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  • 1. Articus, Kristina
    et al.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Tibell, Leif
    Grube, Martin
    Wedin, Mats
    Ribosomal DNA and beta-tubulin data do not support the separation of the lichens Usnea florida and U-subfloridana as distinct species2002In: Mycological Research, ISSN 0953-7562, E-ISSN 1469-8102, Vol. 106, p. 412-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lichens Usnea florida and U. subfloridana have since long been recognised as distinct species. They show many similarities in morphology, but have different reproductive strategies. Usnea florida is always provided with many apothecia and produces no specialised asexual propagules. Usnea subfloridana has soralia, isidiomorphs and occasionally apothecia. Phylogenetic analyses based on continuous sequences of the ITS and LSU regions of the nuclear ribosomal DNA and the gene coding for beta-tubulin, show that specimens of the two species form one monophyletic group of intermixed specimens, and not two groups corresponding to morphology, which Would have been expected if two species were at hand. The 'species pair' concept in lichenology is discussed. Other Usnea species included in the study are: U. articulata, U. barbata, U. ceratina, U. filipendula. U. hirta, U. rigida and U. wasmuthii.

  • 2. Articus, Kristina
    et al.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science.
    Wedin, Mats
    Tibell, Leif
    Morphology and sequence data - conflict and concordance in a phylogeny of some European Usnea species2004Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Articus, Kristina
    et al.
    Belgian Biodiversity Platform, Université Libre de Bruxelles.
    Wedin, Mats
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Stockholm.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap, Biology.
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Grube, Martin
    Institute of plan sciences, University of Graz, Austria.
    Phylogenetic studies in Usnea.2000In: The Fourth IAL Symposium Progress and Problems in Lichenology at the Turn of the Millenium, Abstracts: 100. Barcelona., 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4. Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Fröberg, Lars
    Frödén, Patrik
    Knutsson, Tommy
    Lättman, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Lindblom, Louise
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Thell, Arne
    Westberg, Martin
    Professor Ingvar Karnefelt - a birthday tribute2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, p. 453-456Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Grube, Martin
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Wedin, Mats
    The sister group relation of Parmeliaceae (Lecanorales, Ascomycota)2007In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The family Parmeliaceae (Lecanorales, Ascomycota) is possibly the largest, best known and most thoroughly studied lichen family within its order. Despite this fact the relationship between Parmeliaceae and other groups in Lecanorales is still poorly known. The aim of the present study is to contribute to finding the sister group of Parmeliaceae as an aid in future studies on the phylogeny and character evolution of the group. We do this by sampling all potential relatives to the Parmeliaceae that we have identified, i.e. Cypsoplaca, Japewia, Mycoblastus, Protoparmelia, and Tephromela, a good representation of the major groups within the Parmeliaceae s. lat. and a good representation of other taxa in the core Lecanorales. We use molecular data from two genes, the large subunit of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (nrLSU) and the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA gene (mrSSU), and a Bayesian analysis of the combined data. The results show that the closest relatives to Parmeliaceae are the two genera Protoparmelia and Gypsoplaca, which are crustose lichens. Parmeliaceae in our sense is a well supported group, including also the family segregates Alectoriaceae, Hypogymniaceae, Usneaceae and Anziaceae.

  • 6.
    Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    University of Lund.
    Ekman, Stefan
    University of Lund.
    Lindblom, Louise
    University of Lund.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    University of Lund.
    High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), an improved technique for screening lichen substances.1993In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 25, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ceken, Fatma
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    The use of the theory of conceptual profiles to assess learning outcome2016In: Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2015 Conference: Science education research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, Part 16 / [ed] J. Lavonen, K. Juuti, J. Lampiselkä, A. Uitto & K. Hahl (Eds.); co-eds. P. Kariotoglou & T. Russell, Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2016, p. 2716-2721Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Schools Inspectorate (2012) made an evaluation of the quality in science teaching in year 1–3 in the Swedish compulsory school. Large differences were found among the 30 schools studied. Often teaching only consisted of mediating facts or experiments made by the teacher. The students rarely got an opportunity to learn through systematic investigations. Less than 60% of the lessons observed involved activities were the students to large extent met scientific methods. Also, good examples were found in schools were the teachers consciously let the students make hypotheses about what will happen in an experiment. In many schools the teacher use readymade teaching packages. Generally, they consist of instructions for how series of lessons with different themes may be planned and performed by using the material included. Some of the packages also include education of the teachers. According to the School Inspectorate teachers without education in science claim that with help of the packages they have been able to teach in all areas of school science. Teachers sometime use the packages as inspiration, but chose other methods for their teaching. The purpose of this study was to examine how students in primary school use concepts and to study their conceptual development during two sequences of lessons, primarily based on the student’s own documentations. Written diaries and reports of the students were analysed in order to construct their conceptual profiles and to follow their development. The assessment of the performances in relation to the knowledge requirement evaluated students ability to discuss simple questions concerning chemical processes, plan simple experiments and formulate simple question. The study shows that observations, discussions, and written documentation of simple experiments promotes conceptual development.

