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  • 1. Amato, M
    et al.
    Capelli, L
    University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Siri, Anna
    National policies on STEM in the “Do Well Science” partner countries2019In: Do Well Science: Manual for Innovative Pedagoy in STEM Contents : An Erasmus+ Project to increase secondary students’ achievements in Science subjects / [ed] Massimo Amato & Anna Siri, Breslavia: Società Dante Alighieri , 2019, p. 44-49Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2. Amato, M
    et al.
    De Negri, E
    University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Siri, Anna
    Literature review on STEM education2019In: Do Well Science: Manual for Innovative Pedagoy in STEM Contents : An Erasmus+ Project to increase secondary students’ achievements in Science subjects / [ed] Massimo Amato & Anna Siri, Breslavia: Società Dante Alighieri , 2019, p. 15-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3. Amato, M
    et al.
    De Negri, E
    University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Siri, Anna
    Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education in Europe2019In: Do Well Science: Manual for Innovative Pedagoy in STEM Contents : An Erasmus+ Project to increase secondary students’ achievements in Science subjects / [ed] Massimo Amato & Anna Siri, Breslavia: Società Dante Alighieri , 2019, p. 10-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Capelli, L
    et al.
    University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy.
    De Nigra, E
    University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Siri, Anna
    A comparison of the STEM curricula in “Do Well Science” partner countries2019In: Do Well Science: Manual for Innovative Pedagoy in STEM Contents : An Erasmus+ Project to increase secondary students’ achievements in Science subjects / [ed] Massimo Amato & Anna Siri, Breslavia: Società Dante Alighieri , 2019, p. 50-65Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ceken, Fatma
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    The use of the theory of conceptual profiles to assess learning outcome2016In: Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2015 Conference: Science education research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, Part 16 / [ed] J. Lavonen, K. Juuti, J. Lampiselkä, A. Uitto & K. Hahl (Eds.); co-eds. P. Kariotoglou & T. Russell, Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2016, p. 2716-2721Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Schools Inspectorate (2012) made an evaluation of the quality in science teaching in year 1–3 in the Swedish compulsory school. Large differences were found among the 30 schools studied. Often teaching only consisted of mediating facts or experiments made by the teacher. The students rarely got an opportunity to learn through systematic investigations. Less than 60% of the lessons observed involved activities were the students to large extent met scientific methods. Also, good examples were found in schools were the teachers consciously let the students make hypotheses about what will happen in an experiment. In many schools the teacher use readymade teaching packages. Generally, they consist of instructions for how series of lessons with different themes may be planned and performed by using the material included. Some of the packages also include education of the teachers. According to the School Inspectorate teachers without education in science claim that with help of the packages they have been able to teach in all areas of school science. Teachers sometime use the packages as inspiration, but chose other methods for their teaching. The purpose of this study was to examine how students in primary school use concepts and to study their conceptual development during two sequences of lessons, primarily based on the student’s own documentations. Written diaries and reports of the students were analysed in order to construct their conceptual profiles and to follow their development. The assessment of the performances in relation to the knowledge requirement evaluated students ability to discuss simple questions concerning chemical processes, plan simple experiments and formulate simple question. The study shows that observations, discussions, and written documentation of simple experiments promotes conceptual development.

  • 6.
    Georgiev, Alexander
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Stockholm University.
    Leipus, Arunas
    Umeå University.
    Olsson, Ida
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Berrez, Jean-Marc
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Characterization of MYR1, a dosage suppressor of YPT6 and RIC1 deficient mutants2008In: Current Genetics, ISSN 0172-8083, E-ISSN 1432-0983, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 235-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Membrane traffic is tightly regulated and the Rab protein family of small GTPases plays a central role in this regulation. One member of this family is the Saccharomyces cerevisae protein Ypt6. To search for new genes interacting with Ypt6-related pathways, we performed a genetic screen for high copy suppressors of ypt6 Delta temperature sensitivity at 35 degrees C. Among the suppressors, MYR1 was also able to suppress the temperature sensitive mutant lacking Ric1, a subunit of the Ypt6 guanine exchanging factor complex Ric1/Rgp1. Myr1 is characterized by a coiled coil region and a GYF domain, a protein module binding proline-rich sequences. Myr1 is able to bind membranes but is also associated with larger structures insoluble in Triton X-100. By immunofluorescence, Myr1 shows a network-like pattern as well as small foci. Overexpression of Myr1 influences nuclear envelope morphology and high levels are lethal. This lethality is rescued when the N-terminal region, containing the GYF domain, is deleted. The transcription profile of a myr1 Delta strain shows effects on genes involved in nuclear migration, Ras signalling and transcription. Taken together, these results suggest that Myr1 is a novel factor linked to the secretory pathway and important cellular regulatory mechanisms.

  • 7.
    Josefsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Jää-Aro, Kai-Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Lundmark, Sofia
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Mutvei Berrez, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    The implementation of digital tools in teaching: A qualitative case study at a swedish primary school2019In: EDULEARN19 Proceedings, 2019, p. 2382-2387Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many countries have recently implemented digital competence as an important part of their school curricula. In Sweden, the curriculum states: “Teaching should give students the opportunity to use digital tools in a way which promotes knowledge development” [3], making it mandatory to implement digital tools in teaching and learning. This poses challenges for schools and teachers: schools need to assist with infrastructure and make technology available, teachers need to acquire knowledge on how to use technology for educational purposes. Achieving technology integration to support teaching and learning in the classroom has been argued to be influenced by teachers’ attitudes and pedagogical beliefs [4], therefore the link between teachers’ pedagogical beliefs and their practices must be examined in order to fully understand the integration [1].

    This study is part of the Erasmus+ project Functional Information and Communication Technology Instruction On the Net (FICTION) [2] and investigates science teachers’ attitudes towards integration of technology, and how teachers elaborate and implement digital technologies into their teaching practices.

