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  • 1.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Exploring personality and musical self-perceptions among vocalists and instrumentalists at music colleges2019In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 465-482Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    How modes of instrumental practice are distributed in three musical genres and among vocalists and instrumentalists at music colleges2019In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 767-778Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Dimdins, Girts
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology. University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Montgomery, Henry
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology. Uppsala University.
    Psychological variables underlying political orientations in an old and a new democracy: A comparative study between Sweden and Latvia2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 437-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines in detail the psychological variables underlying ideological political orientation, and structure and contents of this orientation, in Sweden and Latvia. Individual political orientation is conceptualized on two dimensions: acceptance vs. rejection of social change and acceptance vs. rejection of inequality. Swedish (N = 320) and Latvian (N = 264) participants completed measures of political orientation, Social Dominance Orientation (SDO), Right Wing Authoritarianism (RWA), self vs. other orientation, tolerance for ambiguity, humanism and normativism, core political values, system justification, as well as moral foundations questionnaire and portrait values questionnaire. The results showed that the relation among the measured variables was similar in both samples. Swedish participants showed stronger endorsement of egalitarian attitudes and social values, whereas we found more self-enhancing and socially conservative values and attitudes among the Latvian participants.

  • 4.
    Sandgren, Maria
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Montgomery, Henry
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology. Stockholm University.
    Dimdins, Girts
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology. University of Latvia.
    A comparative study of psychological mechanisms underlying political orientation in an old and a new democracy2015In: 2015 Program The Society for Personality and Social psychology 16th Annual Convention: Long Beach, February 26-18, 2015, 2015, p. 505-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Montgomery, Henry
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology. Stockholm University.
    Gustafsson, Philip
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Dimdins, Girts
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology. University of Latvia.
    Temporal distance and the perception of political proposals in terms of their favorability, feasibility and desirability2015In: 2015 Program The Society for Personality and Social psychology 16th Annual Convention: Long Beach, February 26-18, 2015, 2015, p. 56-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty-one university college students were presented with 10 political proposals, recently advanced in Sweden. For each participant, each of the 10 proposals  was described as being implemented in the near future and in a more distant future. The participants were asked to judge the proposals in terms of their favorability, desirability, and feasibility. In line with Construal Level Theory (CLT, Trope & Liberman, 2010), it was found that feasibility better predicted favorability of close future proposals (as compared to temporally distant proposals) whereas the opposite pattern was found for desirability.  Also in line with CLT, correlational data suggested that participants to a larger extent as compared to the near future tailored their representations of the distant future such that feasibility co-varied positively with the desirability of a proposal, suggesting an optimism bias. Presumably, this was possible because feasibility is less concrete and more malleable for more distant events.

  • 6.
    Dimdins, Girts
    et al.
    University of Latvia.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Montgomery, Henry
    Uppsala Universitet.
    A two-dimensional model for measurement of political orientation2014In: On conference website, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although often measured on a single right-left (or conservative-liberal) continuum, individual political orientation can be conceptualized as consisting of at least two orthogonal dimensions. The first is acceptance vs. rejection of social change, and the second is acceptance vs. rejection of inequality. We propose a theoretical model where the former dimension is represented as acceptance vs. avoidance of uncertainty, and the latter dimension is represented as tough mindedness vs. empathy. The former axis corresponds to the conservation vs. openness to change dimension in the Schwartz's (1992) value model; the latter axis corresponds to the self-enhancement vs. self-transcendence dimension. Two secondary axes represent the possible combinations of the variables defining the primary axes. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty avoidance result in high system justification, whereas empathy in combination with uncertainty acceptance represents low system justification. This axis corresponds to the self-protection vs. growth dimension of the refined Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty acceptance results in preference for self-reliance, whereas the opposite combination represents preference for dependence on others. This axis corresponds to the personal vs. social focus of the Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Participants (N = 287) completed both one-dimensional and two-dimensional measures of political orientation, measures of social dominance orientation, right wing authoritarianism, system justification, need for cognitive closure, moral motives, values, dependence on others, and a number of political attitude measures. Multidimensional scaling supported the proposed model. The results show that the network of political beliefs and attitudes that represents individual political orientation can be largely reduced to the basic psychological variables of uncertainty avoidance and tough-mindedness, and that both dimensions of political orientation are separable not only theoretically, but also empirically. Our findings call for using two-dimensional measures of political orientation instead of one-dimensional measures (even in cultural contexts where both dimensions are highly correlated), because each dimension can be used to predict its own set of political beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors.