  • 8. Crespo, Ana
    et al.
    Kauff, Frank
    Divakar, Pradeep K.
    del Prado, Ruth
    Perez-Ortega, Sergio
    Amo de Paz, Guillermo
    Ferencova, Zuzana
    Blanco, Oscar
    Roca-Valiente, Beatriz
    Nunez-Zapata, Jano
    Cubas, Paloma
    Argueello, Arturo
    Elix, John A.
    Esslinger, Theodore L.
    Hawksworth, David L.
    Millanes, Ana
    Carmen Molina, M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Ahti, Teuvo
    Aptroot, Andre
    Barreno, Eva
    Bungartz, Frank
    Calvelo, Susana
    Candan, Mehmet
    Cole, Mariette
    Ertz, Damien
    Goffinet, Bernard
    Lindblom, Louise
    Luecking, Robert
    Lutzoni, Francois
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Ines Messuti, Maria
    Miadlikowska, Jolanta
    Piercey-Normore, Michele
    Rico, Victor J.
    Sipman, Harrie J. M.
    Schmitt, Imke
    Spribille, Toby
    Thell, Arne
    Thor, Goran
    Upreti, Dalip K.
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    Phylogenetic generic classification of parmelioid lichens (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota) based on molecular, morphological and chemical evidence2010In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 1735-1753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parmelioid lichens are a diverse and ubiquitous group of foliose lichens. Generic delimitation in parmelioid lichens has been in a state of flux since the late 1960s with the segregation of the large, heterogeneous genus Parmelia into numerous smaller genera. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies have demonstrated that some of these new genera were monophyletic, some were not, and others, previously believed to be unrelated, fell within single monophyletic groups, indicating the need for a revision of the generic delimitations. This study aims to give an overview of current knowledge of the major clades of all parmelioid lichens. For this, we assembled a dataset of 762 specimens, including 31 of 33 currently accepted parmelioid genera (and 63 of 84 accepted genera of Parmeliaceae). We performed maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of combined datasets including two, three and four loci. Based on these phylogenies and the correlation of morphological and chemical characters that characterize monophyletic groups, we accept 27 genera within nine main clades. We re-circumscribe several genera and reduce Parmelaria to synonymy with Parmotrema. Emodomelanelia Divakar & A. Crespo is described as a new genus (type: E. masonii). Nipponoparmelia (Kurok.) K.H. Moon, Y. Ohmura & Kashiw. ex A. Crespo & al. is elevated to generic rank and 15 new combinations are proposed (in the genera Flavoparmelia, Parmotrema, Myelochroa, Melanelixia and Nipponoparmelia). A short discussion of the accepted genera is provided and remaining challenges and areas requiring additional taxon sampling are identified.

  • 9. Crespo, Ana
    et al.
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Blanco, Oscar
    Divakar, Pradeep K.
    Articus, Kristina
    Wiklund, Elisabeth
    Bawingan, Paulina A.
    Wedin, Mats
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Testing morphology-based hypotheses of phylogenetic relationships in Parmeliaceae (Ascomycota) using three ribosomal markers and the nuclear RPB1 gene2007In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 812-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parmeliaceae is the largest family of lichen-forming fungi with more than 2000 species and includes taxa with different growth forms. Morphology was widely employed to distinguish groups within this large, cosmopolitan family. In this study we test these morphology-based groupings using DNA sequence data from three nuclear and one mitochondrial marker from 1.20 taxa that include 59 genera and represent the morphological and chemical diversity in this lineage. Parmeliaceae is strongly supported as monophyletic and six well-supported main clades can be distinguished within the family. The relationships among them remain unresolved. The clades largely agree with the morphology-based groupings and only the placement of four of the genera studied is rejected by molecular data, while four other genera belong to clades previously unrecognised. The classification of these previously misplaced genera, however, has already been questioned by some authors based on morphological evidence. These results support morphological characters as important for the identification of monophyletic clades within Parmeliaceae.

