sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aitaki, Georgia
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Farmer Wants a (Swedish) Wife: White Mobilities in the Reality Romance Show Bonde Söker Fru – Jorden Runt2021In: View : Journal of European Television History and Culture, E-ISSN 2213-0969, Vol. 10, no 20, p. 64-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we discuss discourses of white mobility in reality television, a genre whose problematic post-racial and neoliberal discourses have long been exposed. Moving beyond the widely researched Anglophone media landscapes, we interrogate the discursive construction of white mobilities in the Swedish romance reality show Bonde Söker Fru – Jorden Runt (TV4, 2019-2020) [Farmer Seeks Wife – Around the World] where Swedish North-to-South migrants working as farmers abroad seek a partner from Sweden through the assistance of reality TV. By focusing on the discursive and visual strategies through which the show perpetuates racial hierarchies, we discuss the colonial imaginaries, the absence of border policies (such as residency, employment, or integration), and the significance of individual migratory preferences in the mobility discourses. We identify three forms of white mobility – the tourist, the adventurer, and the philanthropist – and show that migration is depicted as something reversible, an adventure, and a possibility for self-development, rather than a life-long decision with high stakes.

  • 2.
    Bonotti, Matteo
    et al.
    Politics and International Relations, School of Social Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Rowe, Colin W.
    Institute of Philosophy, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Introduction: Linguistic justice, migration and the nation-state2022In: Nations and Nationalism, ISSN 1354-5078, E-ISSN 1469-8129, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 379-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an introduction to the themed section "Linguistic Justice, Migration and the Nation-State." First, it illustrates the rationale for the themed section by examining the relationship between language, migration and the nation-state. It argues that accounts of linguistic justice that fail to incorporate, discuss and understand the language interests of migrants, and the potential tensions that may emerge between migrants' linguistic rights and duties, and between their linguistic rights and those of autochthonous groups, are likely to become obsolete in an increasingly mobile world. Second, it provides an overview of the articles in the themed section. And, finally, it highlights four specific areas of inquiry that should deserve greater attention in future scholarship.

  • 3.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Boundaries and Belonging Among Settled Minorities and Refugees in Bulgaria2023In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 1123-1142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of settled minorities for facilitating refugee belonging is seldom discussed in research on refugee integration. Drawing on scholarship on belonging, boundary-making, and bordering, this study investigates how boundaries are drawn between settled minorities and refugees in Bulgaria. Based on interviews with integration workers and organizations of settled minorities in a state with the largest historically present Muslim minority in the EU, an Arabic-speaking diaspora settled decades ago, and with minimal state involvement in refugee integration, the study shows how spatial, linguistic, and religious boundaries separate settled minorities from newly arrived refugees. Arabic-speaking diasporas are nevertheless witnessed to overcome the boundaries through geographical proximity, a shared language, and shared countries of origin, whereby they have functioned as facilitators of refugee belonging and inclusion. Furthermore, Muslim institutions led by Bulgarian Turks have functioned as spaces for refugee belonging. The study finds that settled minority communities have, despite multiple boundaries and some assimilatory discourses, contributed to refugee belonging in ways that in part has compensated for the state absence. The study calls for further research investigating the role of settled minorities in inclusionary processes in society.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Connections, separations, and tensions between policies of national minority recognition and immigrant integration in the European UnionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Die "lockere" schwedische Strategie: Ungleichheiten hinter dem Corona-Patriotismus und dem "Schwedischen Exzeptionalismus"2020In: Virenregime: Wie die Coronakrise unsere Welt verändert. Befunde, Analysen, Andegungen / [ed] Thomas Schmidinger & Josef Weidenholzer, Wien: bahoe books , 2020, p. 117-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Linguistic bordering as migration control: the unrecognized citizenship of immigrant speakers of national minority languages2020Other (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Majority nation-building through language requirements: Minority perspectives from EU272022In: Nations and Nationalism, ISSN 1354-5078, E-ISSN 1469-8129, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 465-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study contributes with minority-centred perspectives to the policy trend of imposing majority language requirements on immigrants. With the aim to identify and explore (dis)connections and value conflicts between policies of national minority recognition and immigrant integration, it develops and applies four ideal types of minority-linguistic integration regimes to a mapping of integration and minority language policies in 27 European Union (EU) member states. Most states with recognized minorities are found to exclude national minorities from integration policies. The finding is connected to a discussion that identifies normative tensions between the promotion of national minority languages, the linguistic barriers faced by non-citizen migrants and the asymmetries in how identity and instrumental values are assigned to minority, migrant and majority languages. The study challenges the imposition of language requirements on immigrants and calls for contextually sensitive ways to jointly consider the position of national minorities, majorities, and immigrants in language policies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Navigating Two Languages: Immigrant Integration Policies in Bilingual Finland2017In: Journal on Ethnopolitics and Minority Issues in Europe, E-ISSN 1617-5247, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 41-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immigration into states with historical linguistic minorities creates the dilemma of which language newly arrived immigrants should learn in the state-provided integration programmes. Research has shown how territorially concentrated historical minorities have used immigrants to favour their own nation-building projects. While these minorities to some extent operate like a majority within their federal state or province, this paper explores how constitutionally bilingual Finland, having a Swedish-speaking non-territorial minority with the same linguistic rights as the majority, governs immigrant integration. It investigates the implications of the strong legal and weak societal status of Swedish for immigrant integration by connecting scholarship on liberal multiculturalism and integration in multilingual states to laws, reports and interviews on integration in Swedish-speaking Finland. It shows tensions between Finland-Swedish integration aspirations and state level policies promoting a majority-monolingual integration. Unlike minorities with federal protection, the non-territorial Swedish-speaking minority largely relies on the voluntary choice of immigrants to choose Swedish as their language of integration. Structural obstacles, however, hinder this choice in bilingual regions, having resulted in political debates and actions. This article bridges research on Finnish multiculturalism and research on integration policy in contexts where historical minorities are present by introducing a non-territorial, formerly dominant minority to the research field.