  • 7.
    Sandgren, Maria
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Dimdins, Girts
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology. University of Latvia.
    Montgomery, Henry
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    An empirical test of a two-dimensional model of political orientation: Disentangling the liberal-conservative continuum2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual political orientation can be conceptualized on two dimensions: acceptance vs. rejection of social change and acceptance vs. rejection of inequality. We propose a theoretical model where the orthogonal primary axes represent acceptance vs. avoidance of uncertainty, and tough mindedness vs. empathy, respectively. The former axis corresponds to the conservation-openness to change dimension in the Schwartz's (1992) value model; the latter axis corresponds to the self-enhancement vs. self-transcendence dimension. Two secondary axes represent the possible combinations of the variables defining the primary axes. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty avoidance result in high system justification, whereas empathy in combination with uncertainty acceptance represents low system justification. This axis corresponds to the growth vs. self-protection dimension of the refined Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty acceptance results in preference for self-reliance, whereas the opposite combination represents preference for dependence on others. This axis corresponds to the social vs. personal focus of the Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Participants (N = 287) completed measures of SDO, RWA, system justification, NFC, moral motives, values, dependence, and a number of political attitude measures. Multidimensional scaling supported the proposed model. The results show that the social and economic aspects of political orientation are both theoretically and empirically separable, and can be at least partially explained with the importance of basic values. The model allows a deeper analysis of individual political orientation beyond a simple liberal-conservative division.

  • 8.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Creativity - The missing link between critical and future-oriented thinking in higher education2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Psychological mechanisms underlying political orientations in an old and a newdemocracy: A comparative study between Sweden and Latvia2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Sandgren, Maria
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Dimdins, Girts
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology. University of Latvia.
    Montgomery, Henry
    Stockholms universitet.
    Testing a new theoretical model of political orientation: Findings beyond the simple liberal-conservative division2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual political orientation is primarily comprised of two dimensions: acceptance vs. rejection of social change and acceptance vs. rejection of inequality. We propose a theoretical model where the orthogonal primary axes represent both dimensions (corresponding to acceptance vs. avoidance of uncertainty, and tough mindedness vs. empathy, respectively). Two secondary axes represent the possible combinations of these psychological variables. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty avoidance result in pronounced system justification tendencies, whereas empathy in combination with uncertainty acceptance represent low system justification. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty acceptance results in preference for self-reliance, whereas the opposite combination represents preference for dependence on others. Participants (N = 287) completed measures of SDO, RWA, system justification, NFC, moral motives, values, dependence, and a number of political attitude measures. Multidimensional scaling supported the proposed model. The model allows a deeper analysis of individual political orientation beyond a simple liberal-conservative division.

    To explain individual political orientation, we propose and successfully test a theoretical model where two primary dimensions of acceptance vs. avoidance of uncertainty, and tough mindedness vs. empathy are combined resulting in the secondary dimensions of high vs. low system justification, and high vs. low dependence on others.

  • 11.
    Dimdins, Girts
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology. University of Latvia.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Montgomery, Henry
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology. Uppsala University.
    Uncertainty avoidance and tough-mindedness as the bases for system justification and dependence on others2014In: ISJR Conference Program, 2014, p. 133-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Dimdins, Girts
    et al.
    University of Latvia.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Montgomery, Henry
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Uncertainty avoidance and tough-mindedness as the psychological bases of political orientation2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study tests a theoretical model where the social dimension of political orientation (acceptance vs. rejection of social change) is represented as acceptance vs. avoidance of uncertainty, and the economic dimension (acceptance vs. rejection of inequality) is represented as tough mindedness vs. empathy. The former axis corresponds to the conservation-openness to change dimension in the Schwartz's (1992) value model; the latter axis corresponds to the self-enhancement vs. self-transcendence dimension. {Schwartz, 1992 #322}Two secondary axes represent the possible combinations of the variables defining the primary axes. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty avoidance result in high system justification, whereas empathy in combination with uncertainty acceptance represents low system justification. This axis corresponds to the growth vs. self-protection dimension of the refined Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty acceptance results in preference for self-reliance, whereas the opposite combination represents preference for dependence on others. This axis corresponds to the social vs. personal focus of the Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Participants (N = 287) completed measures of SDO, RWA, system justification, NFC, moral motives, values, dependence, and a number of political attitude measures. Multidimensional scaling supported the proposed model. The results show that the network of political beliefs and attitudes that represents individual political orientation can be largely reduced to the basic psychological variables of uncertainty avoidance and tough-mindedness, and that both dimensions of political orientation are separable, both theoretically and empirically. The model allows a deeper analysis of individual political orientation beyond a simple liberal-conservative division.

