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  • 1.
    Ahmet, Zeynep
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Sumon, Saiful Islam
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Supporting embodied exploration of physical concepts in mixed digital and physical interactive settings2011In: TEI'11: Proceedings of the fifth international conference on Tangible, embedded, and embodied interaction, Funchal, Portugal: ACM Press, 2011, p. 109-116Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper findings are presented from a study on how sensor equipped computer game technologies can be used to create tools for educational settings to learn about for example concepts in physics. In a workshop focusing on the concept of gravity, a group of children interacted with an environment consisting of both physical and digital interactive components. We discuss how the mixed digital and physical setting affects the children's coordination and collaboration and their strategies to solve the given assignment. Findings suggest that the embodied nature of the technology create new opportunities for collaboration and that the alignment of the physical and digital parts of the interactive setting is important in order to create a seamless experience that takes advantage of the properties of the respective media.

  • 2.
    Asplund, S.
    et al.
    KTH.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    SWAY - designing for balance and posture awareness2018In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 470-475Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the SWAY prototype that encourages people to explore aspects around balance and posture in a playful way. The prototype senses small movements and shifts in posture using a Kinect sensor, and translates these movements to the tilting of a platform holding a set of marbles, and to haptic feedback in the form of vibrations. The prototype provides an interactive experience focusing on building body awareness with a particular focus on balance and posture. The design inquiry provided new insights with respect to reinforcement of bodily experiences and how different modalities affect the guiding of attention.

  • 3.
    Bergström, I.
    et al.
    KTH.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Sarka: Sonification and somaesthetic appreciation design2016In: MOCO '16: Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on Movement and Computing, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, article id 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We often take for granted that we have immediate access to our perception and experience of and through our bodies. But inward listening is a demanding activity and thus not easy to learn to perform or design for. With the Sarka mat we want to support the ability to direct attention by providing sound feedback linked to the weight distribution and motion intensity of different parts of the body, and to provide an exemplar for how such design may be conducted. The process of Sarka's creation is informed by Somaesthetic Appreciation Design. We discuss how a sonic feedback signal can influence listeners, followed by how we, in this design, worked to navigate the complex design space presented to us. We detail the design process involved, and the very particular set of limitations which this interactive sonification presented.

  • 4.
    Dew, K. N.
    et al.
    University of Washington, USA.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology. Stockholm University.
    Rosner, D. K.
    University of Washington, USA.
    Thayer, A.
    Immersive Experiences Lab of HP Labs.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Producing Printability: Articulation Work and Alignment in 3D Printing2019In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 34, no 5-6, p. 433-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three-dimensional printing is widely celebrated as enabling open design and manufacturing practice. With easy-to-use techniques such as automated modeling, fabrication machines ostensibly help designers turn ideas into fully fledged objects. Prior HCI literature focuses on improving printing through optimization and by developing printer and material capabilities. This paper expands such considerations by asking, how do 3D printing practitioners understand and create “printability?” And how might HCI better support the work that holds together printing workflows and changing ecosystems of materials and techniques? We conducted studies in two sites of open design: a technology firm in Silicon Valley, California and a makerspace in Stockholm, Sweden. Deploying workshops and interviews, we examine how practitioners negotiate the print experience, revealing a contingent process held together by trial and error exploration and careful interventions. These insights point to the value of tools and processes to support articulation work, what Strauss and colleagues have called the acts of fitting together people, tasks, and their ordering to accomplish an overarching project. We show that despite the sought-after efficiencies of such manufacturing, 3D printing entails articulation work, particularly acts of alignment, exposing messy modes of production carried out by a varied cast of practitioners, machines, and materials.

  • 5. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Revisiting the Jacquard Loom: Threads of History and Current Patterns in HCI2012In: CHI '12 Proceedings of the 2012 ACM annual conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: ACM Press, 2012, p. 1593-1602Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Technology and Design, Media technology.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Technology and Design, Media technology.
    Beyond representations: towards an action centric perspective on tangible interaction2008In: International Journal of Arts and Technology, ISSN 1754-8853, E-ISSN 1754-8861, Vol. 1, no 3/4, p. 249-267Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Technology and Design, Media technology.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Technology and Design, Media technology.
    Towards a new set of ideals: consequences of the practice turn in tangible interaction2008In: Proceedings of the 2nd international conference on Tangible and embedded interaction, New York: ACM , 2008, p. 223-230Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Grufberg, Katja
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Sciensations: making sense of science by designing with sensors2012In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 116-124Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Höök, K.
    et al.
    KTH.
    Hummels, C.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Isbister, K.
    University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Marti, P.
    University of Siena, Siena, Italy.
    Segura, E. M.
    University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Mueller, F.
    RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Sanches, P. A. N.
    KTH.
    Schiphorst, T.
    Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Ståhl, A.
    Mobile Life@SICS, Kista.
    Svanaes, D.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Trotto, A.
    Interactive Institute Umeå.
    Petersen, M. G.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Lim, Y. -K
    Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.
    Soma-based design theory2017In: CHI EA '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 550-557Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based interaction design is increasingly popular, with application domains ranging from dance, sport, gaming to physical rehabilitation. In a workshop at CHI 2016, a set of prominent artists, game designers, and interaction designers embarked on a research journey to explore what we came to refer to as "aesthetics in soma-based design". In this follow-up workshop, we would like to take the next step, shifting from discussing the philosophical underpinnings we draw upon to explain and substantiate our practice, to form our own interaction design theory and conceptualisations. We propose that soma-based design theory needs practical, pragmatic as well as analytical study - otherwise the felt dimension will be missing. We will consider how such tacit knowledge can be articulated, documented and shared. To ground the discussion firmly in the felt experience of our own practice, the workshop is organised as a joint practical design work session, supported by analytical study.

