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  • 1.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Lithuanian Social Research Centre, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Community Mobilizations around Housing and Local Environment: Insights into the Case of Vilnius2013In: Sociologija: Mintis ir Veiksmas, ISSN 1392-3358, E-ISSN 2335-8890, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 136-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews activities of community organizations in the post-Soviet city of Vilnius. The particular attention is paid to the reasons for mobilization of the local communities; the leadership and motivation; the reasons for non-participation; and the communication with the local authorities. The findings of this paper show that mobilizations are not taking place on the massive scale. However, they are being institutionalized and have achieved noteworthy results. Communities mobilize against illegal or unwanted constructions close to their vicinity or to defend green zones in the city. The successful movement is centered around a charismatic leader who devotes his/her time and non-material and material resources to attain results. The explanations for non-participation can be found in difficult economical conditions of the majority of the population; low level of civil society; increasing individualization and income inequalities. The findings of this paper also demonstrate that the political and institutional structure is fairly unfavorable for local activists. The community organizations are not supported by the local governmental structures in a substantial way. On the contrary, they are faced, in most of the cases, with the authority’s alienation and confrontation.

  • 2.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Die Entwicklung in der post-sowjetischen Ära: Das litauische Wohlfahrtssystem2007In: Europäische Wohlfahrtssysteme: Ein Handbuch / [ed] Klaus Schubert, Simon Hegelich, Ursula Bazant, Weisbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften , 2007, p. 403-422Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    From universal system of social policy to particularistic: The case of the Baltic States2003In: Communist and post-communist studies, ISSN 0967-067X, E-ISSN 1873-6920, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 405-426Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Gerovės valstybių patirtis vertinant socialinio teisingumo principo įgyvendinimą švietime: Švedijos, Škotijos ir Vokietijos atvejai2010In: Viesoji Politika ir Administravimas, ISSN 1648-2603, no 34, p. 47-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Lithuanian Social Research Centre, Vilnius, Lithuania .
    Housing Policy Regime in Lithuania: Towards Liberalization and Marketization2014In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 421-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews housing policy development in Lithuania in the light of previous literature which reinterprets Esping-Andersen’s work on welfare regimes and adopts it to study housing policy. It seeks to highlight the major features of the Lithuanian housing policy. The findings of this paper reveal that the Lithuanian housing regime exhibits many features which are common under the liberal one. Most significant of these are low de-commodification for those who have to buy or rent a home for the market price, increasing stratification based on income and the dominant position of the market in housing production, allocation and price determination. However, a detailed examination of the Lithuanian housing policy reveals that the housing policy system, despite having many features similar to the liberal one, has been operating in different social and economic settings as a result of unique historical experience of the communist housing policy (massive production of low quality apartment blocks during the communist era, which currently need substantial renovation) and consequently drastic changes in the housing field since 1990s (massive privatization of the housing stock and decentralization of the housing management system). The Lithuanian housing policy regime could be characterized as a regime with the higher owner-occupation compared to other welfare state regimes, but the lower economic power of the owners to take care of their property maintenance, repair and renovation.

  • 6. Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Old welfare state theories and new welfare regimes in Eastern Europe: Challenges and implications2009In: Communist and post-communist studies, ISSN 0967-067X, E-ISSN 1873-6920, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 23-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews some theoretical and empirical literature written on welfare state development in post-communist Eastern Europe in the light of the theories and approaches that have been developed to study affluent capitalist democracies. The aim of this discussion is to critically reassess the old welfare state theories, definitions and approaches and their implications regarding the study of post-communist Eastern Europe. The paper ends with the conclusion that the exclusion of 'communist' countries for more than twenty years from welfare state theorising has created an empirical and theoretical gap. This creates fresh challenges for welfare state research and calls for a new paradigm. It is evident that the not so well explored Eastern European region with regards to social policy research suggests that it is necessary not only to test already existing welfare state theories, definitions, typologies and approaches on these countries, but also to advance them.

  • 7.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Lithuanian Social Research Centre.
    Post-Sovjet Vilnius: Giving meaning to abandoned buildings2016In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, Vol. IX, no 1-2, p. 68-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the scope, causes, flourishing, and decline of squatting in Lithuanian society during the period of 1990-2002. Drawing on 16 in-depth interviews conducted with squatters in Vilnius, newspaper articles and legal documents, this paper shows that squatters made contributions to the city with their cultural capital, creating local subcultures and making the urban space more attractive. Squatters promoted an alternative way of life, contributed to the preservation of the city and fostered counter-cultural activities. They offered spaces for performances, exhibits, and concerts. These activities are still present up to this day in the Užupis neighborhood that hosted the most long-lived squat, which in turn was transformed into Art Incubator.

