revisiting Enduring Educational Debates2018In: International Handbook of Philosophy of Education / [ed] Smeyers, Paul, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 749-754Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Debate is arguably a central aspect of philosophy. There are a number of topics, however, on which the weighing of argument and counter-argument does not reach a final conclusion, but only a temporary settlement before the issue raises itself again. Understanding the historical development of such debates in philosophy of education is crucial to an appreciation of contemporary discussions in the field of education more broadly. They are debates that seem to have been always there and that continue to challenge new developments. Each chapter in Section 3, Revisiting Enduring Educational Debates, situates the debate related to a particular topic, considers its relevance, and highlights how it continues to influence educational theory and practice today.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Killing the Buddha: Towards a heretical philosophy of learning2018In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how different philosophical models and pictures of learning can become dogmatic and disguise other conceptions of learning. With reference to a passage from St. Paul, I give a sense of the dogmatic teleology that underpins philosophical assumptions about learning. The Pauline assumption is exemplified through a variety of models of learning as conceptualised by Israel Scheffler. In order to show how the Paulinian dogmatism can give rise to radically different pictures of learning, the article turns to St. Augustine’s and Robert Brandom’s examples of language learning, and to general strands in scholarship on moral education. Dewey’s view of childhood immaturity and the problem of adult maturity are used as first attempt at a counter picture to the idea that learning must have an end. The article takes Dewey’s idea further by suggesting how the Zen-Buddhist idea of killing the Buddha and Wittgenstein’s method of destroying pictures work on the dogmatic focus on uses of ‘learning’ that assume ends. In conclusion, the article suggests three possible uses of ‘learning’—learning from wonder, intransitive learning and passionate learning—that do not assume that learning has or must have a teleological end.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Literature and Philosophical Play in Early Childhood Education: A Humanities Based Approach to Research and Practice2018 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature and Philosophical Play in Early Childhood Education explores the role of philosophy and the humanities as pedagogy in early childhood educational research and practice, arguing that research should attend to questions about education and growth that concern social structures, individual development, and existential aspects of learning. It demonstrates how we can think of pedagogy and educational practices in early childhood as artistic, poetic, and philosophical, and exemplifies a humanities-based approach by giving literature and artful play a place in shaping the ground of practice and research. The book explores a range of alternative approaches to theory in education and the feasibility of a curriculum of moral values for young children and contains a variety of scenes involving children’s play and involvement with literature and fiction. It portrays how engaging with children’s play can be a philosophical and pedagogical investigation where children’s own philosophising is taken seriously, where children’s thoughts are put on a par with established research and philosophy. Moreover, the book engages with a range of different forms of literature – picture books, novels, auto-fiction, poetry – and develops these as portrayals that serve as a basis for non-theoretical and poetic pedagogical research. Literature and Philosophical Play in Early Childhood Education will be of great interest to academics, researchers, and post-graduate students in the fields of philosophy and education. It will also appeal to upper-level undergraduates, school psychologists, teachers, and therapists.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education. University Örebro.
    Philosophy for Children and Children for Philosophy: Possibilities and Problems2018In: International Handbook of Philosophy of Education / [ed] Smeyers, Paul, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 1149-1161Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter begins by illustrating the role of children in philosophy, and how childhood may impact philosophy, by turning to the work of Stanley Cavell. In particular this chapter focuses on his idea of philosophy as a confrontation with our culture’s criteria, but read in the light of Pierre Hadot’s understanding of philosophy as a way of life. It goes on to consider how the philosophy for children movement has developed through three generations of thought and practice. To illustrate how these generations have emerged, the chapter surveys differing views of the use of picture books in children’s philosophizing and philosophy. Going on from the third generation’s criticism of how the philosophy for children movement’s use of picture books has been insufficiently aware of its own assumptions, limits, and borders, the chapter concludes by showing that the critical moves from one generation to another in the field itself can be seen as a philosophical way of life, a way of life that involves philosophy for children confronting its own criteria, by emphasizing and questioning not only the boundaries of the content but also of the places where philosophy with children happens.

  • 12.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Örebro University.
    L’immédiateté passionnée: Wittgenstein et Cavell sur le désir et la philosophie incarnée dans la petite enfance2017In: A Contrario, ISSN 1660-7880, Vol. 2, no 25, p. 39-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the philosophy of young children. How can philosophy happen in early childhood? What does it mean to hear philosophy in young children’s expressions? What kind of listening does it require? To explore such questions, this paper turns to the ordinary language philosophy of J. L. Austin, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and Stanley Cavell, and particularly Cavell’s discussion of Austin’s elaboration on the notion of performative utterances. Cavell draws out a passionate dimension of philosophizing that involves not just “the responsibility of implication,” as Cavell puts it, but also “the rights of desire.” This paper suggests that in order to see the philosophical aspects of children’s questions and expressions, we need to listen to how children use particular expressions, which involves understanding the context, the place, and the body. Continuing on from Cavell, we conclude that there are passionate dimensions of children’s philosophical expressions that call for improvisatory responses—a pedagogy of immediacy.

  • 13.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Örebro universitet.
    The Weight of Dogmatism: Investigating “Learning” in Dewey’s Pragmatism and Wittgenstein’s Ordinary Language Philosophy2017In: A Companion to Wittgenstein on Education: Pedagogical Investigations / [ed] Michael A. Peters & Jeff Stickney, Singapore: Springer, 2017, p. 339-352Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is it to learn something? This essay is an attempt to give a treatment of our expectations and wants from an answer to that question by placing Dewey’s pragmatism and Wittgenstein’s ordinary language philosophy in conversation with each other. Both Dewey and Wittgenstein introduce philosophical visions and methods that are meant to avoid dogmatic responses to such questions. Dewey presents a vision of learning based on the view of the human organism transacting in its environment and in that way being involved with education without any other end than continual growth. By suggesting possible results of a Wittgensteinian investigation of our use of the word “learning ”, the essay also proposes a twist on Dewey’s theory of learning, which dissolves our need for a theory of learning as an answer to the question. This gives the child a voice in contexts where the word “learn” is used. An investigation of the use of “learn” becomes a method of releasing us from the dogmatic requirements that determine what learning is. Further, Dewey’s terminology comes to comprise examples of possible uses rather than being a statement as to what learning is.

  • 14.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Örebro universitet.
    Unserious but Serious Pilgrimages: What Educational Philosophy Can Learn about Fiction and Reality from Children's Artful Play2017In: Educational Theory, ISSN 0013-2004, E-ISSN 1741-5446, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 309-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What happens if we think of children's play as a form of great art that we turn to and return to for inspiration, for education? If we can see play as art, then what and how can we learn from children's play or from playing with them? What can philosophy, or philosophers, learn from children's play? In this essay Viktor Johansson gives examples of what and when children can teach philosophers through play or, more specifically, how children's play can teach philosophers about the relation between fiction and reality. It begins by exploring the educational relation between fiction and reality in recent revivals of literary humanism. Johansson gives examples from a preschool project of how children use fiction picture books and create new fiction in their play, and how they do so in ways that relate to previous philosophical considerations of literary fiction. To explore this, the essay enters into conversation with the work of Iris Murdoch on the playfulness of art. Through, and in contrast to, Murdoch's work, Johansson establishes that play can be great art through its nonpurposefulness and its use of skill and imagination. Moreover, turning to children's play becomes a method for attending to what Ludwig Wittgenstein calls philosophy's natural history, that is, a historicization of philosophical thinking that enables philosophers to learn from children. Johansson concludes by showing that encounters between fiction and play, and with children playing, can be an educational embroilment, not only between teacher and child, but between teacher, child, the visual, the material, and the philosophical in which all learn from one another.