    In winter/spring 2019 five teachers from a local primary school took part in three focus group interviews. The first interview defined the current situation, the second generated input on how to challenge each teacher based on their needs. Each teacher was given instructions for a specific technology to try out during teaching. The teachers recorded their experiences on video for the third focus group discussion, which included an evaluation of how they perceived the specific technology to improve their students’ learning. The data so far consist of audio and video recordings from the interviews and the teachers’ experiences of using the proposed technologies in their teaching.

    Some preliminary findings are that while schools invest in infrastructure and technology, the opportunities to use the technology often are hindered by administrative issues such as scheduling, lack of time for competence development and no choice on platforms and systems to work with. The link between the teachers’ pedagogical beliefs and their practice is based on these prerequisites, but also on the teachers’ willingness to try out various technological tools. The data show that the teachers’ pedagogical perspectives and work with, e.g., formative teaching, pleasurable learning, and quality assured teaching and feedback, affect the teachers’ willingness to integrate new technologies and tools in their teaching.

    References:

    [1] Ertmer, P.A. and Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A.T. 2010. Teacher Technology Change. Journal of Research on Technology in Education. 42, 3 (Mar. 2010), 255–284.

    [2] FICTION 2018. Functional Information and Communication Technology Instruction On the Net https://fiction.pixel-online.org/

    [3] Lärarnas Riksförbund 2016. Digital framtid utan fallgropar: En undersökning om lärares och elevers digitala kompetens. Technical Report #2016–10.

    [4] Perrotta, C. 2013. Do school-level factors influence the educational benefits of digital technology? A critical analysis of teachers’ perceptions. British Journal of Educational Technology. 44, 2 (2013), 314–327.

  • 8.
    Jää-Aro, Kai-Mikael
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Josefsson, Pernilla
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Lundmark, Sofia
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Mutvei Berrez, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Professional development for ICT-based teaching2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this workshop we aim to find the current best practices for professional development of educators, what knowledge teachers need and how it is best imparted. The participants share their experiences of what has worked and not in professional development of the pedagogical use of digital technology.

  • 9. Leipus, Arunas
    et al.
    Olsson, Ida
    Stockholms universitet.
    Berrez, Jean-Marc
    Hultenby, Kjell
    Östlund, Cecilia
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Cwh43 is an evolutionary conserved polytopic inner nuclear membrane proteinManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Lönn, Mikael
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Results and Comparison of Different Complementary Assessment Methods of Science Learning Outcome2015In: Conference proceedings. New perspectives in science education, 4th ed., Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2015, p. -5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To assess the quality of different aspects of the learning outcomes in relation to knowledge requirements as results of teaching several assessment methods have to be used. For most teachers it is also obvious that students differ in their ability to demonstrate the learning outcome depending on the assessment method used. In order to compare different assessment methods of the learning outcome of pre-school teacher students’ different types of tasks were evaluated and compared in order to identify the potential of each method to give the students fair chances of showing their skills. Thus, assessments based on multiple choice questionnaires of different types, long answer questions, practical laboratory experiments, experiment construction and the students ability to evaluate experiment plans were compared. Having Swedish as mother tongue also was included as an explanatory variable since we suspected that some of the assessment methods in reality rather evaluates the linguistic skills in interpreting texts rather than evaluating the content knowledge of the subject. The results for each student when different methods were used were compared in order to evaluate if some of the methods for assessment gave similar results or if the methods induced differences in the results for the same student. We use ordination techniques to assess and visualize main trends in the data and linear models and classification trees to evaluate specific associations. There is correlation between results from several assessment methods, there are positive correlation between combinations of results from long answers, experiment and experiment construction, meaning students who showed good results with one method did so also with the others - but in some comparisons like long answer questions and multiple choice questions good results were independent of each other. There was a negative effect of having a non-Swedish mother tongue on the results in multiple choice questionnaires, but a positive effect of a non-Swedish mother tongue on the combined scores on experimental construction and experiment. Linear models show that good achievements in experimental construction are explained by high summed scores of Doll´s criteria, the four R’s richness, recursion, relations, and rigor.

  • 11.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Art studies as tools for understanding observations in science2017In: Conference proceedings New perspectives in science education: 6th Conference Edition: Florence, Italy: 16-17 March 2017, Limena: Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2017, p. 513-516Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations are fundamental in science as they has to include cognitive activities based on the perceived sensations. These activities have to be transformed to written or spoken language. In order to practice and visualize these processes we present a method based on Roland Barthes concepts studium and punctum. About 60 students aiming at becoming primary school teachers (years 4–6) were followed during a period of the first two years of their education. The results on all course examinations during these years (n=17) were compared to the quality of two reflective texts. One from the end of the first year on the impression of art works by David Hockney or Bill Viola, another of experiences from field sites used at the beginning of their studies. They wrote reflections on their experiences including observations and their personal and professional development during their teacher training. The texts where analysed by using the 4 R’s of Doll’s. Results of VARK tests assessing the learning style of the students from the beginning of their education were used. The choice of science courses can be shown to be correlated to different factors depending of the selection of these but there was no general pattern behind the choice of science. Training of observation in different contexts and reflections on these in relation to personal development seem to promote better professional understanding.

  • 12.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    To communicate the theory of evolution to all from babies to adults2017In: Conexão Ciencia, ISSN 1980-7058, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 408-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching evolution is a tricky business. Less teaching seems to give better understanding of the theory. Evolutionary processes are dialectic relations between many actors, individuals, groups, abiotic and biotic factors etc., different from mechanistic descriptions of relations between singular objects in other scientific theories. This difference, in combination with religious beliefs confuses efforts to get understanding and acceptance of the theory of evolution. With the new curriculum for Swedish compulsory school, science education has to be linked to students’ own experiences in order to promote critical thinking and skills useable in daily life. Further, biology in science teaching during the first school years is focused on general observations and fundamental concepts, not on scientific methods and evolutionary processes. Thus, students often experience biology as a subject filled with facts about simple relations and teleological explanations, making the theory of evolution superfluous. The objectives here were to design teaching in evolutionary theory adapted to the professional needs of students and to assess the learning outcome. Three different courses in evolutionary theory were included. Two pre-service teacher training programs, for nursery school and for year 4–6 in the compulsory school, and one for students in environmental studies were included. Assessments of learning outcome were made by analyses of texts written by the students. The quality of the science knowledge content and the personal and professional development were assessed by using the 4 R’s of Doll. Associations between concepts and understanding were evaluated using clustering and ordination statistical techniques. The learning outcome was good showing visible progressions in the understanding. Thus, it is important to assess the understanding of concepts rather than estimating their frequency in students texts.

