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  • 1.
    Bäckström, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    A dogma of speech act theory2020In: Inquiry, ISSN 0020-174X, E-ISSN 1502-3923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I argue that the distinction between illocutionary and perlocutionary acts needs examination, not just in its details but in its philosophical standing. We need to consider whether the distinction is motivated by (sometimes unwittingly) assumed problematic philosophical assumptions concerning the nature of our dependence on the words of others and the rationality of speech reception. Working with an example of the act of telling, I argue against the idea that the distinction is self-evident or easy to draw. By developing an analogy with perception, I argue further that defending the distinction requires one to engage in an argumentative dialectic with powerful alternative positions. I end by suggesting that taking the challenge further would require us to look more closely at how passivity and rationality might be reconciled in the reception of speech.

  • 2.
    Bäckström, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Vad är mat och vad är annat?: Cavell, skepticism, erkännande och komedi2019In: Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-1943, E-ISSN 1504-2901, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 220-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay I discuss, by way of an analysis of a scene from a comedy-show, the relation between humor and comedy and the theme of skepticism in the philosophy of Stanley Cavell. In The Claim of Reason, Cavell develops in detail the connection between skepticism and tragedy, but the connection between skepticism and comedy is only touched upon briefly and in terms of a symmetry with tragedy. I want to suggest that when we allow humor and comedy to take center stage in relation to the theme of skepticism, an asymmetry will emerge. In humor and comedy, there is a possibility of acknowledging the pain involved in tragedy. I discuss Cavell’s concept of acknowledgment and argue that it undergoes a modification when we consider certain forms of humor.

  • 3.
    Bäckström, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Modes of a “complicated form of life”: Expression and human-animal continuity2018In: Wittgenstein and Naturalism / [ed] Kevin M. Cahill, Thomas Raleigh, New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 223-240Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    My aim in this paper is to use the later Wittgenstein to argue against what I call the continuity-view of human and animal expression. Further, I will show that skepticism about animal expression is not the only alternative to the continuity-view. The paper has three sections. In the first section, I articulate the central commitments of the continuity-view: 1) There is a significant overlap in expressive behavior between humans and animals 2) Adding new expressive repertoire to include linguistic expression does not fundamentally alter the entire spectrum of expressive behavior. In the second section, I develop some passages in Wittgenstein into an argument against those commitments. Reflections on the temporal dimension of expressions and the interplay between non-verbal and verbal expression are central to this argument. In the third and more tentative section, I turn to how to avoid skepticism about animal expression, specifically in the form of claiming that the word “expression” is ambiguous. I discuss two ways of preserving conceptual unity while avoiding the continuity-view: categorial generality (which I find in John McDowell’s view on the human-animal relation) and family resemblance (which I associate with Wittgenstein).

  • 4.
    Bäckström, Stina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Huitric, Miriam
    Stockholms universitet.
    Normark, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Reflekterande texter om digitala media: Ett forskningskompendium till teaterföreställningen Spegla mig – ett drama av Rebecca Örtman, konstnärlig ledare för RATS Teater2018Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Bäckström, Stina
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Gustafsson, Martin
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Skill, Drill, and Intelligent Performance: Ryle and Intellectualism2017In: Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy, E-ISSN 2159-0303, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 41-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bäckström, Stina
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    What is it to Despychologize Psychology?2017In: European Journal of Philosophy, ISSN 0966-8373, E-ISSN 1468-0378, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 358-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay, I distinguish two ways of depsychologizing psychology: 'anti-psychologism' and 'non-psychologism'. Both positions are responses to the Fregean sharp distinction between the logical and the psychological. But where anti-psychologism, which I find in John McDowell, attempts to overcome the sharp distinction by arguing that psychological states and their expressions are apt to be articulated into judgments, Stanley Cavell's non-psychologism, a powerful and neglected alternative, wants to overcome the sharp distinction by abandoning judgment as the paradigm expression of thought and communication.

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