  • 8.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Poverty, urbanity and social policy: Central and Eastern Europe compared2009Book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Quality Matters?: Public Opinion on Family Benefits in the Baltic StatesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Reforming Family Policy in the Baltic States: The Views of the Elites2006In: Communist and post-communist studies, ISSN 0967-067X, E-ISSN 1873-6920, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 1-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Social Policy in Transition: The Case of Lithuania2003In: Contemporary change in Lithuania / [ed] Egle Rindzeviciute, Huddinge: Baltic & East European Graduate School, Södertörns högskola , 2003, p. 19-32Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Emergence of the Post-Socialist Welfare State: the Case of the Baltic States : Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation takes a step towards providing a better understanding of post-socialist welfare state development from a theoretical as well as an empirical perspective. The overall analytical goal of this thesis has been to critically assess the development of social policies in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania using them as illustrative examples of post-socialist welfare state development in the light of the theories, approaches and typologies that have been developed to study affluent capitalist democracies. The four studies included in this dissertation aspire to a common aim in a number of specific ways.

    The first study tries to place the ideal-typical welfare state models of the Baltic States within the well-known welfare state typologies. At the same time, it provides a rich overview of the main social security institutions in the three countries by comparing them with each other and with the previous structures of the Soviet period. It examines the social insurance institutions of the Baltic States (old-age pensions, unemployment insurance, short-term benefits, sickness, maternity and parental insurance and family benefits) with respect to conditions of eligibility, replacement rates, financing and contributions. The findings of this study indicate that the Latvian social security system can generally be labelled as a mix of the basic security and corporatist models. The Estonian social security system can generally also be characterised as a mix of the basic security and corporatist models, even if there are some weak elements of the targeted model in it. It appears that the institutional changes developing in the social security system of Lithuania have led to a combination of the basic security and targeted models of the welfare state. Nevertheless, as the example of the three Baltic States shows, there is diversity in how these countries solve problems within the field of social policy. In studying the social security schemes in detail, some common features were found that could be attributed to all three countries. Therefore, the critical analysis of the main social security institutions of the Baltic States in this study gave strong supporting evidence in favour of identifying the post-socialist regime type that is already gaining acceptance within comparative welfare state research.

    Study Two compares the system of social maintenance and insurance in the Soviet Union, which was in force in the three Baltic countries before their independence, with the currently existing social security systems. The aim of the essay is to highlight the forces that have influenced the transformation of the social policy from its former highly universal, albeit authoritarian, form, to the less universal, social insurance-based systems of present-day Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. This study demonstrates that the welfare–economy nexus is not the only important factor in the development of social programs. The results of this analysis revealed that people's attitudes towards distributive justice and the developmental level of civil society also play an important part in shaping social policies. The shift to individualism in people’s mentality and the decline of the labour movement, or, to be more precise, the decline in trade union membership and influence, does nothing to promote the development of social rights in the Baltic countries and hinders the expansion of social policies. The legacy of the past has been another important factor in shaping social programs. It can be concluded that social policy should be studied as if embedded not only in the welfare-economy nexus, but also in the societal, historical and cultural nexus of a given society.

    Study Three discusses the views of the state elites on family policy within a wider theoretical setting covering family policy and social policy in a broader sense and attempts to expand this analytical framework to include other post-socialist countries. The aim of this essay is to explore the various views of the state elites in the Baltics concerning family policy and, in particular, family benefits as one of the possible explanations for the observed policy differences. The qualitative analyses indicate that the Baltic States differ significantly with regard to the motives behind their family policies. Lithuanian decision-makers seek to reduce poverty among families with children and enhance the parents’ responsibility for bringing up their children. Latvian policy-makers act so as to increase the birth rate and create equal opportunities for children from all families. Estonian policy-makers seek to create equal opportunities for all children and the desire to enhance gender equality is more visible in the case of Estonia in comparison with the other two countries. It is strongly arguable that there is a link between the underlying motives and the kinds of family benefits in a given country. This study, thus, indicates how intimately the attitudes of the state bureaucrats, policy-makers, political elite and researchers shape social policy. It confirms that family policy is a product of the prevailing ideology within a country, while the potential influence of globalisation and Europeanisation is detectable too.

    The final essay takes into account the opinions of welfare users and examines the performances of the institutionalised family benefits by relying on the recipients’ opinions regarding these benefits. The opinions of the populations as a whole regarding government efforts to help families are compared with those of the welfare users. Various family benefits are evaluated according to the recipients' satisfaction with those benefits as well as the contemporaneous levels of subjective satisfaction with the welfare programs related to the absolute level of expenditure on each program. The findings of this paper indicate that, in Latvia, people experience a lower level of success regarding state-run family insurance institutions, as compared to those in Lithuania and Estonia. This is deemed to be because the cash benefits for families and children in Latvia are, on average, seen as marginally influencing the overall financial situation of the families concerned. In Lithuania and Estonia, the overwhelming majority think that the family benefit systems improve the financial situation of families. It appears that recipients evaluated universal family benefits as less positive than targeted benefits. Some universal benefits negatively influenced the level of general satisfaction with the family benefits system provided in the countries being researched. This study puts forward a discussion about whether universalism is always more legitimate than targeting. In transitional economies, in which resources are highly constrained, some forms of universal benefits could turn out to be very expensive in relative terms, without being seen as useful or legitimate forms of help to families.

