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  • 1.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology. Linköping University.
    Assessment criteria for interaction design projects: Fostering professional perspectives on the design process2010In: When Design Education and Design Research Meet: Proceedings of E and PDE 2010, the 12th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education / [ed] Casper Boks, William Ion, Chris McMahon, 2010, p. 432-437Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quite often the product of design is assessed in interaction design education, but we need to develop criteria also for courses that focus on learning to conduct and manage the design process. An earlier approach to set grading criteria has been grounded in the SOLO (Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome) taxonomy. Students need, however, to learn practitioners' criteria, rather than teachers' criteria, to make a successful transfer to practice. One way of achieving that is to align criteria with the conceptions of design process quality used by professional interaction designers. The question is then what those conceptions are, and how they can be accounted for in assessment criteria for projects in interaction design education. A phenomenographic research method was used, and interviews were conducted with ten experienced interaction designers. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The results show that professional interaction designers see design process quality as inspiration, a well-grounded rationale, employment of established methods, and constraints management. These conceptions are mapped to a criteria-referenced grading scale. The criteria should, with careful transfer, be applicable also in other design disciplines.

  • 2.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology. Linköping University.
    Interaction design qualities: Theory and practice2010In: NordiCHI 2010: Proceedings of the 6th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Extending Boundaries, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2010, p. 595-598Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the results of an action research project investigating the articulation of interaction design qualities for a web portal for urban planning and development. A framework for analyzing interaction design qualities is presented. The framework consists of the practical, the social, the aesthetic, the structural and the ethical quality dimensions, and it was tried out in practice with developers and designers of the portal. This provided experiences used to revise the framework. The results indicate that the framework can be improved by splitting the social quality dimension into a communicational dimension and an organizational dimension. The structural dimension is also renamed to the technical dimension.

  • 3.
    Holmlid, S.
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Technology and Design, Media technology. Linköping University.
    Developing a thematic design curriculum as a bologna master2007In: Shaping the future?: proceedings of the 9th Engineering & Product Design Education International Conference, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom, 13-14 September, 2007, Basildon: Hadleys , 2007, p. 63-68Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design education is taking on new forms at many universities around the world, since many people see that a designer today works in many different contexts with many different materials. In Europe, the Bologna reform of higher education is therefore timely. It offers a possibility to reflect and restructure design curricula for the changing world of design. In this paper we outline the development of a Bologna style curriculum for a Master of Science (two years) with a Major in Design at Linköpings universitet in Sweden. The Master's Programme in Design is multidisciplinary, and the guiding principle is that a designer of tomorrow will work less with specific materials and more within differing design contexts. A problem we faced with the studio classes was how to define progression. In order to structure the progression we identified a set of core competences for designers. These competences are used to define areas within which learning outcomes can be defined. The competence fields are; Vision & concept, Design methods, Tools & materials, User & actor perspective, Versatility, Design theory & research and Continuous competency development. Our conclusion is progression in studio classes can be structured in relation to these fields.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Findwise AB, Sweden.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Technology and Design, Media technology.
    A case study of how user interface sketches, scenarios and computer prototypes structure stakeholder meetings: Proceedings of HCI 2007: The 21st British HCI Group Annual Conference2007In: People and Computers XXI: HCI-- but not as we know it : proceedings of HCI 2007, the 21st British HCI Group annual conference, University of Lancaster, UK, 3-7 September 2007, Swindon: British Computer Society (BCS), 2007, p. -9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In stakeholder meetings during an interaction design project, prototypes are commonly used for creating shared representations of design ideas. It can, however, be difficult for designers and meeting facilitators to know which prototyping technique to use. In this case study we compare user interface sketches, scenarios, and computer prototypes, and analyse video material from six stakeholder meetings. The scenario did not facilitate a focus on aesthetic or ethical perspectives, nor did it facilitate operational or perceptual issues. The prototype did not facilitate discussions on the overarching concept of the design, to the same extent as the sketches did, but it did facilitate operational issues. The sketches gave the broadest discussion. The groups also approached the design differently; for example, the system developers constantly returned to a constructional perspective. This means that the choice of prototyping technique should be made based on the composition of the group and the desired focus of the meeting. © 2007 Maria Johansson, Mattias Arvola.

  • 5.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Technology and Design, Media technology. Linköping University.
    Lessons learned from facilitation in collaborative design2007In: User Interfaces 2007: Proceedings of the Eighth Australasian User Interface Conference (AUIC2007), Sydney: Australian Computer Society, 2007, p. 51-54Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of a skilled facilitator in design meetings with users is often emphasized, but less is said about how to improve the facilitation process. This paper reports experiences and lessons learned from facilitation of cardbased sessions in three design cases through an analysis of two sessions with users, and one session with professional designers. The analysis showed that many alternatives were not documented in the sessions with users who designed primarily by talking, compared to the professional designers who primarily designed by placing cards. We propose that facilitation, in cases similar to those presented here, could be improved by suggesting alternatives and possible consequences, prompt the participants to explore the consequences, and graphic facilitation.

  • 6.
    Manker, Jon
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University.
    Prototyping in game design: externalization and internalization of game ideas2011In: Proceedings of the 25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Swinton: British Computer Society (BCS), 2011, p. 279-288Conference paper (Refereed)
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