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  • 1.
    Buchanan, John
    et al.
    University of Technology, Sydney UTS.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Editorial: "I love the smell of NAPLAN in the morning"2013In: Issues in educational research, ISSN 0313-7155, E-ISSN 1837-6290, Vol. 23, no 3, p. ii-iiiArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    NAPLAN (The National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy) is an annual Australia-wide testing regime in years 3, 5 7 and 9. It is one of a number of national and international testing schemes currently in operation. This issue of the journal is also being published in the context of an emerging National Curriculum in Australia. At such times, and at all times, it seems, we tend to focus on what we want our students to know and be able to do at the end of a certain period or learning experience. These are fine quest(ion)s. A more fundamental question, one that risks being lost in the mix of this, however, is, 'what kind of people would we like our students to be at the end of and as a result of their learning-time with us, their teachers?'

  • 2.
    Hellsten, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Building Culturally Responsive Academic Research Communities: Transcending boundaries or bordering ontologies?2015In: Local Meets Global Conference: Keynote address. / [ed] Dr. Elina Lehtomäki, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this keynote address, I am going to address the issues of culture as a central agency for contemporary change, by raising a number of meaningful questions related to responsive cultural encounters in education. Culture is an issue close to the heart of contemporary education, yet there seems to be both a need, as well as some fatigue in the education community, over the debates about the place of culture in education.

    At the same time, we are witnessing a world climate that is currently urging the global community to come up with solutions to a number of very complex issues which in many ways are larger than ourselves. I will in this talk invite us to think about the anatomy of culture, as it may contain the components of intentional actions, our practices, and the functions of our work, that bring change through the action and processes in cultural know-how. I will attempt at untangling some of these issues, by drawing on the experiences of our international research community. 

  • 3.
    Hellsten, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Imperatives of Internationalizing Higher Education in the European North2015In: ECER 2015 - the European Conference on Educational Research: WERA Focal Meeting / [ed] Prof. Vanessa Andreotti, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation we engage with the issues on international higher education imperatives in response to recent educational reforms and their implications for scholarship in the region of northern Europe. These issues bring forth components of an ongoing large comparative research project on ethical internationalization involving 20 universities across the globe (EIHE, 2015) funded by the Academy of Finland. 

    Central to the theme are perspectives on how internationalization has been shaped. Historical accounts of the internationalisation of HE have been framed by organizational and system level perspectives (King, Marginson, & Naidoo, 2013) and are closely linked to economical-political-policy demands. In the past, focus was placed on academic and organizational climates and cultures, viewing education primarily from an administrative perspective, linked to economy, politics and policy. Thus, the social role of universities was scrutinized merely in relation to its external global environment, that is, in terms of its impact on ‘market competition’. Transnational corporations have over time exerted significant control that rise above national borders (King, Marginson & Naidoo, 2013) forcing universities to operate within the knowledge-based economy. Marginson (2009) has discussed these escalating developments in terms of status competition driven by neo-liberal political developments causing a reduction in state funding and demanding public universities to become increasingly self-supporting, financially.

    The rapidly escalating international education market has imposed unprecedented pedagogical demands on university teachers' academic professionalism and identity (Hellstén & Reid, 2008; Ryan, 2013; Trahar, 2011). Concurrently, there has been anxiety about lowering academic standards caused by a perceived fragmentation in the field (Ninnes & Hellstén, 2005) which may derive from an epistemic discord about internationalized curriculum policy, employability and conceptualizations about ethics (Andreotti, 2013).

    In this presentation we focus on current imperatives steering international policy and practice and related global, cultural and social imaginaries, by providing a sampling of commentary from teaching spaces in international education contexts. The presentation shows examples of interim EIHE project data collected from the northern EU region. In the presentation we involve the audience in discussing implications for future progression on the issues that might be central to a forming of (ethical) international communities of (educational) practice. 

  • 4.
    Hellsten, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Education.
    Internacionalizar la Universidad2010In: Cuadernos de Pedagogia, ISSN 0210-0630, Vol. 403, no jul, p. 32-35Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [es]

    Los pilares idealistas en los que descansa la educación internacional son la movilidad, la diversidad, la inclusión y la armonía. A la luz de ellos, la autora analiza las nuevas exigencias que afronta la universidad y sitúa la internacionalización de la educación en un contexto histórico social.

  • 5.
    Hellsten, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Re-imagining International Communities of Scholars: from (w)here to possible futures?: Keynote address.2015In: Rethinking Internationalisation in Higher Education: Methodological and Conceptual Challenges. / [ed] Prof Sue Robson, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As an outcome of globalization, international education is facing both quantitative and qualitative future challenges. Quantitatively, global student cross-border mobility has doubled in the first decade of the 21st century and is expected to double in the decade ahead according to OECD predictions (2013). This calls for swift qualitative adaptation across the levels of the higher education sector in Europe and elsewhere in order to enable universities to adequately meet changing societal needs on the one hand and perceptively respond to globalization demands on the other.

    Concurrently, international education as a social process is in need of regeneration and coherence.  Research stresses further socially accountable and critical approaches to pedagogical investigations on international student care, intercultural competencies and transnational literacies, cross-cultural curriculum innovation, pedagogy and practice, intercultural integration and new technologies, policy documentation and management which demand research-informed educational approaches by bridging interdisciplinary academic communities of scholars. This presentation will address these issues from the perspective of progressing international aspects of higher education into possible futures. 

  • 6.
    Hellsten, Meeri
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Education.
    Goldstein-Kyaga, Katrin
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Education.
    Negotiating intercultural academic careers: a narrative analysis of two senior university lecturers2011In: Learning and Teaching Narrative Inquiry: Travelling in the Borderlands. / [ed] Sheila Trahar, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2011, 1, p. 157-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the final chapter of this volume, the authors refer to the “pedagogical vantage points offered by narrative inquiry”, an apt comment that encapsulates the volume’s purpose and its spirit. As an increasing number of people throughout the world – and from a broad range of disciplines – are turning to narrative as a research methodology, this volume is timely in its focus on the learning and teaching of this approach. The contributors to the volume, all narrative scholars themselves, write about the creative and challenging pedagogical activities that they use in order to enable others to learn about and do narrative research. The volume will be of particular interest to those teaching narrative research methodologies at both undergraduate and postgraduate level in the social sciences, medical sciences and the humanities. The contributions from Hong Kong, Israel, Europe and North America, all reflect critically on the rich complexities of using and teaching narrative in those contexts and attend closely to the diverse constituencies of their learning communities.

  • 7. Hellsten, Meeri
    et al.
    Poikela, Sari
    University of Lapland, Finland.
    International scholars of the 21st Century: comparative visions from teaching floors in Finland and Australia2009In: International Journal of Learning, ISSN 1447-9494, E-ISSN 1447-9540, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 367-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars around the world are currently engaging in new debate about what constitutes culturally appropriate, sustainable and effective pedagogy in contexts involving international education (Hellstén & Reid, 2008). There is today universal agreement among the community of scholars that most higher education learning sites in contemporary society are at least culturally and ethnically international. The issue of global academic accountability and best practice is therefore positioned at the core of recent pedagogical articulations. However, at the ground level, where teaching and learning reveals its intricacies of a ‘human kind’, academics and students alike are struggling with relating to the new jargon defining the 21st Century Scholar. This ‘scholar’ is well equipped for the new global era, is amicably versed in the communicative repertoires of globally aware citizens and has an impressively mapped cross-cultural academic pathway and graduate capabilities supported by their institution. In this article we report on discussions with current international students about their academic and professional visions of and for the future, and their sense of place among the community of scholars of the 21st Century. The study was conducted in Australia and Finland, two countries that have received recent comparable attention on student literacy levels internationally (PISA), and consequently on the quality of teaching, including teacher educators.

    The empirical data consists of students’ written and spoken commentary which were analysed using discourse analysis. About 30 students provided data for the research. We offer some implications for developing pedagogy, policy and practice for higher education.

  • 8. Hellstén, Meeri
    Accounting for Culture, Language and Identity in Educational Discourses: The Case of Indigenous Sámi in Finland, Sweden and Norway1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research project examines the enactment of various versions of the concept of ‘culture’ in education policy and practice. Its interest lies in how indigenous Sámi culture is manifest in three different national, linguistic and education administration sites: Finland, Sweden and Norway. The constitution of ‘culture’ in these contexts is contingent upon its relativity to definitions of ‘culture’ defined by the national majority in power. The study adopts a definition of ‘culture’ as an accomplished rather than theoretically or socially predetermined phenomenon. Therefore, the study draws from the theory and application of Ethnomethodology (eg., Garfinkel, 1967; Heritage, 1984; Sacks, 1996a; 1996b).

    Contemporary theorisations about culture in education have been considered with regards to describing educational policy and practice around the world. Theorisations reflecting on the relationship between culture, power, language and education (e.g. Bourdieu, 1992; Foucault, 1980; Bernstein, 1996) have yielded bases on which to contrast and establish the current investigation of culture as an interactionally enacted phenomenon.

    This study consist of interview data, collected in 1993, during a lengthy field research visit to Sámi country in northern Scandinavia. A total of 83 individuals from a total of 37 educational institutions in Finland, Sweden and Norway participated in the study. The participants came from different educational professional categories such as: Sámi teachers; administrators at school, municipal, regional and national levels, teacher education, and other Sámi academic institutions (such as adult and vocational education).

    The interviews consisted of approximately 15 semi-structured questions concerning knowledge and beliefs about the education policy and practice in use at the time. The interview also explored participants’ views on Sáminess in the nation-state and descriptions of the role of culture afforded the indigenous group within the national domain. Further questions inquired about the implications of such descriptions, perceptions and cultural interpretations of the implementation of the Sámi school curriculum.

    The interviews were conducted in three languages (Finnish, Swedish and Norwegian) of which the researcher made use of two, namely, Finnish and Swedish. In Norway, the participants responded to questions in Norwegian, which is mutually intelligible with Swedish. Some culture-specific Sámi vocabulary was also used. All data for the research analysis were translated into English by the researcher and verified as true translations by independent bi- and/or multi-lingual associates.

    The interview tapes were transcribed using conventions adapted from Heritage (1984) and Hutchby & Wooffitt (1998). The analyses were based on the sub-field of Ethnomethodology called Membership Categorisation Analysis (MCA) formulated according to frameworks developed by Sacks (e.g., 1996a) and later by Hester & Eglin (1997). The analyses explored descriptions about the membership category ‘Sámi’ and its attribute Sáminess as constructed by the members of the Sámi education system.

    The analyses found that both the category ‘Sámi’ and its attribute ‘Sáminess’ were situatedly produced to warrant distinctive cultural, social and educational interpretations for the indigenous groups in the three countries. In Finland, the category ‘Sámi’ was described as lacking in strong identity but as capable of looking after their own rights. In Sweden the category ‘Sámi’ is described in the publicly available feature of ‘naturalness’ and is contrasted with descriptions about the ‘non-Sámi’ who in turn are described as generating ‘struggle’, ‘resistance’ and ‘racism’ against the ‘Sámi’. In Norway, the category ‘Sámi’ is afforded the description of ‘standing alone’ as a group in the nation.

    The attribute ‘Sáminess’ is described differently in the three contrastive interview sites. In Finland and Sweden, ‘Sáminess’ and ‘all things Sámi’ are constructed as ‘hidden’ category attributes which are made publicly desirable. For example, the need for the indigenous group to publicly display their ethnicity (e.g., wearing the Sámi costume) is expressed by interviewees. In Norway the attribute ‘Sáminess’ is described as a device from which flow other local practices of Sámi education. In all three interview sites language is generated as the main tool through which both the category ‘Sámi’ and its categorial attributes are realised and implemented.

    The study concludes that, according to the situatedness of the different descriptions of indigenous culture, identity and language, a uniform description of these phenomena cannot be applied. That is, one singular definition of ‘culture’ or ‘cultural hegemony’, for example, does not apply to all Sámi situations across the Sámi geographic area. In each situatedly diverging discursive occasion, members drew on different theorisations to account for the notion of ‘culture’. Such different constructions in turn have vastly different implications for the ways in which the educational package is consequently interpreted, developed and implemented. The concluding statement of this study is thus, that the world-wide agenda on cultural pluralism for the worlds’ classrooms benefits from a view of culture as a situatedly generated product, rather than a pre-theorised model of social order.

  • 9. Hellstén, Meeri
    'Anybody out there a real expert?': transition into the online learning environment by first year university students2005In: E-training practices for professional organizations: IFIP TC3/WG3.3 Fifth Working Conference on eTRAIN Practices for Professional Organizations (eTRAIN 2003), July 7-11, 2003, Pori, Finland / [ed] Paul Nicholson, J Barrie Thompson, Mikko Ruohnen, Jari Multisilta, Dordrecht ; Boston: Kluwer , 2005, 1, p. 51-59Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    'E-training practices for Professional Organisations' is an essential reference for anyone interested in the integration of e-business, e-work and e-learning processes. The book collects for the first time, the proceedings from the 2003 IFIP Conference held in Pori, Finland.

  • 10. Hellstén, Meeri
    [Book review] : Brownlie, Faye; Feniak, Catherine & Schnellert, Leyton (2006). Student Diversity: Classroom Strategies to Meet the Learning Needs of All Students. Second edition. Markham, Ontario: Pembroke Publishers.2006In: Education Review, ISSN 1094-5296, E-ISSN 1094-5296Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11. Hellstén, Meeri
    Book Review : William O’Grady. How Children Learn Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. ISBN 0-521-53192-62006In: Educational Psychology, ISSN 0144-3410, E-ISSN 1469-5820, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 707-708Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 12. Hellstén, Meeri
    Book Review : Yuriy V. Karpov. The Neo-Vygotskian Approach to Child Development, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 20052007In: Educational Psychology, ISSN 0144-3410, E-ISSN 1469-5820, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 854-856Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 13. Hellstén, Meeri
    [Book review]: McGuinness, Diane (2005). Language Development and Learning to Read: The Scientific Study of How Language Development Affects Reading Skill.Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press2006In: Education Review, ISSN 1094-5296, E-ISSN 1094-5296Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14. Hellstén, Meeri
    [Book review]: Undemocratic Schooling: Equity and Quality in Mass Secondary Education in Australia byRichard Teese and John Polesel. 2003. Carlton: Melbourne University Press. ISBN 0-522-85048-02006In: Comparative Education Review, ISSN 0010-4086, E-ISSN 1545-701X, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 706-709Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 15. Hellstén, Meeri
    Cultural values in Samish and Australian Children's literature: a corpus linguistic approach1994In: Researching Language and Literacy in Social Context: a reader / [ed] David Graddol, Janet Maybin, Barry Stierer, Clevedon Hall: Multilingual Matters in association with the Open Univ. , 1994, p. 193-204Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Education.
    Editorial2011In: Issues in educational research, ISSN 0313-7155, E-ISSN 1837-6290, Vol. 21, no 2, p. ii-iiiArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Education.
    Editorial2010In: Issues in educational research, ISSN 0313-7155, E-ISSN 1837-6290, Vol. 20, no 2, p. ii-iiiArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 18. Hellstén, Meeri
    Editorial2008In: Issues in educational research, ISSN 0313-7155, E-ISSN 1837-6290, Vol. 18, no 2, p. ii-iiiArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Editorial 24(1): IIER endings and new beginnings2014In: Issues in educational research, ISSN 0313-7155, E-ISSN 1837-6290, Vol. 24, no 1, p. ii-ivArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Education is about making a difference in the lives of those who experience its interactions as a social justice project of modern democracy. It is intended to encourage the free exploration of ideas and the development of creativity. Quality education needs the underpinning of access to good teaching, challenging curriculum and engaged learning. The articles in this issue demonstrate some of the ways researchers approach these issues. 

  • 20.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    International education imperatives and the era of ethical practice: a Swedish higher education case study example.2014In: CONGRESS2014: The Canadian Society for the Study of Education / [ed] Jane Koustas, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As internationalization of higher education (HE) reaches a forty-year trajectory point, its community of scholars recognize an ever present fragmentation in the field. Four decades of worldwide conceptual and pedagogical incentives have not yielded consensus about successful policy to practice implementation (Ninnes & Hellstén, 2005), nor of its impact upon intercultural understanding (Marginson & Sawir, 2012) or language gains (Grin, 2012). Indeed, the overall advantages of internationalization as a measure of coercive responsiveness to the social justice and civic needs imposed by globalization, remain uncertain.  The outcome of such to date is an uneven distribution of HE provisions on account of the recent world economic crises. The responsiveness of international higher education (HE) to current global flows in employability, mobility and competitiveness has been articulated in national, regional and local level policy guidelines over the past decades. The Swedish government has recently formulated international dimensions in public HE policy, as a need to inform intercultural diversity and innovation, and as a crucial feature of academic provision in the 21st Century (HSV, 2008; European Unit, 2000; Minister of Education, Research and Culture, 2005). One consensus account is a recent collaborative forum initiated by the Swedish Research Council (VR), introducing international mobility as an Action plan strategy (VR, 2012). At the public policy level however, internationalization remains caught in the conflict between the degree of internationalization and academic quality, breaking the assumption that merely having international policies in place provides for higher academic excellence.  The ethical element of implementation of international policies remains a valid imperative, as addressed in the current contributions in the collection of this symposium. This paper reports one aspect of a Swedish case study, as based on survey data from one public HE institution. Surveys were collected from students in three academic discipline areas, education, humanities and sciences on the responses of the international education system and upon the processes affecting its actors. The survey data is discussed from the perspective of identifying processes that provide alternatives to profit-seeking, unethical, and market driven internationalization approaches, and in relation to the body of the larger international empirical research consortium data framework.

  • 21. Hellstén, Meeri
    International student discourse: critical implications for international pedagogy (abstract)2006In: Diversity and inclusion: issues in international education : book of abstracts, Belfast, Ireland: Queen's University , 2006, p. [s. 12]-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22. Hellstén, Meeri
    International student discourse: focus on researching international pedagogy2007In: International Education Journal, ISSN 1443-1475, E-ISSN 2202-493X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 79-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The internationalisation of higher education has brought new dimensions of inquiry into cross-cultural aspects of pedagogy and practice. From the student learning perspective, a smooth transition into new and foreign learning environments is believed to determine academic success. However, the international academic transition period can be challenging for many students. Problems have been reported in the areas of poor decoding of English language and critical thinking skills; failure to participate in collaborative learning modes (e.g. group discussions); and difficulties communicating effectively in social settings. Refuting arguments have been provided by those seeking to break down ill-formed correlations between cultural anomalies and cognitive deficit. This paper takes the premise that sustainable forms of pedagogy in international contexts hinge on researching the language, culture and discourse intersection in academic learning communities during student transition. It will examine international students' cross-cultural learning experiences as attributed to internal and external factors. The paper discusses international students' interpretations of those intercultural communicative subtleties that are manifest in academic discourse and that may be overlooked by the academic community. The paper concludes by providing some implications for sustaining teaching and learning in international contexts.

  • 23. Hellstén, Meeri
    International student transition: focusing on researching international pedagogy for educational sustainability2007In: International Education Journal, ISSN 1443-1475, E-ISSN 2202-493X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 79-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The internationalisation of higher education has brought new dimensions of inquiry into cross-cultural aspects of pedagogy and practice. From the student learning perspective, a smooth transition into new and foreign learning environments is believed to determine academic success. However, the international academic transition period can be challenging for many students. Problems have been reported in the areas of poor decoding of English language and critical thinking skills; failure to participate in collaborative learning modes (e.g. group discussions); and difficulties communicating effectively in social settings. Refuting arguments have been provided by those seeking to break down ill formed correlations between cultural anomalies and cognitive deficit. This paper takes the premise that sustainable forms of pedagogy in international contexts hinge on researching the language, culture and discourse intersection in academic learning communities during student transition. It examines international students' cross-cultural learning experiences as attributed to internal and external factors. The paper discusses international students' interpretations of those inter-cultural communicative subtleties that are manifest in academic discourse and that may be overlooked by the academic community. The paper concludes by providing some implications for sustaining teaching and learning in international contexts. [Author abstract, ed]

  • 24. Hellstén, Meeri
    International student transition revisited: implications for academic achievement2005In: Global pedagogies: equity, access and democracy in education : proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Comparative and International Education Society, School of Education, Australian Catholic University, 3-5 December 2004 / [ed] Joseph Zajda and Peter Ninnes, Melbourne: School of Education, The University , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Hellstén, Meeri
    Internationalizing the curriculum: the student experience2002In: Internationalizing education in the Asia-Pacific region: critical reflections, critical times, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on student experiences of their transition into the Australian university environment. Central to the theme is an investigation of study processes in terms of enculturation, teaching and learning adjustments, as well as some language and communication difficulties between students and staff. The paper offers some implications for inclusive practices and cross-culturally sensitive communication discourses for teaching international students. [Author abstract]

  • 26. Hellstén, Meeri
    Meeting new challenges in multicultural provisions for international students: implications for first year university transition engagements2008In: Proceedings of the 4th International Barcelona Conference on Higher Education: Vol. 6.  Higher education for intercultural dialogue and multiculturalism, Barcelona: GUNI , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities have traditionally maintained a central role in promoting  international relations, increased solidarity and intercultural understanding. The essential part of this movement has been implemented through the internationalization of highereducation (Ninnes & Hellstén, 2005). The rapid growth of a new form of international education has in the past 20 years made dramatic impact both on furtheringintercultural academic exchanges and on its adherent economic prosperity (Altbach & Knight, 2007), especially in English speaking countries. The Australian highereducation  sector has been greatly sustained by internationalization which today contributes significantly to the overall funding of universities. Internationalization of higher education is one of the most successful recent enterprises in Australia and constitutes a major national export industry.The global development of international education has been delineated in at least two ways by leading scholars in the field (e.g. Altbach & Knight, 2007; Adams, 2007). In a recent article, Adams (2007) distinguishes between two general models in global internationalization processes within which he depicts the Australian as an‘export approach’ against a more ‘traditional model’ applied in Europe and some parts of Asia. By this Adams means that Australia has developed a commercial service operation of international education delivery that is both market driven and whichintegrates government initiated public-private business partnerships.The decades of economic prosperity brought about by the national marketdriven approach  to creating international infrastructure in Australian universities has involved major implications for academics and students alike. While on the one hand, the enterprise has enabled pursuits of a rather exotic cultural kind for those academics who yearn to undertake work in faraway foreign contexts, its binary effect demarcated by the ever increasing numbers of ‘foreign’ students on local shores has been marred by teaching challenges and has imposed new initiatives in pedagogy and practice for academics teaching in culturally and linguistically diverse contexts (Hellstén & Reid, forthcoming). The critical change in demographic and cultural make-up of traditionally homogenous student cohorts has introduced new pedagogic confrontations for the academic community, respectively.The ensuing teaching and learning arena dealing with incoming international student issues has gained much deserved research attention in Australia and the English speaking world in the recent decades of the international higher education enterprise. The academic community is consequently searching for innovation in effective and sustainable pedagogies for diverse and multicultural settings that will equally enhance learning opportunities for all students, regardless of ethnic andcultural backgrounds. The pursuit has caused an alteration in educational ethics and values and has brought into question existing conventional assumptions aboutscholarship and knowledge building in the academy. International students across the global disciplinary spectrum have been the target of much debate about failedmethodologies leading to low academic attainment as well as discontent in the academic teaching community.While the recent research attention has been welcomed, it is fair to state that the global network of scholars who are committed to the sustainability of international education, are increasingly at a loss on considerations involving quality assurance of multicultural pedagogy and practice including high quality curriculum delivery and assessment that are sustainable in culturally sensitive ways. There exist to date, very few empirically noteworthy research studies (but see Harman, 2005; Hellstén & Reid, forthcoming) that investigate in any reliable configuration, the pedagogic effects of ‘international learning’ as influenced by various international variables and as reported essentially from a cross-cultural learning perspective.From the student learning perspective then, a seamless transition between the home and host learning environments is believed to determine academic success. However, the international academic transition period can be challenging for many ‘foreign’ students. Problems have been observed in the areas of poor Englishlanguage and critical thinking skills; failure to participate in collaborative learning modes (e.g. group discussions); and difficulties communicating effectively in group seminar settings. A contrary argument is provided by those seeking to break down implicit correlations between cultural maladjustment and cognitive deficit. Disciplinary frames and dominant reasoning and pragmatic discourses that govern academicthinking in some host institutions have been under systematic scrutiny (Harman,2005). This paper makes the assertion that sustainable forms of  pedagogy ininternational contexts hinge on researching the language, culture and discourseintersection in academic learning communities during the university transition period that spans the first twelve months of study in the (foreign) host country and institution. It is argued that challenges in multicultural provisions for international students hinge on a critical appraisal of culturally sensitive teaching methods, followed by effective implementation and modification of teaching strategies that are not merely limited to the context of teaching international students, but are of equal benefit to students from all backgrounds. It is essential in internationally applied pedagogy, that inter-cultural practices involve critical perspective taking, self-critique and assessment of personal teaching methods (including philosophies). The consensus is thatmulticultural teaching and pedagogy in international contexts involves a criticalexamination of the discourses and actions that together constitute the nature of the international student transition as beneficial for sustaining the pedagogy and the quality for inter-cultural relations, harmony and understanding. In the search for new challenges and emerging roles for human and social development, any change in the international education field, must begin with the initiative of the host academiccommunity, rather than the incoming student population.This paper will showcase ways in which international students’ cross-cultural learning experiences are constructed in contextual, pragmatic and socio-culturally contested paradigms. The presentation will showcase data on international students’ perceptive considerations and pertinent interpretations of those inter-cultural communicative subtleties that are manifest in academic discourse and which may be overlooked by the local host academic community. The paper concludes by providing examples that yield implications for teaching and learning in international contexts by drawing on recent comparative data from European and Australian educationalcontexts.

  • 27. Hellstén, Meeri
    Multiculturalism2007In: Encyclopedia of activism and social justice. 2, [E-M] / [ed] Gary L. Anderson & Kathryn G. Herr, Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications , 2007, p. 988-995Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28. Hellstén, Meeri
    Pedagogy for internationalization: Focusing on student transition2005In: Higher education in a changing world: Research and development in higher education : Proceedings of the 28th HERDSA Annual Conference  3-6 July 2005 Sydney, Australia / [ed] Angela Brew, Christine Asmar, Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia , 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition experience of international students has gained some momentum among scholars in recent years. Yet, there is relatively little published research documenting student perspectives on transition related to its effects on subsequent learning and academic achievement. This presentation is a contribution in this area of research. The paper presents research conducted with incoming international students upon their initial entry into higher education. The paper draws on international students' orientation experiences into new socio-cultural and institutional learning environments. Some of the diverse student needs, teaching and learning constraints and cultural tensions are critically examined with the aim of revisiting inclusive pedagogy and teaching practices for some possible solutions.

  • 29. Hellstén, Meeri
    Researching international pedagogy and the forming of new academic identities2008In: Researching International Pedagogies: sustainable practice for teaching and learning in higher education / [ed] Hellstén, Meeri; Reid, Anna, Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer , 2008, , p. 318p. 83-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30. Hellstén, Meeri
    Students in transition: Needs and Experiences of International Students in Australia2002In: New times, new approaches: conference proceedings [of the] 16th Australian International Education Conference, 30 September - 4 October 2002, Hotel Grand Chancellor, Hobart, Australia, [Sydney, N.S.W.]: IDP Education Australia , 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This seminar presents case studies of international student experiences of Australian higher education. The paper provides insights into ways of understanding various implications of international studentsí transition into their new Australian study environment. The paper will explore aspects of enculturation, socio cultural adaptation, adjustment, language, communication and/or any learning difficulties encountered by the students. The seminar explores how students negotiate these aspects into their ethnic and cultural identities as well as their academic learning practices. Finally, the paper will discuss how best to cater for international student needs within the context of cross-cultural sensitivity and academic quality assurance directives. It hopes to raise discussion about curriculum innovation and the implementation of multicultural education principles.

  • 31. Hellstén, Meeri
    The Sami Identity: A Souvenir or Something Living?1998In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 119-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the notion of identity in relation to the options of cultural affiliation available to minority group members. In particular, the paper addresses commentary made in relation to the implementation of national curriculum guidelines in indigenous literacy education settings. The discussion draws examples from documented commentary on the administration and implementation of indigenous Sami education in Finland. The paper concludes with some suggestions as to the polemic of implementing (mainstream) curriculum for the maintenance of indigenous culture and emphasises perceptions about language and literacy as important components of the ethnic identity.

  • 32. Hellstén, Meeri
    et al.
    Bower, Matt
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Borderless supervision in higher degree research: consolidating international pedagogies and web-conferencing technologies2009In: International Journal of Learning, ISSN 1447-9494, E-ISSN 1447-9540, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 81-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intercultural learning has many meanings in the digital age of the 21st Century. The expansion of international and global education has impacted on collaborative knowledge production between students and their academic supervisors in more sophisticated ways than ever before. Doctoral studies are conducted across national borders in real time and with real participants facilitated by virtual environments and sustained by web-based technologies. This article reports on a funded trial of using web-conferencing technologies to support collaborative research supervision. The research work, the project supervision and the collaborative pedagogy produced by the international scholarly teams are enhanced by the use of web conferencing technology. Based on an evaluation of the software, this paper offers implications for enhancing the quality of joint research supervision in international contexts through the use of new technologies.

  • 33. Hellstén, Meeri
    et al.
    Dobozy, Eva
    Editorial2009In: Issues in educational research, ISSN 0313-7155, E-ISSN 1837-6290, Vol. 19, no 3, p. ii-viArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 34. Hellstén, Meeri
    et al.
    Prescott, Anne
    Learning at Macquarie: the international student experience2002In: Celebrating teaching at Macquarie,Macquarie University, NSW, 28-29 November, 2002, North Ryde, NSW.: Macquarie University , 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a research project currently undertaken at Macquarie University. The research explores internationalisation of the University’s curriculum offerings and how this affects international students. The central focus of this paper is to highlight some of the student commentary on communication between teachers and students by problematizing the way it subsequently affects the quality of student learning. The paper concludes by raising some questions around how we may best meet the needs of international students by drawing on inclusive teaching philosophies

  • 35.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    et al.
    Macquarie University, School of Education.
    Prescott, Anne
    Macquarie University, School of Education.
    Learning at University: The International Student Experience2004In: International Education Journal, ISSN 1443-1475, E-ISSN 2202-493X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 344-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on research that explores internationalisation of the University’s curriculum offerings and how this affects international students. The central focus of this paper is to highlight some of the student commentary on communication between teachers and students exemplifying the way it subsequently affects the quality of student learning. The paper concludes by raising some questions concerning how we may best meet the needs of international students by drawing on inclusive teaching philosophies.

  • 36. Hellstén, Meeri
    et al.
    Reid, Anna
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Introduction: Researching International Pedagogies: Being Critical About Learning and Teaching in Higher Education2008In: Researching International Pedagogies: sustainable practice for teaching and learning in higher education / [ed] Hellstén, Meeri; Reid, Anna, Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer , 2008, , p. 318p. 1-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37. Hellstén, Meeri
    et al.
    Reid, AnnaMacquarie University, Australia.
    Researching International Pedagogies: sustainable practice for teaching and learning in higher education2008Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our rapidly globalizing world students are able to access learning through mobility, through computer mediated experiences, and through the diverse perspectives of their peers and teachers. All of these components impact on the ways in which universities and their staff prepare and present courses for their students. This book presents an edited selection of chapters compiled under the theme of ‘new international pedagogies’. The objective is to document current pedagogical frameworks and practices in the teaching and learning context of international education. It showcases innovative teaching and learning methods, methodological frameworks and novel pedagogies that contribute to improving the effectiveness of teaching and learning in international settings and diverse student groups. The collection of seventeen chapters offers new debate on applied critical educational thought, innovation in teaching and learning, and culturally sensitive and inclusive curriculum practices across a broad disciplinary spectrum. Of central interest is the production of teaching and learning examples that provide evidence for implementing progress and advancement in the field. The book aims to stimulate further debate, research and application in the field of international pedagogies.

  • 38. Markose, Susan
    et al.
    Hellsten, Meeri
    Explaining success and failure in mainstream schooling through the lens of cultural continuities and discontinuities: two case studies2009In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 59-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the home literacy practices of two immigrant families, one each of Lebanese and Chinese descent. It explores the consequences of mismatches between home and school literacy practices in relation to mainstream academic outcomes. Two mothers of the families in this study are interviewed about their beliefs and parenting practices in regard to literacy acquisition. Their understandings of literacy and its purpose and their struggle to socialise their children into acquiring the literacies valued by their community form the basis of this study. It is argued that conceptions of literacy and literacy practices themselves are entrenched in the socio-cultural contexts of which families are a part. Results reveal that discontinuities between mainstream and migrants' home literacies have an impact on mainstream literacy acquisition of migrant children. The findings suggest a need to recognise and embed home literacy practices in mainstream schools in order to ensure the acquisition of school literacies.

  • 39. Markose, Susan
    et al.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    'All the kids hate school': cultural capital as a determinant of literacy success : two case studies2008In: Meeting of comparative minds: education in all its forms : proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Comparative and International Education Society, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, 24-27 November 2008, Armidale NSW: Australian and New Zealand Comparative and International Education Society , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses ethnographic data from a study of two immigrant families and argues that literacy acquisition may be influenced by what Bourdieu calls 'the domestic transmission of cultural capital'. The home literacy practices of two immigrant families, a Lebanese-Muslim and a Chinese family, form the focus of this study. Mothers of the two families were interviewed regarding their perspectives on mainstream education, their role in their children's learning and their understandings of literacy. Results indicate that both mothers possessed the cultural capital necessary to access the literacies of their own communities. However, their ability to aid their children in a successful acquisition of mainstream literacies depended on their personal acquisition and transmission of the linguistic structures and learning patterns which are the purview of the dominant culture. Data reveal the mothers felt marginalised by school structures of power which restricted their access to the information required to form effective parent-school partnerships in the education of their children. Rather than tapping into the cultural and linguistic competencies of the immigrant families schools, through their adoption of the socialisation practices of the dominant class, were perceived to disadvantage those children whose cognitive structures and behavioural traits left them ill-equipped to succeed in mainstream school literacies. The findings suggest a need for schools to develop pedagogical practices which are responsive to the habituses of non- dominant classes. The paper also addresses the viability of Bourdieu's call for a 'universal pedagogy' whereby the transmission of the 'instruments of appropriation' ensures academic success in dominant literacies. [Author abstract]

  • 40.
    Markose, Susan
    et al.
    University of Sydney.
    Symes, Colin
    Macquarie University.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Education.
    In this country education happen at the home: two families in search of the instruments of appropriation for school success2011In: Language and Intercultural Communication, ISSN 1470-8477, E-ISSN 1747-759X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 248-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article analyses ethnographic data from the study of the home literacy practices of two immigrant families, a Lebanese-Muslim and a Chinese family. It explores the experiences of the immigrant families as they blend the pedagogical practices and behaviours of their own cultures with those of the mainstream culture to ensure academic success in dominant literacies. Data reveal that for the families in this study, the acquisition of mainstream literacies was dependent on adult members selectively acquiring and transmitting what Bourdieu calls ‘the instruments of appropriation’ needed to access mainstream literacies.

     

  • 41. Ninnes, Peter
    et al.
    Hellsten, Meeri
    Internationalizing Higher Education: critical explorations of pedagogy and policy2005Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization is a multifaceted phenomenon, and one of its major components is the internationalization of education. The increasing pace and complexity of global knowledge flows, and the accelerating exchange of educational ideas, practices and policies, are important drivers of globalization. Higher Education is a key site for these flows and exchanges.

    This book casts a critical eye on the internationalization of higher education. It peels back taken-for-granted practices and beliefs, explores the gaps and silences in current pedagogy and practices, and addresses the ambiguities, tensions and contradictions in internationalization. In this volume, scholars from a range of disciplines and regions critically examine the co modification of higher education, teaching and support for international students, international partnerships for aid and trade, and the impacts on academics’ work.

  • 42. Ninnes, Peter
    et al.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    Introduction: Critical Engagements with the Internationalization of Higher Education2005In: Internationalizing higher education: critical explorations of pedagogy and policy / [ed] Peter Ninnes & Meeri Hellstén, Hong Kong: Comparative Education Research Centre, University of Hong Kong , 2005, Vol. 16, p. 1-8Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Pashby, Karen
    et al.
    University of Alberta, Canada.
    Nicholson, Michelle
    University of Oulu, FInland.
    Hellsten, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Perspectives of teacher education students on global citizenship: implications for ethical internationalisation2015In: NERA 2015 - Marketisation and Differentiation in Education: Abstract book, 2015, p. 248-249Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization has meant that universities are under increased pressure to internationalize through mobility, research partnerships, and internationalised programing. Global citizenship is an increasingly mainstream term being used by the UN and OECD regarding education for the 21st century, yet research about its conceptualization in higher education comes largely from English-speaking contexts (e.g. Jorgenson & Shultz, 2012). This paper presents a piece of an inter-disciplinary, international mixed-methods research project funded through the Academy of Finland and involving 20 universities in 10 countries. It responds to concerns that current economic crises have resulted in an intensification of those internationalization policies in universities that prioritize profit-seeking over those that prioritize ethical alternatives (Khoo, 2011). Drawing on critical and post/de-colonial theories (e.g. Andreotti, 2009), the project considers how, when left unchecked, internationalisation is normalized so as to re-direct social and political values such as global citizenship and social responsibility towards economic values thereby reproducing ideals of exceptionalism, entitlement, and (market) expansionism (Rhoads & Szelényi, 2010); and denying reproduction of systems of inequities (King, Marginson, & Naidoo, 2013; Rizvi, 2007). Selecting social cartography as a method to analyze the findings, the project aims to create a socially accountable map of shifting imaginaries of higher education as expressed in trends in internationalization (Paulston, 1999). In this paper, we focus on imaginaries of global citizenship. We will present a heuristic co-created by project partners and use it to analyze responses from teacher-education students studying in two Nordic universities, focusing on two specific survey questions: Do you see yourself as a global citizen? How do you think global citizens should think, relate and/or act in the world? The heuristic consists of three discursive orientations—neoliberal, liberal and critical—and four interfaces—neoliberal-liberal, liberal-critical, critical-neoliberal, and all four. Interfaces indicate where signifiers are deployed with multiple meanings. The mapping helps to identify dominant discourses, articulating where there are foreclosures of and possibilities for an ethical approach. The project contributes data and frameworks for understanding existing possibilities. By making discursive configurations and interfaces jointly intelligible, processes in higher education can be more informed by ethically oriented versions of international education. 

  • 44.
    Power, Anne
    et al.
    University of Western Sydney.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Editorial 23(1): Education in the 21st century2013In: Issues in educational research, ISSN 0313-7155, E-ISSN 1837-6290, Vol. 23, no 1, p. ii-ivArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Education in the twenty-first century is about equipping students of all ages "to compete in the global economy on knowledge and innovation ... take advantage of opportunity and ... face challenges of this era with confidence" (Melbourne Declaration, 2008, p. 13). There is a strong commitment in Australia, as well as elsewhere, from Federal and State levels on developing reciprocal partnerships with low socio-economic and Indigenous communities. These commitments emerge in documents such as the Bradley Report and the MCEEDYA four year plan. The challenge is for education systems to respond comprehensively to government plans.

  • 45. Prescott, Anne
    et al.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    Hanging Together Even with Non-Native Speakers: The International Student Transition Experience2005In: Internationalizing higher education: critical explorations of pedagogy and policy / [ed] Peter Ninnes & Meeri Hellstén, Hong Kong: Comparative Education Research Centre, University of Hong Kong , 2005, Vol. 16, p. 75-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46. Reid, Anna
    et al.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    The future of research in international pedagogies2008In: Researching International Pedagogies: sustainable practice for teaching and learning in higher education / [ed] Hellstén, Meeri; Reid, Anna, Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer , 2008, , p. 318p. 295-300Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Rodell-Olgaç, Christina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Education.
    Hellstén, Meeri
    Editorial: Special issue in intercultural and critical education2012In: Issues in educational research, ISSN 0313-7155, E-ISSN 1837-6290, Vol. 22, no 1, p. iii-viiArticle in journal (Other academic)
1 - 47 of 47
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