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  • 1.
    Bradshaw, Clare
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies. Stockholm University.
    Golz, A. -L
    Stockholm University.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Coastal ecosystem effects of increased summer temperature and contamination by the flame retardant HBCDD2017In: Journal of Marine Science and Engineering, E-ISSN 2077-1312, Vol. 5, no 2, p. -20, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combined effects of ocean warming and contaminants on marine ecosystems are poorly understood. In this study, we exposed model ecosystems comprising typical shallow coastal Baltic Sea communities to elevated temperature (+5 °C) and the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), both singly and in combination, for 13 days. Higher temperatures caused the release of PO4 from the sediment, which in turn stimulated the growth of the cyanobacteria Dolichospermum sp. This in turn led to an increase in the copepod Acartia bifilosa and other indirect effects in the plankton, interpreted as being caused by changes in predation, grazing, and competition. Elevated temperatures also stimulated benthic primary production and increased production of benthic mollusk larvae. Although increased temperature was the dominant driver of effects in these systems, HBCDD also appeared to have some effects, mainly in the zooplankton (both direct and indirect effects) and benthic meiofauna (an interactive effect with temperature). Although the study used model ecosystems, which are an approximation of field conditions, it highlights that interactive ecosystem effects between two stressors are possible and demonstrates the ecological and temporal complexity of such responses. Such unpredictable responses to warming and contaminants are a major challenge for ecosystem management to deal with multistressor situations in the Baltic Sea. 

  • 2.
    Bradshaw, Clare
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies. Stockholm University.
    Näslund, J.
    AquaBiota Water Research, Stockholm.
    Hansen, J.
    AquaBiota Water Research, Stockholm / Stockholm University.
    Kozlowsky-Suzuki, B.
    Universidade Federal Do Estado Do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Sundström, B.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Hexabromocyclododecane affects benthic-pelagic coupling in an experimental ecosystem2015In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 206, p. 306-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) is an additive brominated flame retardant and a recognized PBT chemical. However, little is known about its effects on coastal species, and even less on ecosystem effects. We investigated the dose-response effects of HBCDD over 8 months in 1000 L experimental mesocosms assembled from coastal Baltic Sea ecosystem components. HBCDD was added via spiked plankton material and a range of structural and functional endpoints were measured during the experiment. Increasing HBCDD concentration decreased the biomass of large Macoma balthica, resulting in a decreased recirculation of nutrients to the water. Changes in plankton communities were also observed, either due to direct toxic HBCDD effects or indirect via changes in benthic-pelagic coupling of nutrients. Such complex ecosystem responses can only be quantified and understood by using realistic experimental set-ups, and including knowledge of system-specific ecological interactions. This is the first study of HBCDD effects on ecosystem level.

  • 3.
    Bradshaw, Clare
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies. Stockholm University.
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University.
    von Stedingk, Hans
    Stockholm University.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Effects of benthos, temperature and dose on the fate of HBCDD in experimental coastal ecosystems2015In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1246-1257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the fate of the brominated flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) added in a particulate suspension to experimental ecosystems assembled from brackish (Baltic Sea) coastal bays. Two experiments examined how A) benthic macrofauna (over 21 d), and B) increased temperature (14 d), affected HBCDD concentrations and fractionation of α, β and γ diastereomers in the water, sediment and biota. A third experiment (C) run over three seasons (231 d), studied the effect of HBCDD dose on the same endpoints. In all treatments of the three experiments, HBCDD partitioned mainly to the sediment, and this proportion increased with time. Presence of macrofauna tended to increase the HBCDD concentration in the sediment and decreased its concentration in the water. Increased temperature (+5 °C) decreased the amount of HBCDD in sediment and water but not in the filter- and deposit-feeding infaunal bivalves (Macoma balthica). The partitioning between water, sediment and biota was not concentration dependent. In all treatments, sediment became enriched in γ-HBCDD, M. balthica in α-HBCDD and water in α- and β-HBCDD. Bioaccumulation of HBCDD in M. balthica was high in all experiments (logBSAF > 1.25), the α diastereomer contributing the most (logBSAF 2.1 to 5.2). There is a risk of trophic transfer of HBCDD from benthic to pelagic food webs, and secondary poisoning of marine consumers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Blidberg, Eva
    Elfgren, Irene Karlsson
    Hellström, Anna
    Kylin, Henrik
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Direct and indirect effects of the fungicide azoxystrobin in outdoor rackish water microcosms2010In: Ecotoxicology, ISSN 0963-9292, E-ISSN 1573-3017, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 431-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of the strobilurin fungicide azoxystrobin were studied in rackish water microcosms, with natural plankton communities and ediment. Two experiments were conducted: Experiment 1 (nominal conc. 0, 5 and 60 mu g/L, 24-L outdoor microcosms for 21 days) and a second, ollow-up, Experiment 2 (nominal conc. 0, 3, 7.5, 15 mu g/L, 4-L indoor icrocosms for 12 days). The microcosms represent a simplified brackish ater community found in shallow semi-enclosed coastal areas in gricultural districts in the Baltic Sea region. Measured water oncentrations of the fungicide (Experiment 1) were, on average, 83 and 2% of nominal concentrations directly after application, and 25 and 30% fter 21 days, for the low and high dose treatments, respectively, orresponding to mean DT50-values of 15.1 and 25.8 days, for low and igh dose treatments, respectively. In Experiment 1, direct toxic ffects on calanoid copepods at both test concentrations were observed. imilarly, in Experiment 2, the copepod abundance was significantly educed at all tested concentrations. There were also significant econdary effects on zooplankton and phytoplankton community structure, tanding stocks and primary production. Very few ecotoxicological tudies have investigated effects of plant protection products on Baltic rganisms in general and effects on community structure and function pecifically. Our results show that azoxystrobin is toxic to brackish ater copepods at considerably lower concentrations than previously eported from single species tests on freshwater crustaceans, and that irect toxic effects on this ecologically important group may lead to ascade effects altering lower food webs and ecosystem functioning.

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