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  • 1.
    Fábián, Katalin
    et al.
    Lafayette College.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. University of Gothenburg.
    Introduction: Rebellious Parents in Central-Eastern Europe and Russia2017In: Rebellious parents: parental movements in central-eastern Europe and Russia / [ed] Katalin Fábián and Elzbieta Korolczuk, Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2017, p. 1-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter introduces the readers to the theme of a broad range of parental movements that have emerged in contemporary Central-Eastern Europe and Russia over the past two decades. Examples of such movements include social mobilizations of conservative parental groups against legal and discursive changes that would affect gender equality in Ukraine and Russia, Czech parents opposing mandatory vaccination of children, and fathers’ groups in Poland and the Czech Republic focusing on custody rights. Parental activism is increasingly visible and influential, but it has been the subject of relatively little research to date. The aim is to rectify this by analyzing representative cases of parental movements in Central-Eastern Europe and Russia, with the hope to enrich and explain the current interpretations of social activism and civil society in the postcommunist region, which is often associated with a low level of social engagement and weak civil society, and to offer new conceptualization of mothers’ and fathers’ activism that may be applicable in other geographical contexts. The introduction to the collection of essays aims to fill a gap in the scholarship on civil society and social movements that is both empirical and theoretical, presenting an entirely new set of observations on the developments in contemporary parental activism in Central-Eastern Europe and Russia and proposing new conceptualizations of civic activism and civil society.

  • 2.
    Fábián, Katalin
    et al.
    Lafayette College.
    Korolczuk, ElżbietaSödertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. University of Gothenburg.
    Rebellious parents: parental movements in central-eastern Europe and Russia2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental movements are strengthening around the world and often spark tense personal and political debate. With an emphasis on Russia and Central and Eastern Europe, this collection analyzes formal organizations as well as informal networks and online platforms which mobilize parents to advocate for change on a grassroots level. In doing so, the work collected here explores the interactions between the politics, everyday life, and social activism of mothers and fathers. From fathers’ rights movements to natural childbirth to vaccination debates, these essays provide new insight into the identities and strategies applied by these movements as they confront local ideals of gender and family with global ideologies. “This is an excellent collection with conceptual and methodological unity and high quality contributions that are thoroughly researched.... The work makes a real contribution to the field (both theoretically and empirically), challenges stereotypes, and presents new areas of valuable research.” — Nanette Funk, coeditor of Gender Politics and Post-Communism: Reflections from Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union “We see here evidence of engaged citizens, not directly challenging political leaders about broad economic or political policies, but seeking to change public atti¬tudes to vital issues facing people in their everyday lives as parents. ...This is very much a contribution to scholarship and knowledge. We just don’t know about this type of activism.” —David Ost, author of The Defeat of Solidarity: Anger and Politics in Postcommunist Europe

  • 3.
    Graff, Agnieszka
    et al.
    University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Towards An Illiberal Future: Anti-Genderism and Anti-Globalization2017In: Global Dialogue, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender matters in global politics. After the US elections, we know this better than ever: the mass appeal of Trump’s blatant misogyny is just a part of the problem. Populism in the US and elsewhere feeds not only on economic instability and fear, but also on anxieties around gender relations, (homo)sexuality and reproduction. In country after country, critiques of what conservatives (especially Catholics) term “gender” or “genderism” – gender equality policies, sex education, LGBTQ and reproductive rights – have helped to mobilize men as well as women, paving the way for populist leaders. This article argues that while opposition to feminism and gender equality policies is not new, the current upsurge marks a departure from the previous neoconservative paradigm: social conservatism is now explicitly linked to hostility towards global capital.