  • 10.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH.
    Caramiaux, Baptiste
    UMR STMS Ircam CNRS UPMC, Paris, France / McGill University, Montreal, Canada / University Paris Saclay, Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Erkut, Cumhur
    Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
    Hajinejad, Nassrin
    City University of Applied Sciences, Bremen, Germany.
    Haller, Michael
    Upper Austria University of Applied Sciences, Hagenberg, Austria..
    Hummels, Caroline C. M.
    University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA..
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Khut, George
    University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia..
    Loke, Lian
    University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia..
    Lottridge, Danielle
    Yahoo Inc, Sunnyvale, CA, USA..
    Marti, Patrizia
    University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands / Department of Social, Political and Cognitive Science, 53100 Siena, Italy.
    Melcer, Edward
    New York University, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
    Muller, Florian Floyd
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Petersen, Marianne Graves
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Schiphorst, Thecla
    Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada..
    Segura, Elena Marquez
    University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE.
    Svanaes, Dag
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway / IT-University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Umea University.
    Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design2018In: Informatics, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective-where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

  • 11.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH.
    Ståhl, Anna
    Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Stockholm.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH.
    Mercurio, Johanna
    Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Stockholm.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Boris Design Ltd., Hong Kong.
    Johnson, Eva-Carin Banka
    IKEA Future Homes, United Kingdom.
    Somaesthetic Design2015In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Johansson, Carloina
    et al.
    Mobile Life Centre.
    Ahmet, Zeynep
    Mobile Life Centre.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Mobile Life Centre.
    Aleo, Franc
    Mobile Life Centre.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Sumon, Saiful
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Weather Gods and Fruit Kids - Embodying abstract concepts using tactile feedback and whole body interaction2011In: Connecting computer-supported collaborative learning to policy and practice: CSCL 2011 Conference Proceedings - Long Papers, 9th International Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference / [ed] Hans Spada, Gerry Stahl, Naomi Miyake, Nancy Law, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2011, p. 160-167Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present findings based on the design and study of a game like activity that allows for physical and bodily interaction around abstract concepts like energy and energy consumption in a collaborative learning setting. The game, called Weather Gods and Fruit Kids, uses motion sensing technologies in combination with tactile and audio feedback to create an embodied interactive setting without computer screens. We analyze and discuss the properties of the interactive setting as well as the interactions with and around the system using characteristics such as multiple modalities of response, large space interaction and aspects of focus and attention. The work suggests that alternative pedagogical activities can be created providing new entries to theoretical concepts using an embodied interaction approach. In particular it may support kinesthetic learners in their preference to learn by being physically engaged.

  • 13.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH.
    Sensing and Making Sense: Designing Middleware for Context Aware Computing2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Computing devices are becoming wireless, smaller and embedded into other artifacts. Some of them are mobile while others are built into the environment. The novel technologies are also becoming more dependent of communication with other computing devices over different kinds of networks. These interconnected devices constitute locally and globally distributed service environments that will enforce new requirements on the design of software systems. These new type of environments provide both opportunities for new types of applications as well as a number of new problems that will have to be addressed. One approach that have been suggested both in order to provide new functionalities and as a possible solution to some of the problems is to try and collect and incorporate aspects of the /context/ of a person, activity or device as a part of the computer system.

    This thesis addresses some issues that have to be considered when designing this kind of systems. In particular the thesis examines how to design middleware that can support the creation of context aware applications. As a part of this work several instances of such systems have been implemented and put in use and tested in various applications. Some key problems with respect to the design of context information middleware are also identified and examined. One question that is addressed concerns the clash between the need for internal representations of context information and the goal of middleware to support a broad range of applications. Another problem that has been addressed concerns how to create means for context aware service discovery in ubiquitous computing environments. Various mechanisms that address these problems have been implemented and tested. Finally the work addresses issues related to the role of the users in this kind of systems. Implementations and experiments have been performed where users take more active roles in aspects of system maintenance and adaptation as well as in the interpretation and representation of context information.

  • 14. Jonsson, Martin
    Using a Folksonomy Approach for Location Tagging in Community Based Presence Systems2007In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on Mobile Data Management, Washington: IEEE Computer Society , 2007, p. 304-308Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Jonsson, Martin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Mattsson, Magnus
    Here be Monsters!2011In: TEI '11 Proceedings of the fifth international conference on Tangible, embedded, and embodied interaction, New York: ACM Press, 2011, p. 389-390Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we present the monster eye installation, consisting of an artifact with which you can examine secrets that are hidden inside the walls.

  • 16.
    Jonsson, Martin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology. Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Ståhl, Anna
    SICS Swedish ICT.
    Mercurio, Johanna
    SICS Swedish ICT.
    Karlsson, Anna
    BORIS Design, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
    Naveen, Ramani
    SICS Swedish ICT.
    Höök, Kristina
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    The aesthetics of heat: Guiding Awareness with Thermal Stimuli2016In: TEI '16 Proceedings of the TEI '16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 109-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the design process and results from a design exploration on the use of thermal stimuli in body awareness exercises. A user-study was performed on an interactive prototype in the form of an interactive heat mat. The paper brings forth an alternative understanding of heat as a design material that extends the common understanding of thermal stimuli in HCI as a communication modality to instead bring the aesthetic and experiential properties to the fore. Findings account for felt body experiences of thermal stimuli and a number of design qualities related to heat as a design material are formulated, pointing to experiential qualities concerning the felt body, subjectivity and subtleness as well as material qualities concerning materiality, inertia and heat transfer.

  • 17.
    Jonsson, Martin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Technology and Design, Media technology.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Technology and Design, Media technology.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    Setting the stage - Embodied and spatial dimensions in emerging programming practices2008In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 21, no 1/2, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n the design of interactive systems, developers sometimes need to engage in various ways of physical performance in order to communicate ideas and to test out properties of the system to be realised. External resources such as sketches, as well as bodily action, often play important parts in such processes, and several methods and tools that explicitly address such aspects of interaction design have recently been developed. This combined with the growing range of pervasive, ubiquitous, and tangible technologies add up to a complex web of physicality within the practice of designing interactive systems. We illustrate this dimension of systems development through three cases which in different ways address the design of systems where embodied performance is important. The first case shows how building a physical sport simulator emphasises a shift in activity between programming and debugging. The second case shows a build-once run-once scenario, where the fine-tuning and control of the run-time activity gets turned into an act of in situ performance by the programmers. The third example illustrates the explorative and experiential nature of programming and debugging systems for specialised and autonomous interaction devices. This multitude in approaches in existing programming settings reveals an expanded perspective of what practices of interaction design consist of, emphasising the interlinking between design, programming, and performance with the system that is being developed.

  • 18.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    The Forensics of Transient Computational Materials2016In: Nordi'CHI 2016 Workshop. Things Fall Apart: Unpacking the Temporalities of Impermanence for HCI, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic components and computational artifacts tend to have a short lifespan. When they age, they become obsolete and lose their value and meaning. In a case where members of a makerspace investigate an old artifact with electronic components, we use the notion of forensics to describe how the lost meanings of discarded objects can be revived, and how the acts of inquiry around these objects and materials also bring new meaning to the objects at hand. This points to an alternative perspective on the transiency of electronic materials, where the focus is not on prolonging their lifespan, but rather on how such objects and materials can become meaningful after their “death”.

  • 19.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    The organization of personal fabrication: Hackathons and makerspaces as semi-professional places for creative making2015In: On website for workshop "The Future of Making: Where Industrial and Personal Fabrication Meet", 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Maker and DIY cultures, as well as the trend towards personal fabrication have gained recent visibility in HCI research. While first reflecting on makers as a new user and “social actor”, current rhetoric has shifted towards the maker movement’s potential for empowerment and democratization. By focusing on places and the organization of personal fabrication we are drawing lines between amateur vs. professional, and home vs. work settings as well as leisure vs. educational motivations. Here we discuss and map out the characteristics of semi-professional places for making in the light of a small study from a hackathon event.

  • 20.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    "It's a Bomb!" - Material Literacy and Narratives of Making2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 121-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses a series of events in which a discarded box found in a garbage room is examined and taken apart in the context of a makerspace. The participants' inquiry provided a rich and multifaceted experience in various settings, including puzzle-solving, exploring physical and digital materials, engaging people with different skills. The social engagements with and around the artifacts brought certain interpretative aspects to the fore. Situated acts of interpretation worked as ways of building a coherent narrative and a meaningful experience. In the paper, we highlight the relationship between on the one hand the subjects' skills and motivations to understand and make sense of the technology at hand which we call material literacy, and on the other hand the specific material qualities that encourage or trigger certain interpretations and experiences. The qualities we discuss are: opacity, risk, authenticity, uniqueness, age, and hybridity. This study allows us to reposition the contemporary understanding of makerspaces beyond that of being places for innovation and learning.

  • 21.
    Lundmark, Sofia
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology. Uppsala university.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Media technology.
    Crafting interaction – materiality in digital interaction design and traditional crafting practices2012In: Feminist Materialisms – Gender, Nature, Body, Materiality, Copenhagen, April 26-27,2012., 2012, p. 44-Conference paper (Refereed)
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