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  • 1.
    Krämer, Benjamin
    et al.
    Ludwig Maximilians University, Munchen, Germany..
    Springer, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Ontology of opposition online: Representing antagonistic structures on the Internet2020In: SCM Studies in Communication and Media, ISSN 2192-4007, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 35-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on cooperative social structures and particular types of conflict behavior online is readily available. However, the field lacks a framework to analyze how antagonistic structures are represented on online platforms. Social structures can be represented formally (manifestly) or informally (in open verbal or visual forms) or remain latent-a distinction that has received little scholarly attention in the analysis of computer-mediated communication. Based on an interpretative analysis of relational structures and types of acts, we distinguish structural elements that lead us to empirical typologies of antagonistic structures and an analysis of whether and how they are represented online. We develop theses about why some structures are formally represented more often than others and theorize the consequences of this selective representation.

  • 2.
    Ksiazek, T. B.
    et al.
    Villanova University, United States.
    Springer, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    User Comments and Moderation in Digital Journalism: Disruptive Engagement2020Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is an authoritative discussion of user comments and moderation in digital journalism, examining how user comments have disrupted the field of journalism and how a growing number of news organizations have abandoned commenting features altogether. Making a broad argument concerning user commentary as a manifestation of user engagement and public deliberation, User Comments and Moderation in Digital Journalism: Disruptive Engagement conceptualizes the act of commenting as interactive engagement and participation in a virtual public sphere. The book also explores the organizational policies that have the potential to disrupt - as well as improve - the quality of user discussions. Ultimately, strategies are proposed for managing and improving user comments and encouraging more productive public deliberation in digital journalism. This engaging discussion of a key development in digital journalism is a valuable resource for academics and researchers in the areas of journalism, media and communication studies. 

  • 3.
    Ksiazek, Thomas B.
    et al.
    Villanova University, United States.
    Springer, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    User comments in digital journalism: Current research and future directions2018In: The Routledge Handbook of Developments in Digital Journalism Studies / [ed] Scott Eldridge II; Bob Franklin, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 475-486Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the ambivalent nature of user comments. It provides an overview of current research on user comments in digital journalism and directions for future research. The chapter also discusses who reads and writes comments as well as motivations and inhibitors for doing so. It analyzes existing theory and research on the act of commenting, including thoughts and findings on commenting as an act of public deliberation and political action. The chapter also discusses prominent issues that come along with the bipolar nature of user comments, such as comment in/civility, comment moderation, and organizational perspectives and commenting policies, as well as commenting effects. Research suggests that the in/civility of comments can be explained by a variety of factors, including: story topic, sources, journalist participation in comment threads, journalist demography, and organizational commenting policies. The chapter concludes with directions for future research.

  • 4.
    Springer, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Media and communication studies in Sweden2021In: Publizistik: Vierteljahreshefte für Kommunikationsforschung, ISSN 0033-4006, E-ISSN 1862-2569, Vol. 66, no 3-4, p. 637-655Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Media and communication studies is a comparatively young academic discipline in Sweden. The subject’s establishment began with the 1960s — a time when the expansion of mass media led to a bigger demand for analysis, education and critical reflection. Along with that, political and commercial interests in more knowledge led to commissioned research, another considerable factor in the subject’s development and institutionalization. The field was brought forth by humanistic and social-scientific strands, and some actors conveniently travel between these two since the demarcation lines are less pronounced in the North. Currently, roughly around 250 scholars are active in the field, with about 200 of them organized in DGPuK’s Nordic sister organization FSMK. Media and communication research in Sweden is also greatly oriented towards the broader Nordic context, institutionalized for instance through the Nordic Information Centre for Media and Communication Research (Nordicom). For scholars, the labour market is comparatively open, not only for other Nordic academics but also for entries from countries outside Scandinavia. For students, the field provides a rich smorgasbord of general and highly specialized programmes or stand-alone courses of variable length offered in both Swedish and English. This article aims to inform about the history and the contemporary conditions of Swedish media and communication studies, with a personal note based on own experiences.

  • 5.
    Springer, Nina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Nygren, Gunnar
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Orlova, Dariya
    National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine.
    Taradai, Daria
    National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Sourcing Dis/Information: How Swedish and Ukrainian Journalists Source, Verify, and Mediate Journalistic Truth During the Russian-Ukrainian Conflict2023In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1111-1130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Journalists form the middle links of global information chains, playing a decisive role in detecting and dismantling or amplifying problematic information. Information sourcing, verification, and transparency are important tools for journalists when they transmit their sense-making of events, i.e., the journalistic truth, to the audiences. This mixed-methods study of the disinformation-prone conflict between Russia and Ukraine investigates how journalists at different positions on the information chain-i.e., on the ground (Ukraine) and at a distance (Sweden)-source, verify, and narrate their journalistic truth to audiences. We found that, even in high-pressure situations created by hot conflicts, sourcing and verification remain mostly individualized practices that are shaped by internalized unwritten, professional rules of an oral newsroom culture. Verification protocols or specialized tools are largely absent. Sources were sometimes hard to detect in the journalistic content; claims about their verification status even harder. There was a fear that being overtly transparent about sources would jeopardize journalists' authority. Especially problematic are the precarious working and living conditions for journalists on the ground. These conditions make them vulnerable sources for journalists abroad.