  • 4.
    Graff, Agnieszka
    et al.
    University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    “Worse than communism and nazism put together”: War on Gender in Poland2017In: Anti-gender campaigns in Europe: mobilizing against equality / [ed] Roman Kuhar and David Paternotte, London and New York: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017, p. 175-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the mobilization against “gender” which has spread across Poland since 2012, pointing to both local specificities and links to the transnational context. It is shown that while Polish anti-genderism is part of a boarder transnational trend (a fact long invisible to most of Poland’s liberal defenders of gender), some aspects of this phenomenon are indeed locally embedded. The campaign has consisted of many initiatives undertaken by the Catholic Church and conservative groups to fight gender equality education and legislation, sexual and reproductive rights, as well as the very use of the term “gender” in policy documents and public discourse. Polish anti-gender campaigners claim that their aim is to protect the Polish family (especially children) against feminists and the “homosexual lobby”; to defend authentic Polish cultural values (which are equated with Catholic values) against the foreign influence of the corrupt West and liberal European Union. Targets include sexual education, ratification of the Istanbul Convention and gender equality policies more broadly. The authors argue that the current wave of anti-gender mobilization in Poland is not business as usual or another wave of conservative backlash, but a new ideological and political configuration, which successfully combines the local and the transnational, making possible a politically effective mass movement. We argue that the success of anti-gender mobilization can be explained by its leaders’ skillful references to ordinary people’s dignity and their identity as an oppressed majority. Anti-genderism consistently presents itself as an effort to defend authentic indigenous values against foreign forces and corrupt elites – a discourse which we interpret as a variant of right-wing appropriation of the anti-colonial frame. What may be construed as an Eastern European peculiarity is that in the region gender tends to be discredited as totalitarian ideology as exemplified by the following statement made in 2013 by Polish Bishop Tadeusz Pieronek: “Gender ideology is worse than communism and Nazism put together”. While the contested policies are coming from the West and are presented as Western impositions, genderism itself is seen as a vast project of social engineering rooted in Marxism and comparable to Stalinism. This tension or ambivalence persists in many of the documents and statements examined here: genderism is demonized as a cultural imposition a foreign body that is Western and Eastern at the same time.

  • 5.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Reproducing Politics: The politicisation of patients' identities and assisted reproduction in Poland and Sweden2016In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 1074-1091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how discourses on assisted reproductive technologies are locally appropriated, translated or contested in the specific cultural and political contexts of Poland and Sweden. The aim is to investigate how two national patients' organisations, namely the Polish association Nasz Bocian and the Swedish organisation Barnlängtan, articulate rights claims in the context of reproductive technologies. To this end, we investigate how these organisations utilise specific context-dependent and affectively laden political vocabularies in order to mobilise politically, and discuss how each of these two groups gives rise to a different set of politicised reproductive identities. In order to trace which political vocabularies the respective organisations utilise to mobilise their respective rights claims, we draw primarily on political discourse theory and concepts of political grammars and empty signifiers. Lastly, we discuss which political reproductive identities emerge as a result of these different versions of political mobilisation around assisted reproductive technologies.

  • 6.
    Hryciuk, Renata E.
    et al.
    University of Warsaw.
    Korolczuk, Elzbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. University of Warsaw.
    At the intersection of gender and class: social mobilization around mothers’ rights in Poland2013In: Beyond NGO‐ization?: The Development of Social Movements in Central and Eastern Europe / [ed] Kerstin Jacobsson and Steven Saxonberg, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 49-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Hryciuk, Renata E.
    et al.
    University of Warsaw.
    Korolczuk, Elzbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Wstęp. Pożegnanie z Matką Polką?2012In: Pożegnanie z Matką-Polką?: Dyskursy, praktyki  i reprezentacje macierzyństwa we współczesnej Polsce / [ed] Renata E. Hryciuk & Elżbieta Korolczuk, Warsaw: University of Warsaw Press, 2012, p. 8-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8. Hryciuk, Renate E.
    et al.
    Korolczuk, ElzbietaSödertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Pożegnanie z Matką Polką?: Dyskursy, praktyki i reprezentacje macierzyństwa we współczesnej Polsce2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first decade of the 21th century has witnessed growing controversies over practices of mothering. On the one hand, the heated debates around abortion, infertility and IVF treatment have reflected the persistent patriarchal construction of motherhood and family well embedded within Polish political discourse. On the other hand, the efforts to counteract dominant discourses and discriminating policies (e.g. the emergence of grass-roots initiatives and organizations dealing with motherhood / parenthood such as Birth In a Dignified Way Foundation or MaMa Foundation) demonstrate growing female agency and consequently potential for social change.

    Significantly, these new trends and the effects of social transformation seem to be have limited influence on the academic discourse on motherhood. The concept of the Polish Mother which has been continuously used (and abused) in various cultural analyses of the Polish context, still awaits critical analysis. It serves both as a basis for the hegemonic narrative on motherhood in Poland, and as a role model for contemporary women. We believe that it needs to be deconstructed. Therefore, the aim of the book is to answer the following question: shall we say farewell to the Polish Mother?