  • 10.
    Dahlman, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Westberg, Martin
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Palmkvist, Kristin
    Umeå universitet.
    Choice of photobiont is more important than geographical origin or morphology in determining resource levels and metabolic capacity of lichens.2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Divakar, Pradeep K.
    et al.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Crespo, Ana
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist..
    Leavitt, Steven D.
    Field Museum, Chicago, USA..
    Hawksworth, David L.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Myllys, Leena
    Univ Helsinki, Bot Museum, Finnish Museum Nat Hist, Helsinki, Finland..
    McCune, Bruce
    Oregon State Univ, Corvallis, USA..
    Randlane, Tiina
    Univ Tartu, Tartu, Estonia..
    Bjerke, Jarle W.
    High North Res Ctr Climate & Environm, Norwegian Inst Nat Res NINA, FRAM, Tromso, Norway..
    Ohmura, Yoshihito
    Natl Museum Nat & Sci, Tsukuba, Japan..
    Schmitt, Imke
    Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr BiK F, Frankfurt, Germany.;Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Dept Biol Sci, Inst Ecol Evolut & Div, D-60438 Frankfurt, Germany..
    Boluda, Carlos G.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Alors, David
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Roca-Valiente, Beatriz
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Del-Prado, Ruth
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Ruibal, Constantino
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Buaruang, Kawinnat
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.;Ramkhamhang Univ, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Nunez-Zapata, Jano
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Amo de Paz, Guillermo
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Rico, Victor J.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Carmen Molina, M.
    Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain..
    Elix, John A.
    Australian Natl Univ, Canberra, Australia..
    Esslinger, Theodore L.
    N Dakota State Univ, Fargo, USA..
    Tronstad, Inger Kristin K.
    Univ Tromso, Arctic Univ Norway, Tromso Univ Museum, Tromso, Norway..
    Lindgren, Hanna
    Univ Helsinki, Bot Museum, Finnish Museum Nat Hist, Helsinki, Finland..
    Ertz, Damien
    Natl Bot Garden Belgium, Meise, Belgium..
    Gueidan, Cecile
    Nat Hist Museum, London, England..
    Saag, Lauri
    Univ Tartu, Tartu, Estonia..
    Mark, Kristiina
    Univ Tartu, Tartu, Estonia..
    Singh, Garima
    Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr BiK F, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Dal Grande, Francesco
    Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr BiK F, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Parnmen, Sittiporn
    Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA.;Minist Publ Hlth, Nonthaburi, Thailand..
    Beck, Andreas
    Botan Staatssammlung, Munich, Germany..
    Benatti, Michel Navarro
    Inst Bot, Nucleo Pesquisa Micol, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil..
    Blanchon, Dan
    Unitec Inst Technol, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Candan, Mehmet
    Anadolu Univ, Eskisehir, Turkey..
    Clerc, Philippe
    Conservatoire & Jardin Bot Ville Geneve, Chambesy, Switzerland..
    Goward, Trevor
    Univ British Columbia, UBC Herbarium, Beaty Museum, Vancouver, Canada..
    Grube, Martin
    Karl Franzens Univ Graz, Graz, Austria..
    Hodkinson, Brendan P.
    Univ Penn, , Philadelphia, USA..
    Hur, Jae-Seoun
    Sunchon Natl Univ, Korean Lichen Res Inst, Sunchon, South Korea..
    Kantvilas, Gintaras
    Tasmanian Herbarium, Hobart, Australia..
    Kirika, Paul M.
    Natl Museums Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Lendemer, James
    New York Bot Garden, Bronx, USA..
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Ines Messuti, Maria
    Univ Comahue, CONICET, San Carlos De Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentina..
    Miadlikowska, Jolanta
    Duke Univ, Dept Biol, Durham, USA..
    Nelsen, Matthew
    Field Museum, Chicago, USA..
    Ohlson, Jan I.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist..
    Perez-Ortega, Sergio
    CSIC, Museo Nacl Ciencias Nat, Madrid, Spain..
    Saag, Andres
    Univ Tartu, Tartu, Estonia..
    Sipman, Harrie J. M.
    Free Univ Berlin, Berlin, Germany..
    Sohrabi, Mohammad
    Iranian Res Org Sci & Technol, Tehran, Iran..
    Thell, Arne
    Lund Univ..
    Thor, Goran
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Truong, Camille
    Conservatoire & Jardin Bot Ville Geneve, CH-1292 Chambesy, Switzerland..
    Yahr, Rebecca
    Royal Bot Gardens, Edinburgh EH3 5LR, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Upreti, Dalip K.
    CSIR, Natl Bot Res Inst, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh, India..
    Cubas, Paloma
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    Field Museum, Chicago, USA..
    Evolution of complex symbiotic relationships in a morphologically derived family of lichen-forming fungi2015In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 208, no 4, p. 1217-1226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the evolutionary history of the Parmeliaceae (Lecanoromycetes, Ascomycota), one of the largest families of lichen-forming fungi with complex and variable morphologies, also including several lichenicolous fungi. We assembled a six-locus data set including nuclear, mitochondrial and low-copy protein-coding genes from 293 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The lichenicolous lifestyle originated independently three times in lichenized ancestors within Parmeliaceae, and a new generic name is introduced for one of these fungi. In all cases, the independent origins occurred c. 24 million yr ago. Further, we show that the Paleocene, Eocene and Oligocene were key periods when diversification of major lineages within Parmeliaceae occurred, with subsequent radiations occurring primarily during the Oligocene and Miocene. Our phylogenetic hypothesis supports the independent origin of lichenicolous fungi associated with climatic shifts at the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Moreover, diversification bursts at different times may be crucial factors driving the diversification of Parmeliaceae. Additionally, our study provides novel insight into evolutionary relationships in this large and diverse family of lichen-forming ascomycetes.

  • 12. Eriksen, Bente
    et al.
    Bölter, Manfred
    Breen, Karen
    Henry, Greg
    Lévesque, Esther
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Parker, Carolyn L.
    Rayback, Shelly
    Environment and site descriptions of an ecological baseline study in the Canadian Arctic: The tundra northwest expedition 1999 (Nunavut and Northwest Territories, Canada2003In: Polarforschung, ISSN 0032-2490, Vol. 73, no 2/3, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Grube, Martin
    et al.
    Graz university, Austria.
    Gutmann, B.
    Graz university, Austria.
    Arup, Ulf
    Graz university, Austria.
    Rios, A. de los
    Graz university, Austria.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Uppsala university.
    Wedin, Mats
    Natural History Museum, London.
    An exceptional group I intron-like insertion in SSU rDNA of lichen mycobionts1999In: Current Genetics, ISSN 0172-8083, E-ISSN 1432-0983, Vol. 35, p. 536-541Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Heidmarsson, Starri
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Uppsala universitet.
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala universitet.
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala universitet.
    Santesson, Rolf
    Uppsala universitet.
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Classification of lichen photomorphs1997In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, no 46, p. 519-520Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kärnefelt, Ingvar
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Lunds universitet.
    Thell, Arne
    Lunds universitet.
    Evolution and phylogeny of cetrarioid lichens1992In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 183, no 1-2, p. 113-160Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Kärnefelt, Ingvar
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Lunds universitet.
    Thell, Arne
    Lunds universitet.
    The lichen genera Arctocetraria, Cetraria, and Cetrariella (Parmeliaceae) and their presumed evolutionary affinities1993In: The Bryologist, ISSN 0007-2745, E-ISSN 1938-4378, no 96, p. 394-404Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lorentsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala university.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Uppsala university.
    New reports of soredia dispersed by ants, Formica cunicularia1999In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 31, p. 204-207Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Lättman, Håkan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Hedlund, Johanna
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Krikorev, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Olsson, Niklas
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Rönnmark, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    At what age becomes Cliostomum corrugatum adult?2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to investigate at what the age specimen of Cliostomum corrugatum become fertile in order to estimate the time span between the meiosis events. The species has its main distribution in Europe but has also been found on the west coast of British Columbia and is red listed, e.g., in Sweden (nearly threatened), Denmark, Germany and England. In the province of Östergötland, southern Sweden it is most frequent on old Quercus robur trees in open oak forest or meadows. I may also be found on other deciduous trees as Ulmus and Fraxinus species. It is mainly groving on the flat terminal parts of the rough bark of the tree trunks and not on the sides of the cracks. Cliostomum corrugatum does not grow on young oak trees. The smallest tree trunk diameter with Cliostomum corrugatum was is 0.65 m, a tree of at least 100 years of age. On two localities in Östergötland all oaks were studied and the size of the trees and the size of the largest thallus of Cliostomum corrugatum were recorded. Out of this data the size of how small a tree can possibly be for hosting Cliostomum corrugatum. This estimate was compared with the size of the smallest thalli with apothecia and the size of trees on which these appeared. With knowledge of the peripheral secondary growth of oaks it was possible to estimate the age of the youngest fertile Cliostomum corrugatum to about 30 years. Thus, equal to the time span between two meiosis events.