  • 13.
    Forsberg Lundell, Fanny
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    High-level proficiency in late L2 acquisition: Relationships between collocational production, language aptitude and personality2013In: Sensitive periods, language aptitude, and ultimate L2 attainment / [ed] Granena, G., & Long, M., Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013, p. 231-256Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Körsång, välbefinnande och vitalitet2013In: Manskörssång i tid och rum: Akademiska Sångföreningen 1838–2013: 175- årsjubileumsskrift / [ed] Michaela Bränn, Helsingfors, Finland: Akademiska Sångföreningen , 2013Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Psychology.
    Improvisation as a mindset for enhancing artistic potential2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to improvise can be regarded as the core in innovative and creative behaviour regardless of field and domain. Improvisation involves a readiness to deal with the unexpected and to create novelty as well as an ability to initiate similar events. Yet, our immediate understanding of improvisation as mainly a part of a performance might cause us to disregard how improvisation could be a crucial part in the process of enhancing the artistic potential.

         As the professional singing voice has many different meanings and uses for the singers (Sandgren, 2010), and one of the central meanings is the voice as means to maintain a high singing ability, therefore it would be valuable to investigate the activity of improvisation as  means or  consistent approach to create new perspectives and ideas.

         The focus of this theoretical paper is on improvisation as a certain mindset that can be developed through training. The line of thought draws on research on creativity and improvisation in cognition and neuroscience (Dietrich, 2004; Kaufman & Sternberg, 2010). Findings on improvisation in domains such as music (Berliner, 1994; MacDonald et al., 2006; Sandgren, 2005), psychotherapy (Stern et al, 1998) and organisations (Weick, 1995; 1998) will be compared.

  • 16.
    Cuypers, Koenraad Frans
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.
    Skjei Knudtsen, Margunn
    Nord-Trøndelag County Council, Steinkjer, Norway.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Psychology.
    Krokstad, Steinar
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.
    Wikström, Britt Maj
    Akerhus University, Lilleström, Norway.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm University.
    Cultural activities and public health: research in Norway and Sweden. An overview2011In: Arts and Health, ISSN 1753-3015, E-ISSN 1753-3023, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 6-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Sandgren, Maria
    Evidence for strong immediate well-being effects of choral singing: With more enjoyment for women than for men2009In: Proceedings of the 7th Triennial Conference of European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM 2009) Jyväskylä, Finland / [ed] Jukka Louhivuori, Tuomas Eerola, Suvi Saarikallio, Tommi Himberg, Päivi-Sisko Eerola, Dep. of Music, Univ. of Jyväskylä , 2009, p. 475-479Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18. Sandgren, Maria
    Health anxiety instead of performance anxiety among opera singers2009In: Proceedings of the 7th Triennial Conference of European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM 2009) Jyväskylä, Finland / [ed] Jukka Louhivuori, Tuomas Eerola, Suvi Saarikallio, Tommi Himberg, Päivi-Sisko Eerola, Dep. of Music, Univ. of Jyväskylä , 2009, p. 468-474Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19. Sandgren, Maria
    More similarities than differences among elite music students in jazz, folk music and classical genre: Personality, practice habits, and self-rated music-related strengths and weaknesses2009In: Proceedings of the 7th Triennial Conference of European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM 2009) Jyväskylä, Finland / [ed] Jukka Louhivuori, Tuomas Eerola, Suvi Saarikallio, Tommi Himberg, Päivi-Sisko Eerola, Dep. of Music, Univ. of Jyväskylä , 2009, p. 463-467Conference paper (Other academic)
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