  • 13.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Aim: To practise scientific methods. Result: Personal development2014In: Ebook proceedings of the ESERA 2013 Conference: Science Education Research For Evidence-based Teaching andCoherence in Learning / [ed] Constantinou, C. P., Papadouris, N. & Hadjigeorgiou, A. : (co-ed. Avraamidou, L. and Michelini, M.), Nicosia, Cypern: European Science Education Research Association , 2014, p. 2410-2417Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field work in a teacher training program was focussed on the collection and presentation of data showing changes in the environment depending on variable factors. The observations should be possible to use as models for studies performed by children at school. The instructions were sparse and many of the observations from the first visit to the sites were impossible to repeat. The first four observations were made during autumn every month while the last was made in late spring sixteen months later. After this the students wrote short reflections on their impressions and experiences during the last visit compared to the earlier ones. These were analysed in order to reveal the impact on the students. Most of the students were very uncertain about what to do the first time. Almost none of them complained about this afterwards. Many were astonished over their own incapability of understanding or declared their lack of understanding general ideas. Many students wrote about strong emotions when returning to a familiar site that appeared to have changed and described how this created a strong attachment to the site. What was more surprising was that some students experienced their own development, in some cases towards becoming a teacher but also on a more private or personal level. They not only recognized themselves as the inexperienced student from the first visit and what was achieved later. They also realized how the relation between themselves and the site had a chronological development in accordance with their own development. The simple activity of field observations in combination with personal reflection created complicated processes beneficial for the student.

    Thus, we achieved and observed unexpected results together with what was expected.

  • 14.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Betygsättning av naturvetenskap enligt 2011 års läroplaner: Workshop2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bedömningstillfällen i naturvetenskap vid lärarutbildning som kan användas i skolan

    Inom lärarutbildningen vid Södertörns högskola har vi inom de naturvetenskapliga ämnena sedan flera år arbetat med olika typer av bedömningstillfällen vid examinationen av studenter. Oftast är dessa bedömningstillfällen konstruerade för att vara examinerande av olika lärandemål som representerar önskade didaktiska förmågor hos den blivande läraren. De kan därför samtidigt fungera som modeller för hur man som lärare kan arbeta inom grund- och gymnasieskolan för bedömning av elevers förmågor. Förutom muntliga och skriftliga redovisningar kan dessa t.ex. bestå av redovisande exkursioner i natur- eller kulturmiljöer, laborationer, självreflektioner, traditionella eller estetiska loggböcker, självdiagnoser med kamratbedömning, museivisningar och webbaserade laborationer. För att studenterna skall få motsvarande träning har undervisningen på högskolan i allt högre utsträckning utvecklats från föreläsningar och demonstrativa laborationer och exkursioner mot många olika typer av interaktiva aktiviteter. Motsvarande utveckling återspeglas internationellt där sedan tio år den traditionella läroboken med beskrivande texter som skall läsas och läras ersatts av läromedel, fortfarande ofta i bokform, som ger anvisningar om hur studenter tillsammans kan arbeta med sin kunskapsutveckling, genom exempel, arbetsuppgifter, diskussionsfrågor, problematiseringar, lärande diagnoser etc.

    Bedömning av naturvetenskap enligt Lgr 11 och Lgy 11

    I de nya läroplanerna Lgr 11 och Lgy 11 skall elevers förmåga, att använda sina kunskaper, användas som grund för betygsättningen. Detta innebär stora förändringar jämfört med tidigare betygsystem där fokus oftast låg på bedömning utifrån elevers redovisning av kunskaper inhämtade från olika typer av läromedel. Enkelt uttryckt kan man säga att tidigare bedömningar försökte värdera elevens förmögenhet i form av samlad (minnes)kunskap medan dagens läroplaner fokuserar på bedömning av elevers förmåga att använda sina kunskaper inom olika områden. Det har följaktligen skett en stor förändring i synsättet på det som skall bedömas och hur detta kan genomföras vilket även får konsekvenser för undervisningen.

    Av reportage, diskussioner och andra inslag i massmedia framkommer att många, även rutinerade lärare, har svårt att förstå hur de skall arbeta med lärande bedömning och vill ha klarare anvisningar och exempel.

    Lärande bedömning

    Jönsson (Lärande bedömning, 2012) beskriver hur undervisning bör planeras utifrån den bedömning av förmågor baserade på betygskriterier som läraren skall utföra. Till skillnad från tidigare där undervisningen först planerades och genomfördes och där resultatet slutligen bedömdes genom skrivningar eller förhör utgår Jönsson från bedömningen och utformar undervisningen utifrån denna. I korthet ser modellen ut så här:

    Läraren konstruerar utifrån betygskriterierna ett bedömningstillfälle (performance assessment) och skapar en bedömningsmatris inför observationen av nivån på de förmågor hos eleven som skall bedömas. Det är inte nödvändigt att betrakta en viss handling, bedömningen kan göras genom av produkter som eleven producerar. Därefter planeras undervisningen dvs. de tillfällen där eleverna skall få möjlighet att träna de förmågor som skall bedömas.