  • 9.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    One Nation, One Language?: National minority and Indigenous recognition in the politics of immigrant integration2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Policies regulating immigrant integration constitute a core element of nation-building through the compliance they prescribe with cultural and linguistic norms. The recognition of multiple national belongings in states with national minorities and Indigenous peoples nevertheless challenges majority-centred notions of what integration should entail. Research on connections between integration and recognition, however, has mainly focused on minority substates such as Quebec and Catalonia, where local integration policies align with the respective minority nationalist project, leaving other contexts of recognition largely unexplored.

    By employing critical and interpretive approaches to the study of politics, this study aims to explore connections, separations, and synergies between policies of national minority recognition and immigrant integration in Europe. Using a combination of document analysis, interviews, and ethnographic observation, it asks how integration policy produces or counters expressions of majority nationhood in states with recognized minorities, how colonial or imperial legacies shape such policies, and what normative tensions can be identified between the promotion of majority and minority identities. Theoretically, it draws on scholarship on liberal multiculturalism, settler colonial studies, and theories on belonging and boundary-making.

    The four articles of this compilation dissertation combine empirical findings with normative questions. States with recognized minorities in EU27 are shown to reproduce majority nationhood through integration, which clashes with minority protection and with some migrants’ aspirations. In Finland, where the Swedish-speaking minority enjoys equal linguistic recognition with the majority, the minority and migrants are shown to mobilize to ensure the implementation of minority elements in the predominantly majority-centred integration. In Indigenous Swedish Sápmi, state-led integration is found to largely reproduce colonial practices, which are nevertheless also occasionally challenged. In Bulgaria, Turkish-speaking, Muslim minorities are othered in society and marginal within integration, even though post-Ottoman Muslim institutions have come to function as spaces of belonging for recent refugees.

    Integration policies are shown to misrecognize minorities and thereby fail to represent the actual heterogeneity faced by migrants. Past and present linguistic, religious, racial, and societal contestations are shown to intersect in complex, layered ways that contemporary monolingual, territory-based models of minority recognition and integration fail to capture. The study’s findings have normative implications for research on minority recognition and integration and call for contextually sensitive perspectives to rethink present policies that serve the goals of majority nation-building rather than mirror actual societal belongings.

