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  • 1.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Socialt arbete.
    Doing things together: Exploring meanings of different forms of sociality among autistic people in an autistic work space2019Ingår i: Alter;European Journal of Disability Research ;Journal Europeen de Recherche Sur le Handicap, ISSN 1875-0672, E-ISSN 1875-0680, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 168-178Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores different meanings of being social among autistic people who are employed at an autistic-separate workplace in Sweden. The analyses in this paper are based on data from fieldwork at an autistic workspace consisting of autistic people working with peer support directed at young autistic adults in Sweden. Two different forms of sociality, which take place in two different social environments, are highlighted: environments dominated by non-autistic people and those dominated by autistic people. Interest-based sociality includes the importance of having interest-based exchanges with one another, and having common interests and communication based on genuine interest in the topic being discussed. Socially based sociality is, rather, based on social group identification. The first is the dominant form of sociality among the participants, which they connect with being in an autistic space. The second may be viewed as a counter-dominant form of sociality among the participants, which they connect with being in spaces dominated by non-autistic people.

  • 2.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Socialt arbete.
    Kourti, Marianthi
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Jackson-Perry, David
    Queens University Belfast, Belfast, UK.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Australia.
    Fletcher, Kirsty
    Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.
    Bendelman, Daniel
    University of Kent, Canterbury, UK.
    O'Dell, Lindsay
    Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.
    Doing it differently: emancipatory autism studies within a neurodiverse academic space2019Ingår i: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 34, nr 7-8, s. 1082-1101Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current research climate, in which many autistic and autism communities are increasingly calling for a move towards collaborative forms of research, we consider how a loosely formed epistemological community may serve to challenge 'business as usual' in the academy. Mindful of the need to move beyond theory, we use this experience to concretely consider how knowledge about autism and neurotypicality can be meaningfully (co)-produced, and made available both to the research community and also to autistic and autism communities. Here, we use our own co-production of this article to explore how autistic experience may trouble normative meanings of academic knowledge production. We also consider the limits and possibilities of a neurodiverse research collaboration to reflect on ways in which a loose epistemological space may serve to contribute to knowledge about both autism and neurotypicality, adding to debate around collaborative research.

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