  • 19.
    Lättman, Håkan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Lindblom, Louise
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Milberg, Per
    Skage, Morten
    Ekman, Stefan
    Estimating the dispersal capacity of the rare lichen Cliostomum corrugatum2009In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 142, no 8, p. 1870-1878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to estimate the dispersal rate in an organism assumed to be confined to tree stands with unbroken continuity. We used the lichen-forming ascomycete Cliostomum corrugatum, which is largely confined to old oak stands. Five populations, with pairwise distances ranging from 6.5 to 83 km, were sampled in Ostergotland, south-eastern Sweden. DNA sequence data from an intron in the small subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA gene was obtained from 85 samples. Nearly all molecular variance (99.6%) was found within populations and there were no signs of isolation-by-distance. The absolute number of immigrants per population per generation (estimated to 30 years), inferred by Bayesian MCMC, was found to be between 1 and 5. Altogether, evidence suggests abundant gene flow in the history of our sample. A simulation procedure demonstrated that we cannot know whether effective dispersal is ongoing or if it ceased at the time when oaks started to decrease dramatically around 400 years BP. However, a scenario where effective dispersal ceased already at the time when the postglacial reinvasion of oak had reached the region around 6000 years BP is unlikely. Vegetation history suggests that the habitat of C. corrugatum was patchily distributed in the landscape since the early Holocene. Combined with the high dispersal rate estimate, this suggests that the species has been successful at frequently crossing distances of at least several kilometres and possibly that it has primarily been limited by the availability of habitat rather than by dispersal.

  • 20.
    Lättman, Håkan
    et al.
    Physics, matematics and biology, Linköping, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Department of Biology, Bergen, Norway.
    Genetic variation in the SSU intron and the dispersal and migration history in Sweden of Cliostomum corrugatum2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim with this study is to determine genetic variation, dispersal potential and the migration history to Sweden since the last glaciation of the rare lichen Cliostomum corrugatum, a crustose epiphytic lichen with a grey greenish thallus,conspicuous light yellow to light brown apothecia and black pycnidia. Collections were made in January and February in 2005 at five sites in Östergötland, Sweden. The most frequent common habitat for Cliostomum corrugatumis on Quercus and sometimes also on other deciduous trees for example Ulmus and Fraxinus. On the tree trunk it is the rough bark it prefers and the flat terminal parts of the bark structure and not on the sides of the cracks. The main distribution of Cliostomum corrugatum is in Europe but a satellite population has been found on the west coast of North American in British Columbia. It is red listed in Sweden, with the status near threatened. Three sequences SSUintron, IGS and ITS were studied and the two latter appear to lack genetic variation. A total of 85 sequences with a length of 614 base pairs were studied of a rRNA SSU intron. Eleven haplotypes were detected, two was common 46 and 30 in numbers respectively and was present on all five localities the other nine were detected only once each. The two common haplotypes are in the centre of a rooted net work and the rare in the periphery. Cliostomum corrugatum does not seem to have problem with its dispersal. The limiting factor seems to be the occurrence big oaks. In the studied area the smallest tree trunk diameter that Cliostomum corrugatum was found on is 0,65 metre. The tree with the largest diameter in the research area is 1,65 metre. A tree that is 0,65 metre in diameter is at least 100 years old. Oaks of this age are scarce and this is one of the reasons for the rareness of Cliostomum corrugatum. When Cliostomum corrugatum colonized Sweden after the last ice age, all eleven haplotypes may already have existed. However, it is possible, that some haplotypes evolved after the migration to Östergötland.

  • 21.
    Lättman, Håkan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science, Biology.
    Milberg, Per
    IFM Biology, Conservation Ecology Group, Linköping University.
    Rapid changes in the epiphytic macrolichen flora in southern Sweden2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Lättman, Håkan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Milberg, Per
    Palmer, Michael W.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Changes in the distributions of epiphytic lichens in southern Sweden using a new statistical method2009In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 413-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Past studies on changes in species distribution have mainly been based on analysis of range boundaries. In contrast, the method used here evaluates shifts in species' geographic centroids within a predefined area. We used presence/absence data on epiphytic lichens collected 1986 and 2003 from 64 sites in southern Sweden. A centroid was calculated each year, for each lichen species and substrate. The distance of centroid movement was evaluated in a permutation procedure. In total, 56 lichen species on 22 tree species were involved in the analyses, yielding 30 cases that had sufficient sample sizes both years to be evaluated. Out of these, three exhibited a significant movement of their centroid. The shift of lichen centroids of Hypogymnia physodes (L.) Nyl. and Vulpicida pinastri (Scop.) J.-E. Mattsson & M. J. Lai on the tree species Juniperus communis L. was 50 and 151 km with the direction 27 degrees and 48 degrees, respectively. For Hypogymnia physodes on Pinus sylvestris L., corresponding values were 41 km and 30 degrees. The northnortheast shifts of these species in Sweden could be a response to a warming climate.

