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  • 1.
    Borg, Erik A
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Kirsch, Frank-Michael
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Succeeding in a Transition Economy: Survival Strategies in Eastern Germany2010Book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Borg, Erik A
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Kirsch, Frank-Michael
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Survivors in the Market Economy: East German Companies after Transition2007In: The Business Review, Cambridge, ISSN 1553-5827, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 179-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The East German transition to Market Economy became a selection process for former DDR companies. Most companies did not survive the transition to the market economy. However, some have survived and are able to compete in the market economy after the transition. Studying these companies renders evidence of what is approved by customers in the competitive markets in the global economy. The research into the survival of East German companies provides and insight into companies facing competition in a market economy, and suggests how market forces influences the functioning of enterprises. Six hypotheses have been developed to account for essential reasons why some East German companies have survived, and why and how they are capable of marketing products and services in the competitive market economy.  The transition to market economy has had many consequences to East German companies. The productivity of the former DDR was substantially lower than that of the West. At the time of the reunification, the companies of Eastern Germany were not competitive, due to high production cost. West German wage levels and working conditions, and the West German institutional model called Model Germany, was transferred to Eastern Germany at the time of reunification (Wiesenthal 2003).

  • 3.
    Borg, Erik
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Kirsch, Frank-Michael
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Market Orientation and Business Culture in Eastern Germany2010In: Proceedings of the 2010 Global Marketing Conference at Tokyo "Marketing in a Turbulent Environment": Hosted by the Korean Academy of Marketing Science, September 9-12, 2010 / [ed] Eun Young Kim, 2010, p. 1103-1111Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Pädam, Sirje
    et al.
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Does service marketing management by design thinking save transaction costs?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify the impacts on transaction costs from marketing management by service design thinking.

     

    Approach –The article is based on the case study of “enkla vardagen”; a project implemented by service design consultants contracted by the Swedish multinational bank SEB. By applying desk research and interviews the study intends to find out whether identified impacts on costs are transaction costs and how other costs were affected by the use of service marketing management by service design thinking (SDT). The hypothesis is that SDT reduces transaction costs.

     

    Findings – The empirical evidence shows that from the perspective of the bank, savings in transaction costs included reductions in uncertainty, which enabled them to reap the long-term savings in transaction costs by conversion of high cost customers to low-cost contracts. However, there were increases in other costs. These were one-time and it is likely they are lower than the savings. In addition, customers saved transaction costs in terms of one-time efforts and lower commission costs. The implication of the case study is thus that SDT saves transaction costs.

     

    Social implications – There is keen competition within the banking sector implying service provides have incentives to satisfy end-users’ needs. The incentives are expected to be different for organisations acting in a non-competitive environment, e.g. public sector organisations. In these environments design thinking may not even be considered. Lacking competitive pressure, public sector organisations in charge of developing e-government services might, therefore, choose solutions that are less able to provide end-user friendly designs and, therefore imply higher transaction costs both within the organisations and for users. As the public sector is financed by tax money, the matter is both of public interest and of citizen-level concern.

     

    Originality – The contribution of this article is about linking service marketing management by design thinking to transaction costs. Earlier studies have analysed the impact from information and communication technology (ICT) on transaction costs, while this study focuses on the service marketing management perspective. To the knowledge of the authors, there are no previous studies that connect service design thinking to potential impacts on transaction costs.

  • 5. Tollhagen, Renate
    A history of work environment innovation: Sweden1995Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Tollhagen-Åkerhielm, Renate
    Stockholms universitet.
    Skräddare utan tråd: en illustration av fyra företag i klädbranschen2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Methods different from the ones applied earlier in service management applied - a natural consequence?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims at a deeper understanding of why a heavily anthropological method as design thinking is being applied by practitioners. 

    Approach – The paper is based on a literature study. 

    Findings – It takes methods different from the ones applied earlier in service management as to the move from uniformity to diversity. And this is only a natural consequence of Zeitgeist. 

    Research limitations/implications – Within the framework of the present document, the research is being limited on marketing as a phenomenon geographically to the Western world and chronologically to the advent of commerce and thereafter. 

    Originality – The contribution of this article is about a deeper understanding of how heavily anthropological methods in service marketing emerge as a consequence of Zeitgeist. Service design thinking is a fresh and recent method. To the knowledge of the author, there have been no studies conducted in order to understand why this method has come into existence. 

  • 8.
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Overcoming cultural differences in intercultural EU-projects2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Present contribution to 12th Conference “European Culture”, Spain, Barcelona on 24‐26 October 2013 aims to describe how to identify relevant cultural differences and their impact on cross‐border projects. It is a problem that the participants’ different cultural backgrounds in a project often lead to misinterpretations and deadlocks. Therefore, the research question deals with how participants in creative processes can identify relevant cultural differences as well as their impact on cross‐border projects. This appears important in order to prevent the processes of creative, intercultural projects from halting or even a collapse. The description will be based on an analysis of reflections made by participants in an intercultural border‐crossing project, financed by the European Regional Development Fund and European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument.

  • 9.
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Public Authorities’ E-Goverment Services for Enterprises - The Swedish Experience: Final report : E-GOvernment solutions as instruments to qualify the public sector for the specific needs of small and medium sized enterPRISEs (SMEs) in the rural BSR2012Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Service Design for Public Authorities2014In: / [ed] ---, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract – The present study focuses on Swedish public authorities’ e-governed design of assistance and support preparedness vis-à-vis small and medium sized enterprises (SME) in a service directive context. 

    Purpose – The paper aims to examine Swedish agencies’ design of assistance and support preparedness vis-à-vis SMEs in a service directive context. 

    Approach – The topic is examined through interviews and investigations. Based on the analysis, it is being concretised from a theoretical angle, to which extent the examined authorities have involved the end-user. 

    Findings – This study shows that public authorities use system-oriented approaches in designing e-government services. 

    Practical implications – One suggestion is that authorities familiarize themselves with methods such as “design thinking” and apply them in their efforts in order to learn how to overcome every feeling of disembodiment and depersonalization that technology has created between government agency and customers. 

    Social implications – The topic examined is a matter of interest for all EU-countries government agencies. The results from this study can be generalized in terms public authorities ”do the right thing in a wrong way”. 

    Originality –In order to highlight the topic from a theoretical angle, an outline divided in system-oriented and market-oriented approaches have emerged as an outcome of the theoretical considerations. To the knowledge of the author, there are no previous studies that have identified above-mentioned categories separated by the degree of end-user involvement in designing services. 

  • 11.
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Service Design in Intercultural Research Environments2011In: University-Business Cooperation: Tallinn 2011 / [ed] Prause, G, Venesaar U., Berlin: Deutscher Wissenschaftsverlag , 2011, p. 148-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Whiteness constructed in a multi-cultural world2014In: International Journal of Economic Practices and Theories, ISSN 2247-7225, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 815-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many garment producers act on a global market, where people from different cultures often move from countries to others, as well as surf in a world-wide virtual space. In this context, garment producers design their marketing communication efforts considering identity and personality related to the target group aimed at. Often they choose models for their ads, which mirror ideals that the generally defined target group is attracted by. Garment producers often succeed in picking models or icons, which fit well into the social class standards, which the target group identifies with. Nevertheless, they often do this without reflecting on the icons’ identity-and personality-value across cultural differences as colour of the skin, gender and sexuality. Consequently, global standardised advertisements contain stereotypes or standardised personalities. It is common these stereotypes are dominated by whiteness. A possible understanding of “whiteness” is as follows: “lifestyles of white human beings, non-coloured persons”. One question is how whiteness is being constructed in the contemporary visual culture of marketing fashion design. By examining four advertisements of brands providing life-style values, this paper aims at better understanding the lifestyle concept of whiteness. This understanding is of actual interest to a garment producer when designing advertisements. A lack of understanding diminishes the producer’s chance of digging all the market-potential. Three brands closely connected to adored white ideal lifestyles are examined. Furthermore, the brands are in a middle-prize segment and act world-wide on a global market. The study shows, whiteness is represented by wealth, financial independence, power, old traditions, cultural interest and education, sport, leisure, power for life and happiness in life. Further, it appears from the study, whiteness is connected to the American dream. In summary, whiteness is plenty of stereotyping. A conclusion is, the concept of whiteness is far to narrow to fit a global garment producer.

  • 13.
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Borg, Erik A
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Kirsch, Frank-Michael
    Survivors in the Market Economy: East German Companies after Transition2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Borg, Erik A
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Kirsch, Frank-Michael
    Three ways to Survive the Market Economy : A study of East German companies2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Åkerhielm, Renate
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Felber, Hannes
    West, Shaun
    Playbook: real people managing projects2016Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 15 of 15
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
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