    Download full text (pdf)
    One Nation, One Language? National minority and Indigenous recognition in the politics of immigrant integration
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 10.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Revitalizing the Indigenous, integrating into the colonized?: The banal colonialism of immigrant integration in Swedish Sapmi2020In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 43, no 16, p. 268-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an endeavour to understand connections between immigration policy and contemporary colonialism on Indigenous territory, this study investigates how state-led immigrant integration policies and practices reproduce colonialism in Swedish Sapmi. It explores the applicability of scholarship on settler colonialism on Sweden and develops the notion of banal colonialism by combining scholarship on settler and everyday colonialism with banal nationalism. Drawing from state documents regulating immigrant integration and semi-structured interviews conducted with integration workers in Swedish Sapmi, the study shows that immigrant integration policy largely silences the colonial past and present of Sweden. While the implementation of national-level policies on Indigenous land reproduces majority-centred narratives, also practices challenging the colonial order are identified. The study shows how the notion of banal colonialism captures mundane colonial practices, but also brings attention to instances where immigrant integration policy has the potential of challenging settler colonialism.

  • 11.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    “The communities, they support each other a lot.”: Boundaries and belonging among settled minorities and refugees in BulgariaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Gerhardt, Karin
    et al.
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Sverige.
    Wolrath Söderberg, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric.
    Lindblad, Inger
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Diderichsen, Öjvind
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Teacher Education and Aesthetic Learning Processes.
    Gullström, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Dahlin, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Rhetoric.
    Köping Olsson, Ann-Sofie
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Lehtilä, Kari
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Rasoal, Chato
    Södertörn University, School of Police Studies.
    Dobers, Peter
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Johansson, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Berndt, Kurt D.
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Mathematics Education.
    Karlholm, Dan
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Kjellqvist, Tomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lalander, Rickard
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Vallström, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Alvarsson-Hjort, Jesper
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Sjöholm, Cecilia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Aesthetics.
    Lönngren, Ann-Sofie
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Comparative Literature.
    Bydler, Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Färjsjö, Eva
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Mathematics Education.
    Porseryd, Tove
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Sio, Miriam
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Teacher Education and Aesthetic Learning Processes.
    Yazdanpanah, Soheyla
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Pihl Skoog, Emma
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Archive Studies.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Gallardo Fernández, Gloria L.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Wadstein MacLeod, Katarina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, History and Theory of Art.
    Garrison, Julie
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Svärd, Veronica
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Hajighasemi, Ali
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Spånberger Weitz, Ylva
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Elmersjö, Magdalena
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Persson, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Borevi, Karin
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Löfgren, Isabel
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ghose, Sheila
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Bornemark, Jonna
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Podolian, Olena
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Grahn, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Faber, Hugo
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Cederberg, Carl
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Gradén, Mattias
    Högskolan Dalarna, Sverige.
    Nog nu, politiker – ta klimatkrisen på allvar2022In: Aftonbladet, no 2022-08-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Liimatainen, Tuire
    et al.
    Helsingfors universitet, Finland.
    Carlsson, Nina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    ”Kyss mig, jag är en sverigefinne!”: Gränsdragningar mellan invandrarskap och minoritetsskap i den sverigefinska etnopolitiska mobiliseringen 1980–20202021In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 76-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unlike immigrants, national minorities are awarded recognition based on their long historical presence in the nation-state. While the political boundary between national minorities and immigrants is governed on state level, minorities’ own agency is significant for constructing and contesting ethnic and political boundaries. This article shows how Sweden-Finns, recognized as a national minority in Sweden since 2000, have contested the immigrant/national minority dichotomy in their transition from stigmatized post-war migranthood to recognized national minority-ness. By asking how boundary-making between migranthood and minority-ness is expressed in Sweden-Finnish ethnopolitical campaigns from the 1980s to the 2010s, we bring attention to how shifts in the socio-political and media technological contexts of these decades have shaped their mobilization. Through an analysis of newspaper articles, campaign material, and interviews, we show how Sweden-Finnish ethnic activists discursively construct identity and draw boundaries of belonging during different time periods.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf