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  • 1.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Lithuanian Social Research Centre, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Fröhlich, Christian
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. National Research University, Moscow, Russia.
    Struggle over public space: grassroots movements in Moscow and Vilnius2015In: International journal of sociology and social policy, ISSN 0144-333X, E-ISSN 1758-6720, Vol. 35, no 7-8, p. 565-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore urban mobilisation patterns in two post-Soviet cities: Vilnius and Moscow. Both cities were subject to similar housing and urban policy during Soviet times, and they have implemented urban development using neoliberal market principles, provoking grassroots opposition from citizens to privatisation and marketisation of their housing environment and local public space. However, the differing conditions of democratic Lithuanian and authoritarian Russian public governance offer different opportunities and set different constraints for neighbourhood mobilisation. The purpose is to contrast local community mobilisations under the two regimes and highlight the differences between and similarities in the activists' repertoires of actions in two distinct political and economic urban settings. Design/methodology/approach - The paper employs qualitative methodology using data from semi-structured interviews conducted with community activists and state officials, presented using a comparative case study design. Findings - Although, citizens' mobilisations in the two cities are reactions to the neoliberalisation of housing and local public space, they take different forms. In Vilnius they are institutionalised and receive formal support from national and local authorities. Moreover, support from the EU encourages organisational development and provides material and cognitive resources for grassroots urban mobilisations. In contrast, residents' mobilisations in Moscow are informal and face fierce opposition from local authorities. However, even in an authoritarian setting, grassroots mobilisations evolve using creative strategies to circumvent institutional constraints. Originality/value - Little attention has been paid to grassroots urban mobilisations in post-Soviet cities. There is also a lack of comparative attempts to show variation in post-Soviet urban activism related to housing and local public space.

  • 2.
    Fröhlich, Christian
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Anarchist movement in contemporary Russia2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Fröhlich, Christian
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Civil society and the state intertwined: The case of disability NGOs in Russia2012In: East European Politics, ISSN 2159-9165, E-ISSN 2159-9173, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 371-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines state - civil society relationships in contemporary Russia. Its objective is to assess opportunity structures of Russian non-governmental organisations (NGOs) that are intertwined with the state. The article presents qualitative data from fieldwork in the Russian cities of Moscow, St Petersburg, Nizhniy Novgorod, and Perm in 2009 and 2010. The focus of NGOs in the field of disability was chosen because of their roles as social service providers and as advocates for the rights of the disabled. The findings indicate that despite the Soviet legacy of an occupying state, Russian NGOs widen their opportunities by maintaining close relationships with state structures. Thus, litigation strategies seem to be an effective instrument for fostering social change for the benefit of the disabled.

  • 4.
    Fröhlich, Christian
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Dog lovers and vegan liberators: Fractures and tensions within the Animal Rights Movement in Russia2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1990s Russia saw many social movements emerging due to developing spaces of social activism and a rising concern of citizens for their immediate surroundings. Although the Putin reign closed many opportunities, social activism in spaces which are not directly connected to political concerns survived and developed further. The example of the animal rights movement shows how its main concern for shelter and survival of homeless animals units a wide range of Russian citizens and mostly stays under the radar of state security organs. However, the access to information to world-wide developments supported the emergence of more radical forms of activism for universal rights of animals, such as animal liberation, property destruction and street protests. These currents were brought in by followers of vegan/vegetarian lifestyles and by anarchists, which propose oppositional positions and radical critiques on society as a whole.

    The paper gives an overview over the main concerns of the Russian animal rights movement and shows how demands and critiques differ according to ideological backgrounds and social positions of their agents. On the one hand, ideological cleavages among concerned citizens and activists cause also differences in organizational approaches to social activism, which makes cooperation and mutual support difficult. But on the other, the Russian movement for the rights of animals succeeds in supporting the diffusion of international lifestyle values and forms of social activism.

  • 5.
    Fröhlich, Christian
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Schlüsselfiguren zeitgenössischer Anarchie-Bewegungen2013In: Forschungsjournal Soziale Bewegungen, ISSN 0933-9361, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 58-64Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Wennerhag, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Fröhlich, ChristianHigher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia.Piotrowski, GrzegorzSödertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES). European Solidarity Centre, Gdansk, Poland.
    Radical left movements in Europe2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When the Iron Curtain lifted in 1989, it was seen by some as proof of the final demise of the ideas and aspirations of the radical left. Not many years passed, however, before the critique of capitalism and social inequalities were once again the main protest themes of social movements. This book provides an account of radical left movements in today’s Europe and how they are trying to accomplish social and political change.

    The book’s international group of leading experts provide detailed analysis on social movement organizations, activist groups, and networks that are rooted in the left-wing ideologies of anarchism, Marxism, socialism, and communism in both newly democratized post-communist and longstanding liberal-democratic polities. Through a range of case studies, the authors explore how radical left movements are influenced by their situated political and social contexts, and how contemporary radical left activism differs from both new and old social movements on one hand, and the activities of radical left parliamentary parties on the other. Ultimately, this volume investigates what it means to be ‘radical left’ in current day liberal-democratic and capi- talist societies after the fall of European state socialism.

    This is valuable reading for students and researchers interested in European politics, contemporary social movements and political sociology.

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