    Workshop med olika bedömningstillfällen i naturvetenskap

    Vi kommer att i mindre grupper genomföra olika bedömningstillfällen anpassade till de nya betygskriterierna och med användande av olika metoder som samtidigt kan utgöra exempel på hur man t.ex. kan arbeta med estetiska lärprocesser (ELP), IKT, laborationer, kamratbedömning utifrån de nya läroplanernas betygskriterier för naturvetenskapliga ämnen inkl. naturgeografi. De modellerar bedömningstillfällen men blir samtidigt exempel på hur man kan arbeta med undervisning enligt de nya läroplanerna. Alla kan inte få pröva allt men genom att erbjuda ett antal olika moment kan deltagarna snabbt få en inblick i olika sätt att bedöma elevers utvecklingsnivå utifrån betygskriterierna. Den tid som krävs vid bedömning, enligt den nu i läroplanerna introducerade betygsskalan, där flera färdigheter förekommer i olika former i flera ämnen, medför ett behov av bedömning av kvaliteten hos flera färdigheter under samma bedömningstillfälle. Därför kommer exemplen i hög utsträckning vara ämnesintegrerade och med vissa modifieringar kunna användas i olika årskurser.

  • 15.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Conceptual profiles for Doll’s four R's.2016In: Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2015 Conference: Science education research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, Part 1 / [ed] J. Lavonen, K. Juuti, J. Lampiselkä, A. Uitto & K. Hahl (Eds.);(co-eds. O. Finlayson & R. Pinto, Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2016, p. 72-77Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As academic organisers and teachers with different positions teacher training programs at Södertörn University we have had the opportunity to develop and assess different types of pedagogic activities and use, e.g., the 4 R´s proposed by Doll, recursion, relations, richness, and rigor in assessments. Here pre-service teacher student reflections assessed by use of the 4R’s are compared with other texts by the same students in order to assess the quality of their understanding of evolutionary theory. Written performances of biology students are also compared with those of pre-service teacher students in order to reveal differences in the use of scientific concepts between the groups. Analysis of student performances show a relation between the use of the 4R’s, and the use of scientific concepts. Analyses of texts by students in evolution theory show a relatively low use of scientific concepts often regarded as important in scientific text. This may be explained by students’ good skills in giving scientific explanations in every-day language. Teacher students used more biological and evolutionary concepts compared to biology students. The emphasis on the use of concepts, especially in school, may be exaggerated. Professional biologists have to communicate with people outside the scientific community but teachers often cares about a strict scientific language. This is also found here where teacher students use the concepts to a larger extent than biology students. School biology should focus on the basic processes of organic evolution as the foundation of all teaching in order to enhance the students’ deeper understanding.

  • 16.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Forces, to visualise the invisible2016In: Conference proceedings: 5th Conference edition, Florence, Italy, 17-18 March 2016, Fitenze: Libreria Universitaria, 2016, p. 537-541Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “This is hard to understand as you can’t see the forces” exclaimed a student during a science course. Basic concepts in physics like force, energy, power are difficult to observe. Usually we often only make conclusions about their existence out of the resulting effects of their appearances. In addition, the use of similar words in other contexts, sometimes metaphorically, sometimes with other meaning, make the situation even worse. In science courses for pre-service primary school teacher students we have tried to design learning situations where students get personal experiences of the world behind the concepts described in words.

    Thus, we designed situations when the students themselves were subjected to different forces or had the opportunity to observe the effects of forces. They wrote reflections on their experiences and we discussed these together in order to get used to how to describe and explain these type of experiences.

    The learning outcome was assessed by analyses of written reflections of experiences from different attractions of an amusement park. One of the main outcomes of these reflections were the differences in the observations of the students. Often they had to do several rides to observe the forces they were subjected to. They also found differences in their personal ability to identify the forces. Some students were better in observing some of the forces than the others.

    Thus, the participation in one activity with the aim of observing something does not necessarily lead to similar observations of other participants. Previous experiences seem to affect the observations so forces in some directions may be regarded as more powerful or easier to identify by some persons than others. This may be a general characteristic of observations in common situations. In that case this may be one explanation why, e.g., students have different focus in the classroom and learn other things than those intended by the teacher.

  • 17.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    How to teach evolution2015In: Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 1877-0428, E-ISSN 1877-0428, Vol. 167, p. 170-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Out of identified general didactic problems when teaching evolutionary theory, structured learning situations for pre-service teacher students were created together with performance assessment. The students’ discussions showed almost no use of evolutionary concepts and well-structured learning situations failed as many students worked in an arbitrarily manner. The performance assessment showed anyhow good results as questions with open answers gave opportunity for constructive thinking. One conclusion is the strength in open questions, promoting the students’ creation of reasonable explanations within a theoretical framework.

  • 18.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Surrealistic Perspectives Useful in Science Education.2018In: New perspectives in science education: 7th edition: Florence, Italy, 22-23 March, 2018, Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper was induced by the observation of how children, about 6 years old, at the Magritte Museum in Brussels were introduced to the idea that the depiction of an object always differ from the object itself. They looked at a painting and discussed how facial expressions in general only partly reveal the character of a person. It clearly demonstrated how the children understood that no matter how naturalistically we depict an object, we never do catch the item itself. The picture helped them with assistance of a supervisor to create this view.Many students are trained in trying to understand what the teacher wants to hear rather than to understand the principles of the theories taught. In science, and most other subjects in school, this results in a knowledge concept based on the quality in the reproduction of texts, formulas, or drawings and the use of important words for concepts in relation to the original presentations. Instead, teaching should result in useful skills based on the understanding of the theories taught.Methods used in presentations of art work at galleries and museums could also be used when science is taught and learned at science museums and in the classrooms. The discrepancy between the representation and reality open up new fields of interpretations which can be used by the teacher to create curiosity. Whatever is demonstrated for students they should be induced to discuss how this should be interpreted and to construct the reality behind instead of trying to remember the representation itself.As the creation of understanding appears in the mind of the student the teacher has to create situations stimulating the wish to understand the reality behind the object instead of the wish to reproduce the mind of the teacher. Here we give some examples of how this method could be used in science education but also how it can be used when assessing the results of teaching.

