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  • 1. Ahrne, Göran
    et al.
    Boström, Magnus
    Pendelrörelser mellan frivillighet och tvång: Organisationers kamp om regleringsstrategier2004In: Den organiserade frivilligheten / [ed] Boström Magnus, Forssell Anders, Jacobsson Kerstin, Tamm Hallström Kristina, Lund: Liber , 2004, p. 144-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2. Ahrne, Göran
    et al.
    Boström, Magnus
    Forssell, Anders
    Meningen med föreningen: Vad är frivilligt med frivilligorganisationer?2004In: Den organiserade frivilligheten / [ed] Boström Magnus, Forssell Anders, Jacobsson Kerstin, Tamm Hallström Kristina, Lund: Liber , 2004, p. 22-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Boström, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    A Missing Pillar? Challenges in theorizing and practicing social sustainability: introductory article in the special issue2012In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, ISSN 1548-7733, E-ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Boström, Magnus
    Cognitive Practices and Collective Identities within a Heterogeneous Social Movement: The Swedish Environmental Movement2004In: Social Movement Studies, ISSN 1474-2837, E-ISSN 1474-2829, Social Movement Studies:, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 73-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies on social movements have highlighted the importance of cultural and ideational factors. Concepts such as collective identity, cognitive praxis, and framing have been used to better understand the emergence, development, and political and cultural impact of social movements. In this article I draw on different schools of thought in order to develop a new use of the concept of cognitive practice. I suggest the relevance of analysing collective identities and cognitive practices at the organizational level (which does not, per se, exclude analysis at other levels). This emphasis also leads to a perspective that suggest a relational and interaction-oriented way in which to understand how movement organizations try to influence other actors through their cognitive practices. This kind of analysis helps to question the implicit notion of unity in the concept of social movement. The analytical focal points are also useful for discussing possibilities and dilemmas for movement organizations with regard to aspects such as how frames become effective and make frame resonance possible; how compromises and delimitations are built into frames; and how cognitive autonomy may be decreased or preserved. The empirical focus in this article is the Swedish environmental movement, and the identities and cognitive practices of some its organizations in the 1990s. I also discuss the relevance of my findings for the study of movement organizations within other fields

  • 5. Boström, Magnus
    Eco-labelling of Seafood.: Toward a credible tool for consumer-based environmental improvement?2005In: Political Consumerism: Its Motivations, Power, and Conditions in the Nordic Countries and Elsewhere.:  Proceedings from the 2nd International Seminar on Political Consumerism, Oslo August 26-29, 2004 / [ed] Boström, MagnusFollesdal, AndreasKlintman, MikaelMicheletti, MicheleSorensen, Mads P., Copenhagen: Nordic Council of Ministers , 2005, p. 365-393Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6. Boström, Magnus
    En mångfald av parter: nya regler i skogen2004In: Regelexplosionen / [ed] Göran Ahrne och Nils Brunsson, Stockholm: Ekonomiska forskningsinstitutet vid Handelshögskolan , 2004, p. 155-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7. Boström, Magnus
    En social rörelses mångfald och interna relationer: Den svenska miljörörelsen2001In: Arkiv för studier i arbetarrörelsens historia, ISSN 0345-0333, no 82-83, p. 21-46Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8. Boström, Magnus
    Environmental Organizations in New Forms of Political Participation: Ecological Modernization and the Making of Voluntary Rules2003In: Environmental Values, ISSN 0963-2719, E-ISSN 1752-7015, Environmental Values:, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 175-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental organisations have been active since the early 1960s in putting environmental issues on the political agenda and in strengthening the environmental consciousness of the public. The struggle has been successful in the sense that there is now a strong demand for practical solutions among all kinds of actors. It is, however, difficult for states and political actors to manage environmental problems by traditional forms and instruments, due to the complex character of the problems. Therefore, environmental organisations take their own initiatives to participate in policy-making by developing new forms, within new arenas, with the help of new instruments (voluntary rules or standards). Special attention is paid to the possibilities of identifying and developing constructive roles in relation to other actors and institutions as well as the capacity to organise standardisation projects and to mobilise and make use of power resources such as symbolic capital and knowledge. In order to interpret characteristics and implications (possibilities and limitations) of standardisation strategies, I draw on the ecological modernisation perspective. Empirically, I refer to the role of Swedish environmental organisations in standardisation projects such as eco-labelling

  • 9. Boström, Magnus
    Establishing credibility: Practising standard-setting ideals in a Swedish seafood-labelling case2006In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 135-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Market-based non-state governance arrangements, many examples of which are seen in the environmental field, require the active approval of a broad group of stakeholders. This paper makes the theoretical argument that credibility is a key issue in the establishment of such arrangements, and examines empirically the effort to develop a trustworthy eco-labelling scheme for seafood in Sweden. Many policy actors view eco-labelling as a particularly credible instrument that consumers and businesspeople can use to demonstrate environmentally friendly behaviour. But establishing credibility is complicated, especially if the issues are controversial and if there is mistrust among the groups. This paper analyses the challenges involved in practising six standard-setting ideals, the fulfilment of which is seen to establish credibility: inclusiveness, independence, auditability, scientific validity, global applicability and the balancing of feasibility versus environmental stringency. The ideals are subjects of framing, debating, power struggles and negotiation; and are dependent upon context, situational and historical factors. The assumed positive relationship between ideals and credibility is complicated because of the challenges involved in practising the ideals. This article draws upon the literature on non-state authority, governance and standardization.

  • 10. Boström, Magnus
    Fina fisken2004Report (Other academic)
  • 11. Boström, Magnus
    Frivilligorganisation och frivillig reglering: Miljöorganisationer i standardiseringsprocesser2002In: Nordiske organisasjonsstudier, ISSN 1501-8237, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 4-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Boström, Magnus
    How State-Dependent is a Non-State-Driven Rule-Making project?: The Case of Forest Certification in Sweden2003In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 165-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, environmental organizations (EOs) have, in co-operation with forest companies and social interest groups, introduced a voluntary certification scheme in accordance with the Forest Stewardship Council's (FSC) principles for sustainable forestry. Sweden was one of the first countries in which a nationally based FSC standard was introduced successfully. It is interesting to examine why a non-state-driven rule-making project has been comparatively successful in Sweden, where the state is often regarded as strong, pragmatic and open for big interest organizations and, therefore, could be expected to be the natural arena for forest regulation initiatives. This article asks: (1) why the certification project was initiated and driven from outside of the state; and (2) to what extent the Swedish state had an impact none the less. The case presented here reveals that the initiatives of EOs were partly motivated by their view that state regulatory processes and frameworks have failed to take care of environmental problems. However, the case also shows indications of state dependency/embeddedness and the article analyses the following factors: (1) regulatory framework; (2) political culture; (3) policy discourse and policy networks; and (4) state legitimacy. These findings suggest that non-state-driven rule-making can receive strength through a positive relationship with the state

  • 13.
    Boström, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Hybridorganisationer2009In: Från klass till organisation: En resa genom det sociala landskapet / [ed] Roman, Christine & Udéhn, Lars, Malnö: Liber , 2009, p. 170-189Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Boström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet.
    Miljörörelsens mångfald2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 15. Boström, Magnus
    Om relationen mellan stat och civilsamhälle: miljöorganisationers interaktion med statliga och politiska organisationer2000Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Boström, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    [Recension av] Ellen Ruppel Shell (2009) Cheap, The High Cost of Discount Culture, New York: The Penguin Press2010In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 174-176Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17. Boström, Magnus
    Regulatory Credibility and Authority through Inclusiveness: Standardization Organizations in Cases of Eco-labelling2006In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Organization:, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 345-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the challenging task of permanently organizing projects that include a broad range of actors: enterprises, social movement organizations and state actors. It focuses on a special type of standardization activity, namely eco-labelling, and is based on case studies of two Swedish projects/organizations: labelling of organic food and sustainable forestry. In this paper, I theorize about the concept of inclusiveness, which is seen as being instrumental for the creation of regulatory credibility and authority and argue that different types of members/participants have different types of power resources, which the standardization organization (SO) seeks to mobilize and control. The combination of these individual power resources brings action capacity and symbolic resources to the SO, including an image of independence. Moreover, the SO provides an organizational setting that, inter alias, helps interdependent actors to maintain a hold on each other, and forces them to engage in a dialogue and repeated interaction over time. This interaction can, in turn, result in common expectations and understandings that are essential for the operations of non-state governance. However, the case studies also indicate difficulties in organizing such complex networks. It can, above all, be difficult to prevent a power shift in favour of organizations with large power resources.

  • 18. Boström, Magnus
    Skogen märks: Hur svensk skogscertifiering kom till och dess konsekvenser2002Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Boström, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    The challenges in achieving the “social” dimension of sustainable development.: The case of the Forest Stewardship Council2010Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Boström, Magnus
    Södertörn University College, School of Life Sciences.
    The Historical and Contemporary Roles of Nature Protection Organisations in Sweden2007In: Protecting Nature: Organizations and networks in Europe and the USA / [ed] C.S.A (Kris) van Koppen & William T. Markham, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2007, p. 213-238Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Boström, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    The Problematic Social Dimension of Sustainable Development: the Case of the Forest Stewardship Council2012In: International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, ISSN 1350-4509, E-ISSN 1745-2627, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Boström, Magnus
    Voluntary rule-making in the environmental field: New alliances between the state, enterprises and environmental organizations2001Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Börjeson, Natasja
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Gilek, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Responsible procurement and complex product chains: the case of chemical risks in textiles2012In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 95-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Börjeson, Natasja
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Gilek, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Towards responsible procurement in relation to chemical risks in textiles?: Findings from an interview study2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we ask whether and how different organizations work with sustainable procurement and how this work relates to the complexity of the product chain. We have chosen to focus on chemical risks in relation to textiles – an issue that increasingly is becoming part of the public discourse and a target for journalists. In the case of textiles, the product chain from raw material to consumption often involves a great number of production steps, sub-contractors and users, often on a global scale. Sustainable management of the supply chain would improve health, quality of life, and labour conditions, for instance in the areas and factories in developing countries where production and processing often take place. However, such management faces great difficulties and challenges in terms of capabilities, knowledge, communication, and policy instruments. These difficulties are related to high uncertainties and other problems that in turn are related to the high complexity of global product chains. The objective of the present report is to gain insights into the opportunities and challenges that private and public organizations face regarding the development of responsible procurement in relation to a complex and uncertain issue. The report focuses on chemicals in textiles and uses a qualitative methodology with semi-structured interviews. Key elements of a pro-active, responsible procurement strategy are defined in the report and include criteria such as using a preventive, systematic, responsive, integrative, and reflective approach. The analysis includes the following topics: (i) priorities and knowledge, (ii) communicative strategies, (iii) policy instruments, (iv) monitoring and trust in relation to suppliers. The results show a fairly modest level of organizational responsibility, although it is possible to observe an initial positive development among the cases investigated. The report ends by suggesting a number of topics that require further investigation.

  • 25.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Casual Vifell, Åsa
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Klintman, M.
    Lund University.
    Soneryd, L.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Hallström, K. T.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Thedvall, R.
    Social sustainability requires social sustainability procedural prerequisites for reaching substantive goals2015In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 131-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synergies and trade-offs between the various dimensions of sustainable development are attracting a rising scholarly attention. Departing from the scholarly debate, this article focuses on internal relationships within social sustainability. Our key claim is that it is diffi cult to strengthen substantive social sustainability goals unless there are key elements of social sustainability contained in the very procedures intended to work toward sustainability. Our analysis, informed by an organizing perspective, is based on a set of case studies on multi-stakeholder transnational sustainability projects (sustainability standards). This article explores six challenges related to the achievement of such procedures that can facilitate substantive social sustainability. Three of these concern the formulation of standards and policies, and three the implementation of standards and policies. To achieve substantive social sustainability procedures must be set in motion with abilities to take hold of people's concerns, frames, resources, as well as existing relevant institutions and infrastructures. © Berghahn Journals.

  • 26. Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Follesdal, Andreas
    Klintman, Mikael
    Micheletti, Michele
    Sorensen, Mads P.
    Political Consumerism: Its Motivations, Power, and Conditions in the Nordic Countries and Elsewhere.:  Proceedings from the 2nd International Seminar on Political Consumerism, Oslo August 26-29, 20042005Report (Other academic)
  • 27. Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Follesdal, Andreas
    Klintman, Mikael
    Micheletti, Michele
    Sorensen, Mads P.
    Studying political consumerism2005In: Political Consumerism: Its Motivations, Power, and Conditions in the Nordic Countries and Elsewhere.:  Proceedings from the 2nd International Seminar on Political Consumerism, Oslo August 26-29, 2004 / [ed] Boström, MagnusFollesdal, AndreasKlintman, MikaelMicheletti, MicheleSorensen, Mads P., Copenhagen: Nordic Council of Ministers , 2005, p. 9-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28. Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Forssell, Anders
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Den dubbelbottnade frivilligheten2004In: Den organiserade frivilligheten / [ed] Boström Magnus, Forssell Anders, Jacobsson Kerstin, Tamm Hallström Kristina, Lund: Liber , 2004, p. 190-209Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29. Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Forssell, Anders
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Södertörn University College, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, Sociology.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Organiserad frivillighet2004In: Den organiserade frivilligheten / [ed] Boström, Magnus, Forssell, Anders, Jacobsson Kerstin, Tamm Hallström, Kristina,, Lund: Liber , 2004, p. 7-21Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Garsten, Christina
    Organizing for accountability2008In: Organizing Transnational Accountability / [ed] Boström, Magnus & Garsten, Christina, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2008, p. 1-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Garsten, Christina
    Organizing Transnational Accountability2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Garsten, Christina
    The treadmill of accountability2008In: Organizing Transnational Accountability / [ed] Boström, Magnus & Garsten, Christina, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2008, p. 231-249Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Gilek, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Hedenström, Eva
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    How to achieve sustainable procurement for “peripheral” products with significant environmental impacts2015In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, ISSN 1548-7733, E-ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from previous theoretical and empirical studies on sustainable supply-chain management, we investigate organizational commitment (drivers and motivations) and capabilities (resources, structures, and policy instruments) in sustainable procurement of “noncore” products. By focusing on chemicals in textiles, the article explores the activi-ties of differently sized organizations and discusses the potentials and limitations of sustainable procurement measures. The study is based on a qualitative and comparative approach, with empirical findings from 26 case stud-ies of Swedish public and private procurement organizations. These organizations operate in the sectors of hotels/ conference venues, transport, cinema, interior design, and hospitals/daycare. While this work demonstrates major challenges for buyers to take into account peripheral items in sustainable procurement, it also identifies constructive measures for moving forward. A general sustainability/environmental focus can, as an effect, spill over to areas per-ceived as peripheral. © 2014 Boström et al.

  • 34.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Örebro universitet.
    Gilek, Michael
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    IKEA and the Responsible Governance of Supply Chains: IKEA’s work on chemicals in textiles2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report focuses on IKEA’s management and communication surrounding sustainability in general and chemical risks specifically. IKEA’s work is analysed in relation to theoretical concepts around responsibility, supply chain, and governance . The report focuses on IKEA’s visions and organizational structures, its policy instruments to deal with chemical risks, supplier-relations and communication and learning. The study is based on previous scholarly literature, analyses of relevant documents, a field visit at a few of IKEA’s suppliers in southern India, as well as interviews with staff working at IKEA in Sweden. The report focuses on IKEA’s systems and processes for dealing with chemical risks, and not on the implementation of such measures in quantitative terms.

  • 35.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Grönholm, Sam
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Hassler, Björn
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    The Ecosystem Approach to Management in Baltic Sea Governance: Towards Increased Reflexivity?2016In: Environmental Governance of the Baltic Sea / [ed] Michael Gilek, Mikael Karlsson, Sebastian Linke, Katarzyna Smolarz, Springer, 2016, 1, p. 149-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter analyses the governance structures linked to the marine environment of the Baltic Sea. The purpose is to assess whether current developments of the governance structures have a potential to take into account requirements of an Ecosystem Approach to Management (EAM). We use the concept of reflexive governance to understand key components and weaknesses in contemporary governance modes, as well as to elaborate on possible pathways towards a governance mode more aligned with EAM. The reflexive governance framework highlights three elements: (1) acknowledgement of uncertainty and ambiguity; (2) a holistic approach in terms of scales, sectors and actors; and (3) acknowledgement of path dependency and incremental policy-making. Our analysis is based on a comparative case study approach, including analysis of the governance in five environmental risk areas: chemical pollution, overfishing, eutrophication, invasive alien species and pollution from shipping. The chapter highlights an existing governance mode that is ill-equipped to deal with the complexity of environmental problems in a holistic manner, with systematic attention to uncertainty, plurality of values, ambiguity and limited knowledge, while also pointing at important recent cognitive and institutional developments that can favour pathways towards reflexive governance and consequently EAM.

  • 36.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Lockie, S.
    James Cook University, Australia.
    Mol, A. P. J.
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Oosterveer, P.
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Sustainable and responsible supply chain governance: Challenges and opportunities2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 107, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces the Special Volume on sustainable and responsible supply chain governance. As globalized supply chains cross multiple regulatory borders, the firms involved in these chains come under increasing pressure from consumers, NGOs and governments to accept responsibility for social and environmental matters beyond their immediate organizational boundaries. Governance arrangements for global supply chains are therefore increasingly faced with sustainability requirements of production and consumption. Our primary objectives for this introductory paper are to explore the governance challenges that globalized supply chains and networks face in becoming sustainable and responsible, and thence to identify opportunities for promoting sustainable and responsible governance. In doing so, we draw on 16 articles published in this Special Volume of the Journal of Cleaner Production as well as upon the broader sustainable supply chain governance literature. We argue that the border-crossing nature of global supply chains comes with six major challenges (or gaps) in sustainability governance and that firms and others attempt to address these using a range of tools including eco-labels, codes of conduct, auditing procedures, product information systems, procurement guidelines, and eco-branding. However, these tools are not sufficient, by themselves, to bridge the geographical, informational, communication, compliance, power and legitimacy gaps that challenge sustainable global chains. What else is required? The articles in this Special Volume suggest that coalition and institution building on a broader scale is essential through, for example, the development of inclusive multi-stakeholder coalitions; flexibility to adapt global governance arrangements to local social and ecological contexts of production and consumption; supplementing effective monitoring and enforcement mechanisms with education and other programs to build compliance capacity; and integration of reflexive learning to improve governance arrangements over time. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 37.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Eco-standards, product labelling and green consumerism2008Book (Other academic)
  • 38. Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Framing, debating and standardising "natural food" in two different political contexts: Sweden and the U.S2003Report (Other academic)
  • 39. Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Hur översätts och förhandlas komplex kunskap till ett kategoriskt miljömärke2006In: Kloka regler?: Kunskap i regelsamhället / [ed] Karin Fernler & Claes-Fredrik Helgesson, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2006, p. 79-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40. Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Klintman, Mikael
    State-Centred versus Non-State-Driven Organic Food Standardization: A comparison of the U.S. and Sweden2006In: Agriculture and Human Values, ISSN 0889-048X, E-ISSN 1572-8366, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 163-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic food standardization is an increasingly important strategy for dealing with consumer concerns about the environment, animal welfare, health, and the economic structure of food production. But the ways in which this consumer-oriented strategy is introduced, organized, and debated vary considerably across countries. In Sweden, a nongovernmental organization [KRAV (Association for Control of Organic Production)] – consisting of social movement organizations, associations for conventional and organic farmers, and the food industry – has been quite successful in promoting organic food labeling as an eco-label. KRAV has developed a complementary position vis-à-vis the state and EU regulatory framework. In the US, the federal government controls standardization. The government frames the label as a “marketing label,” thus rejecting the idea that organic food production would have any significant advantages for the environment or, indirectly, for human health. This framing is separate from the ones created by organic constituencies, leading to deeper controversies than in Sweden. The purpose of this paper is to examine why standardization has followed different patterns in the two settings. We analyze context factors (i.e., political culture, pre-regulatory arrangements, and organizational structures) and process factors (i.e., framing and organizing). What are the benefits of a state-centric versus a nonstate-driven approach regarding powerful standardization? The paper shows that both settings provide not only “threats of regulatory occupation” from actors not committed to organic principles but also avenues for substantial standardization in the future, albeit through different channels.

  • 41.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Klintman, Mikael
    The green political consumer of food: A critical analysis of the research and policies2009In: Anthropology of Food, ISSN 1609-9168, E-ISSN 1609-9168, no Sept.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews the current literature on political and ethical consumers, and relates it to the topic of sustainable food consumption. A first aim is to problematise a somewhat simplistic view of the political and ethical consumer found in the literature. The paper sheds light on some of the dilemmas that confront green political consumers. We indicate that most existing studies say very little about consumers’ thoughts, assumptions, and reflections about green consumerism in general, and about green consumerist tools, such as green labels, more specifically. Based on a literature review, we draw a picture of the typical concerned consumer as reflective, uncertain and ambivalent. This is connected to a second aim of the paper: to discuss a gap or mismatch between the production side and consumption side of green (food) labels. We conclude the paper by suggesting that green and ethical information schemes could become much more in line with the reflective nature of green, political consumers. We relate this discussion to concepts such as sub-politics and meta-politics.

  • 42.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Rabe, Linn
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Rodela, Romina
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Environmental Non-Governmental Organizations and Transnational Collaboration in Two Regional Contexts: The Baltic Sea and Adriatic Sea Region2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Rabe, Linn
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Rodela, Romina
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Environmental non-governmental organizations and transnational collaboration: The Baltic Sea and Adriatic-Ionian Sea regions2015In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 762-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies of environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGO) have primarily taken place within a nation-state perspective without considering multiple levels of politics and governance. Because environmental problems are usually cross-border phenomena, environmental movements must develop transnational features to play constructive roles in politics and governance. This study contributes to the theorizing and study of transnationalization of ENGOs by illuminating the different regional conditions for this process. The conditions for ENGOs to develop transnational collaboration are explored by comparing ENGOs from six countries in two macro-regions: Sweden, Germany, and Poland in the Baltic Sea region, and Italy, Slovenia, and Croatia in the Adriatic-Ionian Sea region. Grounded in the literatures on social movement theory and ENGO transnationalization, the study identifies how different national, macro-regional, and European institutional structures shape the conditions under which ENGOs develop cross-border collaborations, and demonstrate the importance of long-term and dynamic interplay between processes that occur at the domestic and transnational levels.

  • 44. Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Sandstedt, Eva
    Är vi på rätt väg?2004In: Är vi på rätt väg?: Studier om miljöfrågans lösning / [ed] Boström, Magnus,Sandstedt, Eva, Stockholm: Formas , 2004, p. 193-209Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45. Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Sandstedt, Eva
    Är vi på rätt väg?: Studier om miljöfrågans lösning2004Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 46. Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Sandstedt, Eva
    Är vi på rätt väg?: Tendenser, möjligheter och problem2004In: Är vi på rätt väg?: Studier om miljöfrågans lösning / [ed] Magnus Boström, Eva Sandstedt, Stockholm: Formas , 2004, p. 193-209Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Stockholm University.
    Global Multi-Stakeholder Standard Setters: How fragile are they?2013In: Journal of Global Ethics, ISSN 1744-9626, E-ISSN 1744-9634, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 93-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Worldwide we see the rise of new non-state, ‘multi-stakeholder’ organizations setting standardsfor socially and environmentally responsible practices. A multi-stakeholder organization builds on the idea of assembling actors from diverse societal spheres into one rule-setting process, thereby combining their resources, competences, and experiences. These processes also allow competing interests to negotiate and deliberate about their different concerns in globalpolitical and ethical matters. This paper analyzes multi-stakeholder dynamics within three global standard setters: the Forest Stewardship Council, the Marine Stewardship Council, andthe work of the International Organization for Standardization on social responsibility (ISO26000). Although the multi-stakeholder organizational form facilitates the establishment oftransnational non-state authority, this very structure could also result in fragility. The key aim of this paper is to elaborate on this fragility with specific focus on how participatoryaspects within a multi-stakeholder context both contribute to and destabilize the authority of the multi-stakeholder organization. The paper contributes theoretically to current discussionsabout transnational governance in the making, and more specifically it adds nuance to thediscussion about the fragility of non-state authority as well as a critical perspective to the literature on multi-stakeholder arrangements.

  • 48.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    NGO power in global social and environmental standard setting2010In: Global Environmental Politics, ISSN 1526-3800, E-ISSN 1536-0091, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 36-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have seen a worldwide increase in new nonstate, multi-stakeholder organizations setting standards for socially and environmentally responsible behavior. These standard-setting arenas offer new channels for political participation for NGOs. Scholars have drawn attention to the rise and the role of NGOs in global politics, but there is less research on the power and long-term implications of NGO participation in transnational multi-stakeholder standard-setting. This article analyzes NGOs within three such global organizations: the Forest Stewardship Council, the Marine Stewardship Council, and the International Organization for Standardization on Social Responsibility. Using a power-based perspective, we demonstrate the impact that NGOs can have on multi-stakeholder work. In doing so, we analyze four types of NGO power: symbolic, cognitive, social, and monitoring power. The article further emphasizes institutional, structural, and discursive factors within multi-stakeholder organizations that create certain challenges to NGO power and participation in the longer term.

  • 49.
    Börjeson, Natasja
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro Universitet.
    Towards reflexive responsibility in a textile supply chain2017In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Dreyer, Marion
    et al.
    DIALOGIK Non-Profit Institute for Communication and Cooperation Research, Stuttgart, Germany .
    Boström, Magnus
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Participatory Deliberation, Risk Governance and Management of the Marine Region in the European Union2014In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 497-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe, marine environmental risks are governed in a complex multi-level system. The role that the marine region could or should play as a level of risk governance has attracted growing attention of late. In this context, reference has been made to the regional sea as one level at which participatory processes in the future governing of European Union's (EU) marine environment and resources are required. The paper unfolds the particular challenges that one faces when trying to implement stakeholder and citizen participatory deliberation at marine region level. The EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive is highlighted as a key European environmental policy initiative and participatory deliberation at regional sea level is underlined as a requirement for the Directive's successful implementation. The paper's account of participatory deliberation is informed by perspectives of inclusive risk governance and reflexive governance. The discussion of the challenges draws on the distinction between horizontal and vertical risk governance. The paper's main argument is that frequently encountered problems of participatory deliberation are exacerbated when deliberation is to be carried out at the regional sea level, i.e. at a large trans-boundary scale. These problems include the 'inclusivity-effectiveness dilemma', a fragmentation of participation efforts and a loose connection to actual decision-making.

12 1 - 50 of 67
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