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  • 1.
    Andersdotter Fabre, Elin
    et al.
    Global Utmaning.
    Anneroth, Emelie
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Reinvent.
    Borgström, Sara
    KTH.
    Ejigu, Alazar
    Tyréns AB.
    Escobar, Victoria
    Changers Hub.
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Reinvent.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Reinvent.
    León Rosales, René
    Mångkulturellt centrum.
    Wrangsten, Caroline
    Mötesplatser för unga läggs ner. Är det hållbart?2019In: Samhällsbyggaren, ISSN 2002-956X, Vol. 2, p. 26-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Stockholmsregionen växer och utvecklas. Regionen förväntas växa med ytterligare cirka en miljon invånare fram till år 2050. Fler människor måste dela på stadens utrymmen och resurser. Stockholms ytterområden – där de flesta bor och kommer att bo – förtätas och rustas upp. Hur bygger vi då ett hållbart Stockholm, ett samhälle där alla kan få plats, delta, trivas och må bra?

  • 2.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Reinvent.
    Carlson, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Reinvent.
    Heber, Anita
    Stockholms universitet.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Lindström, Jonas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Reinvent.
    Politiskt färgad undersökning med dålig representativitet: Replik DN Debatt 19/22019In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University College, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, Sociology.
    Demokratisk förtroendekris i Ryssland: Moskvaborna misstror samhällets institutioner2005In: Upsala Nya Tidning, ISSN 1104-0173, no 9 oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University College, Department of Society and History, Sociology.
    E-learning, marginalised communities and social capital: A mixed method approach2004In: Researching Widening Access to Lifelong Learning: Issues and approaches in international research / [ed] Michael Osborne, Jim Gallacher, Beth Crossan, London: RoutledgeFalmer , 2004, p. 180-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    The importance of different forms of social capital for health2007In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 115-128Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the concept of social capital and to distinguish its different forms, focusing on their potential effects on health. According to many scholars, social capital comprises social networks, norms of reciprocity or social support and social trust. In this article the core element, the social network, has been further distinguished by the direction of ties and levels of formality, strength and diversity. In the past few years there has been increased interest in social capital in the health field and a great deal of research has suggested that social capital is generally positively related to health. However, little research has been conducted into how different forms of social capital or social networks influence health. What is the difference, for instance, between bonding and bridging social capital in terms of health outcomes? It is important to distinguish the different forms because they imply different resources, support and obligations. More research needs to be conducted into the different forms of social capital and their effects on health. A special focus should be placed on the health impacts of cross-cutting - or bridging and linking - forms of social capital.

  • 6. Ferlander, Sara
    The internet, social capital and local community2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ferlander, Sara
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Reinvent.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Reinvent.
    Utas, Andrea
    WSP Sverige AB.
    Papakostas, Apostolis
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Reinvent.
    Regionens ansvar för förortens mellanmänskliga rum2018In: PLAN, no 4-5, p. 87-88Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Ferlander, Sara
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Social capital, gender and self-rated health. Evidence from the Moscow Health Survey 20042009In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 69, no 9, p. 1323-1332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The state of public health in Russia is undoubtedly poor compared with other European countries. The health crisis that has characterised the transition period has been attributed to a number of factors, with an increasing interest being focused on the impact of social capital - or the lack of it. However, there have been relatively few studies of the relation between social capital and health in Russia, and especially in Moscow. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between social capital and self-rated health in Greater Moscow. The study draws on data from the Moscow Health Survey 2004, where 1190 Muscovites were interviewed. Our results indicate that among women, there is no relationship between any form of social capital and self-rated health. However, an association was detected between social capital outside the family and men’s self-rated health. Men who rarely or never visit friends and acquaintances are significantly more likely to report less than good health than those who visit more often. Likewise, men who are not members of any voluntary associations have significantly higher odds of reporting poorer health than those who are, while social capital in the family does not seem to be of importance at all. We suggest that these findings might be due to the different gender roles in Russia, and the different socializing patterns and values embedded in them. In addition, different forms of social capital provide access to different forms of resources, influence, and support. They also imply different obligations. These differences are highly relevant for health outcomes, both in Moscow and elsewhere.

  • 9.
    Ferlander, Sara
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Shukhatovich, Violetta
    Institute of Sociology of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus.
    Cоциальный капитал и депрессия в Беларуси [Social Capital and Depression in Belarus]: постановка проблемы [Setting the agenda]2017In: ЗДОРОВЬЕ НАСЕЛЕНИЯ: ПРОБЛЕМЫ И ПУТИ РЕШЕНИЯ [Health of the population: Problems and solutions]: Материалы международного научно-практического семинара, 18-19 мая 2017: СБОРНИК НАУЧНЫХ СТАТЕЙ, Minsk: Institute of Sociology of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus , 2017, p. 193-206Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Ferlander, Sara
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK / University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kislitsyna, Olga
    Russian Academy of Sciences.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Carlson, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Uppsala University.
    Social capital - a mixed blessing for women? A cross-sectional study of different forms of social relations and self-rated depression in Moscow2016In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a major health problem worldwide, especially among women. The condition has been related to a number of factors, such as alcohol consumption, economic situation and, more recently, to social capital. However, there have been relatively few studies about the social capital-depression relationship in Eastern Europe. This paper aims to fill this gap by examining the association between different forms of social capital and self-rated depression in Moscow. Differences between men and women will also be examined, with a special focus on women.

    METHODS: Data was obtained from the Moscow Health Survey, which was conducted in 2004 with 1190 Muscovites aged 18 years or above. For depression, a single-item self-reported measure was used. Social capital was operationalised through five questions about different forms of social relations. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to estimate the association between social capital and self-rated depression, separately for men and women.

    RESULTS: More women (48 %) than men (36 %) reported that they had felt depressed during the last year. An association was found between social capital and reported depression only among women. Women who were divorced or widowed or who had little contact with relatives had higher odds of reporting depression than those with more family contact. Women who regularly engaged with people from different age groups outside of their families were also more likely to report depression than those with less regular contact.

    CONCLUSIONS: Social capital can be a mixed blessing for women. Different forms of social relations can lead to different health outcomes, both positive and negative. Although the family is important for women's mental health in Moscow, extra-familial relations across age groups can be mentally distressing. This suggests that even though social capital can be a valuable resource for mental health, some of its forms can be mentally deleterious to maintain, especially for women. More research is needed on both sides to social capital. A special focus should be placed on bridging social relations among women in order to better understand the complex association between social capital and depression in Russia and elsewhere.

  • 11.
    Ferlander, Sara
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). University of Stirling, United Kingdom .
    Timms, Duncan
    Bridging the dual digital divide: A local net and an IT-café in Sweden.2006In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 137-159Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Ferlander, Sara
    et al.
    Timms, Duncan
    Local nets and social capital2001In: Telematics and informatics, ISSN 0736-5853, E-ISSN 1879-324X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 51-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ferlander, Sara
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Timms, Duncan
    Social capital and community building through the Internet: A Swedish case study in a disadvantaged suburban area2007In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 12, no 5, p. online-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid diffusion of the Internet has considerable potential for enhancing the way people connect with each other, the root of social capital. However, the more the Internet is used for building social capital the greater will the impact be on those whose access and/or usage is curtailed. It is therefore important to investigate the impacts of Internet on groups at risk of digital and social exclusion. The aim of this article is to examine how the use of the Internet influences social capital and community building in a disadvantaged area. Quantitative and qualitative data from a case study in a suburban area of Stockholm are used to evaluate the social impacts of two community-based Internet projects: a Local Net and an IT-Cafe. Each of the projects was aimed at enhancing digital inclusion and social capital in a disadvantaged local community. The paper examines the extent to which use of the Internet is associated with an enhancement of social participation, social trust and local identity in the area. The Local Net appears to have had limited success in meeting its goals; the IT-Cafe was more successful. Visitors to the IT-Cafe had more local friends, expressed less social distrust, perceived less tension between different groups in the area and felt a much stronger sense of local identity than non-visitors. Visitors praised the IT-Cafe as providing a meeting-place both online and offline. The Internet was used for networking, exchange of support and information seeking. Although it is difficult to establish causal priorities, the evidence suggests that an IT-Cafe, combining physical with virtual and the local with the global, may be especially well suited to build social capital and a sense of local community in a disadvantaged area. The importance of social, rather than solely technological, factors in determining the impact of the Internet on social capital and community in marginal areas is stressed.

  • 14.
    Ferlander, Sara
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Timms, Duncan
    Social Capital and Third Places through the Internet: Lessons from a disadvantaged Swedish community2011In: ICTs and Sustainable Solutions for the Digital Divide: Theory and Perspectives / [ed] Jacques Steyn & Graeme Johanson, Hershey: Information Science Reference , 2011, p. 199-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15. Ferlander, Sara
    et al.
    Timms, Duncan
    Social cohesion and online community1999Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Kislitsyna, Olga
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Economic strain, social relations, gender, and binge drinking in Moscow2008In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 66, p. 663-674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The harmful effects of alcohol consumption are not necessarily limited to the amounts consumed. Drinking in binges is a specific feature of Russian alcohol consumption that may be of importance even for explaining the current mortality crisis. Based on interviews conducted with a stratified random sample of 1190 Muscovites in 2004, this paper examines binge drinking in relation to the respondents’ economic situation and social relations. Consistent with prior research, this study provides further evidence for a negative relationship between educational level and binge drinking. Our results also indicate a strong but complex link between economic strain and binge drinking. The odds ratios for binge drinking of men experiencing manifold economic problems were almost twice as high compared to those for men with few economic problems. However, the opposite seemed to be true for women. Being married or cohabiting seemed to have a strong protective effect on binge drinking among women compared to being single, while it seemed to have no effect at all among men. Women having regular contact with friends also had more than twice the odds for binge drinking compared to those with little contact with friends, while again no effect was found among men. Gender roles and the behavioural differences embedded in these, may explain the difference. The different effects of economic hardship on binge drinking may also constitute an important factor when explaining the large mortality difference between men and women in Russia.

  • 17. Kislitsyna, Olga
    et al.
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Vliyanie sotsialnoi podderzhki na zdorove Moskvichei: [Social support impact on Moscow inhabitants' health]2008In: Sociologiceskie issledovaniâ, ISSN 0132-1625, no 4, p. 81-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "Impact by social factors on Moscow inhabitants' health" looks into relationships between actual health conditions and the levels of respective individual social capital on the basis of a sociological study among Moscow inhabitants carried out in the spring of 2004. The above relationships have been measured by means of following indices: social networks and informal social supports; degree of trust to institutions of the Russian state or to human beings in general; actual membership of individuals involved in voluntary non-government organizations. However, an outstanding role belongs to possibility to maintain contacts with the closest relatives, or family members.

  • 18. Kislitsyna, Olga
    et al.
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    РОЛЬ СОЦИАЛЬНЫХ ОТНОШЕНИЙ В ОБЪЯСНЕНИИ СОЦИАЛЬНО-ЭКОНОМИЧЕСКИХ РАЗЛИЧИЙ В СОСТОЯНИИ ЗДОРОВЬЯ РОССИЯН [The Role of Social Relations and Explaining Socio-Economic Health Disparities among Russians]2015In: Социальные Aспекты Здоровья Hаселения [Social Aspects of Population Health], ISSN 2071-5021, Vol. 4, no 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Existence of systematic health differences between people with different socio-economic status has been confirmed by many studies. At the same time, social relations have been found to be an important determinant of health. Some scholars consider social relations as mediator between socioeconomic status and health. However, studies on this subject are scattered and inconsistent. At the same time, it remains unclear how social relations are distributed according to socio-economic status. The study, the results of which are presented in this work, is an attempt to examine relationship between socio-economic status, social relations and health.

    Purpose: The purposes of the study are: 1) to explore relationship between socio-economic status and social relations; 2) to confirm association between social relations and health; 3) to reveal whether social relations mediate association between socio-economic status and health.

    Methods: The study is based on data of the European Social Survey, Round 5. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression models. Three indicators were selected to measure social relations: presence of a family partner, confidentiality availability (presence of someone with whom it is possible to discuss intimate and personal matters) and social participation (communication with people for enjoyment rather than for reasons of work or duty). Socioeconomic status was assessed by the level of education, employment and financial situation. Self-rated health on a one-five scale was used as health (illness) indicator.