  • 19.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Students´ Different Strategies in their Development of Knowledge, Understanding, and Skills in Science Education2015In: Conference proceedings. New perspectives in science education, 4th ed., Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2015, p. -4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students differ in their ways of accomplishing varied forms of knowledge, develop personal understanding and improve their skills. Likewise, teachers differ in their way of teaching depending on earlier experiences and training, thus, for teachers it is important understand the different strategies of the students and their own pedagogic profile in order to design learning situations advantageous for all students.

    In this study we try to describe the development and the persistence of the learning outcome of five pre-service primary school teacher students and their teachers during one semester of science and technology teaching. The assessment of the students’ fulfilment of the knowledge requirements was made during and shortly after the course, all of them passed. The focus here is to analyse the students and teachers different routes to achieve professional skills and was made eight months after the finished course. The students and the teachers met and discussed their experiences of their development during the course. The discussions in the whole group and in smaller subgroups were recorded and analysed. One area of interest was to describe the personal and professional development during that semester and how this was regarded retrospectively. This may be regarded as an assessment of the pedagogic activities and their relevance for the different students.

    Another important objective was to describe the conceptual development of both the students and their teachers and to investigate if there were differences in their development. The development of the conceptual profiles of each person was constructed out of the discussions analysed to reveal developmental changes. The conceptual profiles were regarded to contain three basic zones, externalism, internalism and relational.

    A third objective was to investigate the quality of the development out of the criteria of Doll, the four R’s richness, recursion, relations, and rigor and to what extent these criteria were visible in the conceptual development?

    On the professional and personal level all participants recognized a development, for the students supported by experiences during practical training at schools. The result also show that type of conceptual development varied between participants but large similarities in the degree of conceptual development of different concepts in one person. Finally, many of the generative phases of conceptual development were correlated to Doll’s criteria of quality in teaching and learning.

  • 20.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Bollner, Tomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Evolution, Teaching and Assessment of Students in Pre-Service Primary School Teacher Education2015In: Conference proceedings. New perspectives in science education, 4th ed., Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2015, p. -3Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This project aims at assessment of learning outcome of teaching evolutionary theory to pre-service primary school teacher students. The quality of the students understanding and use of evolutionary theory after their participation in seminars and lectures was made by analysing written reflections of the students. The texts were primarily written by students to show that the knowledge requirements of the course were accomplished but they were here used to analyse their ability to communicate the content but also to evaluate the depth of their understanding of evolutionary theory. For this assessment two different methods were used aiming at the two different targets. One was focused on the students’ use of evolutionary terminology and to what extent they used the language of an evolutionist. Here, we also analysed whether the students gave accurate explanations or descriptions without using the traditional evolutionary terminology. Thus, mainly the students´ ability in their own writing to present evolutionary reflections in an everyday language was here investigated. This ability may be useful when teaching young students without using a theoretical framework. For the assessment of quality of the students’ own understanding of the theory Doll’s criteria, the four R´s, richness, recursion, relations, and rigor, were used. Richness refers to the depth, the layers of meaning in their texts. Recursion is here referring to the students’ use of making thoughts loop back on themselves and earlier experiences. The use of relations are important when developing thinking in different areas. Here, both the students’ references to relations to other persons as well as to objects, theories, places etc. were recorded. Rigor means in this context to purposely look for different alternatives, relations, connections, new combinations, interpretations and patterns.

    The results may briefly be summarized as follows: 1) most of the students use evolutionary terminology and 2) are fairly good at presenting their thoughts within the theoretical framework in everyday language, although 3) they often show problems in distinguishing processes on molecular, individual, and population levels.

  • 21.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Development of observation skills in science education for enhanced understanding2018In: Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2017 Conference: Research, Practice and Collaboration in Science Education / [ed] Odilla Finlayson, Eilish McLoughlin, Sibel Erduran & Peter Childs, Dublin, Ireland: Dublin City University , 2018, p. 2086-2094Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observation is a skill necessary for the development of knowledge in science and is used,e.g., in studies to notice patterns and connections between abiotic and biotic factors, or inlaboratory experiments where detailed observations are necessary to achieve understanding.Observation does not only include viewing details but also hearing, smelling and tasting toget all available information from the senses. How students perceive the information dependson their previous personal experiences. It is therefore essential for students to practice theability to observe and to understand the contextual importance for learning. Here we presenta study where 55 pre-service preschool teacher students attended a science course for 10weeks with a variety of exercises. Late in the course they visited a Natural History Museum, agreenhouse with plants adapted to Mediterranean climate conditions and an art museum.Evaluation of written reflections after the visits were done by using the quality marker 4R’sof Doll’s (Relations, Recursion, Richness and Rigor) for the Natural History Museum and thegreenhouse and Roland Barthes concepts studium and punctum for the art museum. Ourresults showed that the students described their experiences from the visits in a personal waywith high quality. The variation of activities was important for the students’ ability to observeand to understand how to design pedagogic activities for children in preschool.

  • 22.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Digestion as an example of integrated teaching of chemistry and biology2017In: Conexão Ciencia, ISSN 1980-7058, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 89-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most people are uncertain about how nutrients enter and are distributed in the body. They may be capable of naming the different parts of the digestive system on a torso but have vague ideas of the relation between these organs and the chemical processes they govern. Reasons for this are poor understanding of gas exchange, the role of the circulatory system, and that most processes are intracellular. In order to create a more holistic view of the biology and chemistry of digestion these subjects may be taught simultaneously and integrated. Here practical exercises and lectures about digestion and nutrients for pre-service primary school teachers are presented. The practical work included food preparation in order to investigate the change of the properties of the macromolecules of nutrients. A simple drawing of a body was used in order to visualize the routes of nutrients and the role of gas exchange in digestion. An evolutionary perspective on digestion was used in order to explain the ancient origin of most chemical processes in the digestive system and in the whole body. The material produced by the students at their final examinations was used for assessing their use and understanding of concepts, the quality based on Doll’s 4R’s and the degree of holistic understanding of the digestive system. The findings show that the pedagogic design used gives a general picture of digestion and energy transfer usable for teaching in primary school.