  • 15.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Örebro universitet.
    Difficulties of the Will: Philosophy of education through children's literature2016In: Philosophy and theory in educational research: writing in the margin / [ed] Amanda Fulford, Naomi Hodgson, London: Routledge, 2016, p. 74-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Stockholm University.
    Questions from the Rough Ground: Teaching, Autobiography and the Cosmopolitan "I"2015In: Studies in Philosophy and Education, ISSN 0039-3746, E-ISSN 1573-191X, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 441-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I explore how cosmopolitanism can be a challenge for ordinary language philosophy. I also explore cosmopolitan aspects of Stanley Cavell's ordinary language philosophy. Beginning by considering the moral aspects of cosmopolitanism and some examples of discussions of cosmopolitanism in philosophy of education, I turn to the scene of instruction in Wittgenstein and to Stanley Cavell's emphasis on the role of autobiography in philosophy. The turn to the autobiographical dimension of ordinary language philosophy, especially its use of "I" and "We", becomes a way to work on the tension between the particular and the universal claims of cosmopolitanism. I show that the autobiographical aspects of philosophy and the philosophical significance of autobiographical writing in ordinary language philosophy can be seen as a test of representativeness-a test of the ground upon which one stands when saying "I", "We" and "You.".

  • 17.
    Roth, Klas
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Gustafsson, Martin
    Åbo Akademi.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Stockholm University.
    Introduction: Perfectionism and Education-Kant and Cavell on Ethics and Aesthetics in Society2014In: The Journal of Aesthetic Education, ISSN 0021-8510, E-ISSN 1543-7809, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Stockholm University.
    Perfectionist Philosophy as a (an Untaken) Way of Life2014In: The Journal of Aesthetic Education, ISSN 0021-8510, E-ISSN 1543-7809, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 58-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Stockholms universitet.
    Dissonant Voices: Philosophy, Children's Literature, and Perfectionist Education2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dissonant Voices has a twofold aspiration. First, it is a philosophical treatment of everyday pedagogical interactions between children and their elders, between teachers and pupils. More specifically it is an exploration of the possibilities to go on with dissonant voices that interrupt established practices – our attunement – in behaviour, practice and thinking. Voices that are incomprehensible or expressions that are unacceptable, morally or otherwise. The text works on a tension between two inclinations: an inclination to wave off, discourage, or change an expression that is unacceptable or unintelligible; and an inclination to be tolerant and accept the dissonant expression as doing something worthwhile, but different.

    The second aspiration is a philosophical engagement with children’s literature. Reading children’s literature becomes a form of philosophising, a way to explore the complexity of a range of philosophical issues. This turn to literature marks a dissatisfaction with what philosophy can accomplish through argumentation and what philosophy can do with a particular and limited set of concepts for a subject, such as ethics. It is a way to go beyond philosophising as the founding of theories that justify particular responses. The philosophy of dissonance and children’s literature becomes a way to destabilise justifications of our established practices and ways of interacting.

    The philosophical investigations of dissonance are meant to make manifest the possibilities and risks of engaging in interactions beyond established agreement or attunements. Thinking of the dissonant voice as an expression beyond established practices calls for improvisation. Such improvisations become a perfectionist education where both the child and the elder, the teacher and the student, search for as yet unattained forms of interaction and take responsibility for every word and action of the interaction.

    The investigation goes through a number of picture books and novels for children such as Harry Potter, Garmann’s Summer, and books by Shaun Tan, Astrid Lindgren and Dr. Seuss as well narratives by J.R.R. Tolkien, Henrik Ibsen, Jane Austen and Henry David Thoreau. These works of fiction are read in conversation with philosophical works of, and inspired by, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Stanley Cavell, their moral perfectionism and ordinary language philosophy.

  • 20.
    Johansson, Viktor
    Stockholm University.
    "I am scared too": Children's Literature for an Ethics beyond Moral Concepts2013In: The Journal of Aesthetic Education, ISSN 0021-8510, E-ISSN 1543-7809, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 80-109Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf