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  • 1. Aervold Bjerre, Thomas
    et al.
    Johannessen, Lene
    Kella, Liz
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, English language.
    Nyman, Jopi
    Nordic Contributions2008In: American Literary Scholarship, ISSN 0065-9142, E-ISSN 1527-2125, p. 524-543Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 2. Fjellestad, Danuta
    et al.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Realism and its discontents2003Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Wahlström, Helena
    Uppsala University.
    Making Home: Orphanhood, kinship, and cultural memory in contemporary American novels2014 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Making Home explores the figure of the orphan child in a broad selection of contemporary US novels by popular and critically acclaimed authors Barbara Kingsolver, Linda Hogan, Leslie Marmon Silko, Marilynne Robinson, Michal Cunningham, Jonathan Safran Foer, John Irving, Kaye Gibbons, Octavia Butler, Jewelle Gomez and Toni Morrison. The orphan child is a continuous presence in US literature, not only in children’s books and nineteenth-century texts, but also in a variety of genres of contemporary fiction for adults. Making Home examines the meanings of this trope in the contexts of American literary history, social history and ideologies of family, race and nation. It argues that contemporary orphan characters function both as links to literary history and as figures around which authors can critique the limits of literary history, family identity and national belonging.

  • 4.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Affect and Nostalgia in Eva Hoffman’s Lost in Translation2015In: Studia Anglica Posnaniensia, ISSN 0081-6272, E-ISSN 2082-5102, Vol. 50, no 2-3, p. 7-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Affect and Nostalgia in Life-Writing of the Polish Diaspora2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the affective landscapes of Poland, Canada, and the US in Eva Hoffman’s autobiographical account of her immigrant/exilic life in Lost in Translation (1989). Hoffman’s reputation as a writer and intellectual was launched with this autobiography. Hoffman left Poland for Vancouver with her Jewish family in 1959, when she was 13, and lived there until college in the US, where she made her career. She lives today primarily in London. Hoffman’s autobiography is divided into three parts, dealing first with Poland, then Canada, then the US. 

    Hoffman's text explicitly thematizes nostalgia. Hoffman affirms her nostalgia for her Polish childhood with a postmodern awareness. Though Lost in Translation has been celebrated for its self-reflexivity and its treatment of the links between language and subjectivity, some scholars have been highly critical of the “nostalgic” view of Poland. Hoffman's work is clearly invested in the dynamics and the affect of remembering and forgetting particular times and particular places. In this paper, I examine Hoffman's understandings of nostalgia, and of the affective landscapes with which she engages. Poland, Canada, and the US have powerful associations, but I focus on primarily on Poland and Canada, emphasizing the overlooked importance of Hoffman's Canadian years.  I am particularly interested in exploring how affect—defined roughly as “something that moves, that triggers reactions, forces, or intensities . . ., simultaneously engaging the mind and body, reason and emotions” (Berberich, Campbell and Hudson 314), and including the affect of nostalgia—is represented and textually communicated with readers. Thus, I look at the effects of Hoffman’s privileging of lyricism as a mode and mood for life-writing.

  • 6. Kella, Elizabeth
    Beloved communities: Solidarity and difference in fiction by Michael Ondaatje, Toni Morrison, and Joy Kogawa2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the civil rights era, the concept of community has become increasingly politicizedin the US and Canada. Inextricably entangled in the new social movements andmulticulturalism of the 1980s and 1990s, community tends to be either much malignedor exaggeratedly extolled in the literary, cultural, and political discourses in which itfigures so prominently. The novels examined in this study, however, probe both thelimitations and the possibilities of community as a site for psycho-political empowerment.Bringing a variety of theoretical critiques of community to bear on Michael Ondaatje'sThe English Patient, Toni Morrison's Beloved and Paradise, and Joy Kogawa's Obasan andItsuka, the study analyzes the criteria for inclusion and exclusion at work in the types ofcommunity imagined in these texts, paying particular but not exclusive attention to theprinciple of race.

    Though imagining community in terms of race, place, nation, or gender risksreinforcing essentialist views of identity and repressing intra-group difference, the novelscounter that risk, at least in part, by returning to historically specific moments of collectivetrauma and oppression. Each novel's focus on collective social experience, it is argued,works in various degrees of opposition to the individualism at the heart of humanistthought. At the same time, however, the depictions of systemic violence and historicaloppression, as well as those of resistant solidarity, inevitably appeal to "universal"conceptions of human value, justice, and, in the case of Kogawa and Morrison, publicnegotiation of difference. The readings of the texts scrutinize the instances andimplications of tensions between essentialist and constructivist foundations for variousforms of community. From these readings emerges a view of community as a conceptuallycomplex and unstable terrain.

  • 7.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    Countering Captivity in Popular Genres: The Only Good Indian and Older Than America.2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the appropriation and redirection of the Gothic in two contemporary, Native-centered feature films that concern a history that can be said to haunt many Native North American communities today: the history of Indian boarding schools. Georgina Lightning’s Older than America (2008) and Kevin Willmott’s The Only Good Indian (2009) make use of Gothic conventions and the figures of the ghost and the vampire to visually relate the history and horrors of Indian boarding schools. Each of these Native-centered films displays a cinematic desire to decenter Eurocentric histories and to counter mainstream American genres with histories and forms of importance to Native North American peoples. Willmott’s film critiques mythologies of the West and frontier heroism, and Lightning’s attempts to sensitize non-Native viewers to contemporary Native North American concerns while also asserting visual sovereignty and affirming spiritual values. 

  • 8.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, Comparative literature.
    Critical Relations: Indian Orphans Move Back Home in Works by Leslie Marmon Silko and Linda Hogan2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication.
    “Dark Matter” and ”Minor Transnationalism” in Toni Morrison’s A Mercy2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Discovering the Past? Memory, Postmemory, and Affect in Autobiographies by Emilia Degenius and Lisa Appignanesi2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of postmemory has been advanced to account for some of the ways that the strong cultural and individual memories of trauma survivors impact on members of the next generation: their children. According to Marianne Hirsch (1997, 2012), post-memory generations have a special tie to history, which they “remember” through emotional and imaginative investment in the memories of others, whose stories, photographs, and day-to-day actions impart a strong sense of the life-changing, often life-threatening, circumstances they have lived through.

    In this paper, I explore the relevance and possible limitations of the concept of postmemory for two auto/biographical works written by women of the Polish diaspora: Losing the Dead (2006) by Lisa Appignanesi and Åka Skridskor I Warszawa (Ice-skating in Warsaw) (2014) by Emilia Degenius. Born about 10 years apart (1946 and 1955), the two writers have some similarities, including Jewish backgrounds, parental and personal experiences of anti-Semitism, and emigration from post-war Poland with subsequent fraught relations to the Polish language. Appignanesi, writing in English, has become a cultural commentator and author with an interest in memory and psychoanalysis. Degenius immigrated alone to Sweden in 1972, where she joined her sister, and she has become a practicing psychoanalyst and author of two autobiographical works in Swedish.

    The narratives of these women writers of the Polish diaspora straddle genres of autobiography, biography, family history, fiction, and memoir. In each account, the relationship to parental figures is of central importance. They each have double narrative strands, one that reconstructs the childhood past through the excavation of memory, and one that figures the adult narrator’s attempts to understand the past through return journeys to Poland, documentation, and interaction. I examine the texts’ formal and thematic characteristics in relation to postmemory.

  • 11.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    “’Impersonating the Self’”: Grotesque Subjects in Joyce Carol Oates’s Academic Novel Mudwoman2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Indian Boarding School Gothic in "Older than America" and "The Only Good Indian"2015In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 5-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the appropriation and redirection of the Gothic in two contemporary Native-centered feature films that concern a history that can be said to haunt many Native North American communities today: the history of Indian boarding schools. Georgina Lightning's Older than America (2008) and Kevin Willmott's The Only Good Indian (2009) make use of Gothic conventions and the figures of the ghost and the vampire to visually relate the history and horrors of Indian boarding schools. Each of these Native-centered films displays a cinematic desire to decenter Eurocentric histories and to counter mainstream American genres with histories and forms of importance to Native North American peoples. Willmott's film critiques mythologies of the West and frontier heroism, and Lightning attempts to sensitive non-Native viewers to contemporary Native North American concerns while also asserting visual sovereignty and affiming spiritual values. 

  • 13.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    Matrophobia and Uncanny Kinship: Eva Hoffman’s The Secret2018In: Humanities, ISSN 2076-0787, Vol. 7, no 4, article id 122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eva Hoffman, known primarily for her autobiography of exile, Lost in Translation: A Life in a New Language (1989), is also the author of a work of Gothic science fiction, set in the future. The Secret: A Fable for our Time (2001) is narrated by a human clone, whose discovery that she is the “monstrous” cloned offspring of a single mother emerges with growing discomfort at the uncanny similarities and tight bonds between her and her mother. This article places Hoffman’s use of the uncanny in relation to her understanding of Holocaust history and the condition of the postmemory generation. Relying on Freud’s definition of the uncanny as being “both very alien and deeply familiar,” she insists that “the second generation has grown up with the uncanny.” In The Secret, growing up with the uncanny leads to matrophobia, a strong dread of becoming one’s mother. This article draws on theoretical work by Adrienne Rich and Deborah D. Rogers to argue that the novel brings to “the matrophobic Gothic” specific insights into the uncanniness of second-generation experiences of kinship, particularly kinship between survivor mothers and their daughters.

  • 14.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Postmemory and Copresence in Lisa Appignanesi and Emilia Degenius: Life Writing of the Polish Diaspora2018In: History, Memory and Nostalgia in Literature and Culture / [ed] Regian Rudaityte, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018, p. 136-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, English language.
    Regeneration through Kinship: Indian "Orphans" Make Home in Works by Linda Hogan and Leslie Marmon Silko2012In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 103-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literary representations of orphanhood immediately activate the question of community through kinship and relation. In simple terms, "orphan" is unthinkable without its opposite family or kin. The language of orphanhood and family has been central to the study of national American literature, but recently indigenous notions of "kinship" have been proposed as key critical tools for examining Native American literature. In readings of Linda Hogan's Solar Storms (1995) and Leslie Marmon Silko's Gardens in the Dunes (1999), I find that attentiveness to kinship focuses inquiry squarely on literary responses to the historical disruption of Native kinship networks, broadly conceived, but also to the state's creation of Indian "orphans" through various forms of child removal. These works employ the motif of the Indian orphan's return to place Native thought and culture in critical relation to Euro-American social, ethical, and environmental practices. While previous scholarship has examined the critiques of Western, colonial cultures in the works of Hogan and Silko, the importance of the orphan figure to these projects has been largely overlooked. The literary orphan, I propose, is a particularly complex site in contemporary Native fiction for narrative interrogations of the limits and possibilities for community.

  • 16.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    “Restorative and reflective nostalgia in life-writing of the Polish diaspora: Eva Hoffman and Lisa Appignanesi”2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares Eva Hoffman’s representation of Poland and its effect on her immigrant/exilic life in Lost in Translation with Lisa Appignanesi’s representations in Losing the Dead. Their works are published about 10 years apart. While Lost in Translation has been viewed as an important work expressing a postmodern awareness of the links between language and subjectivity, a few scholars have been highly critical of the “nostalgic” view of Poland that Hoffman presents. Losing the Dead, though different tone, is also invested in the dynamics of remembering and forgetting. The author has very few first-hand memories of her childhood in Poland, however, and her work of postmemory thus straddles the borders of biography, family history, and memoir. Svetlana Boym’s discussion of restorative and reflective nostalgia provides an important framework for a comparison of these two works’ representations of Poland. While it is tempting to view Hoffman’s work as an example of restorative nostalgia and Appignanesi’s as an example of reflective nostalgia, I argue that these distinctions are not clear cut, and the representations of Poland in these two works complicate Boym’s typology.

  • 17.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Review of: a/b: Auto/Biography Studies 27.1 (2012)2013In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 45, no 1-2, p. 174-176Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, English language.
    Review of: Fisher, Andrew H. Shadow Tribe: The Making of Columbia River Indian Identity2011In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 129-131Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Review of Gymnich, Marion, Barbara Puschmann-Nalenz, Gerold Sedlmayr, and Dirk Vanderbeke (eds.) 2018. The Orphan in Fiction and Comics Since the 19th Century. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.2018In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 243-246Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Review of Mark Shackleton, ed. International Adoption in North American Literature and Culture: Transnational, Transracial, and Transcultural Narratives2018In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 181-184Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Kella, Liz
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Matrophobia and Uncanny Kinship: Eva Hoffman's The Secret2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eva Hoffman is not known for her speculations about the future, but for her engagement with the past. Her autobiography, Lost in Translation (1989), accounts for her personal history as a post-war Polish emigrant to Canada and the US, and her major works of non-fiction examine different aspects of Eastern European and Jewish history. Hoffman repeatedly connects the experiences of the postmemory generation (Hirsch), of children of Holocaust survivors such as herself, with the uncanny. As she explains, “this is . . . the second generation’s difficulty: that it has inherited not experiences, but its shadows. The uncanny, in Freud’s formulation, is the sensation of something that is both very alien and deeply familiar, something that only the unconscious knows. If so, then the second generation has grown up with the uncanny” (ASK 66).

    This paper explores the uncanny in Hoffman’s little known work of Gothic science fiction (Wasson and Alder), The Secret: A Fable for our Time (2001). The protagonist, Iris, retrospectively narrates her coming-of-age from the vantage of the not-too-distant future of 2025. In The Secret, cloning is a practicable but somewhat disparaged mode of human reproduction, and Iris, the narrator, is the “monstrous” cloned offspring of her single mother. As Iris grows into adulthood, the uncanny similarities and tight bonds between her and her mother lead Iris to develop matrophobia, a strong dread of becoming her mother (Sukenick, Rich). Hoffman’s novel can thus be understood in terms of “the matrophobic Gothic” (Rogers), but, I argue, it also modifies this genre by bringing to it insights into the uncanniness of second-generation experiences of mother-daughter kinship.

  • 22.
    Kella, Liz
    Södertörn University College, School of Culture and Communication, English language.
    [Review of:] Chloé Avril, The Feminist Utopian Novels of Charlotte Perkins Gilman: Themes of Sexuality, Marriage, and Motherhood2009In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 203-207Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Kella, Liz
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University.
    Wahlström Henriksson, Helena
    Uppsala University.
    Bilda familj: Om föräldralösa barn, släktskap och nationsskapande i samtida amerikanska romaner2015In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 11-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Kella, Liz
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Language and Culture, English language.
    Johannessen, Lene
    Scandinavian Contributions2005In: American Literary Scholarship, ISSN 0065-9142, E-ISSN 1527-2125, p. 511-520Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Kella, Liz
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Culture and Communication, English language.
    Johannessen, Lene
    Scandinavian Contributions2007In: American Literary Scholarship, ISSN 0065-9142, E-ISSN 1527-2125, p. 521-538Article, review/survey (Other academic)
1 - 25 of 25
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