  • 23.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Observation not only perception but also cognition2016In: Conference proceedings: New perspectives in science education : 5th conference edition : Florence, Italy, 17-18 March 2016, Padova: Libreria Universitaria, 2016, p. 365-369Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the Swedish curriculum for primary school it is important in science subjects to develop skills to observe, to describe the observations and to put them into a theoretical framework already starting year 1–3.

    Thus, it may be important for the teacher not only to be accustomed to the methods of observing but also to be an expert on using these observations in order to design teaching situations where these skills may be developed.

    Here we present a study where 25 pre-service primary school teacher students at the beginning of a 20 weeks course established a relation to a study site focused on ecological questions. The task during the first week of that course was to observe and describe two habitats in the field and suggest what abiotic and biotic factors that had shaped the variation focussing at competition as an important ecological factor. In order to connect those ecological aspects with evolutionary aspects, specimen of the common species in the two habitats were collected and brought to the lab where the students constructed phenetic trees based on morphology but also on ecologically relevant properties like roots/no roots, expecting the set-up to awake evolutionary reflection. A main goal with this week was to give the students tools to investigate nature – to observe and describe patterns and to explain them by observing abiotic and biotic variation and evolutionary features and limitations.

    Later during the course we created other, often not obviously similar, situations where the students had the opportunity to use the experiences of this first training week. We used open questions for reflections and examinations in order to get written material to assess the development of the skills.

    We found notable personal development in most students and a greater awareness about the importance of personal cognitive activities in order to create better understanding and ability to use achieved knowledge in different situations.

  • 24.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Technology in preschool: from idea to product2017In: Conference proceedings New perspectives in science education: 6th Conference Edition: Florence, Italy: 16-17 March 2017, Limena: Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2017, p. 604-609Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching pre-service preschool teachers in technology is a challenge. Technology is a fairly new subject in school, students lack experiences and are not aware of the aim of the subject. In addition technology also include the consequences of technological choices for individuals, society and environment. The curriculum for pre-school in Sweden emphasize development of children´s knowledge in science, technology and their ability to identify technology in everyday life. The education of pre-service teachers involves visualization of their own tacit knowledge and experiences to be used in the teaching of technology. Here a course during a three weeks period with 55 pre-service teacher students is presented. They worked in groups with construction exercises, museum visit and outdoor technology walk. The students wrote summaries of the processes together with critical reflections. The written exams on the identification of technology in everyday life were analysed by using the quality markers 4R’s of Doll’s and compared with marks on their examination tasks. Our results show that many students could describe the processes of construction with high quality showing several perspectives of understanding, e.g., the advantage of group activity, their own development of understanding and how to teach children in preschool.

  • 25.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Bedömning av praktiska färdigheter i naturvetenskap (1–3): Workshop2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi kommer att i mindre grupper genomföra olika bedömningstillfällen av praktiska färdigheter anpassade till de nya betygskriterierna och med användande av olika metoder som samtidigt kan utgöra exempel på hur man t.ex. kan arbeta med estetiska lärprocesser (ELP), IKT, laborationer, kamratbedömning utifrån de nya läroplanernas betygskriterier för naturvetenskapliga ämnen.

  • 26.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Bedömning av praktiska färdigheter i naturvetenskap (4–6): Workshop2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi kommer att i mindre grupper genomföra olika bedömningstillfällen av praktiska färdigheter anpassade till de nya betygskriterierna och med användande av olika metoder som samtidigt kan utgöra exempel på hur man t.ex. kan arbeta med estetiska lärprocesser (ELP), IKT, laborationer, kamratbedömning utifrån de nya läroplanernas betygskriterier för naturvetenskapliga ämnen.

  • 27.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Big ideas in science education in teacher training program2015In: Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 1877-0428, E-ISSN 1877-0428, Vol. 167, p. 190-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New curricula from primary school to higher education include performance assessments of achieved skills. The study investigates if it is possible to respond to this by focusing on some core ideas regarding content and design of learning situations. It was made on pre-service primary school teacher students in science and technology. It shows how the achievement of useable knowledge is enhanced by close relations between teachers and students in combination with open and visible processes of the learning.

  • 28.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Evaluation and assessment of student learning and development2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a general process towards an understanding of knowledge not as a question of remembering facts but to achieve the skill to use what is learnt under different circumstances. According to this, knowledge should be useful at different occasions also outside school. This process may also be identified in the development of new tests performed in order to assess knowledge.

    In courses in biology, chemistry and physics focused on didactics we have developed performance assessments aimed at assessing the understanding of general scientific principles by simple practical investigations. Although, designed to assess whether specific goals are attained, we discovered how small alterations of performance assessments promoted the development of didactic skills. Performance assessments may act as tools for the academic teacher, school teacher and enhancement of student understanding of the theory.

    This workshop is focused on performance assessments of the ability to present skills and to develop new ideas. We will present, explain and familiarize a practical approach to performance assessments in science education. The emphasis is to demonstrate and to give possibility and experience of this assessment tool.

    We will perform elaborative tasks as they may be used by teachers working at different levels, assess the performance and evaluate the learning outcome of the activity. Different types of assessment matrixes will be presented and tested at the workshop. Learning by doing will fill the major part of the workshop but there will also be opportunities for discussion, sharing ideas and suggestions for further development

    The activities performed may be seen as models possible for further development into new assessments.