  • 6.
    Springer, Nina
    et al.
    University of Münster, Germany.
    Orlova, D.
    National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine.
    Nygren, Gunnar
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Taradai, D.
    National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Narrating “Their War” and “Our War”: the Patriotic Journalism Paradigm in the Context of Swedish and Ukrainian Conflict Coverage2022In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 178-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Patriotic journalism, ” a deviation from objectivity, has become an important paradigm and well-documented phenomenon in the analysis of conflict coverage. However, studies rarely focus on the link between journalists' perceptions and narratives. We investigated how journalists from two countries, one involved in a conflict (Ukraine) and the other observing it from a distance (Sweden) relate to the objectivity norm in sourcing and narrating seven conflictive news cases in Ukraine (2017 to 2018). We found pragmatic commitment to objectivity in both countries, which was not always reflected in the content produced. For Swedish journalists, our results hint toward a value-based ally loyalty, which seems less stable than a tribe-based bond. In Ukraine, official Ukrainian perspectives were undisputedly disseminated; however, we did not find that they were generally positively laden, as one would expect for patriotic journalists. Trust in public institutions might be a deciding factor over the extent of patriotism.

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  • 7.
    Springer, Nina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Troger, Franziska
    „Du stehst unter genauer Beobachtung, unangenehmer Beobachtung“2021In: Publizistik: Vierteljahreshefte für Kommunikationsforschung, ISSN 0033-4006, E-ISSN 1862-2569, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 43-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study engages with different forms of problematic audience feedback — such as online harassment, hate speech, and trolling — as verbalized aggression and thereby expressions of communicative violence directed towards journalists. Aggressors react intentionally in a damaging, uncivil way to specific topics, reporting styles, and journalists’ personal characteristics — they are triggered by communicators’ discursive power and aim to eliminate communication through communication. Journalists experience this aggressive, violent communicative behavior as stress, which requires strategies to manage and overcome. Based on prior research on the perception of (digital) security and informed by (empirical applications of) the transactional theory of stress and coping, we illustrate how female journalists are particularly affected by communicative violence. Through nine qualitative interviews conducted in 2017 with affected women journalists in German-speaking areas — Germany, Switzerland, Austria, and South Tyrol — we investigate: (1) how the journalists perceived and assessed the situation in which they experienced communicative violence, and (2) which coping strategies they applied to deal with these situations. The interview analyses illustrate how the violent feedback took our interviewees by surprise, and how the lack of control and the personalization produced considerable insecurity, which is why such situations develop a particular stress potential. Communicative violence aims to manipulate journalists’ emotions, perceptions, and behaviors — both personally and professionally —and has substantial potential to negatively impact their well-being. To deal with such situations, the women journalists we interviewed used both emotional- and problem-focused coping strategies: they decoupled and demarcated themselves from the situation and the aggressors by devaluing the aggressors and using active self-affirmation. They also sharpened their anticipation regarding audience reactions and sought social-emotional support. While these emotion-focused strategies help take control over one’s own feelings to cope from within, problem-focused coping strategies aim to change the person-environment relationship. Strategies the journalists applied to tackle the situation in a problem-solving mode included comment moderation, reactions to and confrontations of aggressors, the collection of (evidence) material, searches for practical (e.g., legal) support, engagement in public discussions to increase public awareness, and, unfortunately, self-censorship. Emotion-focused coping strategies, such as decoupling and self-affirmation, can be understood as “immune reactions” to arouse resistance spirits that can be strong enough to counteract unwanted self-censorship tendencies. The women journalists we interviewed were also able to re-frame their experiences and perceive that outside pressure can ultimately have positive effects, too: the inclusion of diverse perspectives and adherence to the objectivity ideal offer a certain degree of security against audience hostility. In addition, the respondents mentioned more self-reflection, a sharpened perception of their responsibility for individual and social effects of their work and their interviewees, as well as greater empathy and a desire for cooperation. The importance of social (emotional as well as practical) support through colleagues, mentors, and peer-to-peer networks was underlined by all participants in our sample. Such collectives are a particularly valuable resource for freelancers without a traditional editorial structure behind them (a particularly vulnerable group in this regard). In sum, the interviews showed that communicative violence is a problem that needs to be addressed on various levels. First, we recommend educational institutions include the topic in their curricula and support the next generation of journalists in their networking. Second, professional associations and commissioning media organizations can provide important infrastructures and resources, e.g., for practical and legal support. However, communicative violence does not only affect media workers. Aggression is also unleashed on other persons with discursive power, e.g., from politics and science. Available research suggests that triggering mechanisms and coping strategies, but also the particular threat to female representatives, appear to be similar in the different fields. An orientation towards and interaction with the audience is not only relevant for journalists but also unavoidable for politicians or increasingly desired for scientists. The ambivalence of visibility, which can lead to both success and a higher probability of attacks, is obvious, and social media renders the border between the private and public sphere increasingly permeable. In hypermasculine environments such as online gaming or in technology journalism, it has therefore been observed that female representatives “neutralize” their gender. This study must therefore be placed into a broader context — on how communicative violence poses a threat to societies’ advances in diversity and representation.

  • 8.
    Springer, Nina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Voronova, Liudmila
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Sustaining dialogue: A Södertörn case study on journalism departmentsand the sustainable development goals2020In: Mellan det hyperlokala och globala: Journalistikens förändringar och utmaningar i en digital tid: Vänbok till Gunnar Nygren / [ed] Ester Appelgren & Andreas Widholm, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2020, p. 195-206Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Sustaining dialogue – A Södertörn case study on journalism departments and the sustainable development goals
1 - 8 of 8
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