    In sum, by closely examining the different aspects of social policy, this dissertation goes beyond the over-generalisation of Eastern European welfare state development and, instead, takes a more detailed look at what is really going on in these countries through the examples of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. In addition, another important contribution made by this study is that it revives ‘western’ theoretical knowledge through ‘eastern’ empirical evidence and provides the opportunity to expand the theoretical framework for post-socialist societies.

  • 13.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    The Estonian model of the welfare state: tradition and changes2009In: Diversity and commonality in European social policies: the forging of a european social model / [ed] Stanisława Galinowsk, Peter Hengstenberg, Maciej Żukowski, Warszawa: Scholar , 2009, p. 110-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    The Formation of Social Insurance Institutions of the Baltic States in the Post-Socialist Era2006In: Journal of European Social Policy, ISSN 0958-9287, E-ISSN 1461-7269, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 259-270Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    The Welfare System of Lithuania2009In: The handbook of European welfare systems / [ed] Klaus Schubert, Simon Hegelich, Ursula Bazant, London: Routledge , 2009, p. 294-310Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Institute for Social Research, Lithuania.
    Transformation of welfare systems in the Baltic States: Estonia, Latvia and Lithunia2009In: Post-communist welfare pathways: theorizing social policy transformations in Central and Eastern Europe / [ed] Alfio Cerami, Pieter Vanhuysse, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009, p. 96-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17. Aidukaite, Jolanta
    Welfare reforms and socio-economic trends in the 10 new EU member states of Central and Eastern Europe2011In: Communist and post-communist studies, ISSN 0967-067X, E-ISSN 1873-6920, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 211-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper reviews recent socio-economic changes in the 10 new EU member states of Central and Eastern Europe and the earlier and latest debates on the emergence of the post-communist welfare state regime. It asks two questions: are the new EU member states more similar to each other in their social problems encountered than to the rest of the EU world? Do they exhibit enough common socio-economic and institutional features to group them into the distinct/unified post-communist welfare regime that deviates from any well-known welfare state typology? The findings of this paper indicate that despite some slight variation within, the new EU countries exhibit lower indicators compared to the EU-15 as it comes to the minimum wage and social protection expenditure. The degree of material deprivation and the shadow economy is on average also higher if compared to the EU-15 or the EU-27. However, then it comes to at-risk-of-poverty rate after social transfers or Gini index, some Eastern European outliers especially the Check Republic, but also Slovenia, Slovakia and Hungary perform the same or even better than the old capitalist democracies. Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Romania, Bulgaria, Poland, however, show many similarities in their social indicators and performances and this group of countries never perform better than the EU-15 or the EU-27 averages. Nevertheless, the literature reviews on welfare state development in the CEE region reveal a number of important institutional features in support of identifying the distinct/unified post-communist welfare regime. Most resilient of it are: an insurance-based programs that played a major part in the social protection system; high take-up of social security; relatively low social security benefits; increasing signs of liberalization of social policy; and the experience of the Soviet/Communist type of welfare state, which implies still deeply embedded signs of solidarity and universalism.

  • 18.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Lithuanian Social Research Centre, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Fröhlich, Christian
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. National Research University, Moscow, Russia.
    Struggle over public space: grassroots movements in Moscow and Vilnius2015In: International journal of sociology and social policy, ISSN 0144-333X, E-ISSN 1758-6720, Vol. 35, no 7-8, p. 565-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore urban mobilisation patterns in two post-Soviet cities: Vilnius and Moscow. Both cities were subject to similar housing and urban policy during Soviet times, and they have implemented urban development using neoliberal market principles, provoking grassroots opposition from citizens to privatisation and marketisation of their housing environment and local public space. However, the differing conditions of democratic Lithuanian and authoritarian Russian public governance offer different opportunities and set different constraints for neighbourhood mobilisation. The purpose is to contrast local community mobilisations under the two regimes and highlight the differences between and similarities in the activists' repertoires of actions in two distinct political and economic urban settings. Design/methodology/approach - The paper employs qualitative methodology using data from semi-structured interviews conducted with community activists and state officials, presented using a comparative case study design. Findings - Although, citizens' mobilisations in the two cities are reactions to the neoliberalisation of housing and local public space, they take different forms. In Vilnius they are institutionalised and receive formal support from national and local authorities. Moreover, support from the EU encourages organisational development and provides material and cognitive resources for grassroots urban mobilisations. In contrast, residents' mobilisations in Moscow are informal and face fierce opposition from local authorities. However, even in an authoritarian setting, grassroots mobilisations evolve using creative strategies to circumvent institutional constraints. Originality/value - Little attention has been paid to grassroots urban mobilisations in post-Soviet cities. There is also a lack of comparative attempts to show variation in post-Soviet urban activism related to housing and local public space.

  • 19.
    Aidukaite, Jolanta
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Lithuanian Social Research Centre, Vilnius, Lithuania / Mykolas Romeris University, Lithuania.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Europeanisation and Urban Movements: Political Opportunities of Community Organizations in Lithuania2015In: Urban Grassroots Movements in Central and Eastern Europe / [ed] Kerstin Jacobsson, Farnham: Ashgate, 2015, p. 247-272Chapter in book (Refereed)
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