    The edited volume is to present the critical analyses of “old” and “new” practices, discourses and representations of motherhood in the interdisciplinary perspective. The texts are based on the outcomes of original research projects conducted by leading Polish scholars, and personal experience of activists and women working in NGOs. Thus, it can be used in various contexts, e.g. in academic teaching, journalism, professional training and policy-making.

  • 9.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Korolczuk, ElżbietaSödertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. University of Warsaw.
    Civil society revisited: lessons from Poland2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. University of Warsaw.
    Conclusion: Empirical and theoretical lessons from the volume2017In: Civil society revisited: lessons from Poland / [ed] Kerstin Jacobsson and Elzbieta Korolczuk, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 314-324Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. University of Warsaw.
    Introduction: Rethinking Polish Civil Society2017In: Civil society revisited: lessons from Poland / [ed] Kerstin Jacobsson and Elzbieta Korolczuk, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 1-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The text argues that a re-assessment of the post-socialist civil societies in general and Polish civil society in particular is called for on both empirical and theoretical grounds. For the purpose of such re-thinking, the authors address critically the way in which civil society has been conceptualized in the post-socialist context, with special focus on Poland; and, secondly, discuss the limitations of the common indicators used to assess the strength and character of the civil societies in the region. It is argued that there are forms of collective action that have tended to escape observers’ lenses for theoretical, methodological as well as normative and ideological reasons. Consequently, the authors calls attention to the exclusionary practices entailed in the “making up” of civil societies in the region, revealing how the concept of civil society as commonly applied in political discourses as well as empirical research in fact excludes many forms of social activism.

  • 12.
    Korolczuk, Elzbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Gendered boundaries between the state, family and civil society: the case of Poland after 19892013In: The Golden Chain: Family, Civil Society and the State / [ed] J. Nautz, P. Ginsborg and T. Nijhuis, New York: Berghahn Books, 2013, p. 240-258Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article analyzes some aspects of the development of civil society networks in Poland since the collapse of socialism. I scrutinize the interplay between the concepts of family and the state policies in order to demonstrate how discourses on gender in Poland are mediated by the Catholic Church and its alliance with the state. Focusing on women’s participation in public life and women’s rights leads not only to an understanding of relations between the sexes, but to a deeper analysis of the relations between the state, civil society and family within a specific cultural context.

    The examples discussed in the text suggest that civil society networks may emerge in democratic countries, even if they are discouraged by state policies, and members of society can at times challenge the notions of gendered citizenship and make use of their ‘private’ identities in order to gain certain political goals. Nonetheless, these examples also reveal the limitations of such strategies. The imbalance of power between the state apparatus and civil society activists is enormous, and without stabile and substantial resources and built-in mechanisms of support, the struggles of the latter often turn out to be frustrating and not fully successful.

    Unfortunately, in the case of Poland the very roots of the newly established democratic order are patriarchal, and the sphere of formal politics is informed by the idea of a country as a nation rather than as a democratic society. The nation in turn is often imagined as a patriarchal family where ‘real’ women and men occupy their ‘natural’ places: women within the private sphere, bearing and rearing children, and men in the public sphere, protecting ‘womenandchildren’ and making all vital political decisions (Enloe 1991). As a result, instead of a classic triangle of the state, the market and civil society, Poles in general and Polish women in particular are trapped between the nation, the market and the church.

  • 13.
    Korolczuk, Elzbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Kłopot z NGOizacją: Debata na temat społeczeństwa obywatelskiego w Polsce / The Problem with NGO-ization. The Debate on Civil Society in Poland2011In: Polityka Społeczna, ISSN 0137-4729, Vol. 5-6, p. 37-43Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is a contribution to the on-going discussion concerning factors determining civil society’s development in Poland. It examines contemporary debates on civil society as well as financial mechanisms designed to promote people’s civic engagement in Poland (the EU grants and so called ‘percentage law’ allowing  citizens to support an NGO of their choice with 1 percent of their taxes). Detailed analysis of these mechanisms demonstrates that they are advantageous to some types of non-governmental organizations only, and disadvantageous to others, marginalizing the majority of small and middle-size organizations as well as specific types of claims. As a result, these mechanisms weaken rather than strengthen the development of grassroots spontaneous mobilizations and initiatives.  