  • 23.
    Lönn, Mikael
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Results and Comparison of Different Complementary Assessment Methods of Science Learning Outcome2015In: Conference proceedings. New perspectives in science education, 4th ed., Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2015, p. -5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To assess the quality of different aspects of the learning outcomes in relation to knowledge requirements as results of teaching several assessment methods have to be used. For most teachers it is also obvious that students differ in their ability to demonstrate the learning outcome depending on the assessment method used. In order to compare different assessment methods of the learning outcome of pre-school teacher students’ different types of tasks were evaluated and compared in order to identify the potential of each method to give the students fair chances of showing their skills. Thus, assessments based on multiple choice questionnaires of different types, long answer questions, practical laboratory experiments, experiment construction and the students ability to evaluate experiment plans were compared. Having Swedish as mother tongue also was included as an explanatory variable since we suspected that some of the assessment methods in reality rather evaluates the linguistic skills in interpreting texts rather than evaluating the content knowledge of the subject. The results for each student when different methods were used were compared in order to evaluate if some of the methods for assessment gave similar results or if the methods induced differences in the results for the same student. We use ordination techniques to assess and visualize main trends in the data and linear models and classification trees to evaluate specific associations. There is correlation between results from several assessment methods, there are positive correlation between combinations of results from long answers, experiment and experiment construction, meaning students who showed good results with one method did so also with the others - but in some comparisons like long answer questions and multiple choice questions good results were independent of each other. There was a negative effect of having a non-Swedish mother tongue on the results in multiple choice questionnaires, but a positive effect of a non-Swedish mother tongue on the combined scores on experimental construction and experiment. Linear models show that good achievements in experimental construction are explained by high summed scores of Doll´s criteria, the four R’s richness, recursion, relations, and rigor.

  • 24. Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    A monograph of the genus Vulpicida (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycetes)1993Book (Refereed)
  • 25. Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Lichen proteins, secondary products and morphology: A review of protein studies in lichens with special emphasis on taxonomy1994In: Journal of the Hattori Botanical Laboratory, ISSN 0073-0912, Vol. 76, p. 235-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Lichenes Austroamericani ex Herbario Regnelliano: Fasc. 20–221999Book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Promoting interest in lichenology: a responsibility for all of us2007In: IAL Newsletter, ISSN 0300-6883, no 2, p. 15-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Uppsala universitet.
    Proposal to conserve Lichen juniperinus L. with a conserved type (Fungi)1994In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 43, p. 655-656Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Lunds universitet.
    Protein banding patterns in some American and European species of Cetraria1991In: The Bryologist, ISSN 0007-2745, E-ISSN 1938-4378, Vol. 94, p. 261-269Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science.
    Articus, Kristina
    The monophyletic groups of cetrarioid lichens2004In: Contributions to lichen taxonomy and biogeography: dedicated to Leif Tibell / [ed] Göran Thor, Anders Nordin, Inga Hedberg, Uppsala: Acta Upsaliensis Universitatis , 2004, p. 237-244Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science.
    Articus, Kristina
    Wiklund, Elisabeth
    Wedin, Mats
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    The monophyletic groups in the Parmeliaceae2004Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Hansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Lindblom, Louise
    University of Bergen, Museum of Natural History.
    Genetic diversity and substrate preferences in Hypogymnia physodes in northern Europe2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic variation in lichens has mainly been examined in rare or threatened species or species with an otherwise fragmented geographical distribution. The main objectives have often been to compare the diversity between populations in relation to nature conservation issues. In addition, most studied species are sexual reproductive and, hence, produce small spores which may disperse over long distances. More common species have usually been neglected, although they are more easily collected, both because collecting results in a comparatively small disturbance of the populations and because they occur in a larger selection of habitats. Here we present a study on the genetic variation in the lichenized ascomycete Hypogymnia physodes in Northern Europe based on nrDNA data. The species was selected as it probably is the most common lichen in the area, it is corticolous, found on almost all woody plants in most habitats, and has a predominantly asexual dispersal mode. The material was collected in Estonia, Finland, and Sweden as a part of a larger project aiming at identifying localities with high biodiversity of interest for nature conservation projects. We examined the correlations between genetic diversity and substrate ecology as well as spatial distances. An important result is the large genetic variation within a mainly asexual lichen species. The results also show genetic similarity between specimens from similar substrates.

  • 33.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Hansson, Anne-Charlotte
    Lindblom, Louise
    Genetic variation in relation to substratum preferences of Hypogymnia physodes2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, p. 547-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic variability and its relationship to substratum preferences within and among populations of the sorediate foliose lichen Hypogymnia physodes was investigated using sequence variation in the complete nrDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. A few samples of the putatively closely related, sorediate, H. tubulosa were also included. Samples were collected from each tree species in study sites in Estonia, Finland, and Sweden. In total, DNA sequences from 104 individuals of H. physodes and 16 of H. tubulosa were obtained. A group I intron situated at the end of the small subunit (SSU) of the nrDNA was detected in both species. Within-species variability was observed in both species: fifteen haplotypes were found for H. physodes and seven for H. tubulosa for the combined alignment of the intron and the ITS. Possible recombination within the total gene fragment was detected and hence the different regions (intron, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2) were analysed separately. They show a different degree of variability both between each other and between the species. The number of haplotypes of H. physodes in the four regions are 5, 5, 1, and 5 and for H. tubulosa 5, 2, 1 and 2, respectively. A statistical parsimony estimation resulted in two unconnected networks; one containing all the samples of H. physodes and one containing all H. tubulosa samples. It was not possible to show different potentials of the different haplotypes for establishment on different substrata as the network of H. physodes indicates recombination within the ITS region which may be frequent enough to make this primarily clonally reproducing species to behave like a sexual species.

  • 34. Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Lai, M. J.
    A key to the species of Vulpicida: LIAS - a DELTA-based determination and data storage system for lichenized and lichenicolous Ascomycetes.1996Other (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Lai, Ming-Jou
    Vulpicida, a new genus in Parmeliaceae (Lichenized Ascomycetes)1993In: Mycotaxon, ISSN 0093-4666, E-ISSN 2154-8889, Vol. 46, p. 425-428Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science.
    Lättman, Håkan
    Chaos and order in teaching and research2004In: Contributions to lichen taxonomy and biogeography: dedicated to Leif Tibell / [ed] Göran Thor, Anders Nordin, Inga Hedberg, Uppsala: Acta Upsaliensis Universitatis , 2004, p. 245-255Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Lättman, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Divakar, Pradeep
    Complutense University, Madrid, Spain.
    Crespo, Ana
    Complutense University, Madrid, Spain.
    The Parmelia saxatilis complex: Parmelia serrana new to Sweden2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Lättman, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. Linköpings universitet.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköpings universitet.
    Rapid changes in the epiphytic macrolichen flora on sites in southern Sweden2006In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 38, p. 323-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A relatively quick and simple method is presented for monitoring changes in distribution and in site and substratum preferences of epiphytic macrolichens; the method also records the natural turnover of common species. Changes in the epiphytic lichen flora in southern Sweden were recorded at 64 sites in 1986 and again in 2003. In total 1990 observations of lichens were recorded on 15 tree species, mainly on trunks but also on branches up to 2 in above the ground. Almost all species showed a high turnover with regard to substratum, including very abundant species such as Hypogymnia physodes. Many of the species had changed substratum within their sites, possibly reflecting a general change in the ecological quality of sites. Canonical Correspondence Analysis was used to extract the variation in species composition over time, using 1685 records of 55 lichen species on 8 different substrata. Some species such as Hypogymnia tubulosa had increased in abundance whilst others such as Vulpicida pinastri had decreased.

  • 39.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Art studies as tools for understanding observations in science2017In: Conference proceedings New perspectives in science education: 6th Conference Edition: Florence, Italy: 16-17 March 2017, Limena: Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2017, p. 513-516Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations are fundamental in science as they has to include cognitive activities based on the perceived sensations. These activities have to be transformed to written or spoken language. In order to practice and visualize these processes we present a method based on Roland Barthes concepts studium and punctum. About 60 students aiming at becoming primary school teachers (years 4–6) were followed during a period of the first two years of their education. The results on all course examinations during these years (n=17) were compared to the quality of two reflective texts. One from the end of the first year on the impression of art works by David Hockney or Bill Viola, another of experiences from field sites used at the beginning of their studies. They wrote reflections on their experiences including observations and their personal and professional development during their teacher training. The texts where analysed by using the 4 R’s of Doll’s. Results of VARK tests assessing the learning style of the students from the beginning of their education were used. The choice of science courses can be shown to be correlated to different factors depending of the selection of these but there was no general pattern behind the choice of science. Training of observation in different contexts and reflections on these in relation to personal development seem to promote better professional understanding.

  • 40.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching.
    To communicate the theory of evolution to all from babies to adults2017In: Conexão Ciencia, ISSN 1980-7058, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 408-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching evolution is a tricky business. Less teaching seems to give better understanding of the theory. Evolutionary processes are dialectic relations between many actors, individuals, groups, abiotic and biotic factors etc., different from mechanistic descriptions of relations between singular objects in other scientific theories. This difference, in combination with religious beliefs confuses efforts to get understanding and acceptance of the theory of evolution. With the new curriculum for Swedish compulsory school, science education has to be linked to students’ own experiences in order to promote critical thinking and skills useable in daily life. Further, biology in science teaching during the first school years is focused on general observations and fundamental concepts, not on scientific methods and evolutionary processes. Thus, students often experience biology as a subject filled with facts about simple relations and teleological explanations, making the theory of evolution superfluous. The objectives here were to design teaching in evolutionary theory adapted to the professional needs of students and to assess the learning outcome. Three different courses in evolutionary theory were included. Two pre-service teacher training programs, for nursery school and for year 4–6 in the compulsory school, and one for students in environmental studies were included. Assessments of learning outcome were made by analyses of texts written by the students. The quality of the science knowledge content and the personal and professional development were assessed by using the 4 R’s of Doll. Associations between concepts and understanding were evaluated using clustering and ordination statistical techniques. The learning outcome was good showing visible progressions in the understanding. Thus, it is important to assess the understanding of concepts rather than estimating their frequency in students texts.

  • 41.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Aim: To practise scientific methods. Result: Personal development2014In: Ebook proceedings of the ESERA 2013 Conference: Science Education Research For Evidence-based Teaching andCoherence in Learning / [ed] Constantinou, C. P., Papadouris, N. & Hadjigeorgiou, A. : (co-ed. Avraamidou, L. and Michelini, M.), Nicosia, Cypern: European Science Education Research Association , 2014, p. 2410-2417Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field work in a teacher training program was focussed on the collection and presentation of data showing changes in the environment depending on variable factors. The observations should be possible to use as models for studies performed by children at school. The instructions were sparse and many of the observations from the first visit to the sites were impossible to repeat. The first four observations were made during autumn every month while the last was made in late spring sixteen months later. After this the students wrote short reflections on their impressions and experiences during the last visit compared to the earlier ones. These were analysed in order to reveal the impact on the students. Most of the students were very uncertain about what to do the first time. Almost none of them complained about this afterwards. Many were astonished over their own incapability of understanding or declared their lack of understanding general ideas. Many students wrote about strong emotions when returning to a familiar site that appeared to have changed and described how this created a strong attachment to the site. What was more surprising was that some students experienced their own development, in some cases towards becoming a teacher but also on a more private or personal level. They not only recognized themselves as the inexperienced student from the first visit and what was achieved later. They also realized how the relation between themselves and the site had a chronological development in accordance with their own development. The simple activity of field observations in combination with personal reflection created complicated processes beneficial for the student.

    Thus, we achieved and observed unexpected results together with what was expected.