    Results: It was found out that socio-economically disadvantaged persons are at greater risk of social isolation, which, in turn, has negative effect on health. Social relations explain up to 21% of the socio-economic inequalities in self-rated health of the Russian people.

    Conclusions: The received results show the need to promote social support and social integration especially among people with low socio-economic status, which can contribute to reduce health inequalities.

  • 19.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Jukkala, Tanya
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Carlson, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Kislitsyna, Olga
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Institutional Trust in Contemporary Moscow2009In: Europe-Asia Studies, ISSN 0966-8136, E-ISSN 1465-3427, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 779-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Levels of institutional trust in Russia are amongst the lowest in the world. As yet, however, little research has focused on this phenomenon at the sub-national level. The current study examines trust in social and political institutions among citizens in Moscow in 2004. Results showed that levels of institutional trust are extremely low and that there were only three institutions (the church, president and hospitals) that were more trusted than distrusted. Moreover, although the effects of some demographic and other independent variables on trust stretched across institutions, several variables had a unique impact in terms of trust in the president.

  • 20.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Sabawoon, W
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    McKee, M
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Loneliness and health in Eastern Europe: findings from Moscow, Russia2015In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 403-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine which factors are associated with feeling lonely in Moscow, Russia, and to determine whether loneliness is associated with worse health.

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

    METHODS: Data from 1190 participants were drawn from the Moscow Health Survey. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine which factors were associated with feeling lonely and whether loneliness was linked to poor health.

    RESULTS: Almost 10% of the participants reported that they often felt lonely. Divorced and widowed individuals were significantly more likely to feel lonely, while not living alone and having greater social support reduced the risk of loneliness. Participants who felt lonely were more likely to have poor self-rated health (odds ratio [OR]: 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.38-3.76), and have suffered from insomnia (OR: 2.43; CI: 1.56-3.77) and mental ill health (OR: 2.93; CI: 1.88-4.56).

    CONCLUSIONS: Feeling lonely is linked to poorer health in Moscow. More research is now needed on loneliness and the way it affects health in Eastern Europe, so that appropriate interventions can be designed and implemented to reduce loneliness and its harmful impact on population well-being in this setting.

  • 21. Timms, Duncan
    et al.
    Ferlander, Sara
    Timms, Liz
    Social cohesion, higher education and marginal areas: Local nets and social capital.2001In: Wiring the ivory tower. Linking universities across Europe: Paris, France, 28-30 September 2000 : proceedings, Heerlen: EADTU , 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University College, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Unhealthy Societies?: Health Stagnation and Growing Health Inequalities Are Not Consistent with Sustainable Development2006In: Realizing a Common Vision for a Baltic Sea Eco-Region: Report from a Research Symposium on Sustainable Development Patterns 28-29 October 2005 / [ed] Lars Rydén, 2006, p. 39-46Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). CHESS, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet.
    Kislitsyna, Olga
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation .
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Migranova, Ludmila
    Carlson, Per
    Mid Sweden University.
    Rimachevskaya, Natalia
    Moscow Health Survey 2004: social surveying under difficult circumstances2008In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 171-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this paper is to present the Moscow Health Survey 2004, which was designed to examine health inequalities in Moscow. In particular we want to discuss social survey problems, such as non-response, in Moscow and Russia. Methods: Interviews, covering social and economic circumstances, health and social trust, of a stratified random sample of the greater Moscow population, aged 18+. Reasons for nonresponse were noted down with great care. Odds ratios (ORs) for self-rated health by gender and by six social dimensions were estimated separately for districts with low and high response rates. Bias due to non-response is discussed. Results and conclusions: About one in two (53.1 %) of approached individuals could not be interviewed, resulting in 1190 completed interviews. Non-response in most Russian surveys, but perhaps particularly in Moscow, is large, partly due to fear of strangers and distrust of authorities. ORs for poor health vary significantly by gender, occupational class, education and economic hardship. We find no significant differences in these ORs when comparing districts with low and high response rates. Non-response may be a problem when estimating prevalence rates or population means, but much less so when estimating odds ratios in multivariate analyses.

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