  • 14.
    Korolczuk, Elzbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Promoting civil society in contemporary Poland: Gendered results of institutional changes2014In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 949-967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a contribution to the ongoing discussion concerning factors determining the development of civil society in a post-state socialist context. It examines the financial mechanisms designed to promote civic engagement in Poland, including EU grants and the so-called ‘percentage law’ that allows citizens to support NGOs of their choice with 1 % of their taxes. A detailed analysis of these mechanisms demonstrates that they are advantageous for some types of non-governmental organizations and not for others. Instead of enhancing the situation of the whole sector, they tend to support NGOs that already have substantial resources and hold a strong position vis-à-vis the state. Moreover, organizations and groups fighting for issues considered to be controversial—such as women’s NGOs advocating for the right to abortion or criticizing authorities for their lack of concern when it comes to violence against women—have limited chances to gain financial support from both the state and those sources that are independent from the state. This shows how seemingly gender-neutral institutional arrangements may bring gendered results. The following analysis is based on available statistics (several reports provided by the Klon-Jawor Association, Social Diagnosis Reports from 2007 and 2011) and qualitative data (semi-structured interviews and discourse analysis of the Polish media).

  • 15.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Bunt kobiet AD 2016: skąd się wziął i czego nas uczy?2016In: Przebudzona rewolucja: Prawa reprodukcyjne kobiet w Polsce. Raport 2016 / [ed] Agata Czarnacka, Warsaw: Fundacja im. Izabeli Jarugi-Nowackiej , 2016, p. 31-42Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [pl]

    Masowe protesty przeciwko projektowi całkowitego zakazu aborcji w 2016 okazały się sukcesem. Udało się nie tylko zmobilizować do działania setki tysięcy kobiet, ale też wymusić na rządzących zmianę decyzji. Projekt Ordo Iuris został odrzucony po pierwszym czytaniu w Sejmie i choć nie była to z pewnością ostatnia próba zaostrzenia prawa aborcyjnego w Polsce, udało się wygrać przynajmniej tę bitwę. Skala i zasięg protestów pokazują ogromny potencjał zaangażowania kobiet, które nie mieszkają w wielkich miastach i które nie uczestniczyły do tej pory w życiu politycznym, a przynajmniej nie tak aktywnie jak przy okazji Czarnych Protestów. Okazało się, że polskie społeczeństwo obywatelskie nie jest bynajmniej uśpione i apatyczne, ale aktywne i gotowe do wyjścia na ulice, gdy sytuacja tego wymaga. Ten rozdział stara się odpowiedzieć na pytania: dlaczego kobiety zmobilizowały się właśnie w tym momencie i jak to się stało, że w 2016 roku doszło do masowego buntu Polek.

  • 16.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Ciało-w-ciało z matką: Matki i córki w obiektywie Zorka Project [recension av utställningen] Zorka Project "Matki", Galeria Luksfera, Warszawa, 23.09 - 23.10.20052005In: Obieg, no 10Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Explaining mass protests against abortion ban in Poland: the power of connective action2016In: Zoon Politikon, ISSN 2082-7806, no 7, p. 91-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines successful mass mobilization against the proposed total ban on abortion, focusing on the Black Protest initiated online in September 2016 and the All-Poland’s Women Strikes which took place on the 3rd and 24th of October 2016. The aim is to explain how the resistance towards the proposed bill emerged and developed over time, and to shed light on the factors behind its success. It is argued that the emergence of and mass participation in the protests resulted from a range of factors including the heightened political climate in Poland and normalization of street protests as a reaction to the closing of regular communication channels between citizens and authorities, as well as an emotional dynamic of mobilization and wide use of social media for sharing information, communication and networking. The success – the government’s decision to reject the project – can be explained as stemming from the mass scale of mobilization but also from favorable political opportunity structure and the lack of popular support for the proposed law. The analysis shows that the protests followed the logic of connective action based on the use of flexible, easily personalized action frames, which were well-embedded in cultural narratives referencing the history of resistance against an oppressive state. 

  • 18. Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Fiński eksport: szkoła helsińska w Kulturhuset [recension av utställningen] Personligt - Fotografier från The Helsinki School, Kulturhuset, Stockholm 25.02-08.05.20052004In: Obieg, no 2Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    'Ginealogy': Towards the revival of feminine genealogies in the works of contemporary Polish artists2008In: Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering, ISSN 1488-0989, Vol. 10, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Luce Irigaray argues, that in order to re-evaluate and revive the feminine in culture we need to turn our attention to relations between women, especially mothers and daughters, and revive “feminine genealogies from oblivion” (1995: 13). In the present text, I scrutinize the works of contemporary Polish artists: Monika Zielińska/Mamzeta and Katarzyna Górny demonstrating strategies they employ to retrace the voices of women and to re-interpret the figures of the mother and daughter. Their art can be viewed as an attempt to transgress the established gender order in a very Irigarayan sense: by bringing up the maternal, and by regaining female genealogies, or even creating “ginealogies” instead—the term referring to the work “Genealogy/ginealogy: The Scar After the Mother” by Monika Zielińska, who replaced the supposedly neutral prefix “gyne” with feminine “gine.” Through the representations of the maternal body: sensual and desiring, but also aging, sick, disabled or dying, entirely new understanding of female subjectivity can be acquired. Female corporeality, also the non-normative that typically exists on the margins of the patriarchal culture is finally placed in the centre. Artists, whose works I discuss struggle to find visual language(s) that would enable the expression of women’s experiences, in line with Irigaray’s idea of reviving women’s language(s) and representations along with enlivening their-story, making an important contribution to the attempts at recovering the female voice, which is still undervalued and forgotten in our culture(s)

  • 20.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    'It', or The Art of Verbal Detail in Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw’2005In: Versions of Modernist Fiction: Henry James and Vladimir Nabokov / [ed] I. Kranz, Berlin: Freie Universität , 2005, p. 36-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Kobiecość jako źródło cierpień: Matki i córki w polskim kinie2009In: Ciało i seksualność w kinie polskim / [ed] Stanislaw Jagielski & Agnieszka Morstin-Poplawska, Krakow: Wyd. UJ , 2009, p. 155-172Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Mass protests against abortion ban and the awakening of Polish civil society2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Naturalna więź?: Reprezentacje relacji matka-córki w tekstach polskiej kultury popularnej2009In: Kobiety-Feminizm-Demokracja / [ed] Boguslawa Budrowska, Warszawa: Wydawn. IFiS PAN , 2009, p. 43-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. The Institute for Advanced Study, Political Critique in Warsaw.
    Neoliberalism and feminist organizing: from “NGO-ization of resistance” to resistance against neoliberalism2016In: Solidarity in Struggle: Feminist Perspectives on Neoliberalism in East-Central Europe / [ed] Eszter Kováts (ed.), Budapest: Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, 2016, p. 32-41Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages with feminists critiques of neoliberalism, specifically with the influential narrative about the NGO-ization of women’s movement and co-optation of feminism by neo-liberalism (Charkiewicz 2009, Fraser 2011, McRobbie 2009). It argues that while the vision of the feminist actors as “the handmaidens” of neoliberalism accurately captures some aspects of contemporary feminist organizing, it obfuscates others, especially new and original forms of resistance taking place beyond the perimeters of what is usually included in the “Western” context (Aslan and Gambetti 2011, Funk 2012). I discuss some examples of the struggles against neoliberal logic and practices in the Polish context, arguing that while there has been a strong trend towards professionalization and de-politicization of civic activism in the country, during the last decade we can observe a growing resistance against this tendency. The paper concludes with discussing various forms of anti-neoliberal women’s organizing highlighting the opportunities and risks involved in employing them in the context of the local and transnational struggles.

  • 25. Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    One Woman Leads to Another: Female Identity in the Works of Margaret Atwood2004In: American Studies, ISSN 0209-1232, Vol. 21, p. 35-52Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Równość płci – ideologia, utopia czy rzeczywistość? 2010In: Szwecja: Przewodnik nieturystyczny, Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Krytyki Politycznej , 2010, p. 203-212Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. Warsaw University, Warsaw, Poland.
    ‘The purest citizens’ and ‘IVF children’: Reproductive citizenship in contemporary Poland2016In: Reproductive BioMedicine and Society Online, ISSN 2405-6618, Vol. 3, p. 126-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the public debate on reproductive technologies in contemporary Poland, focusing on the rhetoricalstrategies used by the main opponents of IVF: conservative politicians representing the leading parties in the Polish parliament andthe representatives of the Catholic Church. The analysis highlights the exclusionary logic inscribed in the construction of the maincategories of political subjects in this debate, revealing important limitations of reproductive citizenship in the Polish context. Thestudy draws on a variety of texts published in print and electronic media between 2007 and 2015, including articles on infertility andreproductive technologies published in the main Polish daily and weekly print publications, online resources (web pages, forums andFacebook pages), documents issued by the representatives of the Church, politicians and experts, e.g. open letters, commentaries,information for the media and interviews.

  • 28.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    The Social Construction of Motherhood and Daughterhood in Contemporary Poland: a trans-generational perspective2010In: Polish Sociological Review, ISSN 1231-1413, no 4, p. 467-485Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. University of Warsaw.
    When Parents Become Activists: Exploring the Intersection of Civil Society and Family2017In: Civil society revisited: lessons from Poland / [ed] Kerstin Jacobsson & Elzbieta Korolczuk, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 129-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Z matki na córkę?: Ku międzygeneracyjnemu modelowi przemian kobiecej tożsamości we współczesnej Polsce2010In: Kobiety w polskiej transformacji 1989-2009: Podsumowania, interpretacje, prognozy / [ed] Monika Frąckowiak-Sochańska & Sabina Królikowska, Toruń: Wydawnictwo Adam Marszałek , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Anti-genuskampanjer: Globalt hot mot vetenskap och demokrati2018In: Feministiskt perspektiv, ISSN 2002-1542, no 24 januariArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. University of Gothenburg.
    Hryciuk, Renata
    In the Name of the Family and Nation: Framing Fathers’ Activism in Poland2017In: Rebellious parents: parental movements in central-eastern Europe and Russia / [ed] Katalin Fábián and Elzbieta Korolczuk, Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2017, p. 113-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines fathers’ activism in contemporary Poland, focusing on the ways in which activists frame the problem, their claims and expected outcomes, and on the specificity of the fathers’ activism in a post-socialist context in comparison to other cultural and political environments. The authors apply analytical tools of social movement theory, specifically the notion of framing, which is defined as a process of interpretation and meaning production in a given political, cultural and social context. Three main frames that the Polish activists have employed are distinguished: 1) “misogynist” frame which highlights fathers’ rights as men rights, 2) “state violence” frame which focus on fathers rights as citizens, and 3) “equality” frame which stresses fathers’ engagement as part of a gender equality agenda. Each of these types of self-representation and arguments combines to a different degree transnational and local discourses on fathering, masculinity, and the family, which reflects the hybrid nature of contemporary discourses and ideals of fathering. The empirical illustration of the analysis is derived from a case-study of fathers' activism in Poland between 2012 and 2014.

  • 33.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Hryciuk, Renata E.
    University of Warsaw.
    Poland2010In: Encyclopedia of Motherhood / [ed] Andrea O'Reilly, Sage Publications, 2010, p. vol. 3-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Narkowicz, K.
    et al.
    University of Gloucestershire, Cheltenham, UK.
    Korolczuk, Elżbieta
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies. University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Searching for feminist geographies: mappings outside the discipline in Poland2019In: Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, ISSN 0966-369X, E-ISSN 1360-0524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feminist geography in Poland does not exist as a sub-discipline of geography. While there are individual Polish geographers pushing for feminist perspectives, most feminist analyses of issues relating to place, space and politics of location can be found within gender studies or feminist sociology. In this sense, feminist geography in Poland cannot compare to Anglophone feminist geography and attempts to incorporate it within such an established field risks being reductive. Instead, in this report, we shift the focus to the scholarship and activism that does exist in Poland, outside of geography. This contribution focuses on shedding light on geographical questions such as the body, the city and gendered geopolitics that have been recurring themes in gender studies, feminist sociology and feminist activism in Poland. We conclude by pointing to the need to mobilise broadly, and internationally, between disciplines with the intention of de-centering dominant knowledges. For feminist scholarship this is particularly important in the context of recent political successes of right-wing forces.

1 - 34 of 34
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