  • 42.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Betygsättning av naturvetenskap enligt 2011 års läroplaner: Workshop2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bedömningstillfällen i naturvetenskap vid lärarutbildning som kan användas i skolan

    Inom lärarutbildningen vid Södertörns högskola har vi inom de naturvetenskapliga ämnena sedan flera år arbetat med olika typer av bedömningstillfällen vid examinationen av studenter. Oftast är dessa bedömningstillfällen konstruerade för att vara examinerande av olika lärandemål som representerar önskade didaktiska förmågor hos den blivande läraren. De kan därför samtidigt fungera som modeller för hur man som lärare kan arbeta inom grund- och gymnasieskolan för bedömning av elevers förmågor. Förutom muntliga och skriftliga redovisningar kan dessa t.ex. bestå av redovisande exkursioner i natur- eller kulturmiljöer, laborationer, självreflektioner, traditionella eller estetiska loggböcker, självdiagnoser med kamratbedömning, museivisningar och webbaserade laborationer. För att studenterna skall få motsvarande träning har undervisningen på högskolan i allt högre utsträckning utvecklats från föreläsningar och demonstrativa laborationer och exkursioner mot många olika typer av interaktiva aktiviteter. Motsvarande utveckling återspeglas internationellt där sedan tio år den traditionella läroboken med beskrivande texter som skall läsas och läras ersatts av läromedel, fortfarande ofta i bokform, som ger anvisningar om hur studenter tillsammans kan arbeta med sin kunskapsutveckling, genom exempel, arbetsuppgifter, diskussionsfrågor, problematiseringar, lärande diagnoser etc.

    Bedömning av naturvetenskap enligt Lgr 11 och Lgy 11

    I de nya läroplanerna Lgr 11 och Lgy 11 skall elevers förmåga, att använda sina kunskaper, användas som grund för betygsättningen. Detta innebär stora förändringar jämfört med tidigare betygsystem där fokus oftast låg på bedömning utifrån elevers redovisning av kunskaper inhämtade från olika typer av läromedel. Enkelt uttryckt kan man säga att tidigare bedömningar försökte värdera elevens förmögenhet i form av samlad (minnes)kunskap medan dagens läroplaner fokuserar på bedömning av elevers förmåga att använda sina kunskaper inom olika områden. Det har följaktligen skett en stor förändring i synsättet på det som skall bedömas och hur detta kan genomföras vilket även får konsekvenser för undervisningen.

    Av reportage, diskussioner och andra inslag i massmedia framkommer att många, även rutinerade lärare, har svårt att förstå hur de skall arbeta med lärande bedömning och vill ha klarare anvisningar och exempel.

    Lärande bedömning

    Jönsson (Lärande bedömning, 2012) beskriver hur undervisning bör planeras utifrån den bedömning av förmågor baserade på betygskriterier som läraren skall utföra. Till skillnad från tidigare där undervisningen först planerades och genomfördes och där resultatet slutligen bedömdes genom skrivningar eller förhör utgår Jönsson från bedömningen och utformar undervisningen utifrån denna. I korthet ser modellen ut så här:

    Läraren konstruerar utifrån betygskriterierna ett bedömningstillfälle (performance assessment) och skapar en bedömningsmatris inför observationen av nivån på de förmågor hos eleven som skall bedömas. Det är inte nödvändigt att betrakta en viss handling, bedömningen kan göras genom av produkter som eleven producerar. Därefter planeras undervisningen dvs. de tillfällen där eleverna skall få möjlighet att träna de förmågor som skall bedömas.

    Workshop med olika bedömningstillfällen i naturvetenskap

    Vi kommer att i mindre grupper genomföra olika bedömningstillfällen anpassade till de nya betygskriterierna och med användande av olika metoder som samtidigt kan utgöra exempel på hur man t.ex. kan arbeta med estetiska lärprocesser (ELP), IKT, laborationer, kamratbedömning utifrån de nya läroplanernas betygskriterier för naturvetenskapliga ämnen inkl. naturgeografi. De modellerar bedömningstillfällen men blir samtidigt exempel på hur man kan arbeta med undervisning enligt de nya läroplanerna. Alla kan inte få pröva allt men genom att erbjuda ett antal olika moment kan deltagarna snabbt få en inblick i olika sätt att bedöma elevers utvecklingsnivå utifrån betygskriterierna. Den tid som krävs vid bedömning, enligt den nu i läroplanerna introducerade betygsskalan, där flera färdigheter förekommer i olika former i flera ämnen, medför ett behov av bedömning av kvaliteten hos flera färdigheter under samma bedömningstillfälle. Därför kommer exemplen i hög utsträckning vara ämnesintegrerade och med vissa modifieringar kunna användas i olika årskurser.

  • 43.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Conceptual profiles for Doll’s four R's.2016In: Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2015 Conference: Science education research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, Part 1 / [ed] J. Lavonen, K. Juuti, J. Lampiselkä, A. Uitto & K. Hahl (Eds.);(co-eds. O. Finlayson & R. Pinto, Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2016, p. 72-77Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As academic organisers and teachers with different positions teacher training programs at Södertörn University we have had the opportunity to develop and assess different types of pedagogic activities and use, e.g., the 4 R´s proposed by Doll, recursion, relations, richness, and rigor in assessments. Here pre-service teacher student reflections assessed by use of the 4R’s are compared with other texts by the same students in order to assess the quality of their understanding of evolutionary theory. Written performances of biology students are also compared with those of pre-service teacher students in order to reveal differences in the use of scientific concepts between the groups. Analysis of student performances show a relation between the use of the 4R’s, and the use of scientific concepts. Analyses of texts by students in evolution theory show a relatively low use of scientific concepts often regarded as important in scientific text. This may be explained by students’ good skills in giving scientific explanations in every-day language. Teacher students used more biological and evolutionary concepts compared to biology students. The emphasis on the use of concepts, especially in school, may be exaggerated. Professional biologists have to communicate with people outside the scientific community but teachers often cares about a strict scientific language. This is also found here where teacher students use the concepts to a larger extent than biology students. School biology should focus on the basic processes of organic evolution as the foundation of all teaching in order to enhance the students’ deeper understanding.