  • 29.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    How to Form Creative Learners in Science2019In: New Perspectives in Science Education: 8th edition: Florence, Italy, 21-22 March 2019, Filodiritto Editore , 2019, no 8, p. 98-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creative learning involves meaningful learning, ownership of learning, control of learning processes and innovation when new understanding is realised. In order to produce learning situations where creative learning is achieved, teachers have to create trustful atmospheres where students are allowed to think and discuss without critical evaluation of the teacher. It is also important to create practical exercises in which theoretical models are processed and connected to observations. During many years we have tried to develop courses in science with the goal to promote students to become independent learners and explorers out of their own prerequisites. Different methods and designs of teaching have been investigated and the variation of the student’s creative learning was observed. To continue this development, we here are investigating a chemistry course. Chemistry involves considerable amounts of abstract thinking. Further, as many students had bad experiences from school this was a challenge. 17 preservice teacher students were trained by one teacher to become independent and creative in their own learning of chemistry. The course of 10 full days over three weeks included practical activities mixed with discussions in groups followed by discussion with the teacher in order to connect theory with practical exercises. The students wrote short reflections after each week answering the questions: What do you take with you from your own learning processes and/or in meeting other’s learning processes? What surprised and/or amazed you most? The three reflections where analysed by qualitative methods scoring demonstrations of professional development, process thinking and learning processes. Our results showed that students negative to chemistry changed their opinion and enjoyed thinking of phenomena in everyday life with chemical perspectives. All students expressed the importance of practical exercise and group discussions in their own learning. The reflections contained detailed chemical explanations, concepts used properly and were describing their learning processes. They also used their experiences when they discussed how to design teaching situations. Thus, the design of the course promoted creative thinking and deepened their understanding of chemistry.

  • 30.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Performance assessment of practical skills in science in teacher training programs useful in school2014In: Ebook proceedings of the ESERA 2013 Conference: Science Education Research For Evidence-based Teaching andCoherence in Learning / [ed] Constantinou, C. P., Papadouris, N. & Hadjigeorgiou, A.(co-ed. Millar, R and Dolin, J.), Nicosia, Cypern: European Science Education Research Association , 2014, p. 1946-1955Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a general process towards an understanding of knowledge not as a question of remembering facts but to achieve the skill to use what is learnt under different circumstances. According to this, knowledge should be useful at different occasions also outside school. This process may also be identified in the development of new tests performed in order to assess knowledge.

    In courses in biology, chemistry and physics focused on didactics we have developed performance assessments aimed at assessing the understanding of general scientific principles by simple practical investigations. Although, designed to assess whether specific goals are attained, we discovered how small alterations of performance assessments promoted the development of didactic skills. Performance assessments may act as tools for the academic teacher, school teacher and for enhancement of student understanding of the theory.

    This workshop was focused on performance assessments of the ability to present skills and to develop new ideas. We presented, discussed, explained and familiarized a practical approach to performance assessments in science education together with the other participants. The emphasis was to demonstrate and to give experience of this assessment tool.

    We performed elaborative tasks as they may be used by teachers working at different levels, assessed the performances and evaluated the learning outcome of the activity. Different assessment rubrics where be presented and tested at the workshop. Learning by doing filled the major part of the workshop but there were also opportunities for discussions, sharing ideas and suggestions for further development.

    The activities performed may be seen as models possible for further development into new assessments.

  • 31.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Professional Experience of Teacher Students Enhances their Understanding of Evolutionary Concepts2018In: New perspectives in science education: 7th edition: Florence, Italy, 22-23 March 2018, Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During more than ten years we have been educating preservice preschool teacher students with early childhood education and at least three years of working experience from preschool. The studies give the students possibilities to use and connect their practical knowledge with theoretical studies in order to become preschool teachers. Large parts are self-studies, individually or in groups, using textbooks, films and other web-based material while they are working in preschool and only have lectures and exercises one day each week at the university campus. On the third semester, a 10 weeks course in science and technology is included. During this they write four reflections about exercises, lectures and theories from campus including how they shall use their knowledge at work. Here the fourth reflection about evolutionary theories is analysed. Instead of lectures or exercises about evolution textbooks, educational films and articles from newspapers were included to be used for reflections, and also gave comments on their student peers. These students showed a high level of professional experience but they were not aware of how to use their experience to understand patterns and phenomena in nature. The written reflections were assessed by using the quality markers 4R´s of Doll’s (Relations, Recursion, Richness and Rigor). The assessment was focused on use of evolutionary theories and if they gave comments on their experience working with children. The results show that many students used the theories correctly. Many also related to important issues that should be brought up in preschool. In general, the students used their previous experiences in order to construct their own, reasonable, views of the theory of evolution.

  • 32.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    The impact of performance assessment on science education at primary school2014In: Ebook proceedings of the ESERA 2013 Conference: Science Education Research For Evidence-based Teaching andCoherence in Learning / [ed] Constantinou, C. P., Papadouris, N. & Hadjigeorgiou, A. : (co-ed. Avraamidou, L. and Michelini, M.), Nicosia, Cypern: European Science Education Research Association , 2014, p. 1778-1785Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new curriculum in Sweden for the primary and secondary school contains more distinct educational targets. Further, assessment is linked to the usage of knowledge in a specific subject not only in a specific subject but also in other contexts rather than remembering facts. Science education at school now has to be linked to the students own experience and shall develop critical thinking of the student.

    This is supposed to the ability to review arguments and to develop their ability to argue in situations where knowledge of science is of big importance. The performance assessment according to the curriculum shall be used to evaluate if the student have achieved the capacity to use knowledge in discussions within scientific contexts. The student’s practical investigations and documentation of these are important parts in science education. To achieve the required knowledge, students have to train abilities or skills before the assessment.

    In order to assess the required knowledge and to view the development of a student, the teacher has to accomplish several practical assessments and training occasions. The new curriculum expects the teacher to design learning situations where the students get the possibility to have relevant training before the performance assessment. The earlier Swedish curricula had a stronger emphasis on theoretical knowledge whereas the new curriculum highlights the ability to use knowledge.

    The presentation will briefly describe how science teaching is performed according to the new curriculum and to what extent it is applied to the new required knowledge. We will also discuss how the new curricula changed the way of teaching science at school.

  • 33.
    Mutvei, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    The use of conceptual profiles in performance assessments2016In: Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2015 Conference : Science education research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, Part 11 / [ed] J. Lavonen, K. Juuti, J. Lampiselkä, A. Uitto & K. Hahl (Eds.);co-eds. J. Dolin & P. Kind, Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2016, p. 1607-1618Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The curriculum for primary school in Sweden articulates the contextual dependence of concepts used in science. The students’ ability in different situations to use the knowledge achieved makes it important to understand differences in the meaning of words in different contexts in order to avoid conflicts between the intentions of the writer and the interpretation of the reader. The theory of conceptual profiles takes into account the variation in classrooms, which is common in Sweden, and promotes the teacher to achieve better communication. In the workshop the diversity of participants’ backgrounds made it possible to study the importance of mother tongue for conceptual understanding. Thus, the workshop was focused on two questions: 1) What influence does the mother tongue have on understanding and communicating science concepts? 2) Will these influences (if present) affect student communication and assessment? Learning by doing filled the major part of the workshop with opportunities for discussion, sharing ideas, and suggestions for further development. Participants were given assignments to assess students’ answers in biology, physics, and chemistry. Assessments were based on performance criteria of students’ use of concepts to describe processes in different contexts. Our results indicate that mother tongue is important for conceptual understanding while academic traditions seem to be important in assessment.

  • 34.
    Olsson, Ida
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Berrez, Jean-Marc
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Leipus, Arunas
    CHORI, Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, USA / Umeå University.
    Östlund, Cecilia
    Columbia University, New York, USA.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    The arginine methyltransferase Rmt2 is enriched in the nucleus and co-purifies with the nuclear porins Nup49, Nup57 and Nup1002007In: Experimental Cell Research, ISSN 0014-4827, E-ISSN 1090-2422, Vol. 313, no 9, p. 1778-1789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arginine methylation is a post-translational modification of proteins implicated in RNA processing, protein compartmentalization, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. In a screen for proteins associated with the nuclear envelope in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have identified the arginine methyltransferase Rmt2, previously shown to methylate the ribosomal protein L12. By indirect immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionations we demonstrate here that Rmt2 has nuclear and cytoplasmic localizations. Biochemical analysis of a fraction enriched in nuclei reveals that nuclear Rmt2 is resistant to extractions with salt and detergent, indicating an association with structural components. This was supported by affinity purification experiments with TAP-tagged Rmt2. Rmt2 was found to co-purify with the nucleoporins Nup49, Nup57 and Nup100, revealing a novel link between arginine methyltransferases and the nuclear pore complex. In addition, a genome-wide transcription study of the rmt2 Delta mutant shows significant downregulation of the transcription of MYO1, encoding the Type II myosin heavy chain required for cytokinesis and cell separation.

  • 35.
    Olsson, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    The arginine methyltransferase Rmt2 specifically associates with FG-nucleoporins – implications for a function in nuclear transportManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Tobieson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Aesthetic Expression Enhances and Deepens Teacher Students Understanding of Science Subject Matter2018In: New perspectives in science education: 7th edition: Florence, Italy, 22-23 March 2018, Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2018, no 7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Courses and modules within undergraduate programs should be developed and implemented in a way that the students experience deepens and contributes growth of knowledge. Therefore, as teachers we must create a variation of different learning possibilities in order to challenge, motivate and enhance the understanding of theories and abstract models in science and their impact on everyday life experience and conditions. Södertörn University has experience of combining aesthetic expression with science in pre-service teacher program for about fifteen years where we have seen the benefits of embodying abstract theories through art for a better understanding of science subject matter. The integration of science and aesthetic forms of expressions is supported by the Swedish curriculum both for preschool and compulsory school. We use an interdisciplinary knowledge based environmental teaching, basing part of the reflection process with a frame in phenomenology and art-based intermodal theory. Intermodal theory coined by professor emeritus Paolo Knill starts with amodal-perception. Perception as “the ability to see, hear, or become aware of something through the senses” while observation is described as “the action or process of closely observing or monitoring something or someone” were observe is to “notice or perceive (something) and register it as being significant” [1]. Thus, observation is a more complex action where it is necessary to interpret the gathering of what has been paid attention to by perceiving without judgment and putting it into a coherent context. Here we present integration of Aesthetic learning process with science subject matter in order to enhance and deepen students understanding. This was performed in a ten-week science course with a total of 54 pre-service preschool teacher students. We worked with and created two- and three-dimensional images and kinetic-aesthetic sculptures parting from phenomenon such as friction and gravity, the phases of Venus and the moon, different materials isolation and conductive qualities etc. Nearly two years after completed science-course the students answered a questionnaire demonstrated several perspectives of understanding.

  • 37.
    Tobieson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Science integrated with aesthetic expression for better understanding of science subject matter2019In: Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2017 Conference: Research, practice and collaboration in science education / [ed] Odilla Finlayson, Eilish McLoughlin, Sibel Erduran & Peter Childs, Dublin, Ireland: Dublin City University , 2019, no 3, p. 542-554Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers have to create a variation of learning situations to increase the understanding for theories andabstract models in science. We have experiences of combining aesthetic expression with science in pre-serviceteacher programme for more than ten years and have seen the benefits of embodying abstract theories withdance, art, music or drama and better understanding of science subject matter. The integration of science andaesthetic forms of expressions have support in the Swedish curriculum both for preschool and the compulsoryschool and it is therefore important to include exercises using aesthetic expression in the teacher educationprogram. The purpose of the workshop was to give examples of how art can be used to study phenomena inscience. The workshop was divided into three parts. In the first part the participants were doing differentexercises embodying concepts in physics and creating relations with each other. In the second part theparticipants in groups constructed a kinetic mobile. In the third part, the participants reflected and discussedtheir experience and understanding of phenomena during the workshop. Examples of assessments of theconstruction process were presented. Here we also present the planning and theoretical background to thework with aesthetic expression of science.

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