  • 44.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Forces, to visualise the invisible2016In: Conference proceedings: 5th Conference edition, Florence, Italy, 17-18 March 2016, Fitenze: Libreria Universitaria, 2016, p. 537-541Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “This is hard to understand as you can’t see the forces” exclaimed a student during a science course. Basic concepts in physics like force, energy, power are difficult to observe. Usually we often only make conclusions about their existence out of the resulting effects of their appearances. In addition, the use of similar words in other contexts, sometimes metaphorically, sometimes with other meaning, make the situation even worse. In science courses for pre-service primary school teacher students we have tried to design learning situations where students get personal experiences of the world behind the concepts described in words.

    Thus, we designed situations when the students themselves were subjected to different forces or had the opportunity to observe the effects of forces. They wrote reflections on their experiences and we discussed these together in order to get used to how to describe and explain these type of experiences.

    The learning outcome was assessed by analyses of written reflections of experiences from different attractions of an amusement park. One of the main outcomes of these reflections were the differences in the observations of the students. Often they had to do several rides to observe the forces they were subjected to. They also found differences in their personal ability to identify the forces. Some students were better in observing some of the forces than the others.

    Thus, the participation in one activity with the aim of observing something does not necessarily lead to similar observations of other participants. Previous experiences seem to affect the observations so forces in some directions may be regarded as more powerful or easier to identify by some persons than others. This may be a general characteristic of observations in common situations. In that case this may be one explanation why, e.g., students have different focus in the classroom and learn other things than those intended by the teacher.

  • 45.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    How to teach evolution2015In: Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 1877-0428, E-ISSN 1877-0428, Vol. 167, p. 170-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Out of identified general didactic problems when teaching evolutionary theory, structured learning situations for pre-service teacher students were created together with performance assessment. The students’ discussions showed almost no use of evolutionary concepts and well-structured learning situations failed as many students worked in an arbitrarily manner. The performance assessment showed anyhow good results as questions with open answers gave opportunity for constructive thinking. One conclusion is the strength in open questions, promoting the students’ creation of reasonable explanations within a theoretical framework.

  • 46.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Students´ Different Strategies in their Development of Knowledge, Understanding, and Skills in Science Education2015In: Conference proceedings. New perspectives in science education, 4th ed., Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2015, p. -4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students differ in their ways of accomplishing varied forms of knowledge, develop personal understanding and improve their skills. Likewise, teachers differ in their way of teaching depending on earlier experiences and training, thus, for teachers it is important understand the different strategies of the students and their own pedagogic profile in order to design learning situations advantageous for all students.

    In this study we try to describe the development and the persistence of the learning outcome of five pre-service primary school teacher students and their teachers during one semester of science and technology teaching. The assessment of the students’ fulfilment of the knowledge requirements was made during and shortly after the course, all of them passed. The focus here is to analyse the students and teachers different routes to achieve professional skills and was made eight months after the finished course. The students and the teachers met and discussed their experiences of their development during the course. The discussions in the whole group and in smaller subgroups were recorded and analysed. One area of interest was to describe the personal and professional development during that semester and how this was regarded retrospectively. This may be regarded as an assessment of the pedagogic activities and their relevance for the different students.

    Another important objective was to describe the conceptual development of both the students and their teachers and to investigate if there were differences in their development. The development of the conceptual profiles of each person was constructed out of the discussions analysed to reveal developmental changes. The conceptual profiles were regarded to contain three basic zones, externalism, internalism and relational.

    A third objective was to investigate the quality of the development out of the criteria of Doll, the four R’s richness, recursion, relations, and rigor and to what extent these criteria were visible in the conceptual development?

    On the professional and personal level all participants recognized a development, for the students supported by experiences during practical training at schools. The result also show that type of conceptual development varied between participants but large similarities in the degree of conceptual development of different concepts in one person. Finally, many of the generative phases of conceptual development were correlated to Doll’s criteria of quality in teaching and learning.

  • 47.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Vinter, Tiina
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Macrolichen diversity in relation to diversity of woody plants2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In studies concerning nature conservation issues common lichen species have usually been neglected although collecting of these results gives comparatively small disturbance of the populations and is easily done. Instead rare or threatened species or species usually have been used as indicators of sites with high biodiversity. Here, the macrolichen diversity is compared with the diversity of woody plants and other characteristics of different sites in Estonia, Finland and Sweden as a part of a larger project including comparative studies on habitats with presumably high species diversity The site selection was based on the occurrence of Daphne mezereum which usually occurs in semi-open habitats in transitions zones containing species from the surrounding biotopes. One of the main objectives with the study was to develop a fairly rapid method of evaluation of biodiversity using easily identified species. As total inventories are time consuming and reflects snapshots of a certain occasion it is beneficial to use other methods which may give a little less but sufficient information for many purposes, e.g., estimations on biodiversity. The ecological and evolutionary processes that shape diversity and distributions are general and results are assumed to be translatable from the target species to other species. The combination of data from a small number of species may constitute a useful monitoring protocol for lichens and higher plants. In total about 50 lichen species and 25 substrates are included and analyzed in the study. Most of the most common lichens are sorediate or isidiate and asexually reproducing and occur on several substrates. The relation between the diversity of lichen and woody plants is presented.

  • 48.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    The Botanical Museum (Fytoteket), Uppsala University.
    Wedin, Mats
    Botany Department, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, UK.
    A Re-Assessment of the Family Alectoriaceae1999In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 431-440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Uppsala university.
    Wedin, Mats
    The Natural History Museum, London .
    Phylogeny of the Parmeliaceae – DNA data versus morphological data1998In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 30, p. 463-472Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50. Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Westerberg, M
    Palmqvist, K
    Lichens in an Arctic environment2000In: Polarforskningssekritariatets årsbok, ISSN 1402-2613, Vol. 1999, p. 115-116Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
12 